Definitions containing bérulle, cardinal

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Cardinal-nephew

Cardinal-nephew

A cardinal-nephew is a cardinal elevated by a Pope who is that cardinal's uncle, or, more generally, his relative. The practice of creating cardinal-nephews originated in the Middle Ages, and reached its apex during the 16th and 17th centuries. The word nepotism originally referred specifically to this practice, when it appeared in the English language about 1669. From the middle of the Avignon Papacy until Pope Innocent XII's anti-nepotism bull, Romanum decet pontificem, a Pope without a cardinal-nephew was the exception to the rule. Every Renaissance Pope who created cardinals appointed a relative to the College of Cardinals, and the nephew was the most common choice, although one of Alexander VI's creations was his own son. The institution of the cardinal-nephew evolved over seven centuries, tracking developments in the history of the Papacy and the styles of individual Popes. From 1566 until 1692, a cardinal-nephew held the curial office of the Superintendent of the Ecclesiastical State, known as the Cardinal Nephew, and thus the terms are sometimes used interchangeably. The curial office of the Cardinal Nephew as well as the institution of the cardinal-nephew declined as the power of the Cardinal Secretary of State increased and the temporal power of Popes decreased in the 17th and 18th centuries.

— Freebase

Cardinal beetle

Cardinal beetle

The cardinal beetle is a red to orange beetle with a red head. It is approximately 20 mm long. The Black-headed Cardinal beetle is larger and a deeper blood red. The cardinal beetle preys on other insects and is normally found on flowers at the edges of woodland The cardinal beetle is a strong flier. The cardinal beetle is bright red; in that way it warns predators that it is toxic. People often mistake the smaller Scarlet lily beetle, Lilioceris lilii, for a cardinal beetle. Pyrochroa serraticornis, which is very similar to P. coccinea except it has a red head instead of a black one, is also referred to as a Cardinal beetle.

— Freebase

Cardinal tetra

Cardinal tetra

The cardinal tetra, Paracheirodon axelrodi, is a freshwater fish of the characin family of order Characiformes. It is native to the upper Orinoco and Negro Rivers in South America. Growing to about 3 cm total length, the cardinal tetra has the striking iridescent blue line characteristic of the Paracheirodon species laterally bisecting the fish, with the body below this line being vivid red in color, hence the name "cardinal tetra". The cardinal tetra's appearance is similar to that of the closely related neon tetra, with which it is often confused; the neon's red coloration extends only about halfway to the nose, and the neon's blue stripe is a less vibrant blue. The cardinal tetra is a very popular aquarium fish, but is less widespread than the neon tetra because until recently, it was difficult to breed in captivity. However, many breeders are now producing the fish; in most cases one can determine if the cardinal tetra is bred or wild-caught due to damaged fins on wild caught specimens. Normally, aquarists prefer to buy tank-bred fish, but some Brazilian ichthyologists believe fishkeepers should continue to support the sustainable cardinal fishery of the Amazon basin, since thousands of people are employed in the region to capture fish for the aquarium trade. If those fishermen lost their livelihoods catching cardinals and other tropical fish, they might turn their attention to engaging in deforestation.

— Freebase

Cardinal Bird

Cardinal Bird

The Cardinal Bird is the mascot of the University of Louisville. The Cardinal was chosen as the mascot after 1913. It was selected because it is the state bird of Kentucky. The school colors of black and red were adopted later. The Cardinal Bird appears at university sporting events, notably skydiving into Papa John's Cardinal Stadium for each home football game. He also attends other community events during the year. He is considered a part of the "Spirit Groups" and is a member of the Cheerleading team. In 2004, the Cardinal Bird was presented with the National Cheerleaders Association's Most Collegiate Mascot award. On occasion, the Cardinal Bird will travel over to the school marching band's section to conduct the players from the band's podium. The Cardinal Bird is nicknamed "Louie" in some circles. This is in homage its school name and city name, both, as they are sometimes pronounced as "Louie-ville." Others choose abbreviate his name, nicknaming him "C.B." His costume weighs over 50 pounds.

— Freebase

Accessus

Accessus

Accessus is a term applied to the voting in conclave for the election of a pope, by which a cardinal changes his vote and accedes to some other candidate. Accessus voting was first used in the papal conclave, 1455. The procedure was likely adopted from the Roman Senate where an acceding Senator would physically move to join the proponents of a proposal. When the votes of the cardinals have been counted after the first balloting and the two-thirds majority has fallen to none of those voted for, at the following vote opportunity is granted for a cardinal to change his vote, by writing "Accedo domino Cardinali", mentioning one of those who have been voted for, but not the cardinal for whom he has already voted. If he should not wish to change his vote, the cardinal can vote "Nemini". If these supplementary votes of accession, added to those a candidate has received, equal two-thirds of the total vote, then there is an election. If not, the ballots are burned, and the usual ballot takes place the next day. Election by accessus was only possible because, until the mid-20th century, the ballots used by each Cardinal were identified by a text of scripture in the back side. When a Cardinal decided to use the right of accession, his two ballots had to "be compared and identified by the text on the reverse face of the ballot, so as to prevent a double vote for the same candidate by any elector".

— Freebase

Hartogs number

Hartogs number

In mathematics, specifically in axiomatic set theory, a Hartogs number is a particular kind of cardinal number. It was shown by Friedrich Hartogs in 1915, from ZF alone, that there is a least well-ordered cardinal greater than a given well-ordered cardinal. To define the Hartogs number of a set it is not in fact necessary that the set be well-orderable: If X is any set, then the Hartogs number of X is the least ordinal α such that there is no injection from α into X. If X cannot be well-ordered, then we can no longer say that this α is the least well-ordered cardinal greater than the cardinality of X, but it remains the least well-ordered cardinal not less than or equal to the cardinality of X. The map taking X to α is sometimes called Hartogs' function.

— Freebase

Cardinal sign

Cardinal sign

In astrology, a cardinal sign is a sign of the zodiac that initiates a change of temperate zone season when the Sun makes its annual passage into them. The word "cardinal" originates from the Latin word for "hinge," since they each mark the turning point of a temperate season. They were called moveable by traditional astrologers because, as Bonatti says, the "air" changes when the Sun enters each of these signs, bringing a change of season. Sometimes the word cardinal is confused with the word angular. Angular signs are those signs which are located on the astrological angles of any given natal chart. Angular houses may be cardinal, fixed or mutable, depending on the birth time of the chart, but only Aries, Cancer, Libra and Capricorn are cardinal signs.

— Freebase

Cardinal Midstream

Cardinal Midstream

Cardinal was founded in 2008 with an initial $75 million equity commitment from EnCap Investments L.P. and EnCap Flatrock Midstream. In 2010, the equity commitment to Cardinal was increased to $280 million. Cardinal acquired and developed a substantial natural gas gathering, treating and processing system in the Arkoma Woodford Shale, and in 2012 the company sold all of its midstream assets and its natural gas contract treating business to Atlas Pipeline Partners, L.P. (NYSE: APL) for $600 million.

— CrunchBase

Cardinal number

Cardinal number

In mathematics, cardinal numbers, or cardinals for short, are a generalization of the natural numbers used to measure the cardinality of sets. The cardinality of a finite set is a natural number – the number of elements in the set. The transfinite cardinal numbers describe the sizes of infinite sets. Cardinality is defined in terms of bijective functions. Two sets have the same cardinality if and only if there is a bijection between them. In the case of finite sets, this agrees with the intuitive notion of size. In the case of infinite sets, the behavior is more complex. A fundamental theorem due to Georg Cantor shows that it is possible for infinite sets to have different cardinalities, and in particular the cardinality of the set of real numbers is greater than the cardinality of the set of natural numbers. It is also possible for a proper subset of an infinite set to have the same cardinality as the original set, something that cannot happen with proper subsets of finite sets. There is a transfinite sequence of cardinal numbers: This sequence starts with the natural numbers including zero, which are followed by the aleph numbers. The aleph numbers are indexed by ordinal numbers. Under the assumption of the axiom of choice, this transfinite sequence includes every cardinal number. If one rejects that axiom, the situation is more complicated, with additional infinite cardinals that are not alephs.

— Freebase

Cardinal

Cardinal

A cardinal is a senior ecclesiastical official, usually an ordained bishop, and ecclesiastical prince of the Catholic Church. Cardinals are collectively known as the College of Cardinals, which as a body elects a new pope. The duties of the cardinals include attending the meetings of the College and making themselves available individually or in groups to the pope if he requests their counsel. Most cardinals have additional duties, such as leading a diocese or archdiocese or running a department of the Roman Curia. A cardinal's other main function is electing the pope whenever, by death or resignation, the see becomes vacant. In 1059, the right of electing the pope was reserved to the principal clergy of Rome and the bishops of the seven suburbicarian sees. During the sede vacante, the period between a pope's death or resignation and the election of his successor, the day-to-day governance of the Church as a whole is in the hands of the College of Cardinals. The right to enter the conclave of cardinals who elect the pope is now limited to those who have not reached the age of 80 years by the day of the pope's death or resignation. The term cardinal at one time applied to any priest permanently assigned or incardinated to a church, or specifically to the senior priest of an important church, based on the Latin cardo, meaning "principal" or "chief". The term was applied in this sense as early as the ninth century to the priests of the tituli of the diocese of Rome. A remnant of these earlier cardinals is retained by the Church of England, where the title of "cardinal" is still held by the two senior members of the College of Minor Canons of St Paul's Cathedral.

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Cornaro

Cornaro

The Cornaro, also known as Corner, are a patrician family in Venice, from which for centuries senior office-holders and Doges sprung. Members include Marco Cornaro, doge 1365-68 Luigi Cornaro, who wrote treatises on dieting Giorgio Cornaro, brother of Caterina Cornaro Caterina Cornaro, Queen of Cyprus from 1474 to 1489 Francesco Cornaro, Cardinal from 1527 Marco Cornaro, cardinal from 1500 Cardinal Federico Cornaro, Patriarch of Venice in 1631-1644 Giovanni I Cornaro, doge from 1624 Francesco Corner, doge in 1656 Giovanni II Cornaro, doge from 1709 Giovanni Cornaro, cardinal from 1778 They had eight palaces on the Grand Canal, Venice at different times, and commissioned many famous monuments and works of art, including Bernini's Ecstasy of St Theresa in the Cornaro Chapel of Santa Maria della Vittoria in Rome. In Greece the island of Scarpanto was their fief from the early 14th century until the Ottoman conquest. Other Cornaros include: Alvise Cornaro, writer Vitsentzos Kornaros, Cretan poet Elena Cornaro Piscopia, first woman to get a Doctor of Philosophy degree

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Protector

Protector

a cardinal, from one of the more considerable Roman Catholic nations, who looks after the interests of his people at Rome; also, a cardinal who has the same relation to a college, religious order, etc

— Webster Dictionary

cardinal bishop

cardinal bishop

A cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church who is bishop of one of the cardinal ("hinge") dioceses of the Province of Rome.

— Wiktionary

Cardinal direction

Cardinal direction

The four cardinal directions or cardinal points are the directions of north, east, south, and west, commonly denoted by their initials: N, E, S, W. East and west are at right angles to north and south, with east being in the clockwise direction of rotation and west being directly opposite. Intermediate points between the four cardinal directions form the points of the compass. The intermediate directions are northeast, southeast, southwest, and northwest. On Earth, upright observers facing north will have south behind them, east on their right, and west on their left. Most devices and methods for orientation therefore operate by finding north first, although any other direction is equally valid, if it can be reliably located. Several of these devices and methods are described below.

— Freebase

Congregation

Congregation

The highest-ranking departments of the Roman Curia are called congregations. Lower-ranking are the pontifical councils and pontifical commissions. Others are tribunals and offices. In origin, the congregations were selected groups of cardinals, not the whole College of Cardinals, commissioned to take care of some field of activity that concerned the Holy See. Today, as a result of a decision of the Second Vatican Council, the membership includes diocesan bishops from diverse parts of the world who are not cardinals. Each congregation also has a permanent staff to assist it in dealing with the business that comes before it. Each congregation is led by a prefect, who is usually a cardinal. Until recently, a non-cardinal appointed to head a congregation was styled pro-prefect until made a cardinal. This practice has been abandoned.

— Freebase

Ethnolinguistics

Ethnolinguistics

Ethnolinguistics is a field of linguistics which studies the relationship between language and culture, and the way different ethnic groups perceive the world. It is the combination between ethnology and linguistics. The former refers to the way of life of an entire community, i.e., all the characteristics which distinguish one community from the other. Those characteristics make the cultural aspects of a community or a society. Ethnolinguists study the way perception and conceptualization influences language, and show how this is linked to different cultures and societies. An example is the way spatial orientation is expressed in various cultures. In many societies, words for the cardinal directions east and west are derived from terms for sunrise/sunset. The nomenclature for cardinal directions of Inuit speakers of Greenland, however, is based on geographical landmarks such as the river system and one's position on the coast. Similarly, the Yurok lack the idea of cardinal directions; they orient themselves with respect to their principal geographic feature, the Klamath River. Cultural Linguistics refers to a related branch of linguistics that explores the relationship between language, culture, and conceptualisation. Cultural Linguistics draws on, but is not limited to, the theoretical notions and analytical tools of cognitive linguistics and cognitive anthropology. Central to the approach of Cultural Linguistics are notions of "cultural schema" and "cultural model". It examines how various features of language encode cultural schemas and cultural models. In Cultural Linguistics, language is viewed as deeply entrenched in the group-level, cultural cognition of communities of speakers. Thus far, the approach of Cultural Linguistics has been adopted in several areas of applied linguistic research, including intercultural communication, second language learning, and World Englishes.

— Freebase

Cardinal virtues

Cardinal virtues

The cardinal virtues are a set of four virtues recognized in the writings of Classical Antiquity and, along with the theological virtues, also in Christian tradition. They consist of: ⁕Prudence - ability to judge between actions with regard to appropriate actions at a given time ⁕Justice - the perpetual and constant will of rendering to each one his right ⁕Temperance or Restraint - practicing self-control, abstention, and moderation; tempering the appetition ⁕Fortitude or Courage - forbearance, endurance, and ability to confront fear, uncertainty and intimidation These were derived initially from Plato's scheme; expanded on by Cicero, and adapted by Saint Ambrose, Augustine of Hippo, and Thomas Aquinas. The term "cardinal" comes from the Latin cardo or hinge; the cardinal virtues are so called because they are the basic virtues, required for a virtuous life.

— Freebase

College of Cardinals

College of Cardinals

The College of Cardinals is the body of all cardinals of the Catholic Church. A function of the college is to advise the Pope about church matters when he summons them to an ordinary consistory. It also convenes on the death or resignation of a pope as a papal conclave to elect a successor. The college has no ruling power except during the sede vacante period, and even then its powers are extremely limited by the terms of the current law, which is laid down in the Apostolic constitution Universi Dominici Gregis and the Fundamental Law of Vatican City State. Historically, cardinals were the clergy of the city of Rome, serving the Bishop of Rome as the Pope, who had clerical duties in parishes of the city. The College has its origins in the events surrounding the crowning of Henry IV as King of Germany and Holy Roman Emperor at the age of six, after the unexpected death of Henry III in 1056. Until this moment secular authorities had significant influence over who was to be appointed Pope, and the Holy Roman Emperor in particular had the special ability to appoint him. This was significant as the aims and views of the Holy Roman Emperor and the Church did not always coincide. Members of what was to become known as the Gregorian Reform took advantage of the new King and his lack of power, and in 1059 declared that the election of the Pope was an affair only for the Church. This was part of a larger power struggle, which became known as the Investiture Controversy, as the Church attempted to gain more control over their clergy, and in doing so gain more influence in the lands and governments they were appointed to. Theological implications aside, its creation represented a significant shift in the balance of power in the Early Medieval world. From the beginning of the 12th century, the College of Cardinals started to meet as such, when the cardinal bishops, cardinal priests, and cardinal deacons ceased acting as separate groups.

— Freebase

Pyrrhuloxia

Pyrrhuloxia

The Pyrrhuloxia or Desert Cardinal is a medium-sized North American song bird found in the American southwest and northern Mexico. This distinctive species with a short, stout bill, red crest and wings, closely resembles the Northern Cardinal and the Vermilion Cardinal, all of which are in the same genus.

— Freebase

The Cardinal

The Cardinal

The Cardinal is a 1963 American drama film which was produced independently and directed by Otto Preminger, and distributed by Columbia Pictures. The screenplay was written by Robert Dozier, based on the novel of the same name by Henry Morton Robinson. Its cast featured Tom Tryon, Romy Schneider and John Huston, and it was nominated for six Academy Awards. The film was shot on location in Boston, in Bridgeport, Connecticut, and in Rome and Vienna. The music score was written by Jerome Moross. The Cardinal featured the final appearance by veteran film star Dorothy Gish as well as the last big-screen performance of Maggie McNamara. Robinson's novel was based on the life of Cardinal Francis Spellman, who was then Archbishop of New York. The Vatican's liaison officer for the film was Joseph Ratzinger, later to become Pope Benedict XVI.

— Freebase

Cardinalis

Cardinalis

Cardinalis is a genus of cardinal in the family Cardinalidae. There are three species ranging across North America and into northern South America. Genus Cardinalis Northern cardinal, Cardinalis cardinalis Pyrrhuloxia, Cardinalis sinuatus Vermilion cardinal, Cardinalis phoeniceus

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Peritus

Peritus

Peritus is the title given to Roman Catholic theologians who are present to give advice at an ecumenical council. At the most recent council, the Second Vatican Council, some periti accompanied individual bishops or groups of bishops from various countries. Others were formally appointed as advisers to the whole Council. Father Joseph Ratzinger, Pope Benedict XVI, served as peritus to Cardinal Josef Frings, Archbishop of Cologne, Germany, while Hans Küng was a peritus for the Council, rather than for an individual Bishop. The influential German theologian Father Karl Rahner S.J. served as peritus to Cardinal Franz König of Vienna. Cardinal Yves Congar, O.P. served as a consultant to the Second Vatican Council upon the invitation of Pope John XXIII, but was hired as personal and expert theologian at the council to Bishop Jean-Julien Weber of Strasbourg which allowed him to attend all the general congregations and to take part in the discussions of any conciliar commission to which he was invited by one of its members. John Henry Newman refused an invitation to be a peritus at the First Vatican Council.

— Freebase

Cardinal Blue Software

Cardinal Blue Software

Cardinal Blue makes PicCollage, a social photo collage app for the iPhone and iPad. It is a Top 10 Photography app in the US and other countries, and allows you to easily create collages from your Facebook and iPhone photos, and share with your friends and family.Previously, Cardinal Blue built apps on the Facebook platform, including Travel Balloon and Friend Stock Market, with millions of users.They develop in Ruby on Rails and were selected as a Heroku success story. The company has received investment from 500 Startups, and is based in Mountain View, CA and Taipei, Taiwan.

— CrunchBase

Melchior Klesl

Melchior Klesl

Melchior Klesl was an Austrian statesman and cardinal of the Roman Catholic church during the time of the Counter-Reformation. Klesl was appointed Bishop of Vienna in 1598 and elevated to cardinal in 1616.

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Summer Tanager

Summer Tanager

The Summer Tanager, is a medium-sized American songbird. Formerly placed in the tanager family, it and other members of its genus are now classified in the cardinal family. The species's plumage and vocalizations are similar to other members of the cardinal family. Their breeding habitat is open wooded areas, especially with oaks, across the southern United States, extending as far north as Iowa. These birds migrate to Mexico, Central America and northern South America. This tanager is an extremely rare vagrant to western Europe. Adults have stout pointed bills and measure 17 cm in length and 29 g in weight. Adult males are rose red and similar in appearance to the Hepatic Tanager, although the latter has a dark bill; females are orangish on the underparts and olive on top, with olive-brown wings and tail. As with all other birds, all red and orange colorations are acquired through their diet. These birds are often out of sight, foraging high in trees, sometimes flying out to catch insects in flight. They mainly eat insects, especially bees and wasps, and berries. Fruit of Cymbopetalum mayanum are an especially well-liked food in their winter quarters, and birds will forage in human-altered habitat. Consequently, these trees can be planted to entice them to residential areas, and they may well be attracted to bird feeders. Summer Tanagers build a cup nest on a horizontal tree branch.

— Freebase

Prudence

Prudence

Prudence is the ability to govern and discipline oneself by the use of reason. It is classically considered to be a virtue, and in particular one of the four Cardinal virtues. The word comes from Old French prudence, from Latin prudentia. It is often associated with wisdom, insight, and knowledge. In this case, the virtue is the ability to judge between virtuous and vicious actions, not only in a general sense, but with regard to appropriate actions at a given time and place. Although prudence itself does not perform any actions, and is concerned solely with knowledge, all virtues had to be regulated by it. Distinguishing when acts are courageous, as opposed to reckless or cowardly, for instance, is an act of prudence, and for this reason it is classified as a cardinal virtue. Although prudence would be applied to any such judgment, the more difficult tasks, which distinguish a person as prudent, are those in which various goods have to be weighed against each other, as when a person is determining what would be best to give charitable donations, or how to punish a child so as to prevent repeating an offense.

— Freebase

Erythrina herbacea

Erythrina herbacea

Erythrina herbacea, commonly known as the Coral Bean, Cherokee Bean, Red Cardinal or Cardinal Spear, is a flowering shrub or small tree found throughout the southeastern United States and northeastern Mexico; it has also been reported from parts of Central America and, as an introduced species, from Pakistan. Various other systematic names have been used for this plant in the past, including Erythrina arborea, Erythrina hederifolia, Erythrina humilis, Erythrina rubicunda, Corallodendron herbaceum and Xyphanthus hederifolius.

— Freebase

Western Tanager

Western Tanager

The Western Tanager, is a medium-sized American songbird. Formerly placed in the tanager family, it and other members of its genus are now classified in the cardinal family. The species's plumage and vocalizations are similar to other members of the cardinal family. Adults have pale stout pointed bills, yellow underparts and light wing bars. Adult males have a bright red face and a yellow nape, shoulder, and rump, with black upper back, wings, and tail; in non-breeding plumage the head has no more than a reddish cast and the body has an olive tinge. Females have a yellow head and are olive on the back, with dark wings and tail. The song of disconnected short phrases suggests an American Robin's but is hoarser and rather monotonous. The call is described as "pit-er-ick". Their breeding habitat is coniferous or mixed woods across western North America from the Mexico-U.S. border as far north as southern Alaska; thus they are the northernmost-breeding tanager. They build a flimsy cup nest on a horizontal tree branch, usually in a conifer. They lay four bluish-green eggs with brown spots. These birds migrate, wintering from central Mexico to Costa Rica. Some also winter in southern California.

— Freebase

Trichotomy

Trichotomy

In mathematics, the Law of Trichotomy states that every real number is either positive, negative, or zero. More generally, trichotomy is the property of an order relation < on a set X that for any x and y, exactly one of the following holds:, or . In mathematical notation, this is Assuming that the ordering is irreflexive and transitive, this can be simplified to In classical logic, this axiom of trichotomy holds for ordinary comparison between real numbers and therefore also for comparisons between integers and between rational numbers. The law does not hold in general in intuitionistic logic. In ZF set theory and Bernays set theory, the law of trichotomy holds between the cardinal numbers of well-orderable sets even without the axiom of choice. If the axiom of choice holds, then tricotomy holds between arbitrary cardinal numbers. More generally, a binary relation R on X is trichotomous if for all x and y in X exactly one of xRy, yRx or x=y holds. If such a relation is also transitive it is a strict total order; this is a special case of a strict weak order. For example, in the case of three element set {a,b,c} the relation R given by aRb, aRc, bRc is a strict total order, while the relation R given by the cyclic aRb, bRc, cRa is a non-transitive trichotomous relation.

— Freebase

Dicastery

Dicastery

Dicastery is an Italicism sometimes used in English to refer to the Departments of the Roman Curia. Apart from the Secretariat of State, these Dicasteries or Departments are grouped in the following categories: ⁕Congregations, headed by a Prefect, who is most frequently a cardinal: ⁕The Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith ⁕The Congregation for the Oriental Churches ⁕The Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments ⁕The Congregation for the Causes of Saints ⁕The Congregation for Bishops ⁕The Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples ⁕The Congregation for the Clergy ⁕The Congregation for Institutes of Consecrated Life and Societies of Apostolic Life ⁕The Congregation for Catholic Education ⁕Tribunals: ⁕The Apostolic Penitentiary, headed by the Major Cardinal Penitentiary, for the "internal forum" ⁕The Supreme Tribunal of the Apostolic Signatura, headed by a Prefect ⁕The Tribunal of the Roman Rota, headed by the Dean, which judges cases such as those brought to prove the nullity of a marriage

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Hepatic Tanager

Hepatic Tanager

The Hepatic Tanager, is a medium-sized American songbird. Formerly placed in the tanager family, it and other members of its genus are now classified in the cardinal family. The species's plumage and vocalizations are similar to other members of the cardinal family. The habits of the Hepatic Tanager are similar to those of the Western Tanager. It ranges from the southwestern United States to northern Argentina. There are three subspecies groups, which may be separate species: hepatica group, breeding from Nicaragua north in pine and pine-oak forests and partially migratory; lutea group, resident from Costa Rica to northern and western South America in highland forest edges; and flava group, resident in open woods elsewhere in South America. Members of the northern group are larger and stockier than other Piranga tanagers and have a relatively short tail and a stout bill. Its brightest color is always on its forehead and throat. In all plumages, it has grey flanks, dusky cheeks, and a dark eye streak. The female is yellow, and the male is red. Its average weight is 1.3 oz. Its average wingspan is 12.5 in and length 8 inches.

— Freebase

Conclavist

Conclavist

A conclavist was a personal aide of a cardinal present in a papal conclave. The term is sometimes used to refer to all present with a conclave, including the cardinal-electors, but is more properly applied only to the non-cardinals. Conclavists played an important historical role in the negotiations of papal elections and in the evolution of secrecy, writing many of the extant accounts of papal elections. Three popes have been elected from former conclavists, including Pope Pius VI. Other conclavists have later been elevated to the cardinalate, such as Pierre Guérin de Tencin, Niccolò Coscia, Christoph Anton Migazzi, and Carlo Confalonieri. Pope Paul VI in effect eliminated the role of the historical conclavist by banning private aides and creating a common support staff.

— Freebase

The pen is mightier than the sword

The pen is mightier than the sword

"The pen is mightier than the sword" is a metonymic adage coined by English author Edward Bulwer-Lytton in 1839 for his play Richelieu; Or the Conspiracy. The play was about Cardinal Richelieu, though in the author's words "license with dates and details... has been, though not unsparingly, indulged." The Cardinal's line in Act II, scene II, was more fully: True, This! — Beneath the rule of men entirely great The pen is mightier than the sword. Behold The arch-enchanters wand! — itself is nothing! — But taking sorcery from the master-hand To paralyse the Cæsars, and to strike The loud earth breathless! — Take away the sword — The play opened at London's Covent Garden Theatre on 7 March 1839 with William Charles Macready in the lead role. Macready believed its opening night success was "unequivocal"; Queen Victoria attended a performance on 14 March. In 1870, literary critic Edward Sherman Gould wrote that Bulwer "had the good fortune to do, what few men can hope to do: he wrote a line that is likely to live for ages." By 1888 another author, Charles Sharp, feared that repeating the phrase "might sound trite and commonplace". The Thomas Jefferson Building of the Library of Congress, which opened in 1897, has the adage decorating an interior wall. Though Bulwer's phrasing was novel, the idea of communication surpassing violence in efficacy had numerous predecessors.

— Freebase

Pasquino

Pasquino

Pasquino or Pasquin is the name used by Romans since the Early modern period to describe a battered Hellenistic-style statue dating to the 3rd century BC, which was unearthed in the Parione district of Rome in the 15th century. The statue's fame dates to the early 16th century, when Cardinal Oliviero Carafa draped the marble torso of the statue in a toga and decorated it with Latin epigrams on the occasion of Saint Mark's Day. From this incident are derived the English-language terms pasquinade and pasquil, which refer to an anonymous lampoon in verse or prose. The Cardinal's actions led to a custom of criticizing the pope or his government by the writing of satirical poems in broad Roman dialect—called "pasquinades" from the Italian "pasquinate"—and attaching them to the statue "Pasquino." Thus Pasquino became the first "talking statue" of Rome. He spoke out about the people's dissatisfaction, denounced injustice, and assaulted misgovernment by members of the Church.

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Scarlet Tanager

Scarlet Tanager

The Scarlet Tanager is a medium-sized American songbird. Formerly placed in the tanager family, it and other members of its genus are now classified in the cardinal family. The species' plumage and vocalizations are similar to other members of the cardinal family.

— Freebase

Uncountable set

Uncountable set

In mathematics, an uncountable set is an infinite set that contains too many elements to be countable. The uncountability of a set is closely related to its cardinal number: a set is uncountable if its cardinal number is larger than that of the set of all natural numbers.

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Régence

Régence

The Régence is the period in French history between 1715 and 1723, when King Louis XV was a minor and the land was governed by a Regent, Philippe d'Orléans, the nephew of Louis XIV of France. The era was the time when Philippe was able to prise power away from the Duke of Maine who was the favourite son of the late king and had had much influence. During the Regency there was the Polysynody which was the system of government in use in France between 1715 and 1718 and in which each minister was replaced by a council. The Regent also introduced the système de Law which transformed the finances of the bankrupted kingdom and its aristocracy. Cardinal Dubois and Cardinal Fleury were key people during the time. Contemporary European rulers were Philip V of Spain; John V of Portugal; George I of Great Britain; Charles VI, Holy Roman Emperor and Victor Amadeus II, Duke of Savoy; Savoy was the maternal grand father of Louis XV.

— Freebase

Cesare Borgia

Cesare Borgia

Cesare Borgia, Duke of Valentinois, was an Italian condottiero, nobleman, politician, and cardinal. He was the son of Pope Alexander VI and his long-term mistress Vannozza dei Cattanei. He was the brother of Lucrezia Borgia; Giovanni Borgia, Duke of Gandia; and Gioffre Borgia, Prince of Squillace. He was half-brother to Don Pedro Luis de Borja and Girolama de Borja, children of unknown mothers. After initially entering the church and becoming a cardinal on his father's election to the Papacy, after the death of his brother in 1498 he became the first person to resign a cardinalcy. His father set him up as a prince with territory carved from the Papal States, but after his father's death he was unable to retain power for long, and after escaping from prison died fighting in Spain.

— Freebase

Papabile

Papabile

Papabile is an unofficial Italian term first coined by Vaticanologists and now used internationally in many languages to describe a Roman Catholic man, in practice always a cardinal, who is thought a likely or possible candidate to be elected pope. A literal English translation would be "pope-able" or "able to be pope".In Italy the term has became very common and people use it for another situations too. In some cases the cardinals will choose a papabile candidate. Among the papabili cardinals who have been elected pope are Eugenio Pacelli, Giovanni Battista Montini, and Joseph Ratzinger. However, at times the College of Cardinals elect a man who was not considered papabile by most Vatican watchers. In recent years those who were elected pope though not considered papabile include John XXIII, John Paul I, and John Paul II. There is a saying among Vaticanologists: "He who enters the conclave as pope, leaves it as a cardinal." The list of papabili changes as cardinals age. For instance, Carlo Maria Martini was thought to be papabile until he retired from his see upon reaching 75 years of age. In Italian, the word papabile is also used to designate, among the available candidates, somebody who is likely to get elected or appointed to a specific position.

— Freebase

Aldobrandini family

Aldobrandini family

The Aldobrandini are an Italian noble family from Florence, with close ties to the Vatican. Its Roman fortunes were made when Ippolito Aldobrandini became pope under the name Pope Clement VIII. He arranged the marriage that linked the Aldobrandini with the Roman family of Pamphili. Additionally, they were also linked to marriage alliances with the Farnese and Borghese. The family also lends its name to the Palazzo Aldobrandini on the Quirinal Hill. The Aldobrandini family, having reached the height of its powers when Ippolito Aldobrandini became Pope Clement VIII, began the building of the villa. In 1600 Clement VIII acquired the Orti Vitelli on the Quirinal hill and in 1601 donated the property to his nephew Cardinal Pietro Aldobrandini. The old buildings of the Vitelli Family were demolished and construction began on the new villa and adjacent garden. The villa was never the family seat as the Aldobrandini family owned even more splendid residences elsewhere in Rome. The villa on the Quirinal hill served essentially for ceremonial functions. More famous was the Villa Aldobrandini in Frascati. Also known as Belvedere for its charming location overlooking the whole valley up to Rome, it was rebuilt on the order of Cardinal Pietro Aldobrandini, Pope Clement VIII's nephew over a pre-existing edifice built by the Vatican prelate Alessandro Rufini in 1550. The villa, aligned with the cathedral down its axial avenue that is continued through the town as Viale Catone, was rebuilt in the current form by Giacomo della Porta from 1598 to 1602, and then completed by Carlo Maderno and Giovanni Fontana. The villa has an imposing 17th -century facade and some other interesting architectural and environmental features, such as the double gallery order on the rear facade, the spiral-shaped flights, the large exedra of the Water Theatre and the magnificent park. Inside there are paintings of Mannerist and Baroque artists such as the Zuccari brothers, Cavalier D'Arpino and Domenichino. Outside there is a monumental gate by Carlo Francesco Bizzaccheri.

— Freebase

Blue Grosbeak

Blue Grosbeak

Blue Grosbeak, is a medium-sized seed-eating bird in the same family as the Northern Cardinal, "tropical" or New World buntings, and "cardinal-grosbeaks" or New World grosbeaks. The male Blue Grosbeak is a beautiful bird, being almost entirely deep blue. The female is mostly brown. Both sexes are distinguished by their large, deep bill and double wing bars. These features, as well as the grosbeak's relatively larger size, distinguish this species from the Indigo Bunting. Length can range from 14 to 19 cm and wingspan is from 26 to 29 cm. Body mass is typically from 26 to 31.5 g. This is a migratory bird, with nesting grounds across most of the southern half of the United States and much of northern Mexico, migrating south to Central America and in very small numbers to northern South America; the southernmost record comes from eastern Ecuador. It eats mostly insects, but it will also eat snails, spiders, seeds, grains, and wild fruits. The Blue Grosbeak forages on the ground and in shrubs and trees.

— Freebase

Cerebellar Diseases

Cerebellar Diseases

Diseases that affect the structure or function of the cerebellum. Cardinal manifestations of cerebellar dysfunction include dysmetria, GAIT ATAXIA, and MUSCLE HYPOTONIA.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Movement Disorders

Movement Disorders

Syndromes which feature DYSKINESIAS as a cardinal manifestation of the disease process. Included in this category are degenerative, hereditary, post-infectious, medication-induced, post-inflammatory, and post-traumatic conditions.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Pheochromocytoma

Pheochromocytoma

A usually benign, well-encapsulated, lobular, vascular tumor of chromaffin tissue of the ADRENAL MEDULLA or sympathetic paraganglia. The cardinal symptom, reflecting the increased secretion of EPINEPHRINE and NOREPINEPHRINE, is HYPERTENSION, which may be persistent or intermittent. During severe attacks, there may be HEADACHE; SWEATING, palpitation, apprehension, TREMOR; PALLOR or FLUSHING of the face, NAUSEA and VOMITING, pain in the CHEST and ABDOMEN, and paresthesias of the extremities. The incidence of malignancy is as low as 5% but the pathologic distinction between benign and malignant pheochromocytomas is not clear. (Dorland, 27th ed; DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1298)

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Ablegate

Ablegate

a representative of the pope charged with important commissions in foreign countries, one of his duties being to bring to a newly named cardinal his insignia of office

— Webster Dictionary

Berretta

Berretta

a square cap worn by ecclesiastics of the Roman Catholic Church. A cardinal's berretta is scarlet; that worn by other clerics is black, except that a bishop's is lined with green

— Webster Dictionary

Camerlingo

Camerlingo

the papal chamberlain; the cardinal who presides over the pope's household. He has at times possessed great power

— Webster Dictionary

Cap

Cap

one used as the mark or ensign of some rank, office, or dignity, as that of a cardinal

— Webster Dictionary

Cardinalate

Cardinalate

the office, rank, or dignity of a cardinal

— Webster Dictionary

Cardinalize

Cardinalize

to exalt to the office of a cardinal

— Webster Dictionary

Cardinalship

Cardinalship

the condition, dignity, of office of a cardinal

— Webster Dictionary

Conclavist

Conclavist

one of the two ecclesiastics allowed to attend a cardinal in the conclave

— Webster Dictionary

Decardinalize

Decardinalize

to depose from the rank of cardinal

— Webster Dictionary

Dimension

Dimension

a literal factor, as numbered in characterizing a term. The term dimensions forms with the cardinal numbers a phrase equivalent to degree with the ordinal; thus, a2b2c is a term of five dimensions, or of the fifth degree

— Webster Dictionary

Divaricator

Divaricator

one of the muscles which open the shell of brachiopods; a cardinal muscle. See Illust. of Brachiopoda

— Webster Dictionary

East

East

the point in the heavens where the sun is seen to rise at the equinox, or the corresponding point on the earth; that one of the four cardinal points of the compass which is in a direction at right angles to that of north and south, and which is toward the right hand of one who faces the north; the point directly opposite to the west

— Webster Dictionary

Eminence

Eminence

a title of honor, especially applied to a cardinal in the Roman Catholic Church

— Webster Dictionary

Hinge

Hinge

that on which anything turns or depends; a governing principle; a cardinal point or rule; as, this argument was the hinge on which the question turned

— Webster Dictionary

Hinge

Hinge

one of the four cardinal points, east, west, north, or south

— Webster Dictionary

Lobelia

Lobelia

a genus of plants, including a great number of species. Lobelia inflata, or Indian tobacco, is an annual plant of North America, whose leaves contain a poisonous white viscid juice, of an acrid taste. It has often been used in medicine as an emetic, expectorant, etc. L. cardinalis is the cardinal flower, remarkable for the deep and vivid red color of its flowers

— Webster Dictionary

Mazarine

Mazarine

of or pertaining to Cardinal Mazarin, prime minister of France, 1643-1661

— Webster Dictionary

North

North

that one of the four cardinal points of the compass, at any place, which lies in the direction of the true meridian, and to the left hand of a person facing the east; the direction opposite to the south

— Webster Dictionary

Penitentiary

Penitentiary

an office of the papal court which examines cases of conscience, confession, absolution from vows, etc., and delivers decisions, dispensations, etc. Its chief is a cardinal, called the Grand Penitentiary, appointed by the pope

— Webster Dictionary

Pillar

Pillar

a portable ornamental column, formerly carried before a cardinal, as emblematic of his support to the church

— Webster Dictionary

Pope

Pope

the bishop of Rome, the head of the Roman Catholic Church. See Note under Cardinal

— Webster Dictionary

Purple

Purple

a cardinalate. See Cardinal

— Webster Dictionary

Redbird

Redbird

the cardinal bird

— Webster Dictionary

South

South

that one of the four cardinal points directly opposite to the north; the region or direction to the right or direction to the right of a person who faces the east

— Webster Dictionary

Tonsure

Tonsure

the first ceremony used for devoting a person to the service of God and the church; the first degree of the clericate, given by a bishop, abbot, or cardinal priest, consisting in cutting off the hair from a circular space at the back of the head, with prayers and benedictions; hence, entrance or admission into minor orders

— Webster Dictionary

West

West

the point in the heavens where the sun is seen to set at the equinox; or, the corresponding point on the earth; that one of the four cardinal points of the compass which is in a direction at right angles to that of north and south, and on the left hand of a person facing north; the point directly opposite to east

— Webster Dictionary

Wind

Wind

a direction from which the wind may blow; a point of the compass; especially, one of the cardinal points, which are often called the four winds

— Webster Dictionary

Zuchetto

Zuchetto

a skullcap covering the tonsure, worn under the berretta. The pope's is white; a cardinal's red; a bishop's purple; a priest's black

— Webster Dictionary

ablegate

ablegate

A representative of the pope charged with important commissions in foreign countries, one of his duties being to bring to a newly named cardinal his insignia of office.

— Wiktionary

zero

zero

The numeric symbol that represents the cardinal number zero.

— Wiktionary

zero

zero

The value of a magnitude corresponding to the cardinal number zero.

— Wiktionary

twenty

twenty

The cardinal number 20, occurring after nineteen and before twenty-one.

— Wiktionary

thirty

thirty

The cardinal number occurring after twenty-nine and before thirty-one, represented in Arabic numerals as 30.

— Wiktionary

forty

forty

The cardinal number occurring after thirty-nine and before forty-one.

— Wiktionary

fifty

fifty

The cardinal number occurring after forty-nine and before fifty-one.

— Wiktionary

sixty

sixty

The cardinal number occurring after fifty-nine and before sixty-one, represented in Roman numerals as LX and in Arabic numerals as 60.

— Wiktionary

two thousand

two thousand

The cardinal number occurring after one thousand nine hundred and ninety-nine and before two thousand and one.

— Wiktionary

compass

compass

A magnetic or electronic device used to determine the cardinal directions (usually magnetic or true north).

— Wiktionary

five hundred

five hundred

The cardinal number occurring after four hundred ninety-nine and before five hundred one, represented in Arabic numerals as 500. Ordinal: five-hundredth.

— Wiktionary

cardinal number

cardinal number

A word that expresses a countable quantity; a cardinal numeral.

— Wiktionary

southeast

southeast

The direction of the cardinal compass point halfway between south and east, specifically 135u00B0, abbreviated as SE.

— Wiktionary

melancholy

melancholy

Black bile, formerly thought to be one of the four "cardinal humours" of animal bodies.

— Wiktionary

virtue

virtue

Specifically, each of several qualities held to be particularly important, including the four cardinal virtues, the three theological virtues, or the seven virtues opposed to the seven deadly sins.

— Wiktionary

cardinal

cardinal

A number indicating quantity, or the size of a set, e.g., one, two, three. (See Wikipedia article on Cardinal number.)

— Wiktionary

cardinal

cardinal

Any of various related passerine birds of the family Cardinalidae. (See Wikipedia article on cardinal birds.)

— Wiktionary

cardinal

cardinal

Of or relating to the cardinal directions (north, south, east and west).

— Wiktionary

cardinal

cardinal

Having a bright red color (from the color of a Catholic cardinal's cassock).

— Wiktionary

zuchetto

zuchetto

(Roman Catholic Church): A skullcap worn by Roman Catholic clergymen. The Pope's is white; a cardinal's red; a bishop's purple; a priest's black.

— Wiktionary

humour

humour

Any of the fluids in an animal body, especially the four "cardinal humours" of blood, yellow bile, black bile and phlegm that were believed to control the health and mood of the human body.

— Wiktionary

determiner

determiner

A member of a class of words functioning in a noun phrase to identify or distinguish a referent without describing or modifying it. Examples of determiners include articles (a, the), demonstratives (this, those), cardinal numbers (three, fifty), and indefinite numerals (most, any, each).

— Wiktionary

limiting adjective

limiting adjective

an adjective that limits a noun; they include definite articles, indefinite articles, possessive adjectives, demonstrative adjectives, indefinite adjectives, interrogative adjectives, cardinal adjectives, ordinal adjectives, proper adjectives and nouns used as adjectives

— Wiktionary

numerical adjective

numerical adjective

A number used as an adjective; either a cardinal adjective (such as one) or an ordinal adjective (such as first).

— Wiktionary

oblique sailing

oblique sailing

the movement of a ship when she sails upon some rhumb between the four cardinal points, making an oblique angle with the meridian.

— Wiktionary

megapixel

megapixel

(preceded by a cardinal number) Having a resolution of the specified number of megapixels.

— Wiktionary

camerlengo

camerlengo

chamberlain; the cardinal who administers the Roman Catholic Church in the interregnum between Popes

— Wiktionary

sixty-nine

sixty-nine

The cardinal number following sixty-eight and preceding seventy.

— Wiktionary

north-northeast

north-northeast

One of 32 named cardinal points.

— Wiktionary

aleph-null

aleph-null

The first of the transfinite cardinal numbers; corresponds to the number of positive integers, also called natural numbers. Georg Cantor showed that even all the rational numbers could be put in one-to-one correspondence with them, and are therefore countable, enumerable or denumerable.

— Wiktionary

forty-four

forty-four

The cardinal number immediately following forty-three and preceding forty-five.

— Wiktionary

aleph-one

aleph-one

The second of the transfinite cardinal numbers; according to the continuum hypothesis, it corresponds to the number of real numbers.

— Wiktionary

tether

tether

The cardinal number three in an old counting system used in Teesdale and Swaledale. (Variant of tethera)

— Wiktionary

cardinal bishop

cardinal bishop

More loosely, a cardinal who is a bishop anywhere.

— Wiktionary

cardinal adjective

cardinal adjective

a cardinal number used as an adjective

— Wiktionary

seven deadly sins

seven deadly sins

The cardinal sins enumerated by Thomas Aquinas in the 13th century - pride/vanity, envy, gluttony, greed/avarice, lust, sloth, wrath/anger.

— Wiktionary

shimpan

shimpan

the four judges, sitting at each cardinal point

— Wiktionary

toku-dawara

toku-dawara

small enlargements at the cardinal points of the dohyo; originally the entry and exit points

— Wiktionary

two hundred

two hundred

The cardinal number occurring after one hundred ninety-nine and before two hundred one, represented in Arabic numerals as 200.

— Wiktionary

seven hundred

seven hundred

The cardinal number occurring after six hundred ninety-nine and before seven hundred one, represented in Arabic numerals as 700.

— Wiktionary

four hundred

four hundred

The cardinal number occurring after three hundred ninety-nine and before four hundred one, represented in Arabic numerals as 400.

— Wiktionary

eight hundred

eight hundred

The cardinal number occurring after seven hundred ninety-nine and before eight hundred one, represented in Arabic numerals as 800.

— Wiktionary

six hundred

six hundred

The cardinal number occurring after five hundred ninety-nine and before six hundred one, represented in Arabic numerals as 600.

— Wiktionary

nine hundred

nine hundred

The cardinal number occurring after eight hundred ninety-nine and before nine hundred one, represented in Arabic numerals as 900. Ordinal: nine-hundredth.

— Wiktionary

cardinal numeral

cardinal numeral

A word used to represent a cardinal number.

— Wiktionary

cardinally

cardinally

In a cardinal manner.

— Wiktionary

slantwise

slantwise

diagonally, in a direction or orientation between cardinal axes

— Wiktionary

slantwise

slantwise

diagonal, in a direction or orientation between cardinal axes

— Wiktionary

ordinal indicator

ordinal indicator

A sign adjacent to a numeral denoting that it is an ordinal number, rather than a cardinal number.

— Wiktionary

incardinate

incardinate

To raise someone to the rank of cardinal

— Wiktionary

redbird

redbird

Any of several unrelated birds having red plumage, but especially the cardinal.

— Wiktionary

cardinal-nephew

cardinal-nephew

Any cardinal created by the nepotism of a Pope

— Wiktionary

intercardinal direction

intercardinal direction

Any of the four intermediate compass directions located halfway between the cardinal directions - northeast, southeast, southwest and northwest.

— Wiktionary

cardinal variables

cardinal variables

Plural of cardinal variable

— Wiktionary

-teen

-teen

Used to form cardinal numbers from thirteen to nineteen.

— Wiktionary

eight thousand

eight thousand

The cardinal number between seven thousand nine hundred and ninety nine and eight thousand and one.

— Wiktionary

cardinalate

cardinalate

The dignity and ecclestiastic office of Roman Catholic cardinal.

— Wiktionary

generalized continuum hypothesis

generalized continuum hypothesis

The hypothesis that, for each ordinal , there is no cardinal number strictly between and , i.e. .

— Wiktionary

intercardinal

intercardinal

Between the cardinal directions, as for example southwest between south and west.

— Wiktionary

conclavist

conclavist

The personal aide of a cardinal at a papal conclave.

— Wiktionary

noncardinal

noncardinal

Not cardinal.

— Wiktionary

cardinalship

cardinalship

The office (or term of office) of a cardinal

— Wiktionary

supercompact

supercompact

Being a type of large cardinal with a variety of reflection properties.

— Wiktionary

three hundred

three hundred

The cardinal number occurring after two hundred ninety-nine and before three hundred one, represented in Arabic numerals as 300.

— Wiktionary

cardinalize

cardinalize

to transform an ordinal measure (where distance between points doesn't matter, just the ordering) into a cardinal one (where distance matters).

— Wiktionary

caput mortuum

caput mortuum

Cardinal purple, a variety of haematite iron oxide pigment

— Wiktionary

normal impact effect

normal impact effect

See cardinal point effect.

— Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms

AssuraMed

AssuraMed

AssuraMed, previously known as HGI Holding, Inc., is a leading mail-order, direct-to-consumer provider of disposable medical products to chronic disease patients. AssuraMed operates through its Edgepark Medical Supplies and Independence Medical divisions, offering its large and fragmented customer base more than 30,000 products addressing a diverse set of chronic disease market segments including ostomy, diabetes, urological, enteral, incontinence and wound care. CD&R sold Assuramed to Cardinal Health in 2013. Over the course of CD&R's ownership, EBITDA increased by approximately 88%.

— CrunchBase

InstaEDU

InstaEDU

InstaEDU makes it easy for any student to instantly connect with a top tutor in an online lesson space. The website combines the effectiveness of face-to-face private tutoring with the convenience and affordability of an online service. Students can browse tutor profiles, message with tutors, and choose to get connected instantly, or to set up a lesson with a specific tutor at a specific time. The InstaEDU lesson space includes video, audio and text chat (with LaTeX support), as well as a collaborative whiteboard and text editor. InstaEDU co-founders Alison Johnston Rue and Dan Johnston previously ran an in-home tutoring service called Cardinal Scholars (sold to Course Hero). While running that service, they realized that traditional tutoring was both prohibitively expensive for most students, and not built for students’ schedules - most tutoring is in the afternoon at a set time each week, whereas many students don’t realize they need help until the night before a test at 10 or 11 p.m. From there, they founded InstaEDU to make it possible for any student to get immediate academic support when it’s needed most urgently.

— CrunchBase

Bedmar, Marquis de

Bedmar, Marquis de

cardinal and bishop of Oviedo, and a Spanish diplomatist, notorious for a part he played in a daring conspiracy in 1618 aimed at the destruction of Venice, but which, being betrayed, was defeated, for concern in which several people were executed, though the arch-delinquent got off; he is the subject of Otway's "Venice Preserved"; it was after this he was made cardinal, and governor of the Netherlands, where he was detested and obliged to retire (1572-1655).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Bembo, Pietro

Bembo, Pietro

cardinal, an erudite man of letters and patron of literature and the arts, born at Venice; secretary to Pope Leo X.; historiographer of Venice, and librarian of St. Mark's; made cardinal by Paul III., and bishop of Bergamo; a fastidious stylist and a stickler for purity in language (1470-1547).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Bessar`ion, John

Bessar`ion, John

cardinal, native of Trebizond; contributed by his zeal in Greek literature to the fall of scholasticism and the revival of letters; tried hard to unite the Churches of the East and the West; joined the latter, and was made cardinal; too much of a Grecian to recommend himself to the popehood, to which he was twice over nearly elevated (1395-1472).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Louis XIII.

Louis XIII.

the son of Henry IV.; being only nine years old at the death of his father, the government was conducted by Marie de' Medicis, his mother, and at his accession the country was a prey to civil dissensions, which increased on the young king's marriage with a Spanish princess; the Huguenots rose in arms, but a peace was concluded in 1623; it was now Richelieu came to the front and assumed the reins with his threefold policy of taming the nobles, checkmating the Huguenots, and humbling the house of Austria; Rochelle, the head-quarters of the Huguenots, revolted, the English assisting them, but by the strategy adopted the city was taken and the English driven to sea; henceforth the king was nobody and the cardinal was king; the cardinal died in 1642 and the king the year after, leaving two sons, Louis, who succeeded him, and Philip, Duke of Orleans and the first of his line (1601-1644).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Manning, Henry Edward

Manning, Henry Edward

cardinal, born in Hertfordshire; Fellow of Merton, Oxford, and a leader in the Tractarian Movement there; became rector in Sussex; married, and became Archdeacon of Chichester; his wife being dead, and dissatisfied with the state of matters in the Church of England, in 1851 joined the Church of Rome, became Archbishop of Westminster in 1865, and Cardinal in 1875; took interest in social matters as well as the Catholic propaganda; a too candid "Life" has been written of him since his decease, which has created much controversy (1808-1892).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Sadoleto, Jacopo

Sadoleto, Jacopo

cardinal, born in Modena; acted as secretary under Leo X., Clement VII., and Paul III., the latter of whom created him a cardinal in 1536; was a faithful Churchman and an accomplished scholar, and eminent in both capacities (1477-1547).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Tasso, Torquato

Tasso, Torquato

an illustrious Italian poet, son of preceding, born at Sorrento, near Naples; educated at a Jesuit school in Naples, he displayed unusual precocity, and subsequently studied law at the university of Padua, but already devoted to poetry, at 18 published his first poem "Rinaldo," a romance in 12 cantos, the subject-matter of which is drawn from the Charlemagne legends; in 1566 he entered the service of Cardinal Luigi d'Este, by whom he was introduced to Alfonso, Duke of Ferrara, brother of the cardinal, within whose court he received the needful impulse to begin his great poem "La Gerusalemme Liberata"; for the court stage he wrote his pastoral play "Aminta," a work of high poetic accomplishment, which extended his popularity, and by 1575 his great epic was finished; in the following year the symptoms of mental disease revealed themselves, and after a confinement of a few days he fled from Ferrara, and for two years led the life of a wanderer, the victim of his own brooding, religious melancholy, passing on foot from city to city of Italy; yielding to a pent-up longing to revisit Ferrara he returned, but was coldly received by the duke, and after an outburst of frenzy placed in confinement for seven years; during these years the fame of his epic spread throughout Italy, and the interest created in its author eventually led to his liberation; in 1595 he was summoned by Pope Clement VIII., from a heartless and wandering life, to appear at Rome to be crowned upon the Capitol the poet-laureate of Italy, but, although he reached the city, his worn-out frame succumbed before the ceremony could take place; "One thing," says Settembrini, the literary historian of Italy, "Tasso had, which few in his time possessed, a great heart, and that made him a true and great poet, and a most unhappy man;" Fairfax's translation of the "Jerusalem Delivered" is one of his great translations in the English language (1544-1595).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Wiseman, Nicholas

Wiseman, Nicholas

cardinal and Roman Catholic Archbishop of Westminster, born at Seville, of Irish parents; studied at a Roman Catholic college near Durham and the English college at Rome, of which he became rector; lectured in London in 1836 on the Doctrines of the Catholic Church, and in 1840 became vicar-apostolic, first in the central district of England, then of the London district in 1846, and was in 1850 named Archbishop of Westminster by the Pope; this was known in England as the "papal aggression," which raised a storm of opposition in the country, but this storm Wiseman, now cardinal, succeeded very considerably in allaying by a native courtesy of manner which commended him to the regard of the intelligent and educated classes of the community; he was a scholarly man, and a vigorous writer and orator (1802-1865).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Wolsey, Thomas

Wolsey, Thomas

cardinal, born at Ipswich, son of a well-to-do grazier and wool-merchant; educated at Magdalen College, Oxford; entered the Church early; gained the favour of Henry VII., and was promoted by him for his services to the deanery of Lincoln; this was the first of a series of preferments at the hands of royalty, which secured him one bishopric after another until his revenue accruing therefrom equalled that of the crown itself, which he spent partly in display of his rank and partly in acts of munificence; of his acts of munificence the founding of Christ Church College in the interest of learning was one, and the presentation of Hampton Court Palace, which he had built, to the king, was another; it was in the reign of Henry VIII. that he rose to power, and to him especially he owed his honours; it was for his services to him he obtained the chancellorship of the kingdom, and at his suit that he obtained the cardinal's hat and other favours from the Pope; this, though not the height of his ambition, was the limit of it, for he soon learned how frail a reed is a prince's favour; he refused to sanction his master's marriage with Anne Boleyn, and was driven from power and bereft of all his possessions; finally, though restored to the see of York, he was arrested on a charge of treason, took ill on the way to London, and died at Leicester, with the words on his lips, "Had I but served God as I have served the king, He would not have forsaken me in my grey hairs" (1471-1530).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

baker's dozen

thirteen, 13, XIII, baker's dozen, long dozen

the cardinal number that is the sum of twelve and one

— Princeton's WordNet

bellarmine

Bellarmine, Bellarmino, Cardinal Bellarmine, Roberto Francesco Romolo Bellarmine

Italian cardinal and theologian (1542-1621)

— Princeton's WordNet

bellarmine

bellarmine, longbeard, long-beard, greybeard

a stoneware drinking jug with a long neck; decorated with a caricature of Cardinal Bellarmine (17th century)

— Princeton's WordNet

bellarmino

Bellarmine, Bellarmino, Cardinal Bellarmine, Roberto Francesco Romolo Bellarmine

Italian cardinal and theologian (1542-1621)

— Princeton's WordNet

borgia

Borgia, Cesare Borgia

Italian cardinal and military leader; model for Machiavelli's prince (1475-1507)

— Princeton's WordNet

captain hicks

six, 6, VI, sixer, sise, Captain Hicks, half a dozen, sextet, sestet, sextuplet, hexad

the cardinal number that is the sum of five and one

— Princeton's WordNet

cardinal bellarmine

Bellarmine, Bellarmino, Cardinal Bellarmine, Roberto Francesco Romolo Bellarmine

Italian cardinal and theologian (1542-1621)

— Princeton's WordNet

cardinal newman

Newman, John Henry Newman, Cardinal Newman

English prelate and theologian who (with John Keble and Edward Pusey) founded the Oxford movement; Newman later turned to Roman Catholicism and became a cardinal (1801-1890)

— Princeton's WordNet

cardinalship

cardinalship

the office of cardinal

— Princeton's WordNet

cesare borgia

Borgia, Cesare Borgia

Italian cardinal and military leader; model for Machiavelli's prince (1475-1507)

— Princeton's WordNet

chiliad

thousand, one thousand, 1000, M, K, chiliad, G, grand, thou, yard

the cardinal number that is the product of 10 and 100

— Princeton's WordNet

cinque

five, 5, V, cinque, quint, quintet, fivesome, quintuplet, pentad, fin, Phoebe, Little Phoebe

the cardinal number that is the sum of four and one

— Princeton's WordNet

common cardinal vein

common cardinal vein

the major return channels to the heart; formed by anastomosis of the anterior and posterior cardinal veins

— Princeton's WordNet

compass flower

compass plant, compass flower

any of several plants having leaves so arranged on the axis as to indicate the cardinal points of the compass

— Princeton's WordNet

compass plant

compass plant, compass flower

any of several plants having leaves so arranged on the axis as to indicate the cardinal points of the compass

— Princeton's WordNet

d

five hundred, 500, D

the cardinal number that is the product of one hundred and five

— Princeton's WordNet

decade

ten, 10, X, tenner, decade

the cardinal number that is the sum of nine and one; the base of the decimal system

— Princeton's WordNet

deuce-ace

three, 3, III, trio, threesome, tierce, leash, troika, triad, trine, trinity, ternary, ternion, triplet, tercet, terzetto, trey, deuce-ace

the cardinal number that is the sum of one and one and one

— Princeton's WordNet

deuce

two, 2, II, deuce

the cardinal number that is the sum of one and one or a numeral representing this number

— Princeton's WordNet

dozen

twelve, 12, XII, dozen

the cardinal number that is the sum of eleven and one

— Princeton's WordNet

due east

east, due east, eastward, E

the cardinal compass point that is at 90 degrees

— Princeton's WordNet

due north

north, due north, northward, N

the cardinal compass point that is at 0 or 360 degrees

— Princeton's WordNet

due south

south, due south, southward, S

the cardinal compass point that is at 180 degrees

— Princeton's WordNet

due west

west, due west, westward, W

the cardinal compass point that is a 270 degrees

— Princeton's WordNet

e

east, due east, eastward, E

the cardinal compass point that is at 90 degrees

— Princeton's WordNet

east

east, due east, eastward, E

the cardinal compass point that is at 90 degrees

— Princeton's WordNet

east

east

the direction corresponding to the eastward cardinal compass point

— Princeton's WordNet

eastward

east, due east, eastward, E

the cardinal compass point that is at 90 degrees

— Princeton's WordNet

eighteen

eighteen, 18, XVIII

the cardinal number that is the sum of seventeen and one

— Princeton's WordNet

eighter from decatur

eight, 8, VIII, eighter, eighter from Decatur, octad, ogdoad, octonary, octet

the cardinal number that is the sum of seven and one

— Princeton's WordNet

eighter

eight, 8, VIII, eighter, eighter from Decatur, octad, ogdoad, octonary, octet

the cardinal number that is the sum of seven and one

— Princeton's WordNet

eight

eight, 8, VIII, eighter, eighter from Decatur, octad, ogdoad, octonary, octet

the cardinal number that is the sum of seven and one

— Princeton's WordNet

eighty

eighty, 80, LXXX, fourscore

the cardinal number that is the product of ten and eight

— Princeton's WordNet

eleven

eleven, 11, XI

the cardinal number that is the sum of ten and one

— Princeton's WordNet

ennead

nine, 9, IX, niner, Nina from Carolina, ennead

the cardinal number that is the sum of eight and one

— Princeton's WordNet

fifteen

fifteen, 15, XV

the cardinal number that is the sum of fourteen and one

— Princeton's WordNet

fifty

fifty, 50, L

the cardinal number that is the product of ten and five

— Princeton's WordNet

fin

five, 5, V, cinque, quint, quintet, fivesome, quintuplet, pentad, fin, Phoebe, Little Phoebe

the cardinal number that is the sum of four and one

— Princeton's WordNet

five

five, 5, V, cinque, quint, quintet, fivesome, quintuplet, pentad, fin, Phoebe, Little Phoebe

the cardinal number that is the sum of four and one

— Princeton's WordNet

five hundred

five hundred, 500, D

the cardinal number that is the product of one hundred and five

— Princeton's WordNet

fivesome

five, 5, V, cinque, quint, quintet, fivesome, quintuplet, pentad, fin, Phoebe, Little Phoebe

the cardinal number that is the sum of four and one

— Princeton's WordNet

forty

forty, 40, XL

the cardinal number that is the product of ten and four

— Princeton's WordNet

four

four, 4, IV, tetrad, quatern, quaternion, quaternary, quaternity, quartet, quadruplet, foursome, Little Joe

the cardinal number that is the sum of three and one

— Princeton's WordNet

fourscore

eighty, 80, LXXX, fourscore

the cardinal number that is the product of ten and eight

— Princeton's WordNet

foursome

four, 4, IV, tetrad, quatern, quaternion, quaternary, quaternity, quartet, quadruplet, foursome, Little Joe

the cardinal number that is the sum of three and one

— Princeton's WordNet

fourteen

fourteen, 14, XIV

the cardinal number that is the sum of thirteen and one

— Princeton's WordNet

g

thousand, one thousand, 1000, M, K, chiliad, G, grand, thou, yard

the cardinal number that is the product of 10 and 100

— Princeton's WordNet

googol

googol

a cardinal number represented as 1 followed by 100 zeros (ten raised to the power of a hundred)

— Princeton's WordNet

googolplex

googolplex

a cardinal number represented as 1 followed by a googol of zeros (ten raised to the power of a googol)

— Princeton's WordNet

grand

thousand, one thousand, 1000, M, K, chiliad, G, grand, thou, yard

the cardinal number that is the product of 10 and 100

— Princeton's WordNet

great gross

great gross, 1728

a cardinal number equal to one dozen gross

— Princeton's WordNet

great hundred

long hundred, great hundred, 120

the cardinal number that is the product of ten and twelve

— Princeton's WordNet

greybeard

bellarmine, longbeard, long-beard, greybeard

a stoneware drinking jug with a long neck; decorated with a caricature of Cardinal Bellarmine (17th century)

— Princeton's WordNet

half a dozen

six, 6, VI, sixer, sise, Captain Hicks, half a dozen, sextet, sestet, sextuplet, hexad

the cardinal number that is the sum of five and one

— Princeton's WordNet

heptad

seven, 7, VII, sevener, heptad, septet, septenary

the cardinal number that is the sum of six and one

— Princeton's WordNet

hexad

six, 6, VI, sixer, sise, Captain Hicks, half a dozen, sextet, sestet, sextuplet, hexad

the cardinal number that is the sum of five and one

— Princeton's WordNet

hundred thousand

hundred thousand, 100000, lakh

the cardinal number that is the fifth power of ten

— Princeton's WordNet

ii

two, 2, II, deuce

the cardinal number that is the sum of one and one or a numeral representing this number

— Princeton's WordNet

iii

three, 3, III, trio, threesome, tierce, leash, troika, triad, trine, trinity, ternary, ternion, triplet, tercet, terzetto, trey, deuce-ace

the cardinal number that is the sum of one and one and one

— Princeton's WordNet

iv

four, 4, IV, tetrad, quatern, quaternion, quaternary, quaternity, quartet, quadruplet, foursome, Little Joe

the cardinal number that is the sum of three and one

— Princeton's WordNet

ix

nine, 9, IX, niner, Nina from Carolina, ennead

the cardinal number that is the sum of eight and one

— Princeton's WordNet

john henry newman

Newman, John Henry Newman, Cardinal Newman

English prelate and theologian who (with John Keble and Edward Pusey) founded the Oxford movement; Newman later turned to Roman Catholicism and became a cardinal (1801-1890)

— Princeton's WordNet

k

thousand, one thousand, 1000, M, K, chiliad, G, grand, thou, yard

the cardinal number that is the product of 10 and 100

— Princeton's WordNet

l

fifty, 50, L

the cardinal number that is the product of ten and five

— Princeton's WordNet

lakh

hundred thousand, 100000, lakh

the cardinal number that is the fifth power of ten

— Princeton's WordNet

leash

three, 3, III, trio, threesome, tierce, leash, troika, triad, trine, trinity, ternary, ternion, triplet, tercet, terzetto, trey, deuce-ace

the cardinal number that is the sum of one and one and one

— Princeton's WordNet

little joe

four, 4, IV, tetrad, quatern, quaternion, quaternary, quaternity, quartet, quadruplet, foursome, Little Joe

the cardinal number that is the sum of three and one

— Princeton's WordNet

little phoebe

five, 5, V, cinque, quint, quintet, fivesome, quintuplet, pentad, fin, Phoebe, Little Phoebe

the cardinal number that is the sum of four and one

— Princeton's WordNet

long-beard

bellarmine, longbeard, long-beard, greybeard

a stoneware drinking jug with a long neck; decorated with a caricature of Cardinal Bellarmine (17th century)

— Princeton's WordNet

longbeard

bellarmine, longbeard, long-beard, greybeard

a stoneware drinking jug with a long neck; decorated with a caricature of Cardinal Bellarmine (17th century)

— Princeton's WordNet

long dozen

thirteen, 13, XIII, baker's dozen, long dozen

the cardinal number that is the sum of twelve and one

— Princeton's WordNet

long hundred

long hundred, great hundred, 120

the cardinal number that is the product of ten and twelve

— Princeton's WordNet

louis xiii

Louis XIII

king of France from 1610 to 1643 who relied heavily on the advice of Cardinal Richelieu (1601-1643)

— Princeton's WordNet

lutheranism

Lutheranism

teachings of Martin Luther emphasizing the cardinal doctrine of justification by faith alone

— Princeton's WordNet

lx

sixty, 60, LX

the cardinal number that is the product of ten and six

— Princeton's WordNet

lxx

seventy, 70, LXX

the cardinal number that is the product of ten and seven

— Princeton's WordNet

lxxviii

seventy-eight, 78, LXXVIII

the cardinal number that is the sum of seventy and eight

— Princeton's WordNet

lxxx

eighty, 80, LXXX, fourscore

the cardinal number that is the product of ten and eight

— Princeton's WordNet

m

thousand, one thousand, 1000, M, K, chiliad, G, grand, thou, yard

the cardinal number that is the product of 10 and 100

— Princeton's WordNet

myriad

ten thousand, 10000, myriad

the cardinal number that is the product of ten and one thousand

— Princeton's WordNet

n

north, due north, northward, N

the cardinal compass point that is at 0 or 360 degrees

— Princeton's WordNet

newman

Newman, John Henry Newman, Cardinal Newman

English prelate and theologian who (with John Keble and Edward Pusey) founded the Oxford movement; Newman later turned to Roman Catholicism and became a cardinal (1801-1890)

— Princeton's WordNet

nina from carolina

nine, 9, IX, niner, Nina from Carolina, ennead

the cardinal number that is the sum of eight and one

— Princeton's WordNet

nine

nine, 9, IX, niner, Nina from Carolina, ennead

the cardinal number that is the sum of eight and one

— Princeton's WordNet

niner

nine, 9, IX, niner, Nina from Carolina, ennead

the cardinal number that is the sum of eight and one

— Princeton's WordNet

nineteen

nineteen, 19, XIX

the cardinal number that is the sum of eighteen and one

— Princeton's WordNet

ninety

ninety, 90, XC

the cardinal number that is the product of ten and nine

— Princeton's WordNet

north

north, due north, northward, N

the cardinal compass point that is at 0 or 360 degrees

— Princeton's WordNet

north

north

the direction corresponding to the northward cardinal compass point

— Princeton's WordNet

northward

north, due north, northward, N

the cardinal compass point that is at 0 or 360 degrees

— Princeton's WordNet

octad

eight, 8, VIII, eighter, eighter from Decatur, octad, ogdoad, octonary, octet

the cardinal number that is the sum of seven and one

— Princeton's WordNet

octet

eight, 8, VIII, eighter, eighter from Decatur, octad, ogdoad, octonary, octet

the cardinal number that is the sum of seven and one

— Princeton's WordNet

octonary

eight, 8, VIII, eighter, eighter from Decatur, octad, ogdoad, octonary, octet

the cardinal number that is the sum of seven and one

— Princeton's WordNet

ogdoad

eight, 8, VIII, eighter, eighter from Decatur, octad, ogdoad, octonary, octet

the cardinal number that is the sum of seven and one

— Princeton's WordNet

one thousand

thousand, one thousand, 1000, M, K, chiliad, G, grand, thou, yard

the cardinal number that is the product of 10 and 100

— Princeton's WordNet

pentad

five, 5, V, cinque, quint, quintet, fivesome, quintuplet, pentad, fin, Phoebe, Little Phoebe

the cardinal number that is the sum of four and one

— Princeton's WordNet

phoebe

five, 5, V, cinque, quint, quintet, fivesome, quintuplet, pentad, fin, Phoebe, Little Phoebe

the cardinal number that is the sum of four and one

— Princeton's WordNet

quadruplet

four, 4, IV, tetrad, quatern, quaternion, quaternary, quaternity, quartet, quadruplet, foursome, Little Joe

the cardinal number that is the sum of three and one

— Princeton's WordNet

quartet

four, 4, IV, tetrad, quatern, quaternion, quaternary, quaternity, quartet, quadruplet, foursome, Little Joe

the cardinal number that is the sum of three and one

— Princeton's WordNet

quaternary

four, 4, IV, tetrad, quatern, quaternion, quaternary, quaternity, quartet, quadruplet, foursome, Little Joe

the cardinal number that is the sum of three and one

— Princeton's WordNet


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