Definitions containing béranger, pierre jean de

We've found 250 definitions:

Bonsoir

Bonsoir

Bonsoir is a 1994 French film directed by Jean-Pierre Mocky.

— Freebase

Profil

Profil

Profil was a band that represented France in Eurovision Song Contest 1980 with the entry Hè Hé M'sieurs dames. The band members were: Martine Havet, Martine Bauer, Francis Rignault, Jean-Claude Corbel and Jean-Pierre Izbinski.

— Freebase

Positif

Positif

Positif was a 1984 album by Jean-Jacques Goldman, his third solo album sung in French. It was recorded at Studio Gang by Olivier do Espirito Santo and Jean-Pierre Janiaud. It was released by JRG/BMG Music Publishing. It was certified diamond in France for sales of 1,000,000 copies.

— Freebase

Horoscope

Horoscope

the planisphere invented by Jean Paduanus

— Webster Dictionary

Jane

Jane

a kind of twilled cotton cloth. See Jean

— Webster Dictionary

Droz

Droz

the name of a Swiss family of mechanicians, one of them, Jean Pierre, an engraver of medals (1746-1833); also of a French moralist and historian, author of "History of Louis XVI." (1773-1850).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Renoir

Renoir

a painting by Pierre-Auguste Renoir

— Wiktionary

Renoir

Renoir

Pierre-Auguste Renoir, French painter

— Wiktionary

Saint-Pierre

Saint-Pierre

Capital of Saint-Pierre and Miquelon.

— Wiktionary

Stratospheric

Stratospheric

Stratospheric is an instrumental guitar album, released by French guitarist Jean-Pierre Danel in 2000. Several songs from the album hit the web downloading charts, including three #1's. Stratospheric received the Award for the Best Album of the Year 2000 from the Instrumental Rock Guitar Hall Of Fame, and Jean-Pierre also received the Award for the Composer of the Year, for his track “Ballad For a Friend”. Re-released in 2011, it hits the downloading charts at #46 in France.

— Freebase

Rousseau

Rousseau

Jean-Jacques Rousseau Swiss philosopher

— Wiktionary

jean

jean

Made of denim (as "jean jacket").

— Wiktionary

Moxie Jean

Moxie Jean

Moxie Jean is an upscale resale site that allows busy moms to buy and sell high-quality, brand-name kids' clothes. By providing a curated stylish selection of like-new kids’ clothes, Moxie Jean makes it easy to keep up with fast-growing little bodies, from Newborn to size 8. And with the free, postage-paid Moxie Jean Mailer Bag, it’s easier than ever to clean out the kids’ closets and get cash or credit toward the clothes they need next.Moxie Jean partners with charities such as the Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago to hold “Clean Out Your Closet Fundraisers” where supporters can donate their credits to the patients served by the hospital. Moxie Jean, launched in July of this year and was founded by Chicago moms Sharon Schneider (CEO) and Sandra Pinter (COO).

— CrunchBase

Jeannie

Jeannie

A diminutive of the female given name Jean.

— Wiktionary

Jeanie

Jeanie

A diminutive of the female given name Jean.

— Wiktionary

emile

Emile

the boy whose upbringing was described by Jean-Jacques Rousseau

— Princeton's WordNet

Althusserian

Althusserian

Of or pertaining to Louis Pierre Althusser (1918-1990), Marxist philosopher.

— Wiktionary

Molieresque

Molieresque

Reminiscent of (Jean-Baptiste Poquelin, 1622u20131673), French playwright and actor.

— Wiktionary

Parisine

Parisine

A typeface developed for the Paris Metro by Jean-Franu00E7ois Porchez

— Wiktionary

Saint-Pierre

Saint-Pierre

Saint-Pierre is the capital of the French overseas collectivity of Saint Pierre and Miquelon, off the coast of Newfoundland in Canada. Saint-Pierre is the more populated of the two communes making up Saint Pierre and Miquelon.

— Freebase

Hara-Kiri

Hara-Kiri

In 1960 France, Georges Bernier, Cavanna and Fred Aristidès created the monthly satirical magazine Hara-Kiri. Hara Kiri Hebdo, its weekly counterpart, was first published in 1969. Other collaborators included Melvin Van Peebles, Reiser, Roland Topor, Moebius, Wolinski, Gébé, Cabu, Delfeil de Ton, Fournier, Jean-Pierre Bouyxou and Bernhard Willem Holtrop. In 1966 it published Les Aventures de Jodelle, drawn by Guy Peellaert and written by Pierre Barbier.

— Freebase

Kerouacian

Kerouacian

Of or pertaining to Jean-Louis "Jack" Kerouac (1922-1969), American beat novelist and poet.

— Wiktionary

Minoritaire

Minoritaire

Minoritaire was a 1982 album by Jean-Jacques Goldman, his second solo album sung in French. It was certified platinum in France in 1983, another in 1991 and another in 2001, for a total sales of 900,000 copies. It was recorded at the Studio Gang by Olivier do Espirito Santo and Jean-Pierre Janiaud. It was released by NEF and produced by Marc Lumbroso.

— Freebase

Vinflunine

Vinflunine

Vinflunine is a novel fluorinated Vinca alkaloid undergoing research for the treatment of bladder cancer. It was originally discovered by the team of the Professor Jean-Claude Jacquesy, developed by Laboratoires Pierre Fabre and was licensed to Bristol-Myers Squibb for development in certain countries, including the United States. On November 23, 2007, Pierre Fabre and BMS announced that they are terminating their license agreement for the development of vinflunine.

— Freebase

dungaree

dungaree

Heavy denim fabric, often blue; blue jean material.

— Wiktionary

Jeanette

Jeanette

, a Scottish diminutive of Jean, or an anglicized form of Jeannette.

— Wiktionary

Sartrean

Sartrean

Of or pertaining to Jean-Paul Sartre or his works

— Wiktionary

The Child

The Child

L'Enfant is a 2005 Belgian film directed by Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne. The film was released under its French title in the US, and as The Child in the UK.

— Freebase

Ramist

Ramist

a follower of Pierre Rame, better known as Ramus, a celebrated French scholar, who was professor of rhetoric and philosophy at Paris in the reign of Henry II., and opposed the Aristotelians

— Webster Dictionary

Godardian

Godardian

Of or pertaining to Jean-Luc Godard (born 1930) or his cinematic style.

— Wiktionary

Pierre

Pierre

Pierre is the capital of the U.S. state of South Dakota and the county seat of Hughes County. The population was 13,646 at the 2010 census, making it the second least populous state capital after Montpelier, Vermont. Founded in 1880 on the Missouri River opposite Fort Pierre, Pierre has been the capital since South Dakota gained statehood on November 2, 1889, having been chosen for its location in the geographic center of the state. Fort Pierre itself was named after Pierre Chouteau, Jr., an American fur trader of French origin. Pierre is the principal city of the Pierre Micropolitan Statistical Area, which includes all of Hughes and Stanley counties.

— Freebase

Laplace

Laplace

Pierre-Simon Laplace, French mathematician 1749-1827, used attributively in the names of various mathematical concepts named after him (see "Derived terms" below)

— Wiktionary

assimilation

assimilation

in the theories of Jean Piaget: the application of a general schema to a particular instance

— Princeton's WordNet

rousseauan

Rousseauan

of or pertaining to or characteristic of French philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712-1778)

— Princeton's WordNet

Baudelairean

Baudelairean

Of or pertaining to Charles Pierre Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic, and translator, or to his works.

— Wiktionary

Pilote

Pilote

Pilote was a French comics periodical published from 1959 to 1989. Showcasing most of the major French or Belgian comics talents of its day the magazine introduced major series such as Astérix, Barbe-Rouge, Blueberry, Achille Talon, and Valérian et Laureline. Major comics writers like René Goscinny, Jean-Michel Charlier, Greg, Pierre Christin and Jacques Lob were featured in the magazine, as were artists such as Jijé, Morris, Albert Uderzo, Jean Giraud, Enki Bilal, Jean-Claude Mézières, Jacques Tardi, Philippe Druillet, Marcel Gotlib, Alexis, and Annie Goetzinger. Pilote also published several international talents such as Hugo Pratt, Frank Bellamy and Robert Crumb.

— Freebase

Pestalozzian

Pestalozzian

belonging to, or characteristic of, a system of elementary education which combined manual training with other instruction, advocated and practiced by Jean Henri Pestalozzi (1746-1827), a Swiss teacher

— Webster Dictionary

Arc de Triomphe

Arc de Triomphe

A monument in Paris, designed by Jean Chalgrin in 1806, started in 1808 and inaugurated in 1836.

— Wiktionary

Trudeaumania

Trudeaumania

Fervent admiration of former Canadian Prime Minister Pierre Elliott Trudeau (1919-2000), especially during his 1968 election campaign and his early years in office.

— Wiktionary

piagetian

Piagetian

of or relating to or like or in the manner of Jean Piaget

— Princeton's WordNet

Rameau

Rameau

of French origin. Widely known as the surname of the French composer Jean-Philippe Rameau (1683-1764).

— Wiktionary

accommodation

accommodation

in the theories of Jean Piaget: the modification of internal representations in order to accommodate a changing knowledge of reality

— Princeton's WordNet

South Dakota

South Dakota

A north-central state of the United States of America. Capital: Pierre. West of Minnesota, south of North Dakota, north of Nebraska.

— Wiktionary

arthur honegger

Honegger, Arthur Honegger

Swiss composer (born in France) who was the founding member of a group in Paris that included Erik Satie and Darius Milhaud and Francis Poulenc and Jean Cocteau (1892-1955)

— Princeton's WordNet

honegger

Honegger, Arthur Honegger

Swiss composer (born in France) who was the founding member of a group in Paris that included Erik Satie and Darius Milhaud and Francis Poulenc and Jean Cocteau (1892-1955)

— Princeton's WordNet

Labadist

Labadist

a follower of Jean de Labadie, a religious teacher of the 17th century, who left the Roman Catholic Church and taught a kind of mysticism, and the obligation of community of property among Christians

— Webster Dictionary

circle-A

circle-A

u24B6; The symbol of anarchism; an A inside a circle (and often extending slightly beyond it). The symbol is derived from the slogan "Anarchy is Order" by French anarchist Pierre-Joseph Proudhon.

— Wiktionary

Entre Nous

Entre Nous

Entre Nous is a 1983 French biographical drama film directed by Diane Kurys, who shares the writing credits with Olivier Cohen. Set in the France of the mid twentieth century, the film stars Isabelle Huppert, Miou-Miou, Guy Marchand, Jean-Pierre Bacri and Christine Pascal. Coup de Foudre means "love at first sight".

— Freebase

Squalodon

Squalodon

Squalodon is an extinct genus of whales, belonging to the family Squalodontidae. Named by Jean-Pierre Sylvestre de Grateloup in 1840, it was originally believed to be an iguanodontid dinosaur but has since been reclassified. The name Squalodon comes from Squalus, a genus of shark. As a result its name means "shark tooth."

— Freebase

Chien de Jean de Nivelle

Chien de Jean de Nivelle

Chien de Jean de Nivelle is an animal or a man who does not want to obey when called, as in the expression Here comes the dog of Jean de Nivelle, it flees when it is called. The origins of the expression are unknown. It is thought that this Jean de Nivelle refused to help his father, Jean de Montmorency, to support Louis XI in the war against the duke of Burgundy. Furious, his father disinherited him and Jean de Nivelle fled to Flanders, hoping to avoid further troubles.

— Freebase

Pierre Cambronne

Pierre Cambronne

Pierre Jacques Étienne Cambronne, later Pierre, Viscount Cambronne, was a General of the French Empire. He fought during the wars of the Revolution and the Napoleonic Era. He was wounded at the Battle of Waterloo.

— Freebase

Kathleen

Kathleen

Kathleen Sergerie, known professionally as Kathleen, is a Québécoise pop singer from Quebec, Canada who records only under her first name. She released several albums and scored hits on the Canadian charts in the early 1990s with songs such as "Où aller" and "Ça va bien!" Her 1993 album Ça va bien! was written and produced by Jean-Pierre Isaac.

— Freebase

Corbeau

Corbeau

Corbeau was a Quebec rock group, very popular at the end of the seventies. The group was formed in 1977 by the film-maker and lyricist Pierre Harel with Michel "Willie" Lamothe and Roger "Wézo" Belval. Donald Hince joined the group some time later, and Jean Millaire completed the make up of Corbeau after a short tenure with Offenbach. Harel was the lead-singer up until the arrival of Marjolaine "Marjo" Morin, whereupon they shared the role until the departure of Harel just before the launching of their first album in 1979. Corbeau broke up in 1984 after the departure of Marjo and Jean Millaire. In 2009 the original members re-united to record one track for Marjo's new album, Marjo et ses hommes. Corbeau re-recorded the track Demain.

— Freebase

Pierre Robin syndrome

Pierre Robin syndrome

Pierre Robin syndrome, is a congenital condition of facial abnormalities in humans. PRS is a sequence, i.e. a chain of certain developmental malformations, one entailing the next. The 3 main features are cleft palate, micrognathia and glossoptosis. A genetic cause to PRS was recently identified. Pierre Robin sequence may be caused by genetic anomalies at chromosomes 2, 11, or 17.

— Freebase

Girondist

Girondist

The Girondists were a political faction in France within the Legislative Assembly and the National Convention during the French Revolution. They campaigned for the end of the monarchy but then resisted the spiraling momentum of the Revolution. They came into conflict with The Mountain. This conflict eventually led to the fall of the Girondists and their mass execution, the beginning of the Reign of Terror. The Girondists were a group of loosely-affiliated individuals rather than an organized political party, and the name was at first informally applied because the most prominent exponents of their point of view were deputies to the States-general from the department of Gironde in southwest France. The famous painting Death of Marat depicts the revenge killing of radical journalist Jean-Paul Marat by Girondist sympathizer, Charlotte Corday. Some prominent Girondists were Jacques Pierre Brissot, Jean Marie Roland and his wife Madame Roland. They had an ally in American Founding Father Thomas Paine. Brissot and Madame Roland were executed with the guillotine and Jean Roland committed suicide when he learned what had transpired. Paine was arrested and imprisoned but narrowly escaped execution.

— Freebase

Jean Anouilh

Jean Anouilh

Jean Marie Lucien Pierre Anouilh was a French dramatist whose career spanned five decades. Though his work ranged from high drama to absurdist farce, Anouilh is best known for his 1943 play Antigone, an adaptation of Sophocles' classical drama, that was seen as an attack on Marshal Pétain's Vichy government. One of France's most prolific writers after World War II, much of Anouilh's work deals with themes of maintaining integrity in a world of moral compromise.

— Freebase

Jean-Claude

Jean-Claude

Jean-Claude is a fictional character in the Anita Blake: Vampire Hunter series of novels by Laurell K. Hamilton. Within the novels, Jean-Claude's role is as one of the primary love interests of the series heroine, Anita Blake. Jean-Claude is a French-born vampire who is over 400–600 years old. He was a favorite of Belle Morte for his eyes, and, like many vampires of Belle Morte's line, Jean-Claude was selected for his almost perfect mortal beauty. He arrived in St. Louis and, indeed, the United States itself to escape Belle Morte's court with the help of Augustine. Jean-Claude became the Master Vampire of St. Louis after Anita Blake killed Nikolaos. Together with Richard Zeeman, Jean-Claude is a member of Anita's first triumvirate. Jean-Claude's daytime lair is the sub-basement of the Circus of the Damned. As owner of the "JC Corporation," he also owns and runs Guilty Pleasures, The Laughing Corpse, and Danse Macabre, as well as other clubs.

— Freebase

Jean Cocteau

Jean Cocteau

Jean Maurice Eugène Clément Cocteau was a French poet, novelist, dramatist, designer, playwright, artist and filmmaker. Cocteau is best known for his novel Les Enfants terribles, and the films Blood of a Poet, Les Parents terribles, Beauty and the Beast and Orpheus. His circle of associates, friends and lovers included Kenneth Anger, Pablo Picasso, Jean Hugo, Jean Marais, Henri Bernstein, Yul Brynner, Marlene Dietrich, Coco Chanel, Erik Satie, Igor Stravinsky, María Félix, Édith Piaf and Raymond Radiguet.

— Freebase

Divine Doctor

Divine Doctor

Jean de Ruysbroek, the mystic (1294-1381).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Fidelio

Fidelio

Fidelio is a German opera with spoken dialogue in two acts by Ludwig van Beethoven. It is Beethoven's only opera. The German libretto is by Joseph Sonnleithner from the French of Jean-Nicolas Bouilly which had been used for the 1798 opera Léonore, ou L’amour conjugal by Pierre Gaveaux, and for the 1804 opera Leonora by Ferdinando Paer. The opera tells how Leonore, disguised as a prison guard named "Fidelio", rescues her husband Florestan from death in a political prison.

— Freebase

Amanita verna

Amanita verna

Amanita verna, commonly known as the fool's mushroom, Destroying angel or the mushroom fool, is a deadly poisonous basidiomycete fungus, one of many in the genus Amanita. Occurring in Europe in spring, A. verna associates with various deciduous and coniferous trees. The large fruiting bodies appear in summer and autumn; the caps, stipes and gills are all white in colour. Initially described by the French botanist Jean Baptiste François Pierre Bulliard, the fool's mushroom's specific epithet verna is derived from its springtime fruiting habit.

— Freebase

Redbeard

Redbeard

Redbeard is a series of Belgian comic books, originally published in French, created by writer Jean-Michel Charlier and artist Victor Hubinon. After their deaths the series was continued by other artists, including Jijé, Christian Gaty, Patrice Pellerin, Jean Ollivier, Christian Perrissin and Marc Bourgne.

— Freebase

Ecstatic Doctor

Ecstatic Doctor

Jean Ruysbroek, a schoolman given to mysticism (1294-1381).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

existentialism

existentialism

A twentieth-century philosophical movement emphasizing the uniqueness of each human existence in freely making its self-defining choices, with foundations in the thought of Su00F8ren Kierkegaard (1813-55) and Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900) and notably represented in the works of Karl Jaspers (1883-1969), Gabriel Marcel (1887-1973), Martin Heidegger (1889-1976), and Jean-Paul Sartre (1905-80).

— Wiktionary

radiophonic

radiophonic

Describing a type of sound art practice that extends the established radio drama and documentary form by the use of sonic abstractions. Perhaps first used by Pierre Schaeffer http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pierre_Schaeffer in his "Essai Radiophoniques" and subsequently taken up by the BBC to describe their famous sound workshop http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BBC_Radiophonic_Workshop.

— Wiktionary

Hans Arp

Hans Arp

Jean Arp / Hans Arp was a German-French, or Alsatian, sculptor, painter, poet and abstract artist in other media such as torn and pasted paper. When Arp spoke in German he referred to himself as "Hans", and when he spoke in French he referred to himself as "Jean". Many people believe that he was born Hans and later changed his name to Jean, but this is not the case.

— Freebase

Bosman ruling

Bosman ruling

Union Royale Belge des Sociétés de Football Association ASBL v Jean-Marc Bosman C-415/93 is a 1995 European Court of Justice decision concerning freedom of movement for workers, freedom of association, and direct effect of article 39 of the EC Treaty. The case was an important decision on the free movement of labour and had a profound effect on the transfers of football players within the European Union. The decision banned restrictions on foreign EU players within national leagues and allowed players in the EU to move to another club at the end of a contract without a transfer fee being paid. The ruling was made in a consolidation of three separate legal cases, all involving Belgian player Jean-Marc Bosman: ⁕Belgian Football Association v Jean-Marc Bosman ⁕R.F.C. de Liège v Jean-Marc Bosman and others ⁕UEFA v Jean-Marc Bosman

— Freebase

Helene

Helene

Helene is a moon of Saturn. It was discovered by Pierre Laques and Jean Lecacheux in 1980 from ground-based observations at Pic du Midi Observatory, and was designated S/1980 S 6. In 1988 it was officially named after Helen of Troy, who was the granddaughter of Cronus in Greek mythology. The moon is also designated Saturn XII, a number which it received in 1982, under the designation Dione B, because it is co-orbital with Dione and located in its leading Lagrangian point. It is one of four known trojan moons.

— Freebase

Pierre Boulez

Pierre Boulez

Pierre Boulez is a French composer, conductor, writer, and pianist.

— Freebase

Altiplanos

Altiplanos

Altiplanos is Pierre Bensusan's sixth album, recorded in 1998 and 2004.

— Freebase

Androuet du Cerceau

Androuet du Cerceau

Androuet du Cerceau was a family of French architects and designers active in the 16th and early 17th century. ⁕Jacques I Androuet du Cerceau ⁕Jean Baptiste Androuet du Cerceau ⁕Jacques Androuet II du Cerceau ⁕Jean Androuet du Cerceau

— Freebase

Saint-Jean-de-Luz

Saint-Jean-de-Luz

Saint-Jean-de-Luz is a commune in the Pyrénées-Atlantiques department in south-western France. Saint-Jean-de-Luz is part of the Basque province of Labourd and of the Basque Eurocity Bayonne-San Sebastián.

— Freebase

Downwind

Downwind

Downwind is an album by Pierre Moerlen's Gong, issued in February, 1979. Like the other Pierre Moerlen's Gong albums, Downwind is predominantly jazz fusion and has little to do with the psychedelic space rock of Daevid Allen's Gong, even though the bands share a common history. It marks a slight departure from the formula of Pierre Moerlen's Gong's previous records Gazeuse! and Expresso II, towards conventional pop/rock. "Aeroplane" and "What You Know" are short-form pop songs featuring lead vocals by Moerlen, the first time vocals appeared on a Gong record since 1975. Keyboards, some of which are provided by Steve Winwood, augment or even replace mallet percussion on a few tracks. Mike Oldfield contributes guitar on the title track.

— Freebase

Irène Joliot-Curie

Irène Joliot-Curie

Irène Joliot-Curie was a French scientist, the daughter of Marie Skłodowska-Curie and Pierre Curie and the wife of Frédéric Joliot-Curie. Jointly with her husband, Joliot-Curie was awarded the Nobel Prize for chemistry in 1935 for their discovery of artificial radioactivity. This made the Curies the family with the most Nobel laureates to date. Both children of the Joliot-Curies, Hélène and Pierre, are also esteemed scientists.

— Freebase

Normandin

Normandin

Normandin is a city located on the west side of Lac Saint-Jean in the Canadian province of Quebec. Normandin is name after the surveyor Joseph-Laurent Normandin. Its history of European-Canadian settlement began in 1878 when the first pioneers arrived. Alphonse Laliberté was elected as Normandin's first mayor in 1890. In 1926, the village was set up as a municipality distinct from the township; the notary J.S.N. Turcotte occupied the function of first magistrate. The city is the birthplace of radio talk show psychiatrist Pierre Mailloux. It is also the hometown of André Dédé Fortin, the late lead singer of Les Colocs.

— Freebase

Blondel de Nesle

Blondel de Nesle

Blondel de Nesle - either Jean I of Nesle or his son Jean II of Nesle - was a French trouvère. The name 'Blondel de Nesle' is attached to twenty-four or twenty-five courtly songs. He was identified in 1942, by Holger Dyggve, as Jean II of Nesle, who was nicknamed 'Blondel' for his long blond hair. He married at the time of his father's death in 1202, and that same year, went on the Fourth Crusade; he later fought in the Albigensian Crusade. However, in 1994, Yvan Lepage suggested that the poet may have been Jean I, father of Jean II, who was Lord of Nesle from 1180 to 1202; this Jean took part in the Third Crusade, which may explain the subsequent legend linking him with Richard I of England. If the works are correctly identified and dated, he was a significant influence on his European contemporaries, who made much use of his melodies.. His works are fairly conventional, and several have been recorded in modern times.

— Freebase

Balmain

Balmain

Balmain is a fashion house that was founded by Pierre Balmain. In the period following World War II, Pierre Balmain was "a king of French fashion" and outfitted stars including Ava Gardner and Brigitte Bardot and the Nicaraguan first lady Hope Portocarrero. His most famous client was Queen Sirikit of Thailand. After Pierre Balmain's death in 1982, the house was led by Erik Mortensen, described by Vogue as Pierre Balmain's "right hand." Oscar de la Renta led the house between 1993 and 2002. Under Pierre Balmain, Mortensen, and de la Renta, the house was known for its classic, luxurious designs. Until 2011, the house was led by designer Christophe Decarnin, whose vision for the house is more modern and edgier. In April 2011, the fashion house announced that Decarnin was succeeded by Olivier Rousteing. Around 2008 and 2009, the clothing line became extremely popular both among fashion magazines, runways and celebrities. His 2010 collection, shown during Paris fashion week, was said to be "totally retro" and "[brought] back the glitz and glitter of the 1970s disco era." In the song, Where Do You Go To? by Peter Sarstedt he says in the lyrics, "Your clothes are all made by Balmain"

— Freebase

Orange Blossom

Orange Blossom

Orange Blossom is a French band that plays a mix of electronic and world music. The band was formed in Nantes in 1993 with Pierre-Jean Chabot on violin and Jean-Christophe Waechter on percussions and vocals. In 1994, Éric joined the band and a first audio tape was recorded in September. In 1995 the band stabilized with the arrival of Carlos Robles Arenas on drums, djembé, and sampler, and the departure of Éric. Their first disc, Orange Blossom, came out in 1997 on the Prikosnovénie label, selling 15,000 copies. Before their second album came out, the group was influenced by ethnic and traditional music. They met and collaborated with several non-French artists, like Ivorian percussion group Yelemba D'Abidjan and Egyptian group Ganoub. They toured in Egypt, France, and Belgium. Vocalist Jay C. left the band in 2000 and created Prajña. In 2002, percussionist Mathias Vaguenez and vocalist Leïla Bounous joined the group. The album Everything Must Change came out in 2005 on the Bonsaï Music label. Carlos Robles Arenas is Mexican. Leïla Bounous is part Algerian, part Breton.

— Freebase

Folie à deux

Folie à deux

Folie à deux, or shared psychosis, is a psychiatric syndrome in which symptoms of a delusional belief are transmitted from one individual to another. The same syndrome shared by more than two people may be called folie à trois, folie à quatre, folie en famille or even folie à plusieurs. Recent psychiatric classifications refer to the syndrome as shared psychotic disorder and induced delusional disorder in the ICD-10, although the research literature largely uses the original name. The disorder was first conceptualized in 19th century French psychiatry by Charles Lasègue and Jean-Pierre Falret and so also known as Lasègue-Falret Syndrome.

— Freebase

Blue Jean

Blue Jean

"Blue Jean" is a song from the album Tonight by David Bowie. One of only two tracks on the album to be written entirely by Bowie, it was released as a single ahead of the album. Loosely inspired by Eddie Cochran, the song was an uncomplicated composition, recalling earlier Bowie rockers such as "The Jean Genie," and is generally regarded as one of the better parts of a disappointing album. Following the huge commercial success of Bowie's previous album, Let's Dance, its singles and the Serious Moonlight Tour, "Blue Jean" was launched with massive promotion. Julien Temple was engaged to direct a 21-minute short film to promote the song, Blue Jean. The song performance segment from this was also used as a more conventional music video. "Blue Jean" was a hit in the UK and America, reaching No. 6 and No. 8, respectively. The song would remain in Bowie's live repertoire for the rest of his career, being performed on tours in 1987, 1990 and 2004.

— Freebase

Sarrusophone

Sarrusophone

The sarrusophone is a family of transposing musical instruments patented and placed into production by Pierre-Louis Gautrot in 1856. It was named after the French bandmaster Pierre-Auguste Sarrus who is credited with the concept of the instrument, though it is not clear whether Sarrus benefited financially from this association. The instrument was intended to serve as a replacement in wind bands for the oboe and bassoon which, at that time, lacked the carrying power required for outdoor band music.

— Freebase

Numéro

Numéro

Numéro# is an electro-pop Canadian duo from Montreal formed by French Jérôme Rocipon and Québécois Pierre Crube.

— Freebase

Jean Lafitte

Jean Lafitte

Jean Lafitte was a French pirate and privateer in the Gulf of Mexico in the early 19th century. He and his elder brother, Pierre, spelled their last name Laffite, but English-language documents of the time used "Lafitte". The latter has become the common spelling in the United States, including for places named for him. Lafitte is believed to have been born either in France or the French colony of Saint-Domingue. By 1805, he operated a warehouse in New Orleans to help disperse the goods smuggled by his brother Pierre Lafitte. After the United States government passed the Embargo Act of 1807, the Lafittes moved their operations to an island in Barataria Bay, Louisiana. By 1810, their new port was very successful; the Lafittes pursued a successful smuggling operation and also started to engage in piracy. Though Lafitte tried to warn Barataria of a British attack, the American authorities successfully invaded in 1814 and captured most of Lafitte's fleet. In return for a pardon, Lafitte helped General Andrew Jackson defend New Orleans against the British in 1815. The Lafittes became spies for the Spanish during the Mexican War of Independence and moved to Galveston Island, Texas, where they developed a pirate colony called Campeche.

— Freebase

Octobre

Octobre

Octobre is a 1994 Quebec movie directed by filmmaker and noted separatist Pierre Falardeau. It tells a fictionalized version of the October Crisis from the point of view of the Chénier Cell, the FLQ terrorist cell who in 1970 kidnapped and murdered Quebec minister and Deputy Premier Pierre Laporte. The movie was co-written with and based on a book by Francis Simard, who was one of the members of the Chénier Cell, and co-produced by the National Film Board of Canada.

— Freebase

Démodé

Démodé

Démodé is Jean-Jacques Goldman first solo album sung in French, set in 1981. It was recorded at the Studios Pathé in Paris and the Studio Vénus in Longueville. The album has also been released under the names A l'envers and Jean-Jacques Goldman. It was certified platinum in France for sales of 300,000 copies.

— Freebase

Amélie

Amélie

Amélie is a 2001 romantic comedy film directed by Jean-Pierre Jeunet. Written by Jeunet with Guillaume Laurant, the film is a whimsical depiction of contemporary Parisian life, set in Montmartre. It tells the story of a shy waitress, played by Audrey Tautou, who decides to change the lives of those around her for the better, while struggling with her own isolation. The film was an international co-production between companies in France and Germany. Grossing over $33 million in limited theatrical release, it is still the highest-grossing French-language film released in the United States. The film met with critical acclaim and was a major box-office success. Amélie won Best Film at the European Film Awards; it won four César Awards, two BAFTA Awards, and was nominated for five Academy Awards. A Broadway adaptation is in development.

— Freebase

Miss Julie

Miss Julie

Miss Julie is a naturalistic play written in 1888 by August Strindberg dealing with class, love, lust, the battle of the sexes, and the interaction among them. Set on Midsummer's Eve on the estate of a Count in Sweden, the young woman of the title, attempting to escape an existence cramped by social mores and have a little fun, dances at the servants' annual midsummer party, where she is drawn to a senior servant, a footman named Jean, who is particularly well-traveled, well-mannered and well-read. The action takes place in the kitchen of Miss Julie's father's manor; here Jean's fiancée, a servant named Kristin, cooks and sometimes sleeps while Jean and Miss Julie talk. The plot is primarily concerned with power in its various forms. Miss Julie has power over Jean because she is upper-class. Jean has power over Miss Julie because he is male and uninhibited by aristocratic values. The count, Miss Julie's father, has power over both of them since he is a nobleman, an employer, and a father. On this night, behavior between Miss Julie and Jean which was previously a flirtatious contest for power rapidly escalates to a love relationship—or is it just lust?—that is fully consummated. Over the course of the play, Miss Julie and Jean battle for control, which swings back and forth between them until Jean convinces her that the only way to escape her predicament is to commit suicide.

— Freebase

Saratoga

Saratoga

Saratoga is a 1937 American romantic comedy film written by Anita Loos and directed by Jack Conway. The movie stars Clark Gable and Jean Harlow in their sixth and final film collaboration, and features Lionel Barrymore, Frank Morgan, Walter Pidgeon, Hattie McDaniel, and Margaret Hamilton. Jean Harlow died before filming was finished, and it was completed using stand-ins. Saratoga was MGM's biggest moneymaker of 1937.

— Freebase

Funeral Rites

Funeral Rites

Funeral Rites is a 1948 novel by Jean Genet. It is a story of love and betrayal across political divides, written this time for the narrator's lover, Jean Decarnin, killed by the Germans in WWII. The first edition was limited to 1,500 copies; in 1953 the text was revised by Gallimard, excising some possibly offensive passages, which became the basis for the 1953 English translation by Frechtman.

— Freebase

A River

A River

A River is a sculpture created by Jean-Jacques Caffieri in 1759.

— Freebase

The Words

The Words

The Words is Jean-Paul Sartre's 1963 autobiography.

— Freebase

Pigsty

Pigsty

Pigsty is a 1969 Italian film, written and directed by Pier Paolo Pasolini and starring Jean-Pierre Léaud, Marco Ferreri, Ugo Tognazzi, Pierre Clémenti, Alberto Lionello, Franco Citti, and Anne Wiazemsky. Its cinematographer is Tonino Delli Colli. The film features two parallel stories. The first one is set in an unknown past time and is about a young man who wanders in a volcanic landscape and turns into a cannibal. The man joins forces with a thug and ravages the countryside. At the end, his company gets arrested and during his execution, he recites the famous tagline of the film: "I killed my father, I ate human flesh and I quiver with joy." The story is about the human capacity of destruction and a rebellion against the social prerequisites implied against it. The second story is about Herr Klotz, a German industrialist and his young son Julian who live in 1960s Germany. Julian, instead of passing time with his radically politicised fiancée Ida, prefers to build relationships with pigs. Herr Klotz, on the other hand, with his loyal aide Hans Guenther tries to solve his rivalry with fellow industrialist Herdhitze. The two industrialists join forces while Julian gets eaten by pigs in the sty. Klotz and Herdhitze conceal the event to avoid a scandal. The story attempts to provide a link between the Third Reich and Wirtschaftswunder Germany.

— Freebase

Martin, Aimé

Martin, Aimé

a French writer, born at Lyons, repaired to Paris, became the pupil and friend of Bernardin de St. Pierre; collected his works and married his widow; his letters to Sophia on "Natural History," &c., highly popular (1781-1844).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Talca

Talca

Talca is a city and commune in Chile located about 255 km south of Santiago, and is the capital of both Talca Province and Maule Region. As of the 2002 census, the city had a population of 193,755. The city is an important economic center, with agricultural and manufacturing activities, as well as wine production. It is also the location of the Universidad de Talca and the Catholic University of Maule, among others. The Catholic Church of Talca has held a prominent role in the history of Chile. The inhabitants of Talca have a saying, Talca, Paris & London, born from a hat shop which had placed a ribbon stating that it had branches in Paris and London. The shop was owned by a French immigrant named Jean-Pierre Lagarde.

— Freebase

Dromaius

Dromaius

Dromaius is a genus of ratite present in Australia. There is one extant species, Dromaius novaehollandiae commonly known as the Emu. In his original 1816 description of the emu, Louis Jean Pierre Vieillot used two generic names; first Dromiceius, then Dromaius a few pages later. It has been a point of contention ever since which is correct; the latter is more correctly formed, but the convention in taxonomy is that the first name given stands, unless it is clearly a typographical error. Most modern publications, including those of the Australian government, use Dromaius, with Dromiceius mentioned as an alternative spelling. Others misspelling synonyms are descript for genus. However, the Dromiceius spelling was used by Dale Russell in his 1972 naming of the dinosaur Dromiceiomimus.

— Freebase

Ottawan

Ottawan

Ottawan is a French Eurodisco duo, led by Jean Patrick.

— Freebase

Collinson, Peter

Collinson, Peter

an English horticulturist, to whom we are indebted for the introduction into the country of many ornamental shrubs (1694-1768).

Collot d'Herbois, Jean Marie

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Bernardin de Saint-Pierre

Bernardin de Saint-Pierre

commonly called Saint-Pierre simply, a celebrated French writer, born at Havre; author of "Paul and Virginia," written on the eve of the Revolution, called by Carlyle "the swan-song of old dying France," (1739-1814).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Meise

Meise

Meise is a municipality located in the Belgian province of Flemish Brabant. The municipality comprises the towns of Meise proper and Wolvertem, and, several smaller villages like Sint-Brixius-Rode, Oppem, Meusegem, Impde/Imde, Rossem, Westrode and quarters as Bouchout, Nerom and Slozen. As of January 1, 2006 Meise has a total population of 18,464. The total area is 34.82 km² which gives a population density of 530 inhabitants per km². Some of Meise's most famous inhabitants are Eddy Merckx, Frank Deboosere, Tony De Pauw, Kris Wauters, Bart Mullie and Jean-Pierre Van Rossem. Also a historical resident, Empress Carlota of Mexico spent many secluded years at the Castle of Bouchout where she died in 1927. Meise is also a last name of a few families originating from Germany.

— Freebase

Camillo Felgen

Camillo Felgen

Camillo Jean Nicolas Felgen was a Luxembourgian singer, lyricist, DJ, and television presenter.

— Freebase

Orders

Orders

Orders is a 1974 Quebec historical drama film about the incarceration of innocent civilians during the 1970 October Crisis and the War Measures Act enacted by the Canadian government of Pierre Trudeau. It is the second film by director Michel Brault. It features entertainer and Senator Jean Lapointe. The film tells the story of five of those incarcerated civilians. It is scripted but is inspired by a number of interviews with actual prisoners made during the events and its style is heavily inspired by the Quebec school of Cinéma vérité. It is a docufiction. It won a Cannes Film Festival Award in 1975 and four Canadian Film Awards the same year. It was also selected as the Canadian entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 48th Academy Awards, but was not accepted as a nominee.

— Freebase

Structures

Structures

Structures I and Structures II are two related works for two pianos, composed by the French composer Pierre Boulez.

— Freebase

Édouard Vuillard

Édouard Vuillard

Jean-Édouard Vuillard was a French painter and printmaker associated with the Nabis.

— Freebase

Cotta

Cotta

German publisher, born at Stuttgart; established in Tübingen; published the works of Goethe, Schiller, Jean Paul, Herder, and others of note among their contemporaries (1764-1832).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Gazeuse!

Gazeuse!

Gazeuse! is an album by Pierre Moerlen's Gong, issued in 1976. In the U.S., it was called Expresso. The album is jazz fusion and has little to do with the psychedelic space rock of Daevid Allen's Gong, even though the bands share a common history. Although the album was issued under the name of Gong, and the name "Pierre Moerlen's Gong" would not be adopted for a couple of years, the lineup involved and the nature of the music are that of the Moerlen-led band. Writing credits are about half-divided between Holdsworth and Moerlen, except the final track, which is by early Magma bassist Francis Moze.

— Freebase

Jaune

Jaune

Jaune is an album by Jean-Pierre Ferland, released in 1970. Considered an enduring classic of Canadian and Quebec music, the album was named the 71st greatest Canadian album of all time in Bob Mersereau's 2007 book The Top 100 Canadian Albums. It was the only francophone album from Quebec named to the list besides the three studio albums by Harmonium. In 2005 Ferland released a 35th anniversary box set version of the album, which included the original album, new recordings of the album's songs by Ferland himself, an audio DVD including a surround sound remastering of the album, and a disc including covers of the album's songs by musicians such as Ariane Moffatt, Champion, Montag, Sixtoo, Kid Loco and Carl Bastien. "Le Chat du café des artistes" was covered by Charlotte Gainsbourg on her 2010 album IRM.

— Freebase

Won

Won

'Won' is Pacewon's debut solo album. Pacewon is a founding member of the rap group The Outsidaz and was on their first and only two albums. The album is produced by Wyclef Jean, of the rap group The Fugees, which Pacewon has worked with. The other producers are Jerry Duplessis and Ski. The album includes 21 songs and features seven guest stars. The featured rappers are Young Zee of the Outsidaz, Wyclef Jean of The Fugees, Azz Izz, Kurupt, Melanie Blatt, Richie Thumbs, and Rah Digga also of the Outsidaz.

— Freebase

Bienne, Lake of

Bienne, Lake of

in the Swiss canton of Berne; the Aar is led into it when in flood, so as to prevent inundation below; on the shores of it are remains of lake-dwellings, and an island in it, St. Pierre, the retreat of Rousseau in 1765.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Trudeau

Trudeau

Trudeau is a 2002 television miniseries dramatizing the life of former Canadian Prime Minister Pierre Elliott Trudeau. It aired on CBC Television and was written by Wayne Grigsby and directed by Jerry Ciccoritti. The miniseries was one of the highest-rated Canadian television programs of the year. It won several Gemini Awards, including Best Actor, Best Writing and Best Direction. It follows Pierre Trudeau through the major events of his political mandates up to the patriation of the Canadian Constitution. A few of the major characters in the film are fictional, or composite characters. A prequel, Trudeau II: Maverick in the Making, came out in 2005, examining Trudeau's early life.

— Freebase

Oedipus rex

Oedipus rex

Oedipus rex is an "Opera-oratorio after Sophocles" by Igor Stravinsky, scored for orchestra, speaker, soloists, and male chorus. The libretto, based on Sophocles's tragedy, was written by Jean Cocteau in French and then translated by Abbé Jean Daniélou into Latin. Oedipus rex was written towards the beginning of Stravinsky's neoclassical period. He had considered setting the work in Ancient Greek, but decided ultimately on Latin: in his words "a medium not dead but turned to stone."

— Freebase

Hof

Hof

a town of Bavaria, on the Saale, 40 m. NE. of Baireuth; has flourishing textile factories, breweries, and iron-works; is associated with the early struggles of Jean Paul Richter.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Jansenism

Jansenism

Jansenism was a Christian theological movement, primarily in France, that emphasized original sin, human depravity, the necessity of divine grace, and predestination. The movement originated from the posthumously published work of the Dutch theologian Cornelius Jansen, who died in 1638. It was first popularized by Jansen's friend Jean du Vergier, Abbé de Saint-Cyran, and after Saint-Cyran's death in 1643 was led by Antoine Arnauld. Through the 17th and into the 18th centuries, Jansenism was a distinct movement within the Catholic Church. The theological centre of the movement was the Parisian convent of Port-Royal, which was a haven for writers including Saint-Cyran, Arnauld, Pierre Nicole, Blaise Pascal, and Jean Racine. Jansenism was opposed by many in the Catholic hierarchy, especially the Jesuits. Although the Jansenists identified themselves only as rigorous followers of Augustinism, Jesuits coined the term "Jansenism" to identify them as having Calvinist affinities. The papal bull Cum occasione, issued by Pope Innocent X in 1653, condemned five cardinal doctrines of Jansenism as heresy — especially the relationship between human free will and efficacious grace, wherein the teachings of Augustine, as presented by the Jansenists, contradicted the teachings of the Jesuit School. Jansenist leaders endeavored to accommodate the pope's pronouncements while retaining their distinctives, and enjoyed a measure of peace in the late 17th century under Pope Clement IX. However, further controversy led to the bull Unigenitus, issued by Clement XI in 1713, which marked the end of Catholic toleration of Jansenist doctrine.

— Freebase

Prince Edward Island

Prince Edward Island

An island in the Gulf of St. Lawrence constituting a province of Canada in the eastern part of the country. It is very irregular in shape with many deep inlets. Its capital is Charlottetown. Discovered by the French in 1534 and originally named Ile Saint-Jean, it was renamed in 1799 in honor of Prince Edward, fourth son of George III and future father of Queen Victoria. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p981 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p433)

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Pierre Charles L'Enfant

Pierre Charles L'Enfant

Pierre "Peter" Charles L'Enfant was a French-born American architect and civil engineer best known for designing the layout of the streets of Washington, D.C., the L'Enfant Plan.

— Freebase

Djambi

Djambi

Djambi is a board game and a chess variant for four players, invented by Jean Anesto in 1975.

— Freebase

Dupuytren, Baron

Dupuytren, Baron

a celebrated French surgeon, born at Pierre-Buffière; he was a man of firm nerve, signally sure and skilful as an operator, and contributed greatly, both by his inventions and discoveries, to the progress of surgery; a museum of pathological anatomy, in which he made important discoveries, bears his name (1777-1835).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Humans

Humans

Humains is a French horror film directed from Pierre-Olivier Thévenin and Jacques-Olivier Molon. The film stars Sara Forestier, Dominique Pinon and Philippe Nahon.

— Freebase

Riverman

Riverman

Riverman was a French Thoroughbred racehorse. Foaled in Kentucky, he was bred by Harry F. Guggenheim of the prominent American Guggenheim family. Riverman was from the mare River Lady and sired by Guggenheim's stallion Never Bend, a grandson of the extremely important sire, Nearco. Purchased by French perfume magnate Pierre Wertheimer, head of the House of Chanel, the colt raced under the colors of his wife, Germaine. Trained by Alec Head, Riverman was sent to the track in 1971 where he won the Prix Yacowlef and finished second in the Critérium de Maisons-Laffitte. The following year, he won the Group II Prix Jean Prat plus two Group One races, the Prix d'Ispahan and the Poule d'Essai des Poulains. Sent to race in England, he notably ran third to Brigadier Gerard in July's King George VI and Queen Elizabeth Stakes and second to him in October's Champion Stakes.

— Freebase

Dessalines

Dessalines

Dessalines is a town in the Artibonite Department of Haiti. It is named after Jean-Jacques Dessalines, a leader of the Haitian Revolution and the first ruler of independent Haiti. This Town is the First Black Capital in the World. In 1804 The First Black Free Country has born. And Marchand Dessalines, became the Capital of the new Country. Jean-Jacques Dessalines loved so much this town. Most of the fortifications are still in good condition.

— Freebase

Belga

Belga

Belga is a Belgian news agency. Belga was founded in 1920 as "Agence télégraphique belge de presse" by Pierre-Marie Olivier and Maurice Travailleur. Seat : 8B Frédéric Pelletier Street, 1030 Schaerbeek

— Freebase

Brainbox

Brainbox

Brainbox is a Dutch rock group from the late 1960s/early 1970s. The band was founded in Amsterdam by guitarist Jan Akkerman, drummer Pierre van der Linden and singer Kazimir Lux. Their debut single was "Down Man", which established their progressive blues sound. They had several hit singles in the Netherlands, including "Between Alpha and Omega", "Doomsday Train", Reason to Believe and "Smile". Soon after they released their first album, Jan Akkerman and Pierre van der Linden left the group to join Focus. After Pierre van der linden and Jan Akkerman left, Brainbox bass player Cyril Havermans also followed to join Focus, replacing the original bass player Bert Ruiter. They were replaced by guitarists Herman Meyer and Rudie de Queljoe and drummer Frans Smit. Meyer was later replaced by John Schuursma. After Kaz Lux left the group in 1971, their popularity waned and they split up in 1972. In 2004 Kaz Lux reassembled the band and they performed in the Netherlands. In 2010 and 2011 the band performed again and recorded a new studio album The 3rd Flood.

— Freebase

Du Fu

Du Fu

Du Fu was a prominent Chinese poet of the Tang Dynasty. Along with Li Bai, he is frequently called the greatest of the Chinese poets. His greatest ambition was to serve his country as a successful civil servant, but he proved unable to make the necessary accommodations. His life, like the whole country, was devastated by the An Lushan Rebellion of 755, and his last 15 years were a time of almost constant unrest. Although initially he was little-known to other writers, his works came to be hugely influential in both Chinese and Japanese literary culture. Of his poetic writing, nearly fifteen hundred poems have been preserved over the ages. He has been called the "Poet-Historian" and the "Poet-Sage" by Chinese critics, while the range of his work has allowed him to be introduced to Western readers as "the Chinese Virgil, Horace, Ovid, Shakespeare, Milton, Burns, Wordsworth, Béranger, Hugo or Baudelaire".

— Freebase

Mucopolysaccharidosis VI

Mucopolysaccharidosis VI

Maroteaux–Lamy syndrome is a form of mucopolysaccharidosis caused by a deficiency in arylsulfatase B. It is named after Pierre Maroteaux and his mentor Maurice Emil Joseph Lamy, both French physicians.

— Freebase

Rocambole

Rocambole

Rocambole is a fictional adventurer created by Pierre Alexis Ponson du Terrail, a 19th-century French writer. The word rocambolesque has become common in French and other languages to label any kind of fantastic adventure.

— Freebase

Levana

Levana

the title of a book by Jean Paul on the education of children; title from the name of a Roman goddess, the protectress of foundlings.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Seychelles

Seychelles

A group of Indian Ocean Islands, east of Tanzania. Their capital is Victoria. They were first claimed by the French in 1744 but taken by the English in 1794 and made a dependency of MAURITIUS in 1810. They became a crown colony in 1903 and a republic within the Commonwealth in 1976. They were named for the French finance minister, Jean Moreau de Sechelles, but respelled by the English in 1794. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1102 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p496)

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Carlos

Carlos

Carlos, born Yvan-Chrysostome Dolto, and sometimes called Jean-Christophe Doltovitch, was a French singer, entertainer and actor.

— Freebase

Science

Science

Science creates, scales and acquires successful digital businesses by bringing together ideas, talent, resources and financing through a centralized platform. The company focuses on developing new businesses, providing emerging startups with operational strategy and capital, and transforming later-stage Internet ventures with new talent and innovations.Science is backed by a group of top institutional and independent investors, which include: Rustic Canyon, White Star Capital, The Social+Capital Partnership, Tomorrow Ventures, Siemer Ventures, Philippe Camus, Jean-Marie Messier, Jonathan Miller and Dennis Phelps.

— CrunchBase

mirliton

mirliton

A buzzword created to refer to and advertise a new women's bonnet style (AKA "coiffure de gaze" as seen in the early 19th century French painting Portrait De Jeune Femme (En Coiffure De Gaze) by Henri Pierre-Louis Grevedon see here) of 1723 involving a gauzy cloth or net for which the word was invented. Within months, comedies of the time created songs and verses using the new word to make light of political and social leaders. The word gained the meaning sense as a catch-all phrase such that it might refer to any silly trifle or thing of little value or merit as in the English word folderol. From there, it acquired more serious, specific usages.

— Wiktionary

Kookai

Kookai

Kookai is a French fashion label founded in 1983 by Jean-Lou Tepper, Jacques Nataf and Philippe de Hesdin. It has a simple philosophy: "to supply young women with affordable apparel for their wardrobes". It has stores in Europe, Asia, America and Australia. Its clothing line is generally characterised by French fashion trends. Galleries Lafayette carried a large line of Kookai, Claudie Pierlot, Jean-Charles de Castelbajac, Lolita Bis by Lolita Lempicka, Plein Sud, P.J. Hohenscheid, and other European labels when it opened its first American store in Trump Tower, in September 1991.

— Freebase

Jean Giono

Jean Giono

Jean Giono was a French author who wrote works of fiction mostly set in the Provence region of France.

— Freebase

Rising Tide

Rising Tide

Rising Tide is a historical young-adult novel by Jean Thesman and a sequel to her novel A Sea So Far.

— Freebase

Fourier Analysis

Fourier Analysis

Analysis based on the mathematical function first formulated by Jean-Baptiste-Joseph Fourier in 1807. The function, known as the Fourier transform, describes the sinusoidal pattern of any fluctuating pattern in the physical world in terms of its amplitude and its phase. It has broad applications in biomedicine, e.g., analysis of the x-ray crystallography data pivotal in identifying the double helical nature of DNA and in analysis of other molecules, including viruses, and the modified back-projection algorithm universally used in computerized tomography imaging, etc. (From Segen, The Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Jean Paul

Jean Paul

Jean Paul, born Johann Paul Friedrich Richter, was a German Romantic writer, best known for his humorous novels and stories.

— Freebase

Alençon, Counts and Dukes of

Alençon, Counts and Dukes of

a title borne by several members of the house of Valois—e. g. Charles of Valois, who fell at Crécy (1346); Jean IV., who fell at Agincourt (1415).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Coquerel, Athanase

Coquerel, Athanase

a Protestant pastor, son of preceding, born at Amsterdam; celebrated for his liberal and tolerant views, too much so for M. Guizot; edited Voltaire's letters on toleration; his chief work, "Jean Calas et sa Famille" (1820-1875).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Pierre Larousse

Pierre Larousse

Pierre Athanase Larousse was a French grammarian, lexicographer and encyclopaedist. He published many of the outstanding educational and reference works of 19th-century France, including the 15 volume Grand Dictionnaire universel du XIXe siècle.

— Freebase

Billie Jean

Billie Jean

"Billie Jean" is a song by American recording artist Michael Jackson. It is the second single from the singer's sixth solo album, Thriller. It was written and composed by Jackson and produced by him and Quincy Jones. There are contradictory claims to what the song's lyrics refer to. One suggests that they are derived from a real-life experience, in which a female fan claimed that Jackson had fathered one of her twins. However, Jackson himself stated that "Billie Jean" was based on groupies he had encountered. The song is well known for its distinctive bassline by guitarist David Williams, and Jackson's vocal hiccups. The song was mixed 91 times by audio engineer Bruce Swedien before it was finalized. The song became a worldwide commercial and critical success; it was one of the best-selling singles of 1983 and is one of the best-selling singles worldwide. The song topped both the US and UK charts simultaneously. In other countries, it topped the charts of Switzerland and reached the top ten in Austria, Italy, New Zealand, Norway and Sweden. "Billie Jean" was certified platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America in 1989.

— Freebase

Pierre Laporte Bridge

Pierre Laporte Bridge

The Pierre Laporte Bridge is the longest main span suspension bridge in Canada. It crosses the Saint Lawrence River approximately 200 metres west of the famous Quebec Bridge between historic Quebec City and Lévis, Quebec. It is the longest non-tolled suspension bridge in the world. It was originally named the New Quebec Bridge and was supposed to be called Pont Frontenac until it was renamed in honour of Quebec Vice-Premier Pierre Laporte, who was kidnapped and murdered during the October Crisis of 1970 as construction of the bridge was nearing completion. It was constructed for the Province of Quebec, Department of Roads in a joint venture with the private firm of Parsons Transportation Group. It carries Autoroute 73, north from Autoroute 20, the Trans-Canada Highway, to Quebec City and Autoroute 40, and northwards towards Saguenay, Quebec.

— Freebase

Antoine Henri Becquerel

Antoine Henri Becquerel

Antoine Henri Becquerel was a French physicist, Nobel laureate, and the discoverer of radioactivity along with Marie Skłodowska-Curie and Pierre Curie, for which all three won the 1903 Nobel Prize in Physics.

— Freebase

Amygdalin

Amygdalin

Amygdalin, C20H27NO11, is a glycoside initially isolated from the seeds of the tree Prunus dulcis, also known as bitter almonds, by Pierre-Jean Robiquet and Antoine Boutron-Charlard, in 1830 and subsequently investigated by Liebig and Wöhler in 1830. Several other related species in the genus of Prunus, including apricot and black cherry, also contain amygdalin. Since the early 1950s, both amygdalin and a modified form named laetrile or Vitamin B17 have been promoted as cancer cures. However, neither of these compounds nor any other derivatives are vitamins in any sense, and studies have found them to be clinically ineffective in the treatment of cancer, as well as dangerously toxic. They are potentially lethal when taken by mouth, because certain enzymes act on them to produce cyanide. The promotion of laetrile to treat cancer has been described in the medical literature as a canonical example of quackery, and as "the slickest, most sophisticated, and certainly the most remunerative cancer quack promotion in medical history."

— Freebase

Voir

Voir

Voir is a chain of francophone alternative weekly newspapers in the Canadian province of Quebec published by Communications Voir. The magazine was founded by Pierre Paquet in November 1986.

— Freebase

Louis Barthou

Louis Barthou

Jean Louis Barthou was a French politician of the Third Republic who served as Prime Minister of France for eight months in 1913.

— Freebase

Odéon-Théâtre de l'Europe

Odéon-Théâtre de l'Europe

The Odéon-Théâtre de l'Europe is one of France's six national theatres. It is located at 2 rue Corneille in the 6th arrondissement of Paris on the left bank of the Seine, next to the Luxembourg Garden. It was originally built between 1779 and 1782, in the garden of the former Hôtel de Condé, to a Neoclassical design by Charles De Wailly and Marie-Joseph Peyre, originally in order to house the Comédie Française, which, however, preferred to stay at the Théâtre-Français in the Palais Royal. The new theatre was inaugurated by Marie-Antoinette on April 9, 1782. It was there that The Marriage of Figaro play was premiered two years later. An 1808 reconstruction of the theater designed by Jean Chalgrin was officially named the Théâtre de l'Impératrice, but everyone still called it the Odéon. It burned in 1818. The third and present structure, designed by Pierre Thomas Baraguay, was opened in September 1819. In 1990, the theater was given the sobriquet 'Théâtre de l'Europe'. It is a member theater of the Union of the Theatres of Europe.

— Freebase

Glossoptosis

Glossoptosis

Glossoptosis is a medical condition and abnormality which refers to the downward displacement or retraction of the tongue. It is one of the features of Pierre Robin Sequence and Down Syndrome.

— Freebase

Bai`reuth

Bai`reuth

the capital of Upper Franconia, in Bavaria, with a large theatre erected by the king for the performance of Wagner's musical compositions, and with a monument, simple but massive, as was fit, to the memory of Jean Paul, who died there.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

No, No, No

No, No, No

"No, No, No" is an R&B song performed by American group Destiny's Child for their debut studio album Destiny's Child and the track was produced by Vincent Herbert, Rob Fusari and Wyclef Jean and received a positive reception from music critics. The original version and its remix featuring Wyclef Jean was released as the group's debut single in the fourth quarter of 1997 and reached No. 3 in the United States, where it was certified platinum. It was the first single for the group, worldwide. The remix is based around a sample of The Love Unlimited Orchestra's "Strange Games and Things."

— Freebase

Knock Off

Knock Off

Knock Off is a 1998 American action film directed by Tsui Hark, starring Jean-Claude Van Damme, Lela Rochon, Michael Fitzgerald Wong, Rob Schneider and Paul Sorvino.

— Freebase

Carlingue

Carlingue

The French Gestapo or Carlingue was the name given to French auxiliaries of the Gestapo, based at 93, rue Lauriston in the 16th arrondissement of Paris, and active between 1941 and 1944. It was headed by Henri Lafont and Pierre Loutrel. The group was formally named Active Group Hesse, after the German SS officer "who'd looked after its foundation". This group drew its members from the same milieu as that of its leaders, the gangsters Henri Lafont and Pierre Loutrel, alias Pierrot le fou, or from those with a criminal background, for example Pierre Bonny, who was wanted by the police for misappropriation of funds and selling influence, and who was a central figure in the Seznec and Stavisky affairs. Their links with the occupiers granted them many contacts with disreputable figures like Joseph Joanovici. They originated from the North African Brigade, made up of Muslims devoted to the Nazi cause, which was involved in suppressing the Maquis in Tulle. According to the retired policeman Henri Longuechaud, "one might be scandalised by the numbers of 30,000 to 32,000 sometimes quoted [as Carlingue's members]. In Paris, when the occupier launched a recruitment drive for 2,000 auxiliary policeman in their service, they received no fewer than 6,000 candidates."

— Freebase

Cultural capital

Cultural capital

The term cultural capital refers to non-financial social assets that promote social mobility beyond economic means. Examples can include education, intellect, style of speech, dress, or physical appearance. Cultural capital is a sociological concept that has gained widespread popularity since it was first articulated by Pierre Bourdieu. Bourdieu and Jean-Claude Passeron first used the term in "Cultural Reproduction and Social Reproduction". In this work he attempted to explain differences in children's outcomes in France during the 1960s. It has since been elaborated and developed in terms of other types of capital in The Forms of Capital; and in terms of higher education, for instance, in The State Nobility. For Bourdieu, capital acts as a social relation within a system of exchange, and the term is extended ‘to all the goods material and symbolic, without distinction, that present themselves as rare and worthy of being sought after in a particular social formation and cultural capital acts as a social relation within a system of exchange that includes the accumulated cultural knowledge that confers power and status.

— Freebase

Jean-François Berthelier

Jean-François Berthelier

Jean-François-Philibert Berthelier was a French actor and singer, who performed many light tenor roles in opéra-comique and opéra-bouffe.

— Freebase

Clerc

Clerc

or Leclerc, Jean, a French theologian of the Arminian school, born at Geneva; a prolific author; wrote commentaries on all the books of the Old Testament, on lines since followed by the Rationalist school or Neologians of Germany (1657-1736).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Duty Free

Duty Free

Duty Free is a British sitcom written by Eric Chappell and Jean Warr that aired on ITV from 1984 to 1986. It was made by Yorkshire Television.

— Freebase

Jean-Francois Millet

Jean-Francois Millet

Jean-Francois Millet is a fictional character in Mark Twain's play Is He Dead?, named after the famous French painter of the same name.

— Freebase

Champollion

Champollion

Champollion was a planned cometary rendezvous and landing spacecraft. It was named after Jean-François Champollion, a French Egyptologist known for translating the Rosetta stone.

— Freebase

General will

General will

In political philosophy, the general will is the will of the people as a whole. The term was made famous by Jean-Jacques Rousseau.

— Freebase

Pierre Corneille

Pierre Corneille

Pierre Corneille was a French tragedian who was one of the three great seventeenth-century French dramatists, along with Molière and Racine. He has been called “the founder of French tragedy” and produced plays for nearly forty years.

— Freebase

Japanese slipper

Japanese slipper

A Japanese slipper is an IBA Official Cocktail made from Midori, Cointreau, and lemon juice. It was created in 1984 by Jean-Paul Bourguignon at Mietta's Restaurant in Melbourne.

— Freebase

ARB

ARB

ARB is a Japanese rock band formed in 1978. Its members are Ryo Ishibashi, Koya Naito, Ebi, and Keith. Jean-Jacques Burnel from The Stranglers was also a member for a short time.

— Freebase

Political anthropology

Political anthropology

Political anthropology concerns the structure of political systems, looked at from the basis of the structure of societies. Political anthropologists include Pierre Clastres, E. E. Evans-Pritchard, Meyer Fortes, Georges Balandier, F.G. Bailey, Jeremy Boissevain, Marc Abélès, Jocelyne Streiff-Fenart, Ted C. Lewellen, Robert L. Carneiro, John Borneman and Joan Vincent.

— Freebase

Saint-Jean

Saint-Jean

Saint-Jean is a federal electoral district in Quebec, Canada, that has been represented in the House of Commons of Canada since 1968.

— Freebase

Grolier, Jean

Grolier, Jean

a famous bibliophile, whose library was dispersed in 1675; the bindings of the books being ornamented with geometric patterns, have given name to bindings in this style; they bore the inscription, "Io. Grolieri et Amicorum" (the property of Jean Grolier and his friends).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Aplomb

Aplomb

In classical ballet, aplomb refers to the basic law of ballet – stability. The French ballet master Jean-Étienne Despréaux defined it in 1806 as a specific kind of dynamic balance fundamental to all positions and movements of ballet. A 1905 book Grammar of the Art of Dancing, Theoretical and Practical referring to Bernhard Klemm, wrote: "Aplomb is the absolute safety in rising and falling back which results from the perpendicular attitude of the upper body and the artistic placing of the feet. By means of aplomb the dancer acquires a precision and an elegance which insure the successful execution of every foot-movement, however artistic and difficult, and thereby creates a pleasing and a satisfactory impression upon the observer. Aplomb may be compared with the sureness of touch of the pianist." Aplomb is achieved with straight body with its weight equally distributed over the supporting foot. Aplomb is controlled by feeling and controlling the muscular sensations in the spine, i.e., by "holding the back". The base of aplomb are the five positions of the feet codified by Pierre Beauchamp in 1680. The correct set of the body influences all ballet steps, and the perfection of the aplomb requires years of training. Exercises at the barre begin the training of the stability and balance.

— Freebase

Contempt

Contempt

Contempt is a 1963 film directed by Jean-Luc Godard, based on the Italian novel Il disprezzo [A Ghost at Noon]. 1954. OCLC 360548. by Alberto Moravia. It stars Brigitte Bardot.

— Freebase

Two Brothers

Two Brothers

Two Brothers is a 2004 adventure family film directed by Jean-Jacques Annaud. It is about two tigers who are separated as cubs and then reunited years later.

— Freebase

Conversion disorder

Conversion disorder

A conversion disorder causes patients to suffer from neurological symptoms, such as numbness, blindness, paralysis, or fits without a definable organic cause. It is thought that symptoms arise in response to stressful situations affecting a patient's mental health and Conversion disorder is considered a psychiatric disorder in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders fifth edition. Formerly known as "hysteria", the disorder has arguably been known for millennia, though it came to greatest prominence at the end of the 19th century, when the neurologists Jean-Martin Charcot and Sigmund Freud and psychiatrist Pierre Janet focused their studies on the subject. Before Freud's studies on hysteria, people who suffered from physical disabilities that were not caused by any physical impairments, known as hysterical patients, were believed to be malingering, suffering from weak nerves, or just suffering from meaningless disturbances. The term "conversion" has its origins in Freud's doctrine that anxiety is "converted" into physical symptoms. Though previously thought to have vanished from the west in the 20th century, some research has suggested it is as common as ever.

— Freebase

Riffraff

Riffraff

Riffraff is a 1936 film starring Jean Harlow and Spencer Tracy. The movie was written by Frances Marion, Anita Loos, and H. W. Hannaford, and directed by J. Walter Ruben.

— Freebase

Mouchette

Mouchette

Mouchette is a 1967 French film directed by Robert Bresson, starring Nadine Nortier and Jean-Claude Guilbert. It is based on the novel by Georges Bernanos. It was entered into the 1967 Cannes Film Festival, winning the OCIC Award. Mouchette tells the story of a girl entering adolescence, the daughter of a bullying alcoholic father and ailing mother set in a rural French village. One stormy night Mouchette's world changes. It is a coming of age film which Bresson portrays in his own unique style. According to Bresson, "Mouchette offers evidence of misery and cruelty. She is found everywhere: wars, concentration camps, tortures, assassinations." The Criterion Collection DVD release includes a trailer for this film made by Jean-Luc Godard.

— Freebase

Paul and Virginia

Paul and Virginia

a celebrated novel by Saint-Pierre, written on the eve of the French Revolution, in which "there rises melodiously, as it were, the wail of a moribund world: everywhere wholesome Nature in unequal conflict with diseased, perfidious art; cannot escape from it in the lowest hut, in the remotest island of the sea"; it records the fate of a child of nature corrupted by the false, artificial sentimentality that prevailed at the time among the upper classes of France.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Cono Christian School

Cono Christian School

Cono, founded in 1951 near Walker, Iowa, by Max and Jean Belz, is a K-12 day and boarding school serving students from around the United States and the world. Boarding students are generally in middle and high school. This Christian boarding school began, and still exists as, a ministry of Bible Presbyterian Church. Max Belz was the pastor of the church at the time of the school's founding. He, Jean, and their eight children lived on the 1-acre of donated property where the church building was built. Today Cono has 200 acres, 25 of which are developed with academic, athletic and student and staff residential facilities. Class sizes are small and average six to eight students for a full academic program.

— Freebase

Labadists

Labadists

The Labadists were a 17th-century Protestant religious community movement founded by Jean de Labadie, a French pietist. The movement derived its name from that of its founder.

— Freebase

Visiting Hours

Visiting Hours

Visiting Hours is a 1982 slasher film starring Michael Ironside, Lee Grant, Linda Purl, William Shatner and Lenore Zann. It was directed by Jean-Claude Lord and written by Brian Taggert.

— Freebase

Saint Louis River

Saint Louis River

The Saint Louis River is a river in the U.S. states of Minnesota and Wisconsin that flows into Lake Superior. The largest U.S. river to flow into the lake, it is 192 miles in length and starts 13 miles east of Hoyt Lakes, Minnesota. The river's watershed covers 3,634 square miles. Near the Twin Ports of Duluth, Minnesota and Superior, Wisconsin, the river becomes a freshwater estuary. According to Warren Upham, the Ojibwe name of the river is Gichigami-ziibi. He notes: "The river was probably so named by Pierre Gaultier de Varennes, sieur de La Vérendrye, who was a very active explorer, in the years 1731 and onward, of the vast country from Pigeon River and Rainy Lake to the Saskatchewan and Missouri Rivers, establishing trading posts and missions. The king of France in 1749, shortly before the death of La Vérendrye, conferred on him the cross of Saint Louis as a recognition of the importance of his discoveries, and thence the name of the Saint Louis River appears to have come. On Jean-Baptiste-Louis Franquelin's map and Philippe Buache's map, it is called the Rivière du Fond du Lac, and the map by Gilles Robert de Vaugondy and Jonathan Carver's map are the earliest to give the present name."

— Freebase

Get Ready

Get Ready

"Get Ready" is the first studio album by 2 Unlimited, a Eurodance project founded in 1991 by Belgian producers Jean-Paul DeCoster and Phil Wilde and fronted by Dutch rapper Ray Slijngaard and Dutch vocalist Anita Doth.

— Freebase

Ramus, Peter

Ramus, Peter

or Pierre de la Ramée, a French philosopher and humanist, son of poor parents; became a servant in the College of Navarre; devoted his leisure to study, and became a great scholar; attacked scholasticism in a work against Aristotle as the main pillar of the system, and was interdicted from teaching philosophy, but the judgment was reversed by Henry II., and he was made a royal professor; he turned Protestant in the end, and was massacred on the eve of St. Bartholomew (1515-1572).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Bignonia

Bignonia

Bignonia is a genus of flowering plants in the catalpa family, Bignoniaceae. Its genus and family were named after Jean-Paul Bignon by his protégé Joseph Pitton de Tournefort in 1694.

— Freebase

Sibelius

Sibelius

Sibelius is a 2003 Finnish film biography of Jean Sibelius directed and written by Timo Koivusalo. It is the first full-length feature film about the famous composer.

— Freebase

Wampus

Wampus

Wampus is a French comic book character written by Franco Frescura and illustrated by Luciano Bernasconi for French publisher Editions Lug in 1969. Wampus is an alien monster with shapeshifting powers who has been sent by an evil cosmic intelligence, the Great Mind, to destroy Earth. He is discovered and pursued by French secret agent, Jean Sten. In the course of its original six issues, Wampus caused havoc in France, Germany, the USA, Japan, England and Spain. Wampus was originally published in six, digest-sized magazines. The series was then discontinued because of censorship problems. The final episode was eventually serialized in 1985 in Ombrax, another of Lug's magazines. The same concept was also reprised as L'Autre in the magazine Futura in 1973. Wampus returned in 2001, written by Jean-Marc Lofficier and still drawn by Bernasconi for a series of seven new episodes which completed the storyline begun in 1969, depicting the final confrontation between Jean Sten and his alien nemesis. The stories also featured a number of guest-stars from the Lug universe. Wampus is now part of Hexagon Comics which has published a collection of his adventures translated into English.

— Freebase

The Reprieve

The Reprieve

The Reprieve is a 1947 novel by Jean-Paul Sartre. It is the second part in the trilogy The Roads to Freedom. It concerns life in France during the eight days before the signing of the Munich Agreement and the subsequent takeover of Czechoslovakia in September 1938.

— Freebase

Georges Cuvier

Georges Cuvier

Jean Léopold Nicolas Frédéric Cuvier, known as Georges Cuvier, was a French naturalist and zoologist. Cuvier was a major figure in natural sciences research in the early 19th century, and was instrumental in establishing the fields of comparative anatomy and paleontology through his work in comparing living animals with fossils. He is well known for establishing extinction as a fact, being the most influential proponent of catastrophism in geology in the early 19th century, and opposing the evolutionary theories of Jean-Baptiste de Lamarck and Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire. His most famous work is Le Règne Animal. In 1819, he was created a peer for life in honor of his scientific contributions. Thereafter he was known as Baron Cuvier. He died in Paris, during an epidemic of cholera.

— Freebase

Parisine

Parisine

Parisine is a typeface created by Jean-François Porchez. Distributed by Typofonderie. It is used in Paris Métro, tramways, buses and RER parts operated by the RATP in Île-de-France.

— Freebase

Elle

Elle

Elle is a worldwide lifestyle magazine of French origin that focuses on fashion, beauty, health, and entertainment. Elle is also the world's best selling fashion magazine. It was founded by Pierre Lazareff and his wife Hélène Gordon in 1945. The title, in French, means "she".

— Freebase

Förster, Ernst

Förster, Ernst

an art critic, brother of succeeding, author of a number of elaborate and important works bearing on the history of art in Germany and Italy; was the son-in-law of Jean Paul, whose works he edited, and to whose biography he made contributions of great value (1800-1885).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Death Warrant

Death Warrant

Death Warrant is a 1990 action movie starring Jean-Claude Van Damme. The film was written by David S. Goyer while a student at USC, and was Goyer's first screenplay to be sold and produced commercially.

— Freebase

Prank call

Prank call

A prank call is a telephone practical joke. Prank phone calls began to gain an American following over a period of many years, as they became a staple of the obscure and amusing cassette tapes traded amongst musicians, sound engineers, and media traders beginning in the late 1970s. Among the most famous and earliest recorded prank calls are the Tube Bar prank calls tapes, which centered around Louis "Red" Deutsch. Comedian Jerry Lewis was an incorrigible phone prankster, and recordings of his hijinks, dating from the 1960s and possibly earlier, still circulate to this day. Very prominent people have fallen victim to prank callers, for example Elizabeth II, who was fooled by Canadian DJ Pierre Brassard posing as Canadian Prime Minister Jean Chrétien, asking her to record a speech in support of Canadian unity ahead of the 1995 Quebec referendum. Two other notable examples of prank calls were made by the Miami-based radio station Radio El Zol. In one, they telephoned Venezuelan president Hugo Chávez, and spoke to him pretending to be Cuban president Fidel Castro. They later reversed the prank, calling Castro and pretending to be Chávez. Castro began swearing at the pranksters live on air after they revealed themselves.

— Freebase

Francis Poulenc

Francis Poulenc

Francis Jean Marcel Poulenc was a French composer and a member of the French group Les Six. He composed art song, solo piano music, chamber music, oratorio, choral music, opera, ballet music, and orchestral music.

— Freebase

Jean Piaget

Jean Piaget

Jean Piaget was a Swiss developmental psychologist and philosopher known for his epistemological studies with children. His theory of cognitive development and epistemological view are together called "genetic epistemology". Piaget placed great importance on the education of children. As the Director of the International Bureau of Education, he declared in 1934 that "only education is capable of saving our societies from possible collapse, whether violent, or gradual." Piaget created the International Center for Genetic Epistemology in Geneva in 1955 and directed it until his death in 1980. The number of collaborations that its founding made possible, and their impact, ultimately led to the Center being referred to in the scholarly literature as "Piaget's factory." According to Ernst von Glasersfeld, Jean Piaget was "the great pioneer of the constructivist theory of knowing."

— Freebase

Eurycoma

Eurycoma

Eurycoma is a small genus of three or four species of flowering plants in the family Simaroubaceae, native to tropical southeastern Asia. They are small evergreen trees with spirally arranged pinnate leaves. The flowers are small, produced in large panicles. ⁕Eurycoma apiculata Benn. ⁕Eurycoma harmandiana Pierre ⁕Eurycoma latifolia Ridl. ⁕Eurycoma longifolia Jack

— Freebase

Myriorama

Myriorama

Myriorama originally meant a set of illustrated cards which 19th century children could arrange and re-arrange, forming different pictures. Later in the century the name was also applied to shows using a sequence of impressive visual effects to entertain and inform an audience. The word myriorama was invented to mean myriad pictures, following the model of panorama, diorama, cosmorama and other novelties. These were all part of a wider interest in viewing landscape as panorama, and in new ways of presenting "spectacular" scenes. The early myrioramas were cards with people, buildings, and other images on compatible backgrounds, and could be laid out in any order, allowing a child to create a variety of imaginary landscapes. Jean-Pierre Brès, a French children's writer, published an early version which he described as a polyoptic picture in the early 19th century, and John Clark of London took up the idea and designed a set of cards he called a myriorama. Clark's "second series" myriorama, an "Italian landscape", was produced in 1824, the same year as a similar set of English cards called a panoramacopia created by drawing teacher T.T.Dales. Reproductions of cards from the period are on sale today with other "traditional toys". Various contemporary artists have used the idea as inspiration for work they have named myriorama.

— Freebase

Kickboxer

Kickboxer

Kickboxer is a 1989 American martial arts sports drama film written, produced and directed by Mark DiSalle, and also directed by David Worth, and starring Jean-Claude Van Damme and former world kickboxing champion, Dennis Alexio.

— Freebase

Blackboard bold

Blackboard bold

Blackboard bold is a typeface style that is often used for certain symbols in mathematical texts, in which certain lines of the symbol are doubled. The symbols usually denote number sets. Blackboard bold symbols are also referred to as double struck, although they cannot actually be produced by double striking on a typewriter. The Chicago Manual of Style in 1993 advises: "blackboard bold should be confined to the classroom" whereas in 2003 it states that "open-faced symbols are reserved for familiar systems of numbers". In some texts these symbols are simply shown in bold type: blackboard bold in fact originated from the attempt to write bold letters on blackboards in a way that clearly differentiated them from non-bold letters, and then made its way back in print form as a separate style from ordinary bold, possibly starting with the original 1965 edition of Gunning and Rossi's textbook on complex analysis. Some mathematicians, therefore, do not recognize blackboard bold as a separate style from bold: Jean-Pierre Serre, for example, has publicly inveighed against the use of "blackboard bold" anywhere other than on a blackboard, and uses double-struck letters when writing bold on the blackboard, whereas his published works consistently use ordinary bold for the same symbols. Donald Knuth also advises against the use of blackboard bold in print.

— Freebase

Ritualization

Ritualization

Ritualization is a behavior that occurs typically in a member of a given species in a highly stereotyped fashion and independent of any direct physiological significance. Ritualization is also associated with the work of the religious studies scholar Catherine Bell. Bell, drawing on the Practice Theory of Pierre Bourdieu, has taken a less functional view of ritual with her elaboration of ritualization. More recently scholars interested in the cognitive science of religion such as Pascal Boyer, Pierre Liénard, and William W. McCorkle Jr. have been involved in experimental, ethnographic, and archival research on how ritualized actions might inform the study of ritualization and ritual forms of action. Boyer, Liénard, and McCorkle argue that ritualized compulsions are in relation to an evolved cognitive architecture where social, cultural, and environmental selection pressures stimulate "hazard-precaution" systems such as predation, contagion, and disgust in human minds. Furthermore, McCorkle advances the hypothesis that these ritualized compulsions were turned into ritual scripts by professional guilds only several thousand years ago with advancement in technology such as the domestication of plants and animals, literacy, and writing.

— Freebase

As Luck Would Have It

As Luck Would Have It

As Luck Would Have It is a 2002 Swiss film. It was directed by Lorenzo Gabriele and stars Jean-Claude Brialy and Julien Bravo. It was based on an original script by Julie Gilbert.

— Freebase

Double Impact

Double Impact

Double Impact is a 1991 American action film written and directed by Sheldon Lettich and also written, produced by and starring Jean-Claude Van Damme in a double role as Chad and Alex Wagner.

— Freebase

Caen stone

Caen stone

Caen stone or Pierre de Caen, is a light creamy-yellow Jurassic limestone quarried in northwestern France near the city of Caen. The limestone is a fine grained oolitic limestone formed in shallow water lagoons in the Bathonian Age about 167 million years ago. The stone is homogenous, and therefore suitable for carving.

— Freebase

Lire

Lire

Lire is a French literary magazine covering both French and foreign literature. It was founded in 1975 by Jean-Louis Servan-Schreiber and Bernard Pivot. Today "Lire" is owned by the company Express Roularta.

— Freebase

Depth-first search

Depth-first search

Depth-first search is an algorithm for traversing or searching tree or graph data structures. One starts at the root and explores as far as possible along each branch before backtracking. A version of depth-first search was investigated in the 19th century by French mathematician Charles Pierre Trémaux as a strategy for solving mazes.

— Freebase

Pierre Curie

Pierre Curie

Pierre Curie was a French physicist, a pioneer in crystallography, magnetism, piezoelectricity and radioactivity. In 1903 he received the Nobel Prize in Physics with his wife, Marie Salomea Skłodowska-Curie, and Henri Becquerel, "in recognition of the extraordinary services they have rendered by their joint researches on the radiation phenomena discovered by Professor Henri Becquerel".

— Freebase

Berthierite

Berthierite

Berthierite is a mineral, a sulfide of iron and antimony with formula FeSb2S4. It is steel grey in colour with a metallic lustre which can be covered by an iridescent tarnish. Because of its appearance it is often mistaken for stibnite. It was discovered in France in 1827 and named for the French chemist, Pierre Berthier.

— Freebase

Grandville

Grandville

the pseudonym of Jean Ignace Isidore Gérard, a French caricaturist, born at Nancy; his fame was first established by the "Metamorphoses du Jour," a series of satirical sketches representing men with animal faces characteristic of them; his subsequent work embraced political cartoons and illustrations for "Gulliver's Travels," "Don Quixote," "Robinson Crusoe," La Fontaine's "Fables," &c. (1803-1847).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Faust

Faust

Faust are a German krautrock band. Formed in 1971 in Wümme, the group was originally composed of Werner "Zappi" Diermaier, Hans Joachim Irmler, Arnulf Meifert, Jean-Hervé Péron, Rudolf Sosna and Gunther Wüsthoff, working with record producer Uwe Nettelbeck and engineer Kurt Graupner.

— Freebase

Molière

Molière

Jean-Baptiste Poquelin, known by his stage name Molière, was a French playwright and actor who is considered to be one of the greatest masters of comedy in Western literature. Among Molière's best-known works are Le Misanthrope, L'École des Femmes, Tartuffe ou L'Imposteur, L'Avare, Le Malade Imaginaire, and Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme. Born into a prosperous family and having studied at the Collège de Clermont, Molière was well suited to begin a life in the theatre. Thirteen years as an itinerant actor helped him polish his comic abilities while he began writing, combining Commedia dell'arte elements with the more refined French comedy. Through the patronage of a few aristocrats, including Philippe I, Duke of Orléans – the brother of Louis XIV – Molière procured a command performance before the King at the Louvre. Performing a classic play by Pierre Corneille and a farce of his own, Le Docteur Amoureux, Molière was granted the use of salle du Petit-Bourbon near the Louvre, a spacious room appointed for theatrical performances. Later, Molière was granted the use of the Palais-Royal. In both locations he found success among the Parisians with plays such as Les Précieuses ridicules, L'École des Maris and L'École des Femmes. This royal favor brought a royal pension to his troupe and the title "Troupe du Roi". Molière continued as the official author of court entertainments.

— Freebase

Rendez-Vous

Rendez-Vous

Rendez-Vous is an album of instrumental electronic music composed and produced by Jean Michel Jarre, and released on Disques Dreyfus, licensed to Polydor, in 1986. It is his fifth overall studio album. It sold some three million copies worldwide and remains Jarre's longest-running chart album in both the U.S. and UK, with a 20 week run in the U.S. and an impressive 38 week run in the UK. The last track on the album was supposed to have the saxophone part played in outer space by astronaut Ron McNair, but on January 28, 1986 he and the entire Space Shuttle Challenger crew were killed. 73 seconds after lift-off the shuttle disintegrated. In memory, this piece was dedicated to him. On the album the saxophone part is played by saxophonist Pierre Gossez. The album reached #9 in the UK charts and #52 in the U.S. charts. In April 1986, Jarre performed the large-scale outdoor concert Rendez-vous Houston in Houston, Texas, celebrating the 150th anniversary of the founding of Texas, and the 25th anniversary of NASA. The show attracted a then-world record live audience of 1.3 million people. Originally, the track Last Rendez Vous was due to be played by saxophonist astronaut Ron McNair via a live link with the Challenger space shuttle. However, after the Challenger disaster, the concert became a part-tribute to the lost astronauts.

— Freebase

Armored

Armored

Armored is a 2009 American crime thriller film directed by Nimród Antal, written by first-time screenwriter James V. Simpson, and starring Matt Dillon, Jean Reno, Laurence Fishburne, Amaury Nolasco, Milo Ventimiglia, Skeet Ulrich, and Columbus Short. It was released on December 4, 2009.

— Freebase

Polyad

Polyad

In mathematics, polyad is a concept of category theory introduced by Jean Bénabou in generalising monads. A polyad in a bicategory D is a bicategory morphism Φ from a locally punctual bicategory C to D, Φ : C → D. Monads are polyads Φ : C → D where C has only one object.

— Freebase

Pierre Cauchon

Pierre Cauchon

Pierre Cauchon was Bishop of Beauvais from 1420 to 1432. A strong partisan of English interests in France during the latter years of the Hundred Years' War, his role in arranging Joan of Arc's downfall led most subsequent observers to condemn his extension of secular politics into an ecclesiastical trial. The Catholic Church overturned his verdict in 1455.

— Freebase

Routhierite

Routhierite

Routhierite is a rare thallium sulfosalt mineral with formula Tl(Hg,Zn)2(As,Sb)2S6. It was first described in 1974 for an occurrence in the Jas Roux deposit in the French Alps. It was named after French geologist Pierre Routhier. It is also reported from the Northern Ural Mountains, Russia and the Thunder Bay district of Ontario, Canada.

— Freebase

Polyphème

Polyphème

Polyphème is an opera composed by Jean Cras with a libretto by Albert Samain. It was written by Cras during World War I and was premiered in Paris in 1922, giving Cras a burst of notoriety in the French press.

— Freebase

Poncelet

Poncelet

The poncelet is an obsolete unit of power, once used in France and replaced by cheval vapeur. The unit was named after Jean-Victor Poncelet. One poncelet is defined as the power required to raise a hundred-kilogram mass at a velocity of one metre per second.

— Freebase

Fournier gangrene

Fournier gangrene

Fournier gangrene is a type of necrotizing infection or gangrene usually affecting the perineum. It was first described by Baurienne in 1764 and is named after a French venereologist, Jean Alfred Fournier following five cases he presented in clinical lectures in 1883.

— Freebase

Camisards

Camisards

Huguenots of the Cévennes, who took up arms by thousands in serious revolt against Louis XIV., in which others joined, under Jean Cavalier their chief, after, and in consequence of, the revocation of the Edict of Nantes (1685); so called because they wore a camiso (Fr. a chemise), a blouse over their armour; were partly persuaded and partly compelled into submission by Marshal Villars in 1704.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Henri Labrouste

Henri Labrouste

Pierre-François-Henri Labrouste was a French architect from the famous École des Beaux Arts school of architecture. After a six-year stay in Rome, Labrouste opened an architectural training workshop, which quickly became the center of the rationalist view. He became noted for his use of iron-frame construction and was one of the first to realize the importance of its use.

— Freebase

Marida

Marida

Marida is a titular see of the Roman Catholic Church. Its last bishop was Jean Hermil. It is in the ecclesiastical province of Osroene, under the metropolitan of Edessa. It likely represents the now-suppressed bishopric formerly seated at Mardin, Turkey.

— Freebase

Sanvitalia

Sanvitalia

The creeping zinnias are four or five species belonging to the family Asteraceae and native to Southwestern United States, Mexico, Central America, South America, Northwest China. The original descriptions of this genus was by Jean-Baptiste Lamarck using samples provided by "M. Gualteri".

— Freebase

Quiberon

Quiberon

Quiberon is a commune in the Morbihan department in Brittany in north-western France. It is situated on the southern part of the Quiberon peninsula, the northern part being the commune of Saint-Pierre-Quiberon. It is primarily known as a seaside resort for French tourists during summer, and for its history of sardine production.

— Freebase

Balls

Balls

Balls is the eighteenth album by Sparks released in 2000. "It's a Knockoff" was recorded for the movie Knock Off, starring Jean-Claude Van Damme, directed by the acclaimed Hong Kong based producer/director Tsui Hark. It is featured over the closing credits.

— Freebase

Perique

Perique

Perique is a type of tobacco from Saint James Parish, Louisiana, known for its strong, powerful, and fruity aroma. When the Acadians made their way into this region in 1776, the Choctaw and Chickasaw tribes were cultivating a variety of tobacco with a distinctive flavor. A farmer named Pierre Chenet is credited with first turning this local tobacco into what is now known as Perique in 1824 through the technique of pressure-fermentation.

— Freebase

baud

baud

[simplified from its technical meaning] n. Bits per second. Hence kilobaud or Kbaud, thousands of bits per second. The technical meaning is level transitions per second; this coincides with bps only for two-level modulation with no framing or stop bits. Most hackers are aware of these nuances but blithely ignore them.Historical note: baud was originally a unit of telegraph signalling speed, set at one pulse per second. It was proposed at the November, 1926 conference of the Comité Consultatif International Des Communications Télégraphiques as an improvement on the then standard practice of referring to line speeds in terms of words per minute, and named for Jean Maurice Emile Baudot (1845-1903), a French engineer who did a lot of pioneering work in early teleprinters.

— The New Hacker's Dictionary

Bollandist

Bollandist

The Bollandists are an association of scholars, philologists, and historians who since the early seventeenth century have studied hagiography and the cult of the saints in Christianity. Their most important publication has been the Acta Sanctorum. They are named after Jean Bolland or Bollandus.

— Freebase

Montgolfier brothers

Montgolfier brothers

Joseph-Michel Montgolfier and Jacques-Étienne Montgolfier were the inventors of the Montgolfière-style hot air balloon, globe aérostatique. The brothers succeeded in launching the first manned ascent, carrying Étienne into the sky. Later, in December 1783, in recognition of their achievement, their father Pierre was elevated to the nobility and the hereditary appellation of de Montgolfier by King Louis XVI of France.

— Freebase

DAMS

DAMS

Driot-Arnoux Motorsport is a racing team from France, involved in many areas of motorsport. DAMS was founded in 1988 by Jean-Paul Driot and former Formula One driver René Arnoux. It is headquartered near Le Mans, only 2 km from the Bugatti Circuit.

— Freebase

Trudeaumania

Trudeaumania

Trudeaumania was the nickname given in early 1968 to the excitement generated by Pierre Trudeau's entry into the leadership race of the Liberal Party of Canada. Trudeaumania continued during the subsequent federal election campaign and during Trudeau's early years as Prime Minister of Canada. Many young people in Canada at this time, especially young women, were influenced by the 1970s counterculture and identified with Trudeau, an energetic nonconformist who was relatively young. They were dazzled by his charm and good looks, and a large fan base was established throughout the country. He would often be stopped in the streets for his autograph or for a quick photograph. Trudeau had once sympathized with Marxists and had spent time in the democratic socialist Cooperative Commonwealth Federation, and many of his fans were attracted to his socially liberal stances. Trudeau was also admired for his laid-back attitude and his celebrity relationships; in that word's prevailing use at the time, describing a modern, hip and happening person, he was described as a swinger. A high point happened during Trudeau's election campaign in 1968 during the annual Saint-Jean-Baptiste Day parade in Montreal, when rioting Quebec separatists threw rocks and bottles at the grandstand where Trudeau was seated. Rejecting the pleas of his aides that he take cover, Trudeau stayed in his seat, facing the rioters, without any sign of fear. The image of the politician showing such courage impressed the Canadian people, and he handily won the election the next day.

— Freebase

Flodden, Battle of

Flodden, Battle of

fought on Flodden Hill, a low spur of the Cheviots, 6 m. S. of Coldstream, between James IV. of Scotland and the English under the Earl of Surrey on the 9th of September 1513, which resulted in the crushing defeat of the Scots, who lost their king and the flower of their nobility, an event celebrated in Jean Elliot's "Flowers of the Forest"; a spirited account is given in the sixth canto of Scott's "Marmion."

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Cobalt 60

Cobalt 60

Cobalt 60 was a project featuring Jean-Luc de Meyer and Dominique Lallement. They were an electro-industrial/EBM group, though they frequently use guitars, an uncommon feature among artists of the genre. Cobalt 60 has also done music for the PC game Wing Commander: Prophecy.

— Freebase

Mouton

Mouton

Mouton is an unincorporated community in Lafayette Parish, Louisiana. The town is named after Jean Mouton and Marin Mouton, two local land owners who settled the area during the 1770s. It is located along West Pont Des Mouton Rd between LA Hwy 182 and I-49 .

— Freebase

Librettist

Librettist

A librettist is the author of a libretto (It.: small book), the text of a vocal work, particularly opera or oratorio. Among the notorious librettists have been Pietro Metastasio, Lorenzo Da Ponte, Eugene Scribe, Felice Romani, Francesco Maria Piave, Luigi Illica, Arrigo Boito, and Hugo von Hofmannsthal. Some composers wrote libretti for themselves or for other composers, for example Richard Wagner, Ruggiero Leoncavallo, Frederick Delius, Michael Tippet, Ralph Vaughan Williams, and Gian Carlo Menotti who wrote two libretti for Samuel Barber's operas; others adapted plays for their own use, most notably Claude Debussy, Richard Strauss and Alban Berg. There are also librettists among the famous writers: Bertolt Brecht, Jean Cocteau, Miguel de Cervantes, Gabriele D'Annunzio, Carlo Goldoni, Aleksandr Pushkin, Jean Jacques Rousseau, Voltaire, and Stefan Zweig. And here are some people one would not expect as librettists: Frederick II of Prussia (the Great), Catherine II of Russia, Pope Clement IX, and Franco Zeffirelli.

— Freebase

Kennedia

Kennedia

Kennedia is a genus of plants comprising 16 species, all native to Australia. They are evergreen climbing plants with woody stems. Thet usually have trifoliate leaves and pea-type flowers of various colours from pink to dark red and yellow to black. The genus was named by Étienne Pierre Ventenat after John Kennedy, a partner in the renowned firm of nurserymen, Lee and Kennedy of Hammersmith, London.

— Freebase

Diophantus

Diophantus

Diophantus of Alexandria, sometimes called "the father of algebra", was an Alexandrian Greek mathematician and the author of a series of books called Arithmetica, many of which are now lost. These texts deal with solving algebraic equations,. While reading Claude Gaspard Bachet de Méziriac's edition of Diophantus' Arithmetica, Pierre de Fermat concluded that a certain equation considered by Diophantus had no solutions, and noted in the margin without elaboration that he had found "a truly marvelous proof of this proposition," now referred to as Fermat's Last Theorem. This led to tremendous advances in number theory, and the study of Diophantine equations and of Diophantine approximations remain important areas of mathematical research. Diophantus coined the term παρισὀτης to refer to an approximate equality. This term was rendered as adaequalitat in Latin, and became the technique of adequality developed by Pierre de Fermat to find maxima for functions and tangent lines to curves. Diophantus was the first Greek mathematician who recognized fractions as numbers; thus he allowed positive rational numbers for the coefficients and solutions. In modern use, Diophantine equations are usually algebraic equations with integer coefficients, for which integer solutions are sought. Diophantus also made advances in mathematical notation.

— Freebase

Planet of the Apes

Planet of the Apes

La Planète des Singes, known in English as Planet of the Apes and Monkey Planet, is a 1963 science fiction novel by French author Pierre Boulle. It was adapted into the 1968 film Planet of the Apes, launching the Planet of the Apes media franchise. The novel tells the tale of three human explorers from Earth who visit a planet orbiting the star Betelgeuse, in which great apes are the dominant intelligent and civilized species, whereas humans are reduced to a savage animal-like state.

— Freebase

Colbertism

Colbertism

Colbertism is an economic and political doctrine of the seventeenth century, created by Jean-Baptiste Colbert, the French minister of finance under Louis XIV. Colbertism is a variant of mercantilism and is more a collection of economical practices than a true current of economic thought.

— Freebase

Becquerel

Becquerel

The becquerel is the SI-derived unit of radioactivity. One Bq is defined as the activity of a quantity of radioactive material in which one nucleus decays per second. The Bq unit is therefore equivalent to an inverse second, s−1. The becquerel is named after Henri Becquerel, who shared a Nobel Prize with Pierre and Marie Curie in 1903 for their work in discovering radioactivity.

— Freebase

Becket

Becket

Becket or The Honor of God is a play written in French by Jean Anouilh. It is a depiction of the conflict between Thomas Becket and King Henry II of England leading to Becket's assassination in 1170. It contains many historical inaccuracies, which the author acknowledged.

— Freebase

Flo

Flo

Flo is an American sitcom which aired on CBS from 1980 to 1981. The series is a spin-off for Polly Holliday who portrayed the sassy and street-smart waitress Florence Jean "Flo" Castleberry on the sitcom Alice. Flo was cancelled at the end of its second season.

— Freebase

Institut de l'information scientifique et technique

Institut de l'information scientifique et technique

The Institut de l'information scientifique et technique, or INIST is the CNRS centre of documentation located in France. It has as mission to collect, treat and diffuse results of scientific and technical research. The INIST produces three bibliographic multilingual and multidisciplinary databases: PASCAL, FRANCIS, and DOGE. It is based at Vandœuvre-lès-Nancy, in a building designed by Jean Nouvel. In addition, INIST publishes a number of electronic journals.

— Freebase

James Parkinson

James Parkinson

James Parkinson FGS was an English apothecary surgeon, geologist, paleontologist, and political activist. He is most famous for his 1817 work, An Essay on the Shaking Palsy in which he was the first to describe "paralysis agitans", a condition that would later be renamed Parkinson's disease by Jean-Martin Charcot.

— Freebase

Cyclopia

Cyclopia

Cyclopia, better known by the common name Honeybush, is a genus of flowering plants in the legume family, Fabaceae, of the subfamily Faboideae. The description was published by Étienne Pierre Ventenat in 1808. The name Ibbetsonia, published two years later, is regarded as a synonym of this genus; John Sims had commemorated the physiologist Agnes Ibbetson with this name. Another common name is 'Heuningbos' in Afrikaans.

— Freebase

Ratio test

Ratio test

In mathematics, the ratio test is a test for the convergence of a series, where each term is a real or complex number and is nonzero when n is large. The test was first published by Jean le Rond d'Alembert and is sometimes known as d'Alembert's ratio test.

— Freebase

Exi

Exi

The Exis were a youth movement in Hamburg, Germany, in the 1950s. The Exis took their name from the existentialist movement, and were influenced by its chief proponents, Jean-Paul Sartre and Albert Camus. There are similar German nicknames for other movements, such as "Sozis" and the "Nazis".

— Freebase

Jean Racine

Jean Racine

Jean Racine, baptismal name Jean-Baptiste Racine, was a French dramatist, one of the three great playwrights of 17th-century France, and an important literary figure in the Western tradition. Racine was primarily a tragedian, producing such "examples of neoclassical perfection" as Phèdre, Andromaque, and Athalie, although he did write one comedy, Les Plaideurs, and a muted tragedy, Esther, for the young. Racine's plays displayed his mastery of the dodecasyllabic alexandrine; he is renowned for elegance, purity, speed, and fury, and for what Robert Lowell described as a "diamond-edge", and the "glory of its hard, electric rage". The linguistic effects of Racine's poetry are widely considered to be untranslatable, although many eminent poets have attempted to do so, including Lowell, Ted Hughes, and Derek Mahon into English, and Schiller into German. The latest attempt to translate Racine's plays into English earned a 2011 American Book Award for the poet Geoffrey Argent. Racine's dramaturgy is marked by his psychological insight, the prevailing passion of his characters, and the nakedness of both the plot and stage.

— Freebase

Coco de Mer

Coco de Mer

The Coco de Mer, the sole member of the genus Lodoicea, is a palm endemic to the islands of Praslin and Curieuse in the Seychelles. It formerly also was found on the small islets of St Pierre, Chauve-Souris and Ile Ronde, all located near Praslin, but has become extinct there. The name of the genus, Lodoicea, is derived from Lodoicus, the Latinised form of Louis, in honour of King Louis XV of France.

— Freebase

Blood chit

Blood chit

Blood chit is a notice that is carried by the military, usually aircraft personnel, that displays messages aimed at the civilians that ask them to help the servicemember in case they are shot down. Alternative names are escape and identification flags. Chit is a British English term for a small document, note or pass; it is an Anglo-Indian word dating from the late 18th century, derived from the Hindi citthi. The idea of blood chit originates from 1793 when French balloonist Jean-Pierre Blanchard demonstrated his hot air balloon in the USA. Because he could not control the direction of the balloon, no one knew where he would land. Because Blanchard did not speak English, George Washington gave him a letter that said that all US citizens were obliged to assist him to return to Philadelphia. In World War I, British Royal Flying Corps pilots in India and Mesopotamia carried a "goolie chit" printed in four local languages that promised a reward to anyone who would bring an unharmed British aviator back to British lines. The term "goolie" is British slang for "testicles" and was so called because, in the areas where the chits were used, local tribesmen were said to turn over aviators to their womenfolk, who castrated the pilots for use as servants. But the British officer John Masters recorded in his autobiography that Pathan women in the North-West Frontier Province of British India during the Anglo-Afghan Wars would behead and castrate non Muslim soldiers who were captured, like British and Sikhs.

— Freebase

Cousins

Cousins

Cousins is a 1989 American romantic comedy film directed by Joel Schumacher and starring Ted Danson, Isabella Rossellini, Sean Young, William Petersen, Keith Coogan, Lloyd Bridges and Norma Aleandro. The film is an American remake of the 1975 French comedy Cousin, cousine, directed by Jean-Charles Tacchella.

— Freebase

Pentateuch

Pentateuch

the name given by Origen to the first five books of the Bible, which the Jews call the Law or Five-fifths of the Law, the composition of which has of late years been subjected to keen critical investigation, and the whole ascribed to documents of different dates and diverse authorship, to the rejection of the old traditional hypothesis that it was the work of Moses, first called in question by Spinoza, and shown to be untenable by Jean Astruc (q. v.).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Pierre-Joseph van Beneden

Pierre-Joseph van Beneden

Pierre-Joseph van Beneden was a Belgian zoologist and paleontologist. Born in Mechelen, Belgium, he studied medicine at the State University of Leuven, and studied zoology in Paris under Georges Cuvier. In 1831 he became curator at the natural history museum in Leuven, and from 1836 until 1894 was a professor of zoology at the Catholic University of Leuven. In 1842 he became a member of the Académie des sciences de Belgique, and in 1875 a member of the Royal Society of London. He was the father of biologist Edouard van Beneden.

— Freebase

Facticity

Facticity

Facticity has a multiplicity of meanings from "factuality" and "contingency" to the intractable conditions of human existence. The term is first used by Fichte and has a variety of meanings. It can refer to facts and factuality, as in nineteenth-century positivism, but comes to mean that which resists explanation and interpretation in Dilthey and Neo-Kantianism. The Neo-Kantians contrasted facticity with ideality, as does Jürgen Habermas in Between Facts and Norms. It is a term that takes on a more specialized meaning in 20th century continental philosophy, especially in phenomenology and existentialism, including Edmund Husserl, Martin Heidegger, Jean-Paul Sartre, and Maurice Merleau-Ponty. Recent philosophers such as Giorgio Agamben, Jean-Luc Nancy, and François Raffoul have taken up the notion of facticity in new ways. Facticity plays a key part in Quentin Meillassoux's philosophical project to challenge the thought-world relationship of correlationism. It is defined by him as “the absence of reason for any reality; in other words, the impossibility of providing an ultimate ground for the existence of any being.”

— Freebase

Timebomb

Timebomb

Timebomb is a 1991 sci-fi action film written and directed by Avi Nesher. Starring Michael Biehn and Patsy Kensit. Producers originally wanted Jean-Claude Van Damme or Chuck Norris to play Kay, but Nesher saw Biehn as perfect for the role due to his performance in The Abyss. Biehn himself took a pay cut to show his dedication to the film.

— Freebase

Radiobiology

Radiobiology

Radiobiology, as a field of clinical and basic medical sciences, originated from Leopold Freund's 1896 demonstration of the therapeutic treatment of a hairy mole using a new type of electromagnetic radiation called x-rays, which was discovered 1 year previously by the German physicist, Wilhelm Röntgen. At the same time, Pierre and Marie Curie discovered the radioactive polonium and radium later used to treat cancer. In simplest terms, radiobiology is the study of the action of ionizing radiation on living things.

— Freebase

Direct Cinema

Direct Cinema

Direct Cinema is a documentary genre that originated between 1958 and 1962 in North America, principally in the Canadian province of Quebec and the United States, and developed by Jean Rouch in France. Similar in many respects to the cinéma vérité genre, it was characterized initially by filmmakers' desire to directly capture reality and represent it truthfully, and to question the relationship of reality with cinema.

— Freebase

Bon Voyage

Bon Voyage

Bon Voyage is a French film directed by Jean-Paul Rappeneau, released 16 April 2003. The film was a critical success due in part to its tight interweaving of various genres, including spy, romance, World War II, and comedy. The film features the first reteaming of stars Isabelle Adjani and Gérard Depardieu since 1988's Camille Claudel.

— Freebase

Peter Waldo

Peter Waldo

Peter Waldo, Valdo, Valdes, or Waldes, also Pierre Vaudès or de Vaux, is credited as the founder of the Waldensians, a Christian spiritual movement of the Middle Ages, descendants of which still exist in various regions of southern Europe. Due to lack of reliable documentation there is a great degree of debate over Waldo's role in the Waldensian sect, which may have existed before his leadership. The French historian Thuanus dated his death to the year 1179.

— Freebase


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