Definitions containing céleste, mme

We've found 31 definitions:

Bleu celeste

Bleu celeste

Bleu celeste is a rarely occurring tincture in heraldry. This tincture is sometimes also called ciel or simply celeste. It is depicted in a lighter shade than the range of shades of the more traditional tincture azure, which is the standard blue used in heraldry. Initially considered to be European rather than English or Scottish, after the First World War it became more prevalent in England in badges of coats relating to the Royal Air Force, or the arms of those with some RAF connection. While in the post-WWI period bleu-celeste is depicted as a darker shade, in prior times it was depicted as very light, and has even been treated as a metal, as azure charges have been placed on a bleu celeste field, and vice versa. Bleu celeste can be seen in the coat of arms of Argentina, Peru and also in the arms of the Canadian Governor General Ray Hnatyshyn. In the arms of the University of Natal Athletic Union the azure is defined as "sky blue". In addition to bleu celeste, there is also an apparently unique example in British heraldry of the use of "light blue" in the Municipal Borough of Barnes, through which the Oxford versus Cambridge boat race passes on the Thames. The arms show the respective blades of the teams' oars, and may be blazoned thus:

— Freebase

MME

MME

MME, or 2,4-dimethoxy-5-ethoxyamphetamine, is a lesser-known psychedelic drug. It is a dimethoxy-ethoxy analog of TMA-2. MME was first synthesized by Alexander Shulgin. In his book PiHKAL, the minimum dosage is listed as 40 mg, and the duration listed as 6–10 hours. Shulgin gives MME a ++ on the Shulgin Rating Scale. Very little data exists about the pharmacological properties, metabolism, and toxicity of MME.

— Freebase

Mary Celeste

Mary Celeste

The Mary Celeste was a British-American merchant brigantine famous for having been discovered on 4 December 1872 in the Atlantic Ocean, unmanned and apparently abandoned, although the weather was fine and her crew had been experienced and capable seamen. The Mary Celeste was in seaworthy condition and still under sail heading toward the Strait of Gibraltar. She had been at sea for a month and had over six months' worth of food and water on board. Her cargo was virtually untouched and the crew's personal belongings were still in place, including valuables. None of those on board were ever seen or heard from again, and their disappearance is often cited as the greatest maritime mystery of all time. The question of why the crew left the Mary Celeste has been the subject of much speculation. Theories range from natural causes to human actions to paranormal explanations.

— Freebase

Azure

Azure

In heraldry, azure is the tincture with the colour blue, and belongs to the class of tinctures called "colours". In engraving, it is sometimes depicted as a region of horizontal lines or else marked with either az. or b. as an abbreviation. The term azure derives from name of the deep blue stone now called lapis lazuli. The word was adopted into Old French by the twelfth century, from which the word passed into use in the blazon of coats of arms. As an heraldic colour, the word azure simply means "blue". It is one of many concepts with both a French and German word in English, the former being used by the French-speaking nobles following the Norman Conquest of England in 1066 and the latter being used by the commoners of Anglo-Saxon stock. So while French-speaking heralds described banners as azure, commoners simply called them blue. Because it comes from a French word that simply means "blue", a wide range of colour values is used in the depiction of azure in armory and flags. In addition to the standard blue tincture called azure, there is a lighter blue sometimes found that is called bleu celeste or "sky blue". Neither azure nor bleu celeste is precisely defined as a particular shade of blue, but azure is consistently depicted in a much darker shade.

— Freebase

Celesta

Celesta

The celesta or celeste is a struck idiophone operated by a keyboard. It looks similar to an upright piano, or a large wooden music box. The keys connect to hammers that strike a graduated set of metal plates suspended over wooden resonators. Four- or five-octave models usually have a pedal that sustains or dampens the sound. The three-octave instruments do not have a pedal because of their small "table-top" design. One of the best-known works that uses the celesta is Tchaikovsky's "Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy" from The Nutcracker. The sound of the celesta is similar to that of the glockenspiel, but with a much softer and more subtle timbre. This quality gave the instrument its name, celeste meaning "heavenly" in French. The celesta is a transposing instrument; it sounds an octave higher than the written pitch. Its sounding range is generally considered as C3 to C7, where C3 = middle C. The original French instrument had a five-octave range, but because the lowest octave was considered somewhat unsatisfactory, it was omitted from later models. The standard French four-octave instrument is now gradually being replaced in symphony orchestras by a larger, five-octave German model. Although it is a member of the percussion family, in orchestral terms it is more properly considered as a member of the keyboard section and usually played by a keyboardist. The celesta part is normally written on two bracketed staves, called a grand staff.

— Freebase

Dei Gratia

Dei Gratia

Dei Gratia was a Canadian brigantine built in Bear River, Nova Scotia in 1871. The brigantine was named after the Latin phrase for "By the Grace of God". Dei Gratia became famous in 1872 when, under the command of David Reed Morehouse, she discovered the mystery ship Mary Celeste found sailing abandoned without any crew near the Azores. Morehouse and his crew took the derelict Mary Celeste to Gibraltar and claimed the brigantine as salvage. They were at first subjected to suspicion by Gilbraltar's Attorney General but the Vice Admiralty Court later approved their salvage and commended the crew of Dei Gratia's for their resourcefulness and courage. The salvage award for recovering the mysterious brigantine of about $8,300 was diminished by the high court costs of the long inquiry. Dei Gratia was sold to Irish owners in 1881. She was wrecked at Black Rock, Dale, Pembrokeshire after breaking her moorings in a southeast storm on 27th Dec 1907. The original ship portrait of Dei Gratia is preserved at the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic in Halifax, Nova Scotia.

— Freebase

celestist

celestist

Someone who plays the celeste.

— Wiktionary

Madam

Madam

Madam, or madame, is a polite form of address for women, often contracted to "ma'am". The abbreviation is "Mme" and the plural is mesdames. The term was borrowed from the French madame, which means "my lady".

— Freebase

Adele

Adele

Adele is a musical in three acts with music by Jean Briquet and Adolph Philipp, original French book and lyrics by Paul Hervé, and English adaptation by Adolf Philipp and Edward A. Paulton. The plot concerns a French girl who falls in love with the son of her father's business rival. The Broadway production opened on August 28, 1913, at the Longacre Theatre, transferring to the Harris Theatre and ran for a total of 196 performances. It was directed by Ben Teal. Natalie Alt played the title role. Georgia Caine was Mme. Myrianne de Neuville, Hal Forde was Baron Charles de Chantilly and Craufurd Kent was Robert Friebur. The West End London production opened at the Gaiety Theatre on May 30, 1914.

— Freebase

Carcassonne

Carcassonne

Carcassonne is a fortified French town in the Aude department, of which it is the prefecture, in the former province of Languedoc. It is divided into the fortified Cité de Carcassonne and the more expansive lower city, the ville basse. Carcassone was founded by the Visigoths in the fifth century, though the Romans had fortified the settlement earlier. The fortress, which was thoroughly restored in 1853 by the theorist and architect Eugène Viollet-le-Duc, was added to the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites in 1997. The folk etymology – involving a châtelaine named Carcas, a ruse ending a siege and the joyous ringing of bells – though memorialized in a neo-Gothic sculpture of Mme. Carcas on a column near the Narbonne Gate, is of modern invention. The name can be derived as an augmentative of the name Carcas. Similarly in Italian, there are derived names like Castellino – Castello – Castellone, or Ombrellino – Ombrello – Ombrellone. The double 's' in the name appears for phonetic reasons, as a single 's' would be pronounced as 'z'.

— Freebase

Ghost ship

Ghost ship

A ghost ship, also known as a phantom ship, is a ship with no living crew aboard; it may be a ghostly vessel in folklore or fiction, such as the Flying Dutchman, or a real derelict found adrift with its crew missing or dead, like the Mary Celeste. The term is sometimes used for ships that have been decommissioned but not yet scrapped, such as the Clemenceau.

— Freebase

Ideograph

Ideograph

An ideograph or virtue word is a word frequently used in political discourse that uses an abstract concept to develop support for political positions. Such words are usually terms that do not have a clear definition but are used to give the impression of a clear meaning. Such examples include and . Rhetorical critics use chevrons or angle brackets to mark off ideographs. The term ideograph was coined by rhetorical scholar and critic Michael Calvin McGee describing the use of particular words and phrases as political language in a way that captures particular ideological positions. McGee sees the ideograph as a way of understanding of how specific, concrete instances of political discourse relate to the more abstract idea of political ideology. Robertson defines ideographs as “political slogans or labels that encapsulate ideology in political discourse.” Meanwhile, Celeste Condit and John Lucaites, influenced by McGee, explain, “Ideographs represent in condensed form the normative, collective commitments of the members of a public, and they typically appear in public argumentation as the necessary motivations or justifications for action performed in the name of the public.” Ideographs are common in advertising and political discourse.

— Freebase

Nouvelle Vague

Nouvelle Vague

Nouvelle Vague is a French cover band led by musicians Marc Collin and Olivier Libaux. Their name means "new wave" in French. This refers simultaneously to their "Frenchness" and "artiness", the source of their songs, and their use of '60s bossa nova-style arrangements. Members, former members and contributors include many French artists who are now very well known on their own and considered as part of what is now called the "Renouveau de la chanson Française": Camille, Phoebe Killdeer, Mélanie Pain, Marina Céleste and Gerald Toto. Mareva Galanter joined the roster of vocalists in 2010.

— Freebase

Electrocute

Electrocute

Electrocute is a Los Angeles-based electro rock band. Nicole Morier, from Albuquerque New Mexico, USA, founded the band with former member "Mia Dime" in Berlin, Germany in 2002. The formation was motivated by the explosive electro-pop/electroclash music scene happening in Berlin at the time. After releasing one EP and one LP on the now defunct Emperor Norton records, Mia left the band and Nicole continued touring, hiring "Holly Doll", from Johnson City, Tennessee, to fill in. The two toured extensively throughout Europe, America, and Australia where they played the Big Day Out festival in 2005 and met Mindy, a.k.a. "Legs Le Brock", who was DJ'ing an afterparty. Morier eventually moved to Los Angeles and temporarily disbanded the project to pursue her songwriting career. She recently has had a song she co-wrote with Freescha, featured on the Britney Spears album Blackout entitled "Heaven on Earth". It was during that time that she met up once again with Legs Le Brock who had also recently relocated to LA. The two began doing DJ nights and when Nicole was asked by Mexican arts and culture magazine Celeste to tour in Mexico with Electrocute, she invited Legs to join her.

— Freebase

Celeste

Celeste

Celeste is a city in Hunt County, in the U.S. state of Texas. The population was 814 at the 2010 census.

— Freebase

Chocolat

Chocolat

Chocolat is a 1999 novel by Joanne Harris. It tells the story of Vianne Rocher, a young single mother, who arrives in the French village of Lansquenet-sous-Tannes at the beginning of Lent with her six-year-old daughter, Anouk. Vianne opens a chocolate shop, La Céleste Praline, right opposite the village church, and throughout the traditional season of fasting and self-denial, proceeds to gently change the lives of the villagers who visit her chocolaterie with a combination of sympathy, subversion and a little magic. This scandalizes the parish priest, Francis Reynaud, and his supporters. As tensions run high, the community is increasingly divided. And as Easter approaches, pitting the ritual of the Church against the indulgence of chocolate, Father Reynaud and Vianne Rocher face an inevitable showdown. Harris has indicated that several of the book's characters were influenced by individuals in her life: Her daughter forms the basis for the young Anouk, including her imaginary rabbit, Pantoufle. Harris' strong-willed and independent great-grandmother influenced her portrayal of both Vianne and the elderly Armande. Chocolat is French for "chocolate", and is pronounced or "sho-co-la".

— Freebase

The Chase

The Chase

The Chase is the eighth serial of the second season in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in six weekly parts from 22 May to 26 June 1965. The story is set on multiple locations including the Mary Celeste, the Empire State Building, and the planet Aridius. The serial marks the last appearance of William Russell and Jacqueline Hill as companions Ian Chesterton and Barbara Wright and the introduction of Peter Purves as new companion Steven Taylor.

— Freebase

Sual

Sual

Sual is a first class municipality in the province of Pangasinan, Philippines. According to the 2010 census, it has a population of 31,216 people. The Philippines largest coal power plant, the 1200 megawatt Sual Power Station, is located in this municipality. It is formerly owned by Mirant Services LLC. On January, 2008, Bolinao Mayor Alfonso Celeste said the local government will file damage suit against Indonesian owners of the barge APOL 3003. The University of the Philippines Marine Science Institute stated that the environmental damage was PHP54.9 million. The barge towed by a tug boat from Indonesia to the power plant in Sual on November 27 when Typhoon Mina destroyed its anchor and rope, then hurled it to Ilog Malino reef, spilling 95% of its coal cargo. The hard coal spill spread to 33 hectares of coral and sea grass areas. Sual is one of the towns where the Spanish galleon brought their goods to trade.

— Freebase

Fugative

Fugative

Harry James Byart, better known by his stage name Fugative, is a British rapper, songwriter and record producer. He worked with Kirk Burrowes for a week in April 2009 in Atlanta, Georgia the former manager of Mary J. Blige and co-founder of Bad Boy Records after Burrowes was contacted by Byart's mother Gloria who previously managed Marvin Gaye. . Fugative has toured with Basshunter and has been favourably received by BBC Radio One's Nick Grimshaw who proclaimed, "I want this kid's nuts!" on his Switch radio show. Fugative also released "The Departure" Mixtape in 2010. Fugative admitted during an interview with Jameela Jamil to be dating Nagiiba Georgiou Abdulah after meeting her through close friends confirming several months of media speculation about a romantic relationship between the pair.In early September 2011, it was widely reported that the couple had ended their relationship after approximately two years together. They reconciled later that month. However, in January 2012, it was reported that Fugative and Georgiou Abdulah had broken up again. His debut single, "It's Summertime", peaked at number two in the UK Urban Chart before remaining in the top five for 17 consecutive weeks. This was followed by the release of "Jimmy Shoe" on 6 April 2009. In April 2009 he travelled for a week to Atlanta, Georgia to work with Kirk Burrowes and various producers. His third single, "Supafly" reached #48 in the UK Singles chart. He released his fourth single "Crush", in the UK on 10 May 2010, it reached #26 in the Official UK Charts. It remains Fugative's best chart performance so far. On 25 July 2010, a fifth single, "Bad Girl" feat. Celeste Scalone was released, but peaked at a lower #59. Fugative confirmed his first studio album will be called No Goin Home In August 2010 he announced that he had signed a record deal in Japan and went there for five days in November 2010. He was believed to be going on an Asia tour in the summer of 2011 these plans are thought to have been scrapped. A sixth single, "Go Hard" featuring MZ Bratt and Wiley will be released on 27 February 2011. Fugative released his seventh single "Home" on 4 September 2011, featuring Ed Sheeran and Sway. In 2012 Fugative released a blog previewing a new single called Sun Don't Shine this has not yet been released.But in September 2012 Fugative uploaded a new single on YouTube called OTT and this was released on iTunes on 6 January 2013 this is the first single from his up and coming EP. The second single from the EP is called Charlie Sheen and was released on the 30th June 2013. Fugative has said that his EP will be released in early 2014.

— Freebase

Aiguillon, Duke d'

Aiguillon, Duke d'

corrupt minister of France, previously under trial for official plunder of money, which was quashed, at the corrupt court of Louis XV., and the tool of Mme. Du Barry, with whom he rose and fell (1720-1782).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Caylus, Marquise de

Caylus, Marquise de

born in Poitou, related to Mme. de Maintenon; left piquant souvenirs of the court of Louis XIV. and the house of St. Cyr (1672-1729).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Choiseul, Duc de

Choiseul, Duc de

minister of Louis XV.; served his master in various capacities; was rewarded with a peerage; effected many reforms in the army, strengthened the navy, and aided in bringing about the family compact of the Bourbons; exercised a great influence on the politics of Europe; was nicknamed by Catharine of Russia Le Cocher de l'Europe, "the Driver of Europe"; but becoming obnoxious to Mme. du Barry, "in whom he would discern nothing but a wonderfully dizened scarlet woman," was dismissed from the helm of affairs, Louis's "last substantial man" (1719-1795).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Constant de Rebecque, Henry Benjamin de

Constant de Rebecque, Henry Benjamin de

a French politician, of liberal constitutional principles, born at Lausanne, of Huguenot parents; settled in Paris at the commencement of the Revolution, where he distinguished himself by his political writings and speeches; was expelled from France in 1802, along with Mme. de Staël, for denouncing the military ascendency of Napoleon; lived for a time at Weimar in the society of Goethe and Schiller; translated Schiller's "Wallenstein"; returned to France in 1814; declared for the Bourbons, and pled in favour of constitutional liberty; he was a supporter of Louis Philippe, and a rationalist in religion, and declared himself opposed to the supernatural element in all religions (1760-1830).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Coppet

Coppet

a Swiss village in the Canton de Vaud, on the Lake of Geneva; celebrated as the abode of Mme. de Staël, her burial-place and that of Necker, her father.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Corinne

Corinne

the heroine and title of a novel of Mme. de Staël's, her principal novel, in which she celebrates the praises of the great men and great masterpieces of Italy; her heroine is the type of a woman inspired with poetic ideas and the most generous sentiments.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

D'Aubigné, Theodore Agrippa

D'Aubigné, Theodore Agrippa

a historian, bred to the military profession; held appointments under Henry IV., on whose assassination he returned to Geneva, where he wrote his "Histoire Universelle," which had the honour to be burned by the common hangman in Paris; was a satirical writer; grandfather to Mme. de Maintenon (1550-1630).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Delaunay, Le Vicomte

Delaunay, Le Vicomte

the nom de plume of Mme. Delphine, under which she published her "Parisian Letters."

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Delphine

Delphine

a novel by Mme. de Staël; presumed to be an idealised picture of herself.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Fitzgerald, Lady

Fitzgerald, Lady

a daughter of Egalité and Mme. Genlis, called Pamela; distinguished for her beauty and enthusiasm for liberty, and who became the wife of Lord Fitzgerald, the Irish patriot (q. v.); d. 1831.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Necker, Jacques

Necker, Jacques

celebrated financier, born at Geneva, banker in Paris; married the accomplished Susanne Curchod, the rejected of Gibbon, and became by her the father of Mme. de Staël; was a man of high repute for probity and business capacity; became in 1777 Director-General of Finance in France, tried hard and honestly, by borrowing and retrenchment, to restore the fallen public credit, but was after five years dismissed; was recalled in 1788, but though the funds rose, and he contributed to their relief two million livres of his own money, was again dismissed, to be once more recalled, only to expose his inability to cope with the crisis and to be forced to retire (1732-1804).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Theosophy

Theosophy

a mystic philosophy of very difficult definition which hails from the East, and was introduced among us by Madame Blavatsky, a Russian lady, who was initiated into its mysteries in Thibet by a fraternity there who professed to be the sole custodiers of its secrets as the spiritual successors of those to whom it was at first revealed. The radical idea of the system appears to be reincarnation, and the return of the spirit to itself by a succession of incarnations, each one of which raises it to a higher level until, by seven stages it would seem, the process is complete, matter has become spirit, and spirit matter, God has become man, and man God, agreeably somewhat to the doctrine of Amiel, that "the complete spiritualisation of the animal element in us is the task of our race," though with them it seems rather to mean its extinction. The adherents of this system, with their head-quarters at Madras, are numerous and wide-scattered, and form an organisation of 300 branches, having three definite aims: (1) To establish a brotherhood over the world irrespective of race, creed, caste, or sex; (2) to encourage the study of comparative philosophy, religion, and science; and (3) to investigate the occult secrets of nature and the latent possibilities of man. The principal books in exposition of it are, "The Secret Doctrine," "Isis Unveiled," "The Key to Theosophy," by Mme. Blavatsky; "Esoteric Buddhism," "The Occult World," &c., by Sinnett; "The Ancient Wisdom," "The Birth and Evolution of the Soul," &c., by Annie Besant.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia


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