Definitions containing bürger, gottfried august

We've found 250 definitions:

VJ Day

VJ Day

Victory over Japan day, being 15 August 1945, or in the US 14 August 1945, the day after Japanese forces surrendered in World War II.

— Wiktionary

Transfiguration

Transfiguration

The miraculous event, on a mountain, when the face of Jesus "shone like the sun" before the apostles; the feast commemorating this event u2013 6 August (or 19 August in the Orthodox church)

— Wiktionary

Leibnizian

Leibnizian

Of or relating to the philosophy of Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz.

— Wiktionary

Lammas

Lammas

1st August, a quarter day

— Wiktionary

Whopper

Whopper

The Whopper sandwich is the signature hamburger product sold by the international fast-food restaurant chain Burger King and its Australian franchise Hungry Jack's. Introduced in 1957, it has undergone several reformulations including resizing and bread changes. The burger is one of the best known products in the fast food industry; it is so well known that Burger King bills itself as the Home of the Whopper in its advertising and signage. The company markets several variants of the burger as well as other variants that are specifically tailored to meet local taste preferences or customs of the various regions and countries in which it does business. To promote continuing interest in the product, Burger King occasionally releases limited-time variants on the Whopper.

— Freebase

miniburger

miniburger

A small burger.

— Wiktionary

mid-August

mid-August

In the middle of August.

— Wiktionary

mid-August

mid-August

Happening in the middle of August.

— Wiktionary

Augustly

Augustly

in an august manner

— Webster Dictionary

horseburger

horseburger

A burger made from horsemeat.

— Wiktionary

burgerless

burgerless

Without a burger or burgers.

— Wiktionary

vealburger

vealburger

A burger made with veal.

— Wiktionary

Nieco

Nieco

Nieco is a commercial kitchen equipment manufacturer specializing in automatic broilers. Based in Windsor, California, the company was founded in 1905 as a sheet metal manufacturer. The company counts major companies as A&W Restaurants, Burger King, Burger Ranch, Dairy Queen, Red Robin and others as its clients.

— Freebase

augustly

augustly

In an august or awe inspiring manner.

— Wiktionary

mid-August

mid-August

Any time in the middle of August.

— Wiktionary

leibnizian

Leibnizian, Leibnitzian

of or relating to Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz or to his mathematics or philosophy

— Princeton's WordNet

leibnitzian

Leibnizian, Leibnitzian

of or relating to Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz or to his mathematics or philosophy

— Princeton's WordNet

goatburger

goatburger

A burger made from goat meat.

— Wiktionary

beanburger

beanburger

A vegetarian burger made from beans.

— Wiktionary

mooseburger

mooseburger

A burger made from moose meat

— Wiktionary

soyburger

soyburger

A vegetarian burger made from soy.

— Wiktionary

duckburger

duckburger

A burger made with duck meat

— Wiktionary

quarter-pounder

quarter-pounder

A burger weighing approximately a quarter of a pound.

— Wiktionary

chiliburger

chiliburger

A burger made of chili con carne

— Wiktionary

fishwich

fishwich

A burger with a filling of breaded fish.

— Wiktionary

mid-august

mid-August

the middle part of August

— Princeton's WordNet

lamburger

lamburger

A burger made with lamb instead of beef.

— Wiktionary

porkburger

porkburger

A burger made with pork instead of beef.

— Wiktionary

turkeyburger

turkeyburger

A burger made with turkey instead of beef.

— Wiktionary

salmonburger

salmonburger

A burger made with salmon instead of beef.

— Wiktionary

venisonburger

venisonburger

A burger made with venison instead of beef.

— Wiktionary

shrimpburger

shrimpburger

A burger made with shrimp instead of beef.

— Wiktionary

clamburger

clamburger

A burger made with clam instead of beef.

— Wiktionary

crabburger

crabburger

A burger made with crab instead of beef.

— Wiktionary

tunaburger

tunaburger

A burger made with tuna instead of beef.

— Wiktionary

whaleburger

whaleburger

A burger made with the meat of a whale.

— Wiktionary

fishburger

fishburger

A burger made with fish instead of beef.

— Wiktionary

crab burger

crab burger

a burger with crab meat inside of it

— Wiktionary

Lammas

Lammas

(England) former festival held on 1st August celebrating the harvest.

— Wiktionary

Whopper

Whopper

A hamburger from the fast food company Burger King

— Wiktionary

tofuburger

tofuburger

A vegetarian burger using tofu in place of meat.

— Wiktionary

july

July

the month following June and preceding August

— Princeton's WordNet

sept

September, Sep, Sept

the month following August and preceding October

— Princeton's WordNet

september

September, Sep, Sept

the month following August and preceding October

— Princeton's WordNet

sep

September, Sep, Sept

the month following August and preceding October

— Princeton's WordNet

veggie burger

veggie burger

A burger patty made without meat or other animal products.

— Wiktionary

wayzgoose

wayzgoose

a holiday or party for the benefit of printers, traditionally held in August

— Wiktionary

Veggie burger

Veggie burger

A veggie burger is a hamburger-style, or chicken-style, patty that does not contain animal flesh, but may contain animal products such as rennet, egg, and milk. The patty of a veggie burger may be made from vegetables, textured vegetable protein, legumes, nuts, mushrooms, or grains or seeds, like wheat and flax.

— Freebase

steakburger

steakburger

A burger made with ground beef from a better-than-usual cut.

— Wiktionary

veggie burger

veggie burger

A burger containing a patty made without meat or other animal products.

— Wiktionary

onion dome

onion dome

An onion-shaped dome, characteristic of august buildings in Moghul and Russian architecture

— Wiktionary

dog-day cicada

dog-day cicada, harvest fly

its distinctive song is heard during July and August

— Princeton's WordNet

harvest fly

dog-day cicada, harvest fly

its distinctive song is heard during July and August

— Princeton's WordNet

mushroomburger

mushroomburger

A burger made with mushrooms in addition to, or instead of, meat.

— Wiktionary

augustness

augustness

The state or quality of being august or noble.

— Wiktionary

Little Boy

Little Boy

The nickname of the nuclear bomb dropped over Hiroshima, Japan on August 6, 1945.

— Wiktionary

Augusty

Augusty

characteristic of the month of August

— Wiktionary

Virgo

Virgo

: The zodiac sign for the virgin, ruled by Mercury and covering August 22September 23.

— Wiktionary

Lammas

Lammas

A modern pagan festival celebrated in early August celebrating the start of the grain harvest.

— Wiktionary

Fat Man

Fat Man

The nickname given to the nuclear bomb dropped over Nagasaki, Japan on August 9, 1945.

— Wiktionary

Bartholomew tide

Bartholomew tide

time of the festival of St. Bartholomew, August 24th

— Webster Dictionary

Superb

Superb

grand; magnificent; august; stately; as, a superb edifice; a superb colonnade

— Webster Dictionary

Augustness

Augustness

the quality of being august; dignity of mien; grandeur; magnificence

— Webster Dictionary

Lammas

Lammas

the first day of August; -- called also Lammas day, and Lammastide

— Webster Dictionary

nonburger

nonburger

Not a burger, or not specializing in burgers

— Wiktionary

Hiroshima

Hiroshima

A city in Honshu, Japan, devastated by the first atomic bomb dropped in warfare on August 6, 1945.

— Wiktionary

Fructidor

Fructidor

The twelfth and final month of the French Republican Calendar, starting on August 18 or 19.

— Wiktionary

Majestic

Majestic

possessing or exhibiting majesty; of august dignity, stateliness, or imposing grandeur; lofty; noble; grand

— Webster Dictionary

Cheeseburger

Cheeseburger

A cheeseburger is a hamburger topped with cheese. Traditionally, the slice of cheese is placed on top of the meat patty, but the burger can include many variations in structure, ingredients, and composition. The term itself is a portmanteau of the words "cheese" and "hamburger." The cheese is usually cubed, and then added to the cooking hamburger patty shortly before the patty is completely cooked which allows the cheese to melt. Cheeseburgers are often served with lettuce, tomato, onion, pickles, mustard, mayonnaise, or ketchup. In fast food restaurants, the cheese used is typically processed cheese, but there are variations, such as cheddar, Swiss cheese, mozzarella, blue cheese and pepper jack. When cheese is added to a burger the nutritional value of the burger can be changed substantially. For example, a slice of Cheddar cheese can add 113 calories and 4.5 grams of saturated fat to a burger. Other types and amounts of cheese would have varying effects, depending on their nutritional content.

— Freebase

Princely

Princely

suitable for, or becoming to, a prince; grand; august; munificent; magnificent; as, princely virtues; a princely fortune

— Webster Dictionary

Theodor Gottfried Liesching

Theodor Gottfried Liesching

Theodor Gottfried Liesching was a German jurist and politician.

— Freebase

Fructidor

Fructidor

the twelfth month of the French republican calendar; -- commencing August 18, and ending September 16. See Vendemiaire

— Webster Dictionary

July

July

The seventh month of the Gregorian calendar, following June and preceding August. Abbreviation: Jul or Jul.

— Wiktionary

Damnum absque injuria

Damnum absque injuria

In law, damnum absque injuria is a phrase expressing the principle of tort law in which some person causes damage or loss to another, but does not injure them, and thus the latter has no legal remedy. For example, opening a burger stand near someone else's may cause them to lose customers, but this in itself does not give rise to a cause of action for the original burger stand owner.

— Freebase

Gottfried von Strassburg

Gottfried von Strassburg

Gottfried von Strassburg is the author of the Middle High German courtly romance Tristan, an adaptation of the 12th-century Tristan and Iseult legend. Gottfried's work is regarded, alongside Wolfram von Eschenbach's Parzival and the Nibelungenlied, as one of the great narrative masterpieces of the German Middle Ages. He is probably also the composer of a small number of surviving lyrics. His work became a source of inspiration for Richard Wagner's opera Tristan und Isolde.

— Freebase

Thermidor

Thermidor

the eleventh month of the French republican calendar, -- commencing July 19, and ending August 17. See the Note under Vendemiaire

— Webster Dictionary

Nagasaki

Nagasaki

A large city in Western Kyushu, in Japan; it was annihilated by the second military use of the atomic bomb on August 9, 1945.

— Wiktionary

Hamburger

Hamburger

A hamburger is a sandwich consisting of a cooked patty of ground meat usually placed inside a sliced hamburger bun. Hamburgers are often served with lettuce, bacon, tomato, onion, pickles, cheese and condiments such as mustard, mayonnaise, ketchup and relish. The term "burger", can also be applied to the meat patty on its own, especially in the UK where the term "patty" is rarely used. The term may be prefixed with the type of meat as in "turkey burger".

— Freebase

double double

double double

A double cheeseburger with cheese on each burger (i.e., double cheese).

— Wiktionary

Thermidor

Thermidor

The eleventh month of the French Republican Calendar, from July 19 or 20 to August 18 or 19.

— Wiktionary

VP Day

VP Day

Victory in the Pacific day, being 15 August 1945, the day after Japanese forces surrendered in World War II.

— Wiktionary

Virgo

Virgo

a sign of the zodiac which the sun enters about the 21st of August, marked thus [/] in almanacs

— Webster Dictionary

Ab

Ab

the fifth month of the Jewish year according to the ecclesiastical reckoning, the eleventh by the civil computation, coinciding nearly with August

— Webster Dictionary

Etesian

Etesian

periodical; annual; -- applied to winds which annually blow from the north over the Mediterranean, esp. the eastern part, for an irregular period during July and August

— Webster Dictionary

nagasaki

Nagasaki

a city in southern Japan on Kyushu; a leading port and shipbuilding center; on August 9, 1945 Nagasaki became the second populated area to receive an atomic bomb

— Princeton's WordNet

virgin

Virgo, Virgo the Virgin, Virgin

the sixth sign of the zodiac; the sun is in this sign from about August 23 to September 22

— Princeton's WordNet

virgo

Virgo, Virgo the Virgin, Virgin

the sixth sign of the zodiac; the sun is in this sign from about August 23 to September 22

— Princeton's WordNet

lion

Leo, Leo the Lion, Lion

the fifth sign of the zodiac; the sun is in this sign from about July 23 to August 22

— Princeton's WordNet

leo the lion

Leo, Leo the Lion, Lion

the fifth sign of the zodiac; the sun is in this sign from about July 23 to August 22

— Princeton's WordNet

leo

Leo, Leo the Lion, Lion

the fifth sign of the zodiac; the sun is in this sign from about July 23 to August 22

— Princeton's WordNet

virgo the virgin

Virgo, Virgo the Virgin, Virgin

the sixth sign of the zodiac; the sun is in this sign from about August 23 to September 22

— Princeton's WordNet

Transfiguratien

Transfiguratien

a feast held by some branches of the Christian church on the 6th of August, in commemoration of the miraculous change above mentioned

— Webster Dictionary

September

September

The ninth month of the Gregorian calendar, following August and preceding October. Abbreviations: Sep or Sep., Sept or Sept.

— Wiktionary

White Castle

White Castle

The first fast-food hamburger chain and one of the oldest American fast-food restaurant chains, known for its Slyder, a small square burger.

— Wiktionary

fructidor

Fructidor

twelfth month of the Revolutionary calendar (August and September); the month of fruit

— Princeton's WordNet

thermidor

Thermidor

eleventh month of the Revolutionary calendar (July and August); the month of heat

— Princeton's WordNet

Kingly

Kingly

belonging to, suitable to, or becoming, a king; characteristic of, resembling, a king; directed or administered by a king; monarchical; royal; sovereign; regal; august; noble; grand

— Webster Dictionary

month

month

A period into which a year is divided, historically based on the phases of the moon. In the Gregorian calendar there are twelve months: January, February, March, April, May, June, July, August, September, October, November and December.

— Wiktionary

hiroshima

Hiroshima

a port city on the southwestern coast of Honshu in Japan; on August 6, 1945 Hiroshima was almost completely destroyed by the first atomic bomb dropped on a populated area

— Princeton's WordNet

Smashburger

Smashburger

Smashburger is an innovative restaurant concept that is redefining its category by providing a burger experience that combines the superior product, service and atmosphere associated with sit down casual dining and the speed and convenience associated with quick service restaurants. With its hand-crafted menu items ranging from smashed-to-order burgers, hand-spun Haagen-Dazs shakes, chicken sandwiches, salads, and sides made with fresh, premium ingredients and served in less than six minutes, Smashburger is putting the burger back at the center of the consumer dining experience. As the fastest restaurant company to reach the 100-unit milestone, Smashburger is well on its way to becoming a leading international brand.

— CrunchBase

Druther's

Druther's

Druther's was a chain of fast food restaurants that began as Burger Queen restaurants; it existed from 1963 through 1981. The name was a play on the word druthers, and their mascot was a giant female bee named Queenie Bee. In 1981, Burger Queen changed to Druther's restaurants, although the changes were mostly cosmetic. One reason given for the name change was to eliminate the perception that they were "just burgers", when they also had fried chicken and a serve-yourself salad bar. Druther's featured a character named "Andy Dandytale" on their kids meal items. Their slogan was "I'd Ruther Go to Druther's."

— Freebase

Adyghe Autonomous Oblast

Adyghe Autonomous Oblast

Autonomous oblast of the Soviet Union in the Russian SFSR established on August 24, 1922 and existing until July 3, 1991, when it was elevated to the status of a republic and renamed Republic of Adygea.

— Wiktionary

Perseid

Perseid

one of a group of shooting stars which appear yearly about the 10th of August, and cross the heavens in paths apparently radiating from the constellation Perseus. They are beleived to be fragments once connected with a comet visible in 1862

— Webster Dictionary

feast of dormition

Dormition, Feast of Dormition

celebration in the Eastern Orthodox Church of the Virgin Mary's being taken up into heaven when her earthly life ended; corresponds to the Assumption in the Roman Catholic Church and is also celebrated on August 15th

— Princeton's WordNet

dormition

Dormition, Feast of Dormition

celebration in the Eastern Orthodox Church of the Virgin Mary's being taken up into heaven when her earthly life ended; corresponds to the Assumption in the Roman Catholic Church and is also celebrated on August 15th

— Princeton's WordNet

White Spot

White Spot

White Spot is a Canadian restaurant chain based in Vancouver, British Columbia, best known for its hamburgers, Pirate Pak children's meal and burger sauce. Some locations have carhop drive-in service.

— Freebase

Frita

Frita

Frita is a Cuban dish with a seasoned ground beef patty on Cuban bread topped with shoestring potatoes, lettuce, onions, and a spiced ketchup sauce. A similar dish on Cuban bread is called pan con bistec topped with the shoestring potatoes. This type of burger is found mainly in South Florida. This burger is usually washed down with a batido de trigo, a Cuban puffed wheat milk shake. ⁕One of many burgers featured in Hamburgers and Fries by John T. Edge. Frita along with Loco Moco, Jucy Lucy, green chile burgers at Bobcat Bite, and the fried onion burgers of El Reno, Oklahoma are considered some of the unique regional takes on the hamburger in the United States.

— Freebase

Nones

Nones

the fifth day of the months January, February, April, June, August, September, November, and December, and the seventh day of March, May, July, and October. The nones were nine days before the ides, reckoning inclusively, according to the Roman method

— Webster Dictionary

av

Ab, Av

the eleventh month of the civil year; the fifth month of the ecclesiastical year in the Jewish calendar (in July and August)

— Princeton's WordNet

ellul

Elul, Ellul

the twelfth month of the civil year; the sixth month of the ecclesiastical year in the Jewish calendar (in August and September)

— Princeton's WordNet

elul

Elul, Ellul

the twelfth month of the civil year; the sixth month of the ecclesiastical year in the Jewish calendar (in August and September)

— Princeton's WordNet

ab

Ab, Av

the eleventh month of the civil year; the fifth month of the ecclesiastical year in the Jewish calendar (in July and August)

— Princeton's WordNet

Monadology

Monadology

The Monadology is one of Gottfried Leibniz’s best known works representing his later philosophy. It is a short text which sketches in some 90 paragraphs a metaphysics of simple substances, or monads.

— Freebase

prisoner of war

prisoner of war

A detained person as defined in Articles 4 and 5 of the Geneva Convention Relative to the Treatment of Prisoners of War of August 12, 1949. In particular, one who, while engaged in combat under orders of his or her government, is

— Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms

Sehnsucht

Sehnsucht

Sehnsucht is the second album by German industrial metal band Rammstein, released on 25 August 1997. The album booklet folds out to reveal six different covers, one for each band member. The cover most commonly seen features Till Lindemann with an egg-lifter worn as a muzzle and bent forks over his eyes worn as sunglasses. The cover art was created by Austrian artist Gottfried Helnwein, who also created the cover for the Scorpions' Blackout album, which is very similar to the Sehnsucht cover and even the forks in both covers are the same. Sehnsucht is the only album entirely in German to be certified platinum by the RIAA in the US.

— Freebase

August Kekulé

August Kekulé

August Kekulé, born Friedrich August Kekule, later Friedrich August Kekule von Stradonitz was a German organic chemist. From the 1850s until his death, Kekule was one of the most prominent chemists in Europe, especially in theoretical chemistry. He was the principal founder of the theory of chemical structure.

— Freebase

Sausage Fest

Sausage Fest

Li’l Hitler will win your heart! The Library of Heaven yields answers even God doesn’t know. The Burger King serves up some Delicious B&E. Garfield and Heathcliff take each other to court. A giraffe deals with the stages of death. The gang from Police Academy joins the X-Men.

— Freebase

winter

winter

Traditionally the fourth of the four seasons, typically regarded as being from December 23 to March 20 in continental regions of the Northern Hemisphere or the months of June, July and August in the Southern Hemisphere. It is the time when the sun is lowest in the sky, resulting in short days, and the time of year with the lowest atmospheric temperatures for the region.

— Wiktionary

Problem Child

Problem Child

Problem Child is a 1990 American comedy film. It stars John Ritter, Amy Yasbeck, Gilbert Gottfried, Jack Warden, Michael Richards and Michael Oliver. The film was directed by Dennis Dugan. The film was the first of many produced by Robert Simonds.

— Freebase

Bull Run

Bull Run

a stream in Virginia, U.S., 25 m. from Washington, where the Union army was twice defeated by the Confederate, July 1861 and August 1862.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Kontakte

Kontakte

Kontakte is a celebrated electronic music work by Karlheinz Stockhausen, realized in 1958–60 at the Westdeutscher Rundfunk electronic-music studio in Cologne with the assistance of Gottfried Michael Koenig. The score is Nr. 12 in the composer's catalogue of works, and is dedicated to Otto Tomek.

— Freebase

Dog-days

Dog-days

20 days before and 20 after the rising of the dog-star Sirius, at present from 3rd July to 11th August.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Saarbrück

Saarbrück

a manufacturing town in Rhenish Prussia, on the French frontier, where the French under Napoleon III. repulsed the Germans, August 2, 1870.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Impenetrability

Impenetrability

In metaphysics, impenetrability is the name given to that quality of matter whereby two bodies cannot occupy the same space at the same time. The philosopher John Toland argued that impenetrability and extension were sufficient to define matter, a contention strongly disputed by Gottfried Wilhelm Von Leibnez. Locke considered impenetrability to be "more a consequence of solidity, than solidity itself."[2]

— Freebase

Good Spirit

Good Spirit

Good Spirit is the fifth album and the third live album from Australian roots musician Xavier Rudd. It was released in Australia on 11 April 2005. The album was album recorded from various gigs around Australia: The Enmore Theatre in Sydney on 14 August 2004; The Palais, Melbourne on 19 August 2004 and at the Fly-by-Night Club in Fremantle on 21 August 2004. The success of the album lead it to eventually be certified gold by the ARIA.

— Freebase

Amber Room

Amber Room

The Amber Room in the Catherine Palace of Tsarskoye Selo near Saint Petersburg is a complete chamber decoration of amber panels backed with gold leaf and mirrors. It was created in the 18th century, disappeared during World War II, and was recreated in 2003. Before it was lost, the Amber Room was sometimes dubbed the "Eighth Wonder of the World" due to its singular beauty. Construction of the Amber Room began in 1701 to 1711 in Prussia. The room was designed by German baroque sculptor Andreas Schlüter and Danish amber craftsman Gottfried Wolfram in the service of the Prussian king worked on it until 1707, then work was continued by amber masters Gottfried Turau and Ernst Schacht from Danzig. The amber cabinet remained in Berlin City Palace until 1716 when it was given by Prussian king Friedrich Wilhelm I to his then ally, Tsar Peter the Great of the Russian Empire. In Russia it was expanded and after several renovations, it covered more than 55 square meters and contained over six tons of amber. It was finished in 1755 and restored in 1830. The Amber Room was looted during World War II by Nazi Germany and brought to Königsberg. Knowledge of its whereabouts was lost in the chaos at the end of the war.

— Freebase

Inconsolable

Inconsolable

"Inconsolable" is the first single by the Backstreet Boys from their sixth studio album Unbreakable which was released on October 30, 2007. The single hit the U.S. radio outlets on August 27, 2007. It was first confirmed on July 25, 2007 and premiered by Jive at Z-100 - New York's Hit Music Station on August 6.

— Freebase

Assumption, Feast of the

Assumption, Feast of the

festival in honour of the translation of the Virgin Mary to heaven, celebrated on the 15th of August, the alleged day of the event.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Black Saturday

Black Saturday

name given in Scotland to Saturday, 4th August 1621; a stormy day of great darkness, regarded as a judgment of Heaven against Acts then passed in the Scottish Parliament tending to establish Episcopacy.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Fanconi Anemia

Fanconi Anemia

Congenital disorder affecting all bone marrow elements, resulting in ANEMIA; LEUKOPENIA; and THROMBOPENIA, and associated with cardiac, renal, and limb malformations as well as dermal pigmentary changes. Spontaneous CHROMOSOME BREAKAGE is a feature of this disease along with predisposition to LEUKEMIA. There are at least 7 complementation groups in Fanconi anemia: FANCA, FANCB, FANCC, FANCD1, FANCD2, FANCE, FANCF, FANCG, and FANCL. (from Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/dispomim.cgi?id=227650, August 20, 2004)

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Ber`gamo

Ber`gamo

a Lombard town, in a province of the same name, and 34 m. NE. of Milan, with a large annual fair in August, the largest in Italy; has grindstone quarries in the neighbourhood.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Zinnia

Zinnia

Zinnia is a genus of 20 species of annual and perennial plants of the family Asteraceae. They are native to scrub and dry grassland in an area stretching from the Southwestern United States to South America, with a centre of diversity in Mexico. Members of the genus are notable for their solitary long-stemmed flowers that come in a variety of bright colors. The name honours genus German botanist Johann Gottfried Zinn.

— Freebase

Maintaining

Maintaining

Maintaining was a comic strip by cartoonist Nate Creekmore. Nate is a two-time winner of the Scripps College Cartoonist of the Year and an Associated Press award for achievement in college cartooning. Nate's strip first appeared in the newspaper at Lipscomb University in Nashville. Maintaining was later picked up for syndication through Universal Press Syndicate. It was launched on May 7, 2007 and canceled in August 2009 for poor sales. The last daily strip was August 1, 2009 and the last Sunday strip was August 30, 2009.

— Freebase

Vada pav

Vada pav

Vada pav, sometimes spelled wada pav or Vada Paav, is a popular spicy vegetarian fast food dish native to the Indian state of Maharashtra. It consists of a batata vada sandwiched between 2 slices of a pav. The compound word batata vada refers in Marathi to a vada made out of batata, the latter referring to a potato. Pav refers to unsweetened bread or bun. It is also known as Indian Burger.

— Freebase

Machiavellian

Machiavellian

Machiavellian was an American-bred Thoroughbred racehorse and sire. In a racing career which lasted from August 1989 to August 1990 he ran seven times and won four races. He was the leading French two-year-old of 1989 when he was unbeaten in three races including the Group One Prix Morny and Prix de la Salamandre. He later became a highly successful sire of winners.

— Freebase

Sickness Impact Profile

Sickness Impact Profile

A quality-of-life scale developed in the United States in 1972 as a measure of health status or dysfunction generated by a disease. It is a behaviorally based questionnaire for patients and addresses activities such as sleep and rest, mobility, recreation, home management, emotional behavior, social interaction, and the like. It measures the patient's perceived health status and is sensitive enough to detect changes or differences in health status occurring over time or between groups. (From Medical Care, vol.xix, no.8, August 1981, p.787-805)

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Eugenius

Eugenius

the name of four Popes. E., St., I., Pope from 654 to 658 (festival, August 27); E. II., Pope from 824 to 827; E. III., Pope from 1145 to 1153; E. IV., Pope from 1431 to 1447.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Nicolaus-Cusanus-Gymnasium Bonn

Nicolaus-Cusanus-Gymnasium Bonn

The Nicolaus-Cusanus-Gymnasium is a secondary school in Bonn-Bad Godesberg, Germany. Its pupils range from Grade 5 to Grade 13. The main aspects of the school are a bilingual English-German branch, with lessons such as Geography, Politics and History taught in English and participation at THIMUN. In Grade 5 pupils can choose, if they want to be taught bilingual lessons. The school's headteacher is Nicole Auen, her deputy Gottfried Rottländer.

— Freebase

Lammas Day

Lammas Day

the first of August, literally "the loaf-mass" day or festival day at the beginning of harvest, one of the cross quarter days, Whitsuntide, Martinmas, and Candlemas being the other three.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

WENE

WENE

WENE is a radio station broadcasting a sports format. Licensed to Endicott, New York, USA, the station serves the Binghamton market. During its Top 40/Rock heyday, from the early Sixties through 1975, the station was home to many nationally famous talent such as Johnny Donovan, Greaseman, Bob Savage, Dave "Roe" Mason, Charlie Burger and Fred "Bumper Morgan" Merrin. The station is currently owned by Clear Channel Communications and features programing from Premiere Radio Networks, Dial Global and Fox Sports Radio.

— Freebase

August

August

originally called Sextilis, as the sixth month of the Roman year, which began in March, and named August in honour of Augustus, as being the month identified with remarkable events in his career.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Otterburn

Otterburn

a Northumberland village, 16 m. S. of the border, famous as the scene of a struggle on 19th August 1388 between the Douglases and the Percies, at which the Earl of Douglas lost his life, and Hotspur was taken prisoner. See Chevy Chase.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Saint Roch

Saint Roch

Saint Roch or Rocco; lived c.1348 - 15/16 August 1376/79 was a Christian saint, a confessor whose death is commemorated on 16 August; he is specially invoked against the plague. He may also be called Rock in English, and has the dedication of St Rollox in Glasgow, Scotland, said to be a corruption of St Roch's Loch.

— Freebase

Excited

Excited

"Excited" is the third single from Australian indie rock band Little Birdy's debut album, BigBigLove, released on 18 April 2005. It was produced by Paul McKercher at Big Jesus Burger Studios, and mixed at Studios 301. "Excited" reached number 44 on the Australian ARIA Singles Charts. The B-side of the single includes a live version of "Beautiful to Me" recorded at the 2005 Big Day Out and a version of the Lee Hazlewood song "These Boots Are Made for Walkin'".

— Freebase

Robinsonade

Robinsonade

Robinsonade is a literary genre that takes its name from the 1719 novel Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe. The success of this novel spawned so many imitations that its name was used to define a genre, which is sometimes described simply as a "desert island story". The word "robinsonade" was coined by the German writer Johann Gottfried Schnabel in the Preface of his 1731 work Die Insel Felsenburg. It is often viewed as a subgenre of survivalist fiction.

— Freebase

Northallerton

Northallerton

a market-town and capital of the North Riding of Yorkshire, 30 m. NW. of York; in the vicinity was fought the famous Battle of the Standard, in which David I. of Scotland was routed by the English, August 22, 1138.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Qi

Qi

The vital life force in the body, supposedly able to be regulated by acupuncture. It corresponds roughly to the Greek pneuma, the Latin spiritus, and the ancient Indian prana. The concept of life-breath or vital energy was formulated as an indication of the awareness of man, originally directed externally toward nature or society but later turned inward to the self or life within. (From Comparison between Concepts of Life-Breath in East and West, 15th International Symposium on the Comparative History of Medicine - East and West, August 26-September 3, 1990, Shizuoka, Japan, pp. ix-x)

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Tin Hat

Tin Hat

Tin Hat is an acoustic chamber music group currently based in San Francisco, California. Their music combines many genres of music, including southern blues, bluegrass, neoclassical, eastern European folk music, and avant-garde. Since its formation in 1997, the original Tin Hat Trio has often expanded its trio format by inviting other musicians to join them. All five of their CDs feature guests, among them Mike Patton, Tom Waits and Willie Nelson, as well as friends like clarinetist Ben Goldberg and harpist Zeena Parkins. Parkins appears on 2002's The Rodeo Eroded and 2004's Book of Silk and has performed live with the trio as the resident sound effects artist in their live music/silent film projects. Goldberg has been a frequent guest of Tin Hat Trio and contributed to both Memory is an Elephant and The Rodeo Eroded. When founding member Rob Burger left the trio in late 2004, Mark Orton and Carla Kihlstedt replaced him with both Goldberg and Parkins, presenting a new, though closely related, ensemble—the Tin Hat Quartet—for two short concert tours in the U.S. in January and April 2005. While on tour, they invited another musician to come under their hat, San Francisco's Ara Anderson—known as one of Tom Waits' favorite sidemen in recent years. Like the departed Burger, Anderson plays myriad keyed instruments as well as trumpet and glockenspiel, thus adding new colors and strokes to the already large canvas of Tin Hat's sound.

— Freebase

Heartbroke

Heartbroke

Heartbroke is the first single from The Good Life's fourth full-length album, entitled Help Wanted Nights. It was announced that it would be in stores on August 21st, 2007. However, mail orders began arriving on August 13th. Accompanied by non-album b-side Thirty-Year Evaluation this release was made available digitally and as a limited edition 7" vinyl with B-side etching in hand-screened, individually numbered packaging.

— Freebase

Friedrich August Wolf

Friedrich August Wolf

Friedrich August Wolf was a German philologist and critic.

— Freebase

Neuss

Neuss

Neuss is a city in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. It is located on the west bank of the Rhine opposite Düsseldorf. Neuss is the largest city within the Rhein-Kreis Neuss district and owes its prosperity to its location at the crossing of historic and modern trade routes. It is primarily known for its historic Roman sites, as well as the annual Neusser Bürger-Schützenfest. In 1984 Neuss celebrated 2000 years since its foundation. It therefore holds the title of "Germany's oldest city" alongside the city of Trier.

— Freebase

SNICK

SNICK

SNICK is a two-hour programming block on the American cable television network Nickelodeon, geared toward older audiences, that ran from August 15, 1992 until August 28, 2004. It was aired on Saturdays starting at 8 p.m and ending at 10 p.m. ET. In 2004, SNICK was revamped as the Saturday night edition of TEENick. Nickelodeon continues to run a Saturday night programming block today, though since the TEENick name was removed from the lineup in February 2009, the block no longer goes by any name. The block debuted on Saturday, August 15, 1992, with a pair of Sunday favorites and the network premieres of Roundhouse and Are You Afraid of the Dark?.

— Freebase

Noorderzon

Noorderzon

The Noorderzon Festival is an annual festival in the Dutch city of Groningen taking place in the urban public park the Noorderplantsoen, usually for a period of eleven days beginning in the third week of August. The festival typically draws between 130,000 and 150,000 visitors. The festival started out as a small music festival and a subsidiary of De Parade but has expanded to a festival where art, music, dance and theatre go together. Performances are shown in tents, on the street and in cultural venues in Groningen's inner city. There is a strong emphasis on international work, and on the cross-fertilization between theatre and other performing arts. The 2013 edition takes place from August 15 to August 25.

— Freebase

Ferragosto

Ferragosto

Ferragosto is an Italian holiday celebrated on August 15.

— Freebase

Loure

Loure

The loure, also known as the gigue lente or slow gigue, is a slow French Baroque dance, probably originating in Normandy and named after the sound of the instrument of the same name. The loure is a dance of slow or moderate tempo, sometimes in simple ternary meter, more often in compound binary. The weight is on the first beat, which is further emphasised by the preceding anacrusis that begins the traditional loure. One of its features is a lilting dotted rhythm. In his Musicalisches Lexicon, Johann Gottfried Walther wrote that the loure "is slow and ceremonious; the first note of each half-measure is dotted which should be well observed". Examples of loures are found in the works of Lully and of Bach.

— Freebase

Jade Emperor

Jade Emperor

The Jade Emperor in Chinese folk culture, is the ruler of Heaven and all realms of existence below including that of Man and Hell, according to a version of Taoist mythology. He is one of the most important gods of the Chinese traditional religion pantheon. In actual Taoism, the Jade Emperor governs all of the mortals' realm and below, but ranks below the Three Pure Ones. The Jade Emperor is known by many names, including Heavenly Grandfather which is used by commoners; the Pure August Jade Emperor, August Personage of Jade; the Xuanling High Sovereign; and his rarely used, formal title, Peace Absolving, Central August Spirit Exalted, Ancient Buddha, Most Pious and Honorable, His Highness the Jade-Emperor, Xuanling High Sovereign.

— Freebase

Arroyo Video Solutions

Arroyo Video Solutions

Arroyo Video Solutions is a video on demand company based in the United States. It was acquired by Cisco Systems on August 21, 2006.

— CrunchBase

Poutine

Poutine

Poutine is a common Canadian dish, made with french fries, topped with brown gravy and cheese curds. Sometimes additional ingredients are added. This Québécois fast food dish can now be found across Canada. It is sold by national and international fast food chains, in small "greasy spoon" type diners and pubs, as well as by roadside chip wagons. International chains like McDonald's, A&W, KFC, and Burger King also sell mass-produced poutine in Canada. Poutine may also contain other ingredients such as bacon, beef, pulled pork, lamb, lobster meat, shrimp, rabbit confit, caviar, and truffles.

— Freebase

Margo Guryan

Margo Guryan

Margo Guryan is an American songwriter, singer, musician and lyricist. As a songwriter, her work was first recorded in 1958, although it was for her 1960s song "Sunday Mornin'", a hit for both Spanky and Our Gang and Oliver, that she is perhaps best known. Her songs have also been recorded by Cass Elliot, Glen Campbell and Astrud Gilberto, among others. As a performer, she is best known for her 1968 album Take a Picture, the sole album release in the initial phase of her career. The album was re-released in 2000, and followed by a compilation entitled 25 Demos. In 2014 the American record label Burger Records released another compilation named 27 Demos on cassette.

— Freebase

Inherent Vice

Inherent Vice

Inherent Vice is a novel by Thomas Pynchon, originally published in August 2009.

— Freebase

Jerry Riggs

Jerry Riggs

Jerry Riggs is an American rock guitarist and vocalist, born on August 25, 1956, in Knoxville, Tennessee.

— Freebase

Paul Volcker

Paul Volcker

Paul Adolph Volcker, Jr. is an American economist. He was Chairman of the Federal Reserve under United States Presidents Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan from August 1979 to August 1987. He is widely credited with ending the high levels of inflation seen in the United States during the 1970s and early 1980s. He was the chairman of the Economic Recovery Advisory Board under President Barack Obama from February 2009 until January 2011.

— Freebase

PlayCafe

PlayCafe

PlayCafe was an interactive Internet game show network which billed itself as "the first online game show network." PlayCafe was founded in April 2007 by Dev Nag and Mark Goldenson, funded by angel investors. PlayCafe produced over 300 hour-long episodes, which were broadcast live from Redwood City, California and hosted by Daniella Martin from August 2007 to August 7, 2008, then by Chad Mosher in Flint, Michigan from August 14, 2008 to December 18, 2008. PlayCafe broadcast two shows daily, Monday through Friday, at 6:00 pm and 7:00 pm Pacific Time until May 30, 2008. On the last daily show, it was announced that the broadcast schedule would change to one show a week, starting the following week. On June 5, 2008, PlayCafe broadcast its first weekly shows on Thursday at the same time as the daily shows until its final show on December 18, 2008.

— Freebase

Peter Cornelius

Peter Cornelius

Carl August Peter Cornelius was a German composer, writer about music, poet and translator.

— Freebase

Days

Days

"Days" is a single released by High and Mighty Color on August 17, 2005.

— Freebase

Nonconformists

Nonconformists

a name originally applied to the clergy of the Established Church of England, some two thousand, who in 1662 resigned their livings rather than submit to the terms of the Act of Uniformity passed on the 24th of August that year, and now applied to the whole Dissenting body in England.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Successor

Successor

Successor is an EP by Sonata Arctica, released through Spinefarm Records on August 7, 2000.

— Freebase

Doximity

Doximity

Doximity is an online professional network for verified U.S. physicians launched in March 2011. As of August 2013, Doximity has over 200,000 active physician members.

— CrunchBase

Fructidor

Fructidor

Fructidor is the twelfth month in the French Republican Calendar. The month was named after the Latin word fructus, which means "fruit". Fructidor is the third month of the summer quarter. By the Gregorian calendar, Fructidor starts on either August 18 or August 19 and ends exactly thirty days later, on September 16 or September 17. Fructidor follows the month of Thermidor and precedes the Sansculottides. The month is often used as a shorthand term for the Coup of 18 Fructidor.

— Freebase

Circle of Friends

Circle of Friends

Circle of Friends is a Lifetime Movie starring Julie Benz that aired on 28 August 2006.

— Freebase

Lift Worldwide

Lift Worldwide

Lift provides to tools to boost human potential.Lift was founded in August 2011 by Tony Stubblebine and Jon Crosby, with the help of Obvious Corporation.

— CrunchBase

Helminthology

Helminthology

Helminthology is the study of parasitic worms. This field deals with the study of their taxonomy and the effect on their hosts. The origin of the first compound of the word is from the Greek ἕλμινς - helmins, meaning "worm". In the 18th and early 19th century there was wave of publications on helminthology in the 19th and at the beginning of the 19th century that has been described as “Golden Era” of helminthology. During that period the authors Peter Simon Pallas, Marcus Elieser Bloch, Otto Friedrich Müller, Johann Goeze, Friedrich Zenker, Carl Asmund Rudolphi and Johann Gottfried Bremser started systematic scientific studies of the subject.

— Freebase

Crux Biomedical

Crux Biomedical

Crux Biomedical, Inc., was formed in August 2004 by physicians Tom Fogarty and Frank Arko based upon their observations of the clinical limitations of current vena cava filters.

— CrunchBase

No Friends

No Friends

No Friends is an album by American rapper Loon, released in August 2006 via Cleopatra Records.

— Freebase

Hugo von Hofmannsthal

Hugo von Hofmannsthal

Hugo Laurenz August Hofmann von Hofmannsthal, was an Austrian novelist, librettist, poet, dramatist, narrator, and essayist.

— Freebase

Phantasma

Phantasma

Phantasma is the second studio album by Trance artist Leon Bolier, released on August 30, 2010.

— Freebase

Republic of Upper Volta

Republic of Upper Volta

The Republic of Upper Volta was established on December 11, 1958, as a self-governing colony within the French Community. Before attaining autonomy it had been French Upper Volta and part of the French Union. On August 5, 1960 it attained full independence from France. Thomas Sankara came to power through a military coup d'état on August 4, 1983. After the coup, he formed the National Council for the Revolution, with himself as president. Under the direction of Sankara, the country changed its name on August 4, 1984 from the Upper Volta to Burkina Faso, which means "Land of Incorruptible People". The name Upper Volta indicated that the country contains the upper part of the Volta River. The river is divided into three parts—the Black Volta, White Volta, and Red Volta, which form the colors of the national flag corresponding to parts of the river.

— Freebase

Repros Therapeutics

Repros Therapeutics

Repros Therapeutics Inc. ® was organized on August 20, 1987. We are a development stage biopharmaceutical company focused on the development of new drugs to treat hormonal and reproductive system disorders.

— CrunchBase

Wilhelmina I.

Wilhelmina I.

queen of the Netherlands, daughter of William III., and who ascended the throne on his decease in November 1890; her mother, a sister of the Duchess of Albany, acted as regent during her minority, and she became of age on the 11th August 1898, when she was installed as sovereign amid the enthusiasm of her people; b. 1880.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Foxhunt

Foxhunt

Foxhunt is the debut ep by Australian music collective Dukes of Windsor, released on 15 August 2005.

— Freebase

Pure Software

Pure Software

Pure Software was founded in October 1991 by Reed Hastings and Mark Box. The original product was a debugging tool for Unix/C engineers called Purify. After adding new products such as Quantify and PureLink, and doubling its revenue every year for four years, Pure Software went public with the help of Morgan Stanley in August 1995. In August 1996, Pure Software merged with Atria to form Pure Atria Corporation. Later in August 1997, Rational Software acquired Pure Atria, giving Hastings the capital to start Netflix. When Pure Atria was acquired by Rational Software, it triggered a 42% drop in both companies' stocks after the deal was announced. Hastings was appointed Chief Technical Officer of the combined companies and left soon after the acquisition. "I had the great fortune of doing a mediocre job at my first company," says Hastings. "We got more bureaucratic as we grew." After Pure Software, Hastings spent two years thinking about how to avoid similar problems at his next startup, Netflix.

— Freebase

White Sea

White Sea

a large inlet of the Arctic Ocean, in the N. of Russia, which is entered by a long channel and branches inward into three bays; it is of little service for navigation, being blocked with ice all the year except in June, July, and August, and even when open encumbered with floating ice, and often enveloped in mists at the same time.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Smolensk

Smolensk

an ancient town of Russia, and capital of a government (1,412) of the same name, on the Dnieper, 244 m. SW. of Moscow; is surrounded by walls; has a fine cathedral, and is strongly fortified; carries on a good grain trade; here in 1812 Napoleon defeated the Russians under Barclay de Tolly and Bagration on his march to Moscow in August 1812.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Good Job!

Good Job!

Good Job! is a greatest-hits album released on August 31, 2005 by the Japanese hip hop group, Rip Slyme.

— Freebase

Pocket

Pocket

Pocket is a service that lets you save what you find on the web to watch and read on any device, anytime.Founded in August 2007 by Nate Weiner, it is now based in San Francisco.

— CrunchBase

Integrated Advanced Information Management Systems

Integrated Advanced Information Management Systems

A concept, developed in 1983 under the aegis of and supported by the National Library of Medicine under the name of Integrated Academic Information Management Systems, to provide professionals in academic health sciences centers and health sciences institutions with convenient access to an integrated and comprehensive network of knowledge. It addresses a wide cross-section of users from administrators and faculty to students and clinicians and has applications to planning, clinical and managerial decision-making, teaching, and research. It provides access to various types of clinical, management, educational, etc., databases, as well as to research and bibliographic databases. In August 1992 the name was changed from Integrated Academic Information Management Systems to Integrated Advanced Information Management Systems to reflect use beyond the academic milieu.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Brickfish

Brickfish

Brickfish provides social marketing software and services to global brands and advertising agencies.The company offers marketers comprehensive solutions to build, manage, monitor and measure brand presence across the social web. By combining industry expertise, a leading technology platform, and comprehensive analytics into an integrated approach, Brickfish delivers effective social CRM and marketing solutions to Fortune 2000 brands and agencies.Since 2005, our unique solution has generated over 600 million brand engagements for some of the world’s premier brands, including Microsoft, Dell, Redbox, Capital One, Viacom, QVC, Neiman Marcus, Coach, The North Face® and more. PatentsContent Distribution Systems including Cost Per Engagement United States Patent Application 11893766 Filed August 17, 2007Online Marketing Platforms United States Patent Application 11893765 Filed August 17, 2007Systems and Method for voting in online competitions United States Patent Application 11893839 Filed August 17, 2007Systems and Methods for Conducting Online Campaigns United States Patent Application 12326011 Filed December 1, 2008Systems and Methods for Creating UGC Campaigns using Content from a Content System United States Patent Application 12497916 Filed July 6, 2009 Contact: Michael Mullarkey

— CrunchBase

Vis viva

Vis viva

In the history of science, vis viva is an obsolete scientific theory that served as an elementary and limited early formulation of the principle of conservation of energy. It was the first [known] description of what we now call kinetic energy or of energy related to sensible motions. Proposed by Gottfried Leibniz over the period 1676–1689, the theory was controversial as it seemed to oppose the theory of conservation of momentum advocated by Sir Isaac Newton and René Descartes. The two theories are now understood to be complementary. The theory was eventually absorbed into the modern theory of energy though the term still survives in the context of celestial mechanics through the vis viva equation.

— Freebase

Latvian Soviet Socialist Republic

Latvian Soviet Socialist Republic

The Latvian Soviet Socialist Republic, also known as the Latvian SSR, was a republic of the Soviet Union. It was established on 21 July 1940, during World War II, as a puppet state in the territory of the previously independent Republic of Latvia after it had been occupied by the Soviet Army, in conformity with the terms of 23 August 1939 Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact, on 17 June 1940. The Latvian SSR was formally annexed into the Soviet Union on 5 August 1940, when it nominally became the fifteenth constituent republic of the USSR. Its territory was subsequently conquered by Nazi Germany in 1941, before being retaken by the Soviets in 1944–1945. The first freely elected parliament of the Latvian SSR had passed Sovereignty Declaration "On the Renewal of the Independence of the Republic of Latvia" on May 4, 1990, and renamed the Latvian SSR the Republic of Latvia. The full independence of Republic of Latvia was restored on 21 August 1991.

— Freebase

Zwinger

Zwinger

The Zwinger is a palace in Dresden, eastern Germany, built in Rococo style and designed by court architect Matthäus Daniel Pöppelmann. It served as the orangery, exhibition gallery and festival arena of the Dresden Court. The location was formerly part of the Dresden fortress of which the outer wall is conserved. The name derives from the German word Zwinger; it was for the cannons that were placed between the outer wall and the major wall. The Zwinger was not enclosed until the Neoclassical building by Gottfried Semper called the Semper Gallery was built on its northern side. Today, the Zwinger is a museum complex that contains the Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister, the Dresden Porcelain Collection and the Mathematisch-Physikalischer Salon.

— Freebase

Necessary Evil

Necessary Evil

Necessary Evil, also referred to as Plane #91, was the name of a B-29 Superfortress participating in the atomic bomb attack on Hiroshima on August 6, 1945. Assigned to the 393d Bomb Squadron, 509th Composite Group, it was used as a camera plane to photograph the explosion and effects of the bomb, and to carry scientific observers. At the time of the attack the plane was not named and was known only by its 393d Victor number. The mission was flown by crew B-10, with Captain George Marquardt as aircraft commander. The crew regularly assigned to this airplane in turn flew another on the Nagasaki mission on August 9, 1945, the B-29 Big Stink, though without their aircraft commander, who was ill.

— Freebase

Candyass

Candyass

Candyass is the debut album of the alternative metal band Orgy. It was released on August 18, 1998.

— Freebase

August

August

August is the eighth month of the year in the Julian and Gregorian Calendars and one of seven months with a length of 31 days. In the Southern Hemisphere, August is the seasonal equivalent of February in the Northern Hemisphere. In common years no other month starts on the same day of the week as August, though in leap years February starts on the same day. August ends on the same day of the week as November every year. This month was originally named Sextilis in Latin, because it was the sixth month in the original ten-month Roman calendar under Romulus in 753 BC, when March was the first month of the year. About 700 BC it became the eighth month when January and February were added to the year before March by King Numa Pompilius, who also gave it 29 days. Julius Caesar added two days when he created the Julian calendar in 45 BC giving it its modern length of 31 days. In 8 BC it was renamed in honor of Augustus. According to a Senatus consultum quoted by Macrobius, he chose this month because it was the time of several of his great triumphs, including the conquest of Egypt.

— Freebase

Neutrons

Neutrons

Neutrons is the second studio album by The Denison/Kimball Trio, released on August 12, 1997 through Quarterstick Records.

— Freebase

BESSY

BESSY

The Berliner Elektronenspeicherring-Gesellschaft für Synchrotronstrahlung m. b. H., abbreviated BESSY, is a research establishment in the Adlershof district of Berlin. Founded on 5 March 1979, it currently operates one of Germany's 3rd generation synchrotron radiation facilities, BESSY II. Originally part of the Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Scientific Community, BESSY now belongs to the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin. Owing to the radiometry lab of the PTB, BESSY is the European calibration standard for electromagnetic radiation. BESSY supplies synchrotron light and provides support for science and industry. There are institutional long-time users, like the Max-Planck-Society, the German Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing and the national metrology institute of Germany. Furthermore, research groups from other institutes or universities can apply for utilization for certain projects.

— Freebase

Puppet Show

Puppet Show

Puppet Show is the second full-length album by the Japanese rock group Plastic Tree released on August 28, 1998.

— Freebase

George McClellan

George McClellan

George Brinton McClellan, Jr., CM, OBE, DFC, O.Ont, CD served as the 13th Commissioner of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, from November 1, 1963 to August 14, 1967.

— Freebase

Starfaring

Starfaring

Starfaring is a science fiction role-playing game created by Ken St. Andre and published by Flying Buffalo in August 1976.

— Freebase

Shmoo

Shmoo

A shmoo is a fictional cartoon creature. Created by Al Capp, it first appeared in his classic comic strip Li'l Abner on August 31, 1948, and quickly became a postwar national craze in the USA.

— Freebase

Virgo

Virgo

Virgo is the sixth astrological sign in the Zodiac. It spans the 150-180th degree of the zodiac, between 152.75 and 180 degree of celestial longitude, which the Tropical zodiac the Sun transits this area on average between August 23 to September 22 each year. Virgo is also part of the 12 zodiac signs. In Sidereal astrology, the sun currently transits the constellation of Virgo from August 22 to September 22. Individuals born during these dates, depending on which system of astrology they subscribe to, may be called Virgos or Virgoans.

— Freebase

Mordad

Mordad

Mordad is the fifth month of the Iranian calendar. Mordad has 31 days and in most years begins on 23 July and ends on 22 August. In some years, Mordad begins on 22 July and ends on 21 August. Mordad is the second month of summer after Tir, and is followed by Shahrivar. The name "Mordad" derives from Middle Persian "Amurdad" from Avestan 'Ameretat', the Zoroastrian divinity of "immortality", and under whose protection the month stands. Mordad is also the name of an Iranian company founded in 2007.

— Freebase

EyeView

EyeView

Eyeview is the leading provider of personalized digital video advertising solutions for brand marketers. Eyeview is the only company that offers broadcast quality personalized videos for each consumer, with proprietary creative technology that integrates the brand's relevant messages. As the consumer progresses along the path to purchase, Eyeview dynamically changes the brand's message in-stream to ensure the consumer continues to receive the most relevant informative and effective ad. As a result, our brands consistently experience lift in key performance indicators and increase in brand equity and sales. Eyeview partners with Fortune 500 leaders in automotive, retail, telecommunications, quick service restaurants, entertainment and travel including Target, Comcast, Lowe's, Officemax, Expedia, Toyota, Burger King and more. The company is headquartered in New York City with offices in Los Angeles, Chicago, Detroit, and Tel Aviv. For more information, please visit www.eyeviewdigital.com.

— CrunchBase

Barbra Joan Streisand

Barbra Joan Streisand

Barbra Joan Streisand is an album by Barbra Streisand, released in August, 1971 on Columbia Records.

— Freebase

Forsake

Forsake

We got tired of wet, ruined sneakers. So we built our own. It’s like your hiking boots and dancing shoes had a love child. In stores and online August 1st.www.forsake.co @forsakeco facebook.com/forsakeco

— CrunchBase

Pleiades

Pleiades

in the Greek mythology seven sisters, daughters of Atlas, transformed into stars, six of them visible and one invisible, and forming the group on the shoulders of Taurus in the zodiac; in the last week of May they rise and set with the sun till August, after which they follow the sun and are seen more or less at night till their conjunction with it again in May.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Hot Water

Hot Water

Hot Water is a novel by P.G. Wodehouse, first published on August 17, 1932, in the United Kingdom by Herbert Jenkins, London, and in the United States by Doubleday, Doran, New York. The novel had been serialised in Collier's from 21 May to 6 August 1932. It was subsequently adapted for the stage by Wodehouse and his long-time collaborator Guy Bolton as The Inside Stand. The story takes place at the Chateau Blissac, Brittany, and recounts the various romantic and criminal goings-on there during a house party, hosted by the Vicomte Blissac. It contains a mixture of romance, intrigue and Wodehouse's brand of humour.

— Freebase

Jaywalker

Jaywalker

Jaywalker is the first solo album by singer/songwriter Josh Joplin. Jaywalker was released on August 23, 2005 with Eleven Thirty Records

— Freebase

GAMA

GAMA

Gama is an EP released by Japanese rock band The Gazette on August 3, 2005. The first press edition came in a digipack form.

— Freebase

Plinth

Plinth

In architecture, a plinth is the base or platform upon which a column, pedestal, statue, monument or structure rests. Gottfried Semper's The Four Elements of Architecture posited that the plinth, the hearth, the roof, and the wall make up all of architectural theory. The plinth usually rests directly on the ground, or "stylobate". According to Semper, the plinth exists to negotiate between a structure and the ground. Semper's theory has been influential in the development of architecture. Many houses in flood-prone rural areas of Bangladesh are built on plinths. The word is also used for the base of a cabinet or an audio turntable. In dam engineering, the "plinth" is the link between the ground and the dam. For the case of arch dams, the term is changed to "pulvino".

— Freebase

Bartholomew's Day, St.

Bartholomew's Day, St.

24th August, day in 1572 memorable for the wholesale massacre of the Protestants in France at the instance of Catharine de Medici, then regent of the kingdom for her son, Charles IX., an event, cruelly gloried in by the Pope and the Spanish Court, which kindled a fire in the nation that was not quenched, although it extinguished Protestantism proper in France, till Charles was coerced to grant liberty of conscience throughout the realm.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Moldavian Soviet Socialist Republic

Moldavian Soviet Socialist Republic

The Moldavian Soviet Socialist Republic, commonly abbreviated as the Moldavian SSR or MSSR, was one of the fifteen republics of the Soviet Union. After the Declaration of Sovereignty on June 23, 1990 and until the Declaration of Independence on August 27, 1991, it was officially referred to as the Soviet Socialist Republic of Moldova. Upon gaining formal independence, it became the Republic of Moldova. The Moldavian SSR was formed on August 2, 1940 from parts of Bessarabia, a region annexed from Romania on June 28 of that year, and MASSR, an autonomous republic within the Ukrainian SSR.

— Freebase

Lughnasadh

Lughnasadh

Lughnasadh is a traditional Gaelic holiday celebrated on 1 August. It originated as a harvest festival, corresponding to the Welsh Calan Awst and the English Lammas.

— Freebase

Egao

Egao

"Egao" is the 19th single from Aya Matsuura, a Hello! Project solo artist. It was released on August 29, 2007 under the Zetima label.

— Freebase

Innominate

Innominate

Innominate is the second full-length album by emo band Off Minor. It was released on August 24, 2004, on Golden Brown Records.

— Freebase

Flank steak

Flank steak

The flank steak is a beef steak cut from the abdominal muscles of the cow. A relatively long and flat cut, flank steak is used in a variety of dishes including London broil and as an alternative to the traditional skirt steak in fajitas. It can be grilled, pan-fried, broiled, or braised for increased tenderness. The cut is common in Colombia, where it is known as sobrebarriga, literally meaning "over the belly". Flank steak is best when it has a bright red color. Because it comes from a strong, well-exercised part of the cow, it is best sliced across the grain before serving, to maximise tenderness. Flank steak is frequently used in Asian cuisine, often sold in Chinese markets as "stir-fry beef". In the United Kingdom McDonald's uses "100% forequarter and flank" in its burger patties.

— Freebase

Double Wide

Double Wide

Double Wide is rock/rap artist Uncle Kracker's debut album. It was released on Lava Records. The CRIA certified it platinum in August 2001.

— Freebase

Armamentarium

Armamentarium

Armamentarium is the third studio album by German melodic death metal band Neaera. It was released on 24 August 2007 through Metal Blade Records.

— Freebase

Transmutations

Transmutations

Transmutations is the fourth full-length studio album by Chicago-based progressive metal band Yakuza. It was released on August 7, 2007 by Prosthetic Records.

— Freebase

Assembly

Assembly

The Assembly demo party is a demoscene and gaming event in Finland. The main organizers of the event are Pekka Aakko and Jussi Laakkonen. The event takes place every year between late July and early August, and lasts three to four days. The most recent Assembly was held from the 2 to 5 August 2012 at Hartwall Areena in Helsinki. In the beginning of the year 2007 Assembly Winter was announced. The new winter party is a more gaming oriented event in Tampere where the summer events continues the traditions of the original demoparty in Helsinki under the name Assembly Summer. Both parties will be held once a year.

— Freebase

Black Friday

Black Friday

Black Friday, Friday, August 13, 2004, was the crackdown by the Maldivian National Security Service — later Maldivian National Defence Force — on a peaceful protest in the capital city of Maldives, Malé. This unplanned and unorganized demonstration was the largest such protest in the country's history. Beginning on the evening of August 12, 2004, the demonstration grew and continued until it was forcefully ended on the afternoon of August 13, 2004. Protesters initially demanding the freeing of the pro-reformists arrested on the afternoon of August 12, 2004. As the protest continued to grow, people demanded the resignation of president Maumoon Abdul Gayoom, who had been in power since 1978. What started as a peaceful demonstration ended after 22 hours, as the country's darkest day in recent history. Several people were severely injured as NSS personnel used riot batons and teargas on unarmed civilians. Pursuant to the powers vested in him by Section 144 of the Constitution — and for only the second time in Maldives history — president Maumoon Abdul Gayoom declared a State of Emergency in Malé and the nearby islands a few minutes after the crackdown. Several members of the Majlis, former cabinet ministers, and many reformists were arrested. As a symbol of unity, President Gayoom pardoned all arrested following the December 26th tsunami.

— Freebase

Messengers

Messengers

Messengers is the second album released by metalcore band August Burns Red through Solid State Records, and their first with vocalist Jake Luhrs and bass player Dustin Davidson. It sold 9,000 copies in its first week on sale, and went on to sell over 80,000. A video for the song "Composure" was recorded and was released as a single on September 6, 2007. The second video from this album, for the song "Back Burner", premiered on Myspace Music on August 13, 2008. A vinyl copy of this record was also released with limited press numbers through the band's former label, CI Records.

— Freebase

John Bunyan

John Bunyan

John Bunyan was an English Christian writer and preacher, who is well known for his book The Pilgrim's Progress. Though he became a non-conformist and member of an Independent church, and although he has been described both as a Baptist and as a Congregationalist, he himself preferred to be described simply as a Christian. He is remembered in the Church of England with a Lesser Festival on August 30, and on the liturgical calendar of the Episcopal Church on August 29. Some other Churches of the Anglican Communion, such as the Anglican Church of Australia, honour him on the day of his death together with St Aidan of Lindisfarne.

— Freebase

Disappeared

Disappeared

Disappeared is an album by English electronic duo Spring Heel Jack. The album was released by Thirsty Ear on August 22, 2000.

— Freebase

YCD Multimedia

YCD Multimedia

YCD Multimedia is an industry leader providing corporations and organizations worldwide with advanced digital media solutions and applications within the retail environment, as well as other industries. YCD's flexible platforms help businesses attract clients, reinforce branding and ensure a measurable impact on their business. YCD's end-to-end offering combines strategy, professional services and technology to increase profits, optimize product mix and enhance the customer experience. To date, the company has partnered with over 2,000 customers, including Fortune 500 corporations and some of the world's most recognized brands, such as Burger King, Coca-Cola, Toyota, Estee Lauder, Ferrari, Cartier, and Diesel. Founded in 1999, YCD Multimedia is headquartered in the United States with offices in the United Kingdom and Israel, and has an international network of resellers serving clients around the globe. In October 2011 YCD acquired C-nario, a global provider of digital signage software solutions. For more information, visit www.ycdmultimedia.com

— CrunchBase

On-Foot

On-Foot

On-Foot is a travel show on the Living Asia Channel. The show follows the comic and upbeat television host Tim Tayag around the Philippine and Asian countries. The program is a co-production of Bacon Burger Productions and CCI Asia Group Corporation and is being aired in the Philippines via The Living Asia Channel. It is also being aired simultaneously in North America via The Filipino Channel Direct, North America and Canada via Globecast World TV In Asia, we can be seen in Singapore, Malaysia, Vietnam and Laos as well via The Mabuhay Satellite Corporation. In the Philippines, The Living Asia Channel is currently aired on major cable networks such as Home, Dream, Destiny and Sky. On-Foot is everyday three times a day on an eight hour loop seen simultaneously in the other countries with broadcast partners.

— Freebase

Coates

Coates

Coates is a city in the U.S. state of Minnesota located west of the Upper Mississippi River on the exurban fringe in central Dakota County. U.S. Highway 52 connects north to Saint Paul while County Road 46 draws east-west to nearby suburban cities. The population was 161 at the 2010 census. It is named for Civil War Captain Henry C. Coates who served in the 1st Minnesota Volunteer Infantry. Major employers are in trucking, moving and recycling services. The city is popular with Twin Citians for the House of Coates, a burger joint since 1962. St. Agatha's Catholic Church serves as city hall. Originally a rural post office hub in the 1900s, the U.S. Postal Service now designates addresses as part of larger Rosemount. The city incorporated in 1953 on the northwest corner of Vermillion Township and was named for early settler G. A. Coates.

— Freebase

Primordialism

Primordialism

Primordialism or perennialism is the argument which contends that nations are ancient, natural phenomena. Primordialism can be traced philosophically to the ideas of German Romanticism, particularly in the works of Johann Gottlieb Fichte and Johann Gottfried Herder. For Herder, the nation was synonymous with language group. In Herder's thinking, language was synonymous with thought, and as each language was learnt in community, then each community must think differently. This also suggests that the community would hold a fixed nature over time. Primordialism encountered enormous criticism after the Second World War, with a few scholars of nationalism coming to treat the nation as a community constructed by the technologies and politics of modernity. Though largely rejected by most theorists of nationalism, some of its ideas have found parallels in ethnosymbolism.

— Freebase

Stormy

Stormy

Stormy is an album by American country music singer and songwriter Hank Williams, Jr. It was released on August 31, 1999 on the Curb Records label.

— Freebase

Malovăț

Malovăț

Malovăţ is a commune located in Mehedinţi County, Romania. It is composed of seven villages: 23 August, Bârda, Bobaiţa, Colibaşi, Lazu, Malovăţ and Negreşti.

— Freebase

Breakfast of Champions

Breakfast of Champions

Breakfast of Champions, or Goodbye Blue Monday is a 1973 novel by the American author Kurt Vonnegut. Set in the fictional town of Midland City, it is the story of "two lonesome, skinny, fairly old white men on a planet which was dying fast." One of these men, Dwayne Hoover, is a normal-looking but deeply deranged Pontiac dealer and Burger Chef franchise owner who becomes obsessed with the writings of the other man, Kilgore Trout, taking them for literal truth. Trout, a largely unknown pulp science fiction writer who has appeared in several other Vonnegut novels, looks like a crazy old man but is in fact relatively sane. As the novel opens, Trout journeys toward Midland City to appear at a convention where he is destined to meet Dwayne Hoover and unwittingly inspire him to run amok.

— Freebase

Simplician

Simplician

Simplician or Simplicianus was Archbishop of Milan from 397 to 400. He is honoured as a Saint in the Catholic Church and his feast day is August 14.

— Freebase

Scient

Scient

Scient was a San Francisco-based Internet consulting company, founded in 1997, that was one of the large American consulting firms during the dot-com bubble. The company was founded by Eric Greenberg, who had previously founded its competitor, Viant. Its CEO was Robert Howe, the former head of IBM global consulting. At its height in the fall of 2000, it had quarterly revenues of US$100 million, 1,180 employees and a stock price of US$133. In August 2001, it bought rival company iXL; by then its quarterly revenues were down to US$11 million. In July 2002, the company filed for bankruptcy and was bought by SBI and Company, which became SBI Group. SBI Group later sold Scient with the other members of Avenue A/Razorfish to a company called aQuantive. aQuantive, in turn, was bought by Microsoft in August 2007 and became Microsoft's newly-created Advertiser and Publisher Solutions Group. On August 9, 2009, Microsoft sold the firm to Publicis Groupe for $530M in cash and stock.

— Freebase

Museum Piece

Museum Piece

Museum Piece is the second episode in the first series of the British comedy series Dad's Army, originally transmitted on Wednesday 7 August 1968.

— Freebase

Sequent Medical

Sequent Medical

Sequent Medical Inc. is a privately held, development-stage medical device company in Aliso Viejo , CA that was established in August 2007. The company is dedicated to the development of innovative devices to advance the endovascular treatment of neurovascular disease conditions.

— CrunchBase

Grace

Grace

Grace is the only complete studio album by Jeff Buckley, released on August 23, 1994. While the album initially had poor sales, peaking at No. 149 in the U.S., and received mixed reviews, it gradually acquired critical and popular acclaim and has now sold over 2 million copies worldwide. An extended version of the album celebrating its tenth anniversary was released on August 23, 2004, and it peaked at No. 44 in the UK. Grace re-entered the albums chart in Australia at number 44 for the week of January 29 to February 5, 2007 – 13 years after its original release date. It is currently certified 6x Platinum in Australia.

— Freebase

Leblanc

Leblanc

Leblanc, Inc. is a musical instrument manufacturer based in Kenosha, Wisconsin. The company was purchased on 1 August 2004 by Steinway Musical Instruments, which now operates Leblanc as a division of its Conn-Selmer subsidiary.

— Freebase

August 22

August 22

August 22 is the 234th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 131 days remaining until the end of the year.

— Freebase

Blind

Blind

"Blind" is a song written and recorded by American nu metal band Korn for their self-titled debut album. It was released as the album's first single in August 1994.

— Freebase

One Fell Swoop

One Fell Swoop

One Fell Swoop is the third full-length album from Sioux Falls, South Dakota emo/acoustic band The Spill Canvas. It was released on August 9, 2005, through 111 Records.

— Freebase

Gifi

Gifi

Gifi combines the Venmo API and Foursquare API into a fun, location based game involving real money. By hiding money for one of your friends to claim at a new restaurant you have discovered, recommending a favorite dish becomes a social game. Eg, you leave a Gifi with the hint: “staple pub food in the west village.” The next time a friend checks in at Spotted Pig, she automatically gets a payment “$17 to try the burger at spotted pig. pricey but best in town!” Besides allowing friends to literally put their money where their mouth is when sharing their favorite restaurants, Gifi also provides local merchants a dead simple way for restaurants to deliver rewards to frequent/valued customers. And, because Gifi’s are redeemed Foursquare checkins and public Venmo payments, every time a customer redeems a reward, the restaurant gets valuable distribution in social activity feeds of all of their customers’ friends.

— CrunchBase

Familia

Familia

Familia was the name of a Polish political party led by the Czartoryski magnates and families allied with them, and formed toward the end of the reign of King August II. The Familia's principal leaders were Michał Fryderyk Czartoryski, Great Chancellor of Lithuania, his brother August Aleksander Czartoryski, voivode of Ruthenia, and their brother-in-law, Stanisław Poniatowski, Castellan of Kraków. During the 1733 interregnum, the Familia supported Stanisław Leszczyński for king, then reconciled with August III and became a party of the royal court. Following unsuccessful attempts at reforming the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth undertaken at sejms between 1744 and 1750, the Familia distanced itself from the royal court. In foreign affairs, they represented a pro-Russian orientation. During the 1763–1764 interregnum, armed Russian intervention allowed the Familia to overcome their opponents. When in 1764 Adam Kazimierz Czartoryski declined to seek the throne, the Czartoryskis agreed to the election, as king, of their kinsman, Stanisław August Poniatowski, one-time lover of Russian Empress Catherine II. In this period the Familia partially enacted their program of reforms, including the creation of treasury and military commissions limiting the power of treasurers and hetmans. Also, the liberum veto was suspended. Further reforms, however, were blocked by Russia and Prussia; and conservative opponents of the Familia and the King, backed by Russia's Catherine II, in 1767 formed the Radom Confederation and at the infamous Repnin Sejm abolished part of the recently introduced reforms.

— Freebase

Bunji

Bunji

Bunji was a Japanese era name after Genryaku and before Kenkyū. This period spanned the years from August 1185 through April 1190. The reigning emperor was Go-Toba-tennō.

— Freebase

Kengen

Kengen

Kengen was a Japanese era name after Shōan and before Kagen. This period spanned the years from November 1302 through August 1303. The reigning emperor was Go-Nijō-tennō.

— Freebase

Kagen

Kagen

Kagen was a Japanese era name after Kengen and before Tokuji. This period spanned the years from August 1303 through December 1306. The reigning emperor was Go-Nijō-tennō.

— Freebase

Swimmy

Swimmy

"Swimmy" is the 32nd single by the Japanese j-pop group Every Little Thing, released on August 30, 2006. It was the theme song of the drama Kekkon Dekinai Otoko.

— Freebase

Snapped

Snapped

Snapped is an American true crime television series that airs on the Oxygen Network. Snapped debuted on August 6, 2004 and is produced by Jupiter Entertainment.

— Freebase

Lammas

Lammas

In some English-speaking countries in the Northern Hemisphere, August 1 is Lammas Day, the festival of the wheat harvest, and is the first harvest festival of the year. On this day it was customary to bring to church a loaf made from the new crop, which began to be harvested at Lammastide. The loaf was blessed, and in Anglo-Saxon England it might be employed afterwards to work magic: A book of Anglo-Saxon charms directed that the lammas bread be broken into four bits, which were to be placed at the four corners of the barn, to protect the garnered grain. In many parts of England, tenants were bound to present freshly harvested wheat to their landlords on or before the first day of August. In the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, where it is referred to regularly, it is called "the feast of first fruits". The blessing of first fruits was performed annually in both the Eastern and Western Churches on the first or the sixth of August. Lammas coincides with the feast of St. Peter in Chains, commemorating St. Peter's miraculous deliverance from prison.

— Freebase

Breeding

Breeding

Breeding is the first EP by American indie band Dirty Little Rabbits. It was released on August 15, 2007, for sale exclusively through the New York-based record shop Looney Tunes.

— Freebase

Oswald Spengler

Oswald Spengler

Oswald Arnold Gottfried Spengler was a German historian and philosopher of history whose interests included mathematics, science, and art. He is best known for his book The Decline of the West, published in 1918 and 1922, covering all of world history. He proposed a new theory, according to which the lifespan of civilizations is limited and ultimately they decay. He wrote extensively throughout World War I and the interwar period, and supported German hegemony in Europe. His other writings made little impact outside Germany. In 1920 Spengler produced Prussiandom and Socialism, which argued for an organic, nationalist version of socialism and authoritarianism. Some Nazis held Spengler as an intellectual precursor but he was ostracised by the Nazis after 1933 for his pessimism about Germany's and Europe's future, his refusal to support Nazi ideas of racial superiority, and his critical work The Hour of Decision.

— Freebase

Sparkbrowser

Sparkbrowser

Sparkbrowser is an enterprise scale software company based in Boston Massachusetts. Sparkbrowser produces high quality desktop applications, primarily web browsers.
Sparkbrowser was founded in 2010 to create the most user friendly web browser. And that browser is set to launch in mid to late august of 2011. Sparkbrowser is currently in the development stage, and is closed source as far as contributions. In late 2010 Sparkbrowser has merged with Spark Software Group, as well as Free Software Group to combine efforts to launch the browser in August. As there is an exteremely untapped market as far as browsers go, Sparkbrowser is a pioneer in its respective field. Making leaps ahead of the competition as the only marketed For Profit premium web browser. Sparkbrowser was founded under the principles set forth by the Netscape project, that software should be paid for. And that generally, for profit software is better quality as there are greater resources available, and more attention can be paid to detail. Sparkbrowser has met many challenges over the past several months, however in anticipation of the launch in mid August we would like to apologize for the wait as this browser was expected to launch in march. We can honestly say that it has been worth the wait!
The new browser is faster, and provides a preferred view of the web with new pre-fetching code to ignite speed and agility. As well as a redesigned SSL encryption script. Best regards from the Sparkbrowser Foundation, and we hope that this project has exposed the untapped market of web browsers,the most used application.

— CrunchBase


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