Definitions containing Bleeding

We've found 250 definitions:

Styptic

Styptic

producing contraction; stopping bleeding; having the quality of restraining hemorrhage when applied to the bleeding part; astringent

— Webster Dictionary

bleeding time

bleeding time

The time it takes for bleeding to stop in a bleeding time test.

— Wiktionary

Bleeding on probing

Bleeding on probing

Bleeding on probing which is also known as bleeding gums or gingival bleeding is a term used by dentists and dental hygienists when referring to bleeding that is induced by gentle manipulation of the tissue at the depth of the gingival sulcus, or interface between the gingiva and a tooth. Bleeding on probing, often abbreviated BOP, is a sign of inflammation and indicates some sort of destruction and erosion to the lining of the sulcus or the ulceration of sulcular epithelium. The blood comes from lamina propria after the ulceration of the lining.

— Freebase

Nosebleed

Nosebleed

a bleeding at the nose

— Webster Dictionary

Epistaxis

Epistaxis

bleeding at the nose

— Webster Dictionary

Floramour

Floramour

the plant love-lies-bleeding

— Webster Dictionary

Menorrhagia

Menorrhagia

any profuse bleeding from the uterus; Metrorrhagia

— Webster Dictionary

haemorrhaging

haemorrhaging

bleeding

— Wiktionary

blooded

blooded

bloody, bleeding.

— Wiktionary

menorrhoea

menorrhoea

menstrual bleeding

— Wiktionary

rectorrhagia

rectorrhagia

rectal bleeding

— Wiktionary

Bleeder

Bleeder

one in whom slight wounds give rise to profuse or uncontrollable bleeding

— Webster Dictionary

blooming

blooming

Bloody; bleeding; extremely

— Wiktionary

ICH

ICH

Bleeding inside the skull.

— Wiktionary

antibleeding

antibleeding

Serving to prevent bleeding.

— Wiktionary

hemarthrosis

hemarthrosis

bleeding in the joints

— Wiktionary

hemostatic

hemostatic

That checks bleeding; styptic

— Wiktionary

Uterine Hemorrhage

Uterine Hemorrhage

Bleeding from blood vessels in the UTERUS, sometimes manifested as vaginal bleeding.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

antihemophilic

antihemophilic

That counteracts bleeding in hemophiliacs

— Wiktionary

bloodied nose

bloodied nose

A nose that is bleeding internally.

— Wiktionary

bloody nose

bloody nose

A nose that is bleeding internally.

— Wiktionary

bleeding heck

bleeding heck

minced oath for bleeding hell.

— Wiktionary

hemostatic

hemostatic

Any medicine that stops bleeding.

— Wiktionary

enterohaemorrhagic

enterohaemorrhagic

That causes bleeding in the intestines

— Wiktionary

metrorrhagia

metrorrhagia

uterine bleeding, other than the menses

— Wiktionary

epistaxis

nosebleed, epistaxis

bleeding from the nose

— Princeton's WordNet

ulemorrhagia

ulemorrhagia

bleeding of the gums

— Princeton's WordNet

nosebleed

nosebleed, epistaxis

bleeding from the nose

— Princeton's WordNet

bleed

bleed

An incident of bleeding, as in haemophilia.

— Wiktionary

Metrorrhagia

Metrorrhagia

profuse bleeding from the womb, esp. such as does not occur at the menstrual period

— Webster Dictionary

styptic

styptic

Bringing about contraction of tissues, especially to stop bleeding

— Wiktionary

incruental

incruental

Bloodless; characterized by no blood loss or very little bleeding.

— Wiktionary

menometrorrhagia

menometrorrhagia

Excessive uterine bleeding occurring outside of the normal menstrual period.

— Wiktionary

hemostasis

hemostasis

The process of keeping blood inside a damaged vessel to stop bleeding.

— Wiktionary

leading edge

leading edge

At the forefront of practice or technology, contrast with bleeding edge

— Wiktionary

peliosis

purpura, peliosis

any of several blood diseases causing subcutaneous bleeding

— Princeton's WordNet

cerebral hemorrhage

cerebral hemorrhage

bleeding from a ruptured blood vessel in the brain

— Princeton's WordNet

purpura

purpura, peliosis

any of several blood diseases causing subcutaneous bleeding

— Princeton's WordNet

petechia

petechia

a small spot, especially on an organ, caused by bleeding underneath the skin

— Wiktionary

hematochezia

hematochezia

The presence of fresh blood in stools, often due to lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

— Wiktionary

haemophile

hemophiliac, haemophiliac, bleeder, hemophile, haemophile

someone who has hemophilia and is subject to uncontrollable bleeding

— Princeton's WordNet

haemophiliac

hemophiliac, haemophiliac, bleeder, hemophile, haemophile

someone who has hemophilia and is subject to uncontrollable bleeding

— Princeton's WordNet

haemostat

hemostat, haemostat

a surgical instrument that stops bleeding by clamping the blood vessel

— Princeton's WordNet

hemophile

hemophiliac, haemophiliac, bleeder, hemophile, haemophile

someone who has hemophilia and is subject to uncontrollable bleeding

— Princeton's WordNet

hemophiliac

hemophiliac, haemophiliac, bleeder, hemophile, haemophile

someone who has hemophilia and is subject to uncontrollable bleeding

— Princeton's WordNet

hemostat

hemostat, haemostat

a surgical instrument that stops bleeding by clamping the blood vessel

— Princeton's WordNet

melaena

melena, melaena

abnormally dark tarry feces containing blood (usually from gastrointestinal bleeding)

— Princeton's WordNet

melena

melena, melaena

abnormally dark tarry feces containing blood (usually from gastrointestinal bleeding)

— Princeton's WordNet

bleeder

hemophiliac, haemophiliac, bleeder, hemophile, haemophile

someone who has hemophilia and is subject to uncontrollable bleeding

— Princeton's WordNet

styptic

styptic, hemostatic

tending to check bleeding by contracting the tissues or blood vessels

— Princeton's WordNet

hemostatic

styptic, hemostatic

tending to check bleeding by contracting the tissues or blood vessels

— Princeton's WordNet

prothrombin

prothrombin

A glycoprotein, produced in the liver, that is converted into thrombin during bleeding and subsequent clotting

— Wiktionary

broadhead

broadhead

(bowhunting) a flat arrow head with razor-sharp sides, intended to kill prey by causing severe bleeding.

— Wiktionary

adrenochrome

adrenochrome

An oxidation product of adrenaline or epinephrine; its semicarbazone is used as a drug to reduce bleeding.

— Wiktionary

styptic pencil

styptic pencil

A short medicated stick, typically containing alum, used to stop bleeding from small wounds (as in shaving).

— Wiktionary

ecchymosis

ecchymosis

A skin discoloration caused by bleeding underneath the skin; a bruise.

— Wiktionary

hematophobia

hematophobia

Fear of bleeding or the sight of blood.

— Wiktionary

bleed to death

bleed to death

To die from massive bloodloss, usually from severe arterial bleeding.

— Wiktionary

Metrorrhagia

Metrorrhagia

Abnormal uterine bleeding that is not related to MENSTRUATION, usually in females without regular MENSTRUAL CYCLE. The irregular and unpredictable bleeding usually comes from a dysfunctional ENDOMETRIUM.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

dacryohemorrhea

dacryohemorrhea

Bloody tears; bleeding from the tear ducts while crying; crying blood.

— Wiktionary

tourniquet

tourniquet

A tightly-compressed bandage used to stop bleeding by stopping the flow of blood through a large artery in a limb.

— Wiktionary

melena

melena

A passage of dark, tarry stools containing blood, as the result of upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

— Wiktionary

Abortion, Threatened

Abortion, Threatened

UTERINE BLEEDING from a GESTATION of less than 20 weeks without any CERVICAL DILATATION. It is characterized by vaginal bleeding, lower back discomfort, or midline pelvic cramping and a risk factor for MISCARRIAGE.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Bleeding time

Bleeding time

Bleeding time is a medical test done on someone to assess their platelet function The term "template bleeding time" is used when the test is performed to standardized parameters. This makes it easier to compare data collected at different facilities.

— Freebase

tranexamic acid

tranexamic acid

An alicyclic amino acid trans-4-(aminomethyl)cyclohexanecarboxylic acid that is used to control heavy bleeding

— Wiktionary

haemostat

haemostat

A clamp used in surgery to close the severed end of a blood vessel to stop bleeding.

— Wiktionary

molimina

molimina

The premenstrual time frame. Any symptoms, other than bleeding, that precedes menstruation are moliminal symptoms.

— Wiktionary

aprotinin

aprotinin

A polypeptide, obtained from bovine lung tissue, that acts as a protease inhibitor, and is used in surgery to reduce bleeding

— Wiktionary

Bleeding edge technology

Bleeding edge technology

Bleeding edge technology is a category of technologies incorporating those so new that they could have a high risk of being unreliable and lead adopters to incur greater expense in order to make use of them. The term bleeding edge was formed as an allusion to the similar terms "leading edge" and "cutting edge". It tends to imply even greater advancement, albeit at an increased risk of "metaphorically cutting until bleeding" because of the unreliability of the software or other technology. The phrase was originally coined in an article entitled "Rumors of the Future and the Digital Circus" by Jack Dale, published in Editor & Publisher Magazine, February 12, 1994. By its nature, a proportion of bleeding edge technology will make it into the mainstream. For example, electronic mail was once considered to be bleeding edge.

— Freebase

hyphema

hyphema

bleeding into the interior chamber of the eye

— Princeton's WordNet

Dicentra

Dicentra

a genus of herbaceous plants, with racemes of two-spurred or heart-shaped flowers, including the Dutchman's breeches, and the more showy Bleeding heart (D. spectabilis)

— Webster Dictionary

afibrinogenemia

afibrinogenemia

the absence of fibrinogen in the plasma leading to prolonged bleeding

— Princeton's WordNet

Bloodletting

Bloodletting

the act or process of letting blood or bleeding, as by opening a vein or artery, or by cupping or leeches; -- esp. applied to venesection

— Webster Dictionary

metrorrhagia

metrorrhagia

bleeding from the uterus that is not due to menstruation; usually indicative of disease (as cervical cancer)

— Princeton's WordNet

blood substitution

blood substitution

A temporary substitution for an visibly-bleeding player who must leave the field of play for first-aid treatment.

— Wiktionary

blood bin

blood bin

A temporary substitution for an visibly-bleeding player who must leave the field of play for first-aid treatment.

— Wiktionary

saignu00E9e

saignu00E9e

a method of rosu00E9 production that involves bleeding off the juice after limited contact with the skins. Pronounced 'sonyay'.

— Wiktionary

blood replacement

blood replacement

A temporary substitution for an visibly-bleeding player who must leave the field of play for first-aid treatment.

— Wiktionary

Factor XIII deficiency

Factor XIII deficiency

Factor XIII deficiency may occur very rarely, and can cause a severe bleeding tendency. Incidence is 1 in a million to 1 in 5 million people. Most are due to mutations in the A subunit. Administration of recombinant A subunit improves clot stability and is becoming a therapeutic option for patients with this condition. This deficiency leads to defective cross-linking of fibrin and vulnerability to late re-bleeds when the primary hemostatic plug is overwhelmed. Bleeding tendencies similar to hemophiliacs develop such as hemarthroses and deep tissue bleeding.

— Freebase

fumitory family

Fumariaceae, family Fumariaceae, fumitory family

erect or climbing herbs of the northern hemisphere and southern Africa: bleeding heart; Dutchman's breeches; fumitory; squirrel corn

— Princeton's WordNet

fumariaceae

Fumariaceae, family Fumariaceae, fumitory family

erect or climbing herbs of the northern hemisphere and southern Africa: bleeding heart; Dutchman's breeches; fumitory; squirrel corn

— Princeton's WordNet

family fumariaceae

Fumariaceae, family Fumariaceae, fumitory family

erect or climbing herbs of the northern hemisphere and southern Africa: bleeding heart; Dutchman's breeches; fumitory; squirrel corn

— Princeton's WordNet

ligation

ligation

(surgery) tying a duct or blood vessel with a ligature (as to prevent bleeding during surgery)

— Princeton's WordNet

implantation bleeding

implantation bleeding

Light bleeding from the vagina caused when a fertilized ovum attaches to the wall of the uterus.

— Wiktionary

haemophilia

haemophilia

Any of several hereditary illnesses that impair the body's ability to control bleeding, usually passed from mother to son.

— Wiktionary

haemophilia

hemophilia, haemophilia, bleeder's disease

congenital tendency to uncontrolled bleeding; usually affects males and is transmitted from mother to son

— Princeton's WordNet

bleeder's disease

hemophilia, haemophilia, bleeder's disease

congenital tendency to uncontrolled bleeding; usually affects males and is transmitted from mother to son

— Princeton's WordNet

hemophilia

hemophilia, haemophilia, bleeder's disease

congenital tendency to uncontrolled bleeding; usually affects males and is transmitted from mother to son

— Princeton's WordNet

Hemostatics

Hemostatics

Agents acting to arrest the flow of blood. Absorbable hemostatics arrest bleeding either by the formation of an artificial clot or by providing a mechanical matrix that facilitates clotting when applied directly to the bleeding surface. These agents function more at the capillary level and are not effective at stemming arterial or venous bleeding under any significant intravascular pressure.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Marburg disease

Marburg disease

A viral infection characterised by a high fever, encephalitis, diarrhea, vomiting, and severe bleeding from bodily orifices, and which is often fatal.

— Wiktionary

Apoplexy

Apoplexy

Apoplexy is bleeding within internal organs and the accompanying symptoms. For example, ovarian apoplexy is bleeding in the ovaries. The term formerly referred to what is now called a stroke; nowadays, health care professionals typically specify the type of apoplexy, such as pituitary apoplexy and ovarian apoplexy.

— Freebase

bone wax

bone wax

beeswax with the addition of paraffin, or some other agent, to soften it, used to stop bleeding from bones during surgery.

— Wiktionary

purpura

purpura

The appearance of red or purple discolorations on the skin that do not blanch when pressure is applied, caused by subdermal bleeding.

— Wiktionary

trench mouth

trench mouth

Acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis, a severe bacterial infection of the gums, typically characterized by inflammation, bleeding, deep ulceration, necrotized tissue, pain, fever, enlarged lymph nodes, fatigue, and halitosis.

— Wiktionary

Ebola fever

Ebola fever

An extremely contagious and often fatal illness caused by the Ebola virus, characterised by fever and internal bleeding, contracted through infected body fluids.

— Wiktionary

Hemostasis, Endoscopic

Hemostasis, Endoscopic

Control of bleeding performed through the channel of the endoscope. Techniques include use of lasers, heater probes, bipolar electrocoagulation, and local injection. Endoscopic hemostasis is commonly used to treat bleeding esophageal and gastrointestinal varices and ulcers.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Ergot

Ergot

the mycelium or spawn of this fungus infecting grains of rye and wheat. It is a powerful remedial agent, and also a dangerous poison, and is used as a means of hastening childbirth, and to arrest bleeding

— Webster Dictionary

blood rule

blood rule

A rule requiring that a player receive medical attention before continuing to play if he is bleeding or there is blood on him or his clothes.

— Wiktionary

Metrorrhagia

Metrorrhagia

Metrorrhagia is uterine bleeding at irregular intervals, particularly between the expected menstrual periods. In some women, menstrual spotting between periods occurs as a normal and harmless part of ovulation. Some women experience acute mid-cycle abdominal pain around the time of ovulation. This may also occur at the same time as menstrual spotting. The term breakthrough bleeding or breakthrough spotting is usually used for women using hormonal contraceptives, such as IUDs or oral contraceptives, in which it refers to bleeding or spotting between any expected withdrawal bleedings, or bleeding or spotting at any time if none is expected. If spotting continues beyond the first three cycles of oral contraceptive use, a woman should have her prescription changed to a pill containing either more estrogen or more progesterone. Metrorrhagia may also be a sign of an underlying disorder, such as hormone imbalance, endometriosis, uterine fibroids, or cancer of the reproductive organs. Due to repeated bleeding, it may cause significant iron deficiency anemia.

— Freebase

Hemarthrosis

Hemarthrosis

Hemarthrosis is a bleeding into joint spaces.

— Freebase

arteriovenous malformation

arteriovenous malformation

A congenital disorder in which arteries are connected directly to veins rather than through capillaries that distribute oxygen and nutrients. These connections, often called a nidus, can be extremely fragile and prone to bleeding.

— Wiktionary

bleeding time test

bleeding time test

A test used to assess the ability of a person's blood to clot, carried out by cutting the skin and measuring the time it takes for the resulting bleeding to stop.

— Wiktionary

tamponage

tamponade, tamponage

blockage or closure (as of a wound or body cavity) by (or as if by) a tampon (especially to stop bleeding)

— Princeton's WordNet

tamponade

tamponade, tamponage

blockage or closure (as of a wound or body cavity) by (or as if by) a tampon (especially to stop bleeding)

— Princeton's WordNet

iron deficiency anemia

iron deficiency anemia, iron deficiency anaemia

a form of anemia due to lack of iron in the diet or to iron loss as a result of chronic bleeding

— Princeton's WordNet

iron deficiency anaemia

iron deficiency anemia, iron deficiency anaemia

a form of anemia due to lack of iron in the diet or to iron loss as a result of chronic bleeding

— Princeton's WordNet

hypothrombinemia

hypothrombinemia

a low level of prothrombin (factor II) in the circulating blood; results in long clotting time and poor clot formation and sometimes excessive bleeding; can result from vitamin K deficiency

— Princeton's WordNet

Cerebral Hemorrhage, Traumatic

Cerebral Hemorrhage, Traumatic

Bleeding into one or both CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES due to TRAUMA. Hemorrhage may involve any part of the CEREBRAL CORTEX and the BASAL GANGLIA. Depending on the severity of bleeding, clinical features may include SEIZURES; APHASIA; VISION DISORDERS; MOVEMENT DISORDERS; PARALYSIS; and COMA.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

flesh wound

flesh wound

An injury which pierces the skin and causes bleeding, but which does not injure any bones or vital organs, and does not carry a serious threat of death.

— Wiktionary

angiohemophilia

von Willebrand's disease, angiohemophilia, vascular hemophilia

a form of hemophilia discovered by Erik von Willebrand; a genetic disorder that is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait; characterized by a deficiency of the coagulation factor and by mucosal bleeding

— Princeton's WordNet

vascular hemophilia

von Willebrand's disease, angiohemophilia, vascular hemophilia

a form of hemophilia discovered by Erik von Willebrand; a genetic disorder that is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait; characterized by a deficiency of the coagulation factor and by mucosal bleeding

— Princeton's WordNet

von willebrand's disease

von Willebrand's disease, angiohemophilia, vascular hemophilia

a form of hemophilia discovered by Erik von Willebrand; a genetic disorder that is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait; characterized by a deficiency of the coagulation factor and by mucosal bleeding

— Princeton's WordNet

Hematochezia

Hematochezia

Haematochezia is the passage of fresh blood through the anus, usually in or with stools. Haematochezia is commonly associated with lower gastrointestinal bleeding, but may also occur from a brisk upper gastrointestinal bleed. The difference between haematochezia and rectorrhagia is that the latter rectal bleeding is not associated with defaecation. Instead, it is associated with expulsion of fresh bright red blood without stools.

— Freebase

norethynodrel

norethynodrel

a progesterone derivative used in oral contraceptives and in the control of menstruation and the treatment of abnormal uterine bleeding

— Princeton's WordNet

Thrombasthenia

Thrombasthenia

A congenital bleeding disorder with prolonged bleeding time, absence of aggregation of platelets in response to most agents, especially ADP, and impaired or absent clot retraction. Platelet membranes are deficient in or have a defect in the glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complex (PLATELET GLYCOPROTEIN GPIIB-IIIA COMPLEX).

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Hematosalpinx

Hematosalpinx

Hematosalpinx is a medical condition involving bleeding into the fallopian tubes.

— Freebase

Bone wax

Bone wax

Bone wax is a waxy substance used to help mechanically control bleeding from bone surfaces during surgical procedures. It is generally made of beeswax with a softening agent such as paraffin or petroleum jelly and is smeared across the bleeding edge of the bone, blocking the holes and causing immediate bone hemostasis through a tamponade effect. Bone wax is most commonly supplied in sterile sticks, and usually requires softening before it can be applied.

— Freebase

pressure point

pressure point

any of several points on the body where the pulse can be felt and where pressure on an underlying artery will control bleeding from that artery at a more distal point

— Princeton's WordNet

Coagulopathy

Coagulopathy

Coagulopathy is a condition in which the blood’s ability to clot is impaired. This condition can cause prolonged or excessive bleeding, which may occur spontaneously or following an injury or medical and dental procedures. The normal clotting process depends on the interplay of various proteins in the blood. Coagulopathy may be caused by reduced levels or absence of blood-clotting proteins, known as clotting factors or coagulation factors. Genetic disorders, such as hemophilia and Von Willebrand's disease, can cause a reduction in clotting factors. Coagulopathy may also occur as a result of dysfunction or reduced levels of platelets. If someone has coagulopathy, their health care provider may help them manage their symptoms with medications or replacement therapy. In replacement therapy, the reduced or absent clotting factors are replaced with proteins derived from human blood or created in the laboratory. This therapy may be given either to treat bleeding that has already begun or to prevent bleeding from occurring. Coagulopathy may cause uncontrolled internal or external bleeding. Left untreated, uncontrolled bleeding may cause damage to joints, muscles, or internal organs and may be life threatening. Patients should seek immediate medical care for serious symptoms, including heavy external bleeding, blood in the urine or stool, double vision, severe head or neck pain, repeated vomiting, difficulty walking, convulsions, or seizures. They should seek prompt medical care if they experience mild but unstoppable external bleeding or joint swelling and stiffness.

— Freebase

ergometrine

ergometrine

An ergoline (and lysergamide) derivative, one of the primary ergot and morning glory alkaloids, chemically similar to LSD and used in medicine to facilitate delivery of the placenta and to prevent bleeding after childbirth.

— Wiktionary

scurvy

scurvy

A disease caused by insufficient intake of vitamin C leading to the formation of livid spots on the skin, spongy gums, loosening of the teeth and bleeding into the skin and from almost all mucous membranes.

— Wiktionary

Factor VII

Factor VII

Factor VII is one of the proteins that causes blood to clot in the coagulation cascade. It is an enzyme of the serine protease class. A recombinant form of human factor VIIa has U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for uncontrolled bleeding in hemophilia patients. It is sometimes used unlicensed in severe uncontrollable bleeding, although there have been safety concerns. A Biosimilar form of recombinant activated factor VII is manufacturing by AryoGen Biopharma and since 2012 is available in the market.

— Freebase

Haemophilia A

Haemophilia A

Hemophilia A is an inherited deficiency in clotting factor VIII, which causes increased bleeding and usually affects males.

— Freebase

Menometrorrhagia

Menometrorrhagia

Menometrorrhagia is a condition in which prolonged or excessive uterine bleeding occurs irregularly and more frequently than normal.

— Freebase

Epistaxis

Epistaxis

Bleeding from the nose.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Hemostatic Techniques

Hemostatic Techniques

Techniques for controlling bleeding.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

placenta previa

placenta previa

pregnancy in which the placenta is implanted in the lower part of the uterus (instead of the upper part); can cause bleeding late in pregnancy; delivery by cesarean section may be necessary

— Princeton's WordNet

Thrombolytic Science International

Thrombolytic Science International

Thrombolytic Science is focused on developing a proprietary product, M5, a mutant of pro-urokinase (proUK). M5 is a thrombolytic that follows a different paradigm than tPA, has superior efficacy and is accompanied by little bleeding risk.

— CrunchBase

Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, also known as Osler–Weber–Rendu disease and Osler–Weber–Rendu syndrome, is a genetic disorder that leads to abnormal blood vessel formation in the skin, mucous membranes, and often in organs such as the lungs, liver, and brain. It may lead to nosebleeds, acute and chronic digestive tract bleeding, and various problems due to the involvement of other organs. Treatment focuses on reducing bleeding from blood vessel lesions, and sometimes surgery or other targeted interventions to remove arteriovenous malformations in organs. Chronic bleeding often requires iron supplements and sometimes blood transfusions. HHT is transmitted in an autosomal dominant fashion, and occurs in one in 5,000 people. The disease carries the names of Sir William Osler, Henri Jules Louis Marie Rendu and Frederick Parkes Weber, who described it in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

— Freebase

Menorrhagia

Menorrhagia

Excessive uterine bleeding during MENSTRUATION.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

ebola

Ebola hemorrhagic fever, Ebola fever, Ebola

a severe and often fatal disease in humans and nonhuman primates (monkeys and chimpanzees) caused by the Ebola virus; characterized by high fever and severe internal bleeding; can be spread from person to person; is largely limited to Africa

— Princeton's WordNet

ebola fever

Ebola hemorrhagic fever, Ebola fever, Ebola

a severe and often fatal disease in humans and nonhuman primates (monkeys and chimpanzees) caused by the Ebola virus; characterized by high fever and severe internal bleeding; can be spread from person to person; is largely limited to Africa

— Princeton's WordNet

ebola hemorrhagic fever

Ebola hemorrhagic fever, Ebola fever, Ebola

a severe and often fatal disease in humans and nonhuman primates (monkeys and chimpanzees) caused by the Ebola virus; characterized by high fever and severe internal bleeding; can be spread from person to person; is largely limited to Africa

— Princeton's WordNet

Hyperfibrinolysis

Hyperfibrinolysis

The fibrinolysis system is responsible for removing blood clots. Hyperfibrinolysis describes a situation with markedly enhanced fibrinolytic activity, resulting in increased, sometimes catastrophic bleeding. Hyperfibrinolysis can be caused by acquired or congenital reasons. Among the congenital conditions for hyperfibrinolysis, deficiency of alpha-2-antiplasmin or plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 are very rare. The affected individuals show a hemophilia-like bleeding phenotype. Acquired hyperfibrinolysis is found in liver disease, in patients with severe trauma, during major surgical procedures, and other conditions. A special situation with temporarily enhanced fibrinolysis is thrombolytic therapy with drugs which activate plasminogen, e.g. for use in acute ischemic events or in patients with stroke. In patients with severe trauma, hyperfibrinolysis is associated with poor outcome. Bleeding is caused by the generation of fibrinogen degradation products which interfere with regular fibrin polymerization and inhibit platelet aggregation. Moreover, plasmin which is formed in excess in hyperfibrinolysis can proteolytically activate or inactivate many plasmatic or cellular proteins involved in hemostasis. Especially the degradation of fibrinogen, an essential protein for platelet aggregation and clot stability, may be a major cause for clinical bleeding.

— Freebase

Hemostasis, Surgical

Hemostasis, Surgical

Control of bleeding during or after surgery.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Hemorrhage

Hemorrhage

Bleeding or escape of blood from a vessel.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Blood in the Water

Blood in the Water

A particularly violent water polo match between the USSR and Hungary, played at the 1956 Melbourne Summer Olympics contemporaneously with the Hungarian Revolution of 1956. Images of a Hungarian player leaving the pool with a bleeding head wound led to exaggerated reports of blood in the water.

— Wiktionary

Iron deficiency anemia

Iron deficiency anemia

Iron-deficiency anemia is a common anemia caused by insufficient dietary intake and absorption of iron, and/or iron loss from bleeding which can originate from a range of sources such as the intestinal, uterine or urinary tract. Iron deficiency causes approximately half of all anemia cases worldwide, and affects women more often than men. World estimates of iron deficiency occurrence are somewhat vague, but the true number probably exceeds one billion people. This can result if: ⁕The body does not make enough red blood cells ⁕Bleeding causes loss of red blood cells more quickly than they can be replaced The most significant cause of iron-deficiency anemia in third world children is parasitic worms: hookworms, whipworms, and roundworms. Worms cause intestinal bleeding, which is not always noticeable in faeces, and is especially damaging to growing children. Malaria, hookworms and vitamin A deficiency contribute to anemia during pregnancy in most underdeveloped countries. In women over 50 years old, the most common cause of iron-deficiency anemia is chronic gastrointestinal bleeding from nonparasitic causes, such as gastric ulcers, duodenal ulcers or gastrointestinal cancer.

— Freebase

Tourniquet

Tourniquet

A tourniquet is a constricting or compressing device, specifically a bandage, used to control venous and arterial circulation to an extremity for a period of time. Pressure is applied circumferentially upon the skin and underlying tissues of a limb; this pressure is transferred to the walls of vessels, causing them to become temporarily occluded. It is generally used as a tool for a medical professional in applications such as cannulation or to stem the flow of traumatic bleeding, especially by military medics. The tourniquet is usually applied when the patient is in a life-threatening state as a result of continuous bleeding. A stick, a baton or any other elongated but inelastic object is used to support the tourniquet by first tying the stick to the tourniquet. The stick is then twisted to tighten the tourniquet until the bleeding comes to a halt. This is a traditional device which an individual can employ when experiencing a very serious threat. To further improve this device, modern tourniquet systems have been employed for use.

— Freebase

Bleeding

Bleeding

Bleeding, technically known as hemorrhaging or hæmorrhaging, is the loss of blood or blood escaping from the circulatory system. Bleeding can occur internally, where blood leaks from blood vessels inside the body, or externally, either through a natural opening such as the mouth, nose, ear, urethra, vagina or anus, or through a break in the skin. Desanguination is a massive blood loss, and the complete loss of blood is referred to as exsanguination. Typically, a healthy person can endure a loss of 10–15% of the total blood volume without serious medical difficulties, and blood donation typically takes 8–10% of the donor's blood volume.

— Freebase

Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage

Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage

Bleeding in any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT from ESOPHAGUS to RECTUM.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Carboprost

Carboprost

Carboprost is a synthetic prostaglandin analogue of PGF2α with oxytocic properties. Carboprost induces contractions and can trigger abortion in early pregnancy. It also reduces postpartum bleeding.

— Freebase

Banding

Banding

Banding is a medical procedure which uses elastic bands for constriction. Banding may be used to tie off blood vessels in order to stop bleeding, as in the treatment of bleeding esophageal varices. The band restricts blood flow to the ligated tissue, so that it eventually dies and sloughs away from the supporting tissue. This same principle underlies banding as treatment for hemorrhoids. Banding may also be used to restrict the function of an organ without killing it. In gastric banding to treat obesity, the size of the stomach is reduced so that digestion is slowed and the patient feels full more quickly.

— Freebase

Black eye

Black eye

A black eye, periorbital hematoma, or a shiner, is ecchymosis around the eye commonly due to an injury to the face rather than eye injury. The name is given due to the color of bruising. The so-called black eye is caused by bleeding beneath the skin and around the eye. Sometimes, a black eye indicates a more extensive injury, even a skull fracture, particularly if the area around both eyes is bruised, or if there has been a prior head injury. Although most black eye injuries aren't serious, bleeding within the eye, called a hyphema, is serious and can reduce vision and damage the cornea. In some cases, abnormally high pressure inside the eyeball also can result.

— Freebase

Hemarthrosis

Hemarthrosis

Bleeding into the joints. It may arise from trauma or spontaneously in patients with hemophilia.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Peptic Ulcer Hemorrhage

Peptic Ulcer Hemorrhage

Bleeding from a PEPTIC ULCER that can be located in any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Bernard-Soulier Syndrome

Bernard-Soulier Syndrome

A familial coagulation disorder characterized by a prolonged bleeding time, unusually large platelets, and impaired prothrombin consumption.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

dilation and curettage

dilation and curettage, dilatation and curettage, D and C

a surgical procedure usually performed under local anesthesia in which the cervix is dilated and the endometrial lining of the uterus is scraped with a curet; performed to obtain tissue samples or to stop prolonged bleeding or to remove small tumors or to remove fragments of placenta after childbirth or as a method of abortion

— Princeton's WordNet

d and c

dilation and curettage, dilatation and curettage, D and C

a surgical procedure usually performed under local anesthesia in which the cervix is dilated and the endometrial lining of the uterus is scraped with a curet; performed to obtain tissue samples or to stop prolonged bleeding or to remove small tumors or to remove fragments of placenta after childbirth or as a method of abortion

— Princeton's WordNet

dilatation and curettage

dilation and curettage, dilatation and curettage, D and C

a surgical procedure usually performed under local anesthesia in which the cervix is dilated and the endometrial lining of the uterus is scraped with a curet; performed to obtain tissue samples or to stop prolonged bleeding or to remove small tumors or to remove fragments of placenta after childbirth or as a method of abortion

— Princeton's WordNet

Hyphema

Hyphema

Bleeding in the anterior chamber of the eye.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Retinal Hemorrhage

Retinal Hemorrhage

Bleeding from the vessels of the retina.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Tamponade

Tamponade

Tamponade is the closure or blockage as if by a tampon especially to stop bleeding. Tamponade is a useful method of stopping a hemorrhage. This can be achieved by applying an absorbent dressing directly onto a wound, thereby absorbing excess blood and creating a blockage, or by applying direct pressure with a hand or a tourniquet. There can, however, be disastrous consequences when tamponade occurs as a result of health problems, as in the case of cardiac tamponade. In this situation, fluid collects between the heart muscle and the pericardium. The pressure within the pericardium prevents the heart from expanding fully and filling the ventricles, with the result that a significantly reduced amount of blood circulates within the body. If left unchecked, this condition will result in death. Bladder tamponade is obstruction of the urinary bladder outlet due to heavy blood clot formation within it. It generally requires surgery. Such heavy bleeding is usually due to bladder cancer. Pressing Bone Wax into bleeding bone is considered hemostasis by tamponade, as opposed to methods which physically or biochemicaly activate the clotting cascade.

— Freebase

Blading

Blading

In professional wrestling, blading is the practice of intentionally cutting oneself to provoke bleeding. It is also known as juicing, gigging, or getting color. Similarly, a blade is an object used for blading, and a bladejob is a specific act of blading. The blood in pro wrestling is almost never, as often suspected, theatrical makeup, but actual blood, and the scars borne by longtime pro wrestlers are real ones. The act is usually done a good length into the match as the blood will mix with the flowing sweat to make the wound look like much more blood is flowing from it than there actually is. "Juicing" which occurs outside the storyline is said to be juicing the hardway, or legitimately bleeding.

— Freebase

Scurvy

Scurvy

a disease characterized by livid spots, especially about the thighs and legs, due to extravasation of blood, and by spongy gums, and bleeding from almost all the mucous membranes. It is accompanied by paleness, languor, depression, and general debility. It is occasioned by confinement, innutritious food, and hard labor, but especially by lack of fresh vegetable food, or confinement for a long time to a limited range of food, which is incapable of repairing the waste of the system. It was formerly prevalent among sailors and soldiers

— Webster Dictionary

Papilloma, Intraductal

Papilloma, Intraductal

A small, often impalpable benign papilloma arising in a lactiferous duct and frequently causing bleeding from the nipple. (Stedman, 25th ed)

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Channel Medsystems

Channel Medsystems

Channel Medystems is a clinical-stage medical technology company based in San Francisco. The company is developing proprietary cryo-ablation delivery technologies. Channel Medsystems is currently focused on women’s healthcare and addressing the problem of heavy menstrual bleeding. The company is the fifth spin-out of incubator TheraNova.

— CrunchBase

Methergine

Methergine

Methergine is a brand name of Methylergometrine tablet/solution. Methergine is a blood vessel constrictor most commonly used to prevent or control excessive bleeding following childbirth and spontaneous or elective abortion.

— Freebase

ALIMONY

ALIMONY

An expensive soothing syrup, prescribed by the judge for a divorcee's bleeding heart. (Old spelling, _allay money_).

— The Foolish Dictionary, by Gideon Wurdz

Gastric antral vascular ectasia

Gastric antral vascular ectasia

Gastric antral vascular ectasia is an uncommon cause of chronic gastrointestinal bleeding or iron deficiency anemia. The condition is associated with dilated small blood vessels in the antrum, or the last part of the stomach. The dilated vessels result in intestinal bleeding. It is also called watermelon stomach because streaky long red areas that are present in the stomach may resemble the markings on watermelon. The condition was first discovered in 1952, and reported in the literature in 1953. Watermelon disease was first diagnosed by Wheeler et al. in 1979, and definitively described in four living patients by Jabbari et al. only in 1984. As of 2011, the etiology and pathogenesis are still not known. However, there are several competing hypotheses as to various etiologies.

— Freebase

Ectopic pregnancy

Ectopic pregnancy

An ectopic pregnancy, or eccysis, is a complication of pregnancy in which the embryo implants outside the uterine cavity. With rare exceptions, ectopic pregnancies are not viable. Furthermore, they are dangerous for the mother, since internal haemorrhage is a life-threatening complication. Most ectopic pregnancies occur in the Fallopian tube, but implantation can also occur in the cervix, ovaries, and abdomen. An ectopic pregnancy is a potential medical emergency, and, if not treated properly, can lead to death. In a normal pregnancy, the fertilized egg enters the uterus and settles into the uterine lining where it has plenty of room to divide and grow. About 1% of pregnancies are in an ectopic location with implantation not occurring inside of the womb, and of these 98% occur in the Fallopian tubes. Detection of ectopic pregnancy in early gestation has been achieved mainly due to enhanced diagnostic capability. Despite all these notable successes in diagnostics and detection techniques ectopic pregnancy remains a source of serious maternal morbidity and mortality worldwide, especially in countries with poor prenatal care. In a typical ectopic pregnancy, the embryo adheres to the lining of the fallopian tube and burrows into the tubal lining. Most commonly this invades vessels and will cause bleeding. This intratubal bleeding hematosalpinx expels the implantation out of the tubal end as a tubal abortion. Tubal abortion is a common type of miscarriage. There is no inflammation of the tube in ectopic pregnancy. The pain is caused by prostaglandins released at the implantation site, and by free blood in the peritoneal cavity, which is a local irritant. Sometimes the bleeding might be heavy enough to threaten the health or life of the woman. Usually this degree of bleeding is due to delay in diagnosis, but sometimes, especially if the implantation is in the proximal tube, it may invade into the nearby Sampson artery, causing heavy bleeding earlier than usual.

— Freebase

Mallory–Weiss syndrome

Mallory–Weiss syndrome

Mallory–Weiss syndrome or gastro-esophageal laceration syndrome refers to bleeding from tears in the mucosa at the junction of the stomach and esophagus, usually caused by severe Alcoholism, retching, coughing, or vomiting.

— Freebase

Hypoprothrombinemia

Hypoprothrombinemia

Hypoprothrombinemia is a blood disorder in which a deficiency of prothrombin results in impaired blood clotting, leading to an increased physiological risk for bleeding, especially in the gastrointestinal system, cranial vault, and superficial integumentary system.

— Freebase

Cautery

Cautery

The application of a caustic substance, a hot instrument, an electric current, or other agent to control bleeding while removing or destroying tissue.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Astringents

Astringents

Agents, usually topical, that cause the contraction of tissues for the control of bleeding or secretions.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Fenoprofen

Fenoprofen

An anti-inflammatory analgesic and antipyretic highly bound to plasma proteins. It is pharmacologically similar to ASPIRIN, but causes less gastrointestinal bleeding.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Forge Medical

Forge Medical

Forge Medical, Inc. provides hemostasis devices for dialysis units and phlebotomy laboratories in the United States. It offers VasoStat, a device for assisting hemostasis in patients with various problems, including prolonged bleeding following dialysis graft, fistula puncture, and routine blood draws. The company was incorporated in 2009 and is based in Lancaster, Pennsylvania.

— CrunchBase

Idiopathic pulmonary haemosiderosis

Idiopathic pulmonary haemosiderosis

Idiopathic pulmonary haemosiderosis is a lung disease of unknown cause that is characterized by alveolar capillary bleeding and accumulation of haemosiderin in the lungs. It is rare, with an incidence between 0.24 and 1.23 cases per million people.

— Freebase

Hematemesis

Hematemesis

Vomiting of blood that is either fresh bright red, or older "coffee-ground" in character. It generally indicates bleeding of the UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Entellus Medical

Entellus Medical

Founded in 2006, Entellus Medical is focused on providing unique solutions to the unmet needs of the ENT (ear, nose and throat) physician, their patients, and payers through the development of innovative device technology and treatment solutions. Entellus is based in Maple Grove, MN and markets products throughout the United States.Entellus Medical works closely with leading researchers and clinicians to develop solutions that benefit patients, physicians, and payers. Entellus provides a simple, direct and effective treatment for Chronic Rhinosinusitis (CRS) that is less invasive, reduces pain and bleeding, shortens recovery time, and eliminates the need for general anesthesia.Entellus recently introduced FinESSâ„¢ Sinus Treatment, a simple and direct approach to effectively treat patients with CRS. FinESS can be performed under local anesthesia, with or without light sedation, and remodels the maxillary ostium and the ethmoid infundibulum using a micro endoscope and a small balloon catheter. Unlike sinus surgery techniques, FinESS does not require the removal of delicate bone or sinus tissue, resulting in shorter treatment time with very little pain or bleeding. Recovery time is usually one to two days with many patients resuming normal activity within a day.

— CrunchBase

Basal Ganglia Hemorrhage

Basal Ganglia Hemorrhage

Bleeding within the subcortical regions of cerebral hemispheres (BASAL GANGLIA). It is often associated with HYPERTENSION or ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS. Clinical manifestations may include HEADACHE; DYSKINESIAS; and HEMIPARESIS.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Blood rule

Blood rule

The Blood rule is a rule used in many sports that states that an athlete that receives an open wound, is bleeding, or who has blood on them or their clothes, must immediately leave the playing area to receive medical attention. Though they may be able to play again later, they cannot go back and play again until the wound is taken care of, bleeding has stopped, and all contaminated equipment has been replaced. The main concern addressed by this rule is the spread of infectious diseases like Human immunodeficiency virus, Hepatitis, and other diseases that can be spread through the contact of blood. Before this rule was enforced, the chance of spreading diseases through blood to teammates of the injured player, the opposing team, the officials, and even the injured player himself/herself in some cases where it could be spread through contact of saliva, mucus, or blood from another injured player, was great since an injured player's wound may have ended up touching all the other players by the end of the game as the player would continue playing unless they were bleeding enough for them to possibly die from a loss of a blood. Though there are two options that can be chosen: The first option is that the player be substituted and play resumes, or the official can halt play until the player has returned, the former being the most commonly chosen. In the National Rugby League, the latter option in first employed; play stops whilst the player's medical staff attends to the wound. If the bleeding is not staunched to the referee's satisfaction, the player must then leave the field for further attention.

— Freebase

Laser Coagulation

Laser Coagulation

The use of green light-producing LASERS to stop bleeding. The green light is selectively absorbed by HEMOGLOBIN, thus triggering BLOOD COAGULATION.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Colitis, Ulcerative

Colitis, Ulcerative

Inflammation of the COLON that is predominantly confined to the MUCOSA. Its major symptoms include DIARRHEA, rectal BLEEDING, the passage of MUCUS, and ABDOMINAL PAIN.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Cerebral Hemorrhage

Cerebral Hemorrhage

Bleeding into one or both CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES including the BASAL GANGLIA and the CEREBRAL CORTEX. It is often associated with HYPERTENSION and CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Gray Platelet Syndrome

Gray Platelet Syndrome

A rare, inherited platelet disorder characterized by a selective deficiency in the number and contents of platelet alpha-granules. It is associated with THROMBOCYTOPENIA, enlarged platelets, and prolonged bleeding time.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Amaranthus caudatus

Amaranthus caudatus

Amaranthus caudatus is a species of annual flowering plant. It goes by common names such as love-lies-bleeding, love-lies-a'bleeding, pendant amaranth, tassel flower, velvet flower, foxtail amaranth, and quilete. Many parts of the plants, including the leaves and seeds, are edible, and are frequently used as a source of food in India and South America — where it is the most important Andean species of Amaranthus, known as kiwicha. This species, as with many other of the amaranths, are originally from the American tropics. The exact origin is unknown, as A. caudatus is believed to be a wild Amaranthus hybridus aggregate. The red color of the inflorescences is due to a high content of betacyanins, as in the related species known as "Hopi red dye" amaranth. Ornamental garden varieties sold under the latter name are either Amaranthus cruentus or a hybrid between A. cruentus and A. powelli. In indigenous agriculture, A. cruentus is the Central American counterpart to South American A. caudatus.

— Freebase

Etidocaine

Etidocaine

Etidocaine, marketed under the trade name Duranest, is a local anesthetic given by injection during surgical procedures and labor and delivery. Etidocaine has a long duration of activity, and the main disadvantage of using during dentistry is increased bleeding during surgery.

— Freebase

Unsung

Unsung

Unsung is an EP released on December 6, 2005 by Christian Hardcore/Mathcore group The Chariot. It contains two new songs and four re-worked versions of songs from their debut album Everything Is Alive, Everything Is Breathing, Nothing Is Dead, and Nothing Is Bleeding.

— Freebase

Fumariaceae

Fumariaceae

The fumitory, or bleeding-heart plant family of the order Papaverales, subclass Magnoliidae, class Magnoliopsida. Flowers are bisexual, with two small sepals and four petals, one pistil and six stamens.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Bruise

Bruise

A bruise, also called a contusion, is a type of hematoma of tissue in which capillaries and sometimes venules are damaged by trauma, allowing blood to seep, hemorrhage, or extravasate into the surrounding interstitial tissues. Not blanching on pressure, bruises can involve capillaries at the level of skin, subcutaneous tissue, muscle, or bone. Bruises are not to be confused with other lesions primarily known by their diameter. These lesions include petechia, purpura, and ecchymosis, all of which also do not blanch on pressure, and are caused by internal bleeding not associated with trauma. As a type of hematoma, a bruise is always caused by internal bleeding into the interstitial tissues which does not break through the skin, usually initiated by blunt trauma, which causes damage through physical compression and deceleration forces. Trauma sufficient to cause bruising can occur from a wide variety of situations including accidents, falls, and surgeries. Disease states such as insufficient or malfunctioning platelets, other coagulation deficiencies, or vascular disorders, such as venous blockage associated with severe allergies can lead to the formation of purpura which is not to be confused with trauma-related bruising/contusion. If the trauma is sufficient to break the skin and allow blood to escape the interstitial tissues, the injury is not a bruise but instead a different variety of hemorrhage called bleeding. However, such injuries may be accompanied by bruising elsewhere.

— Freebase

Aerosinusitis

Aerosinusitis

Aerosinusitis, also called barosinusitis, sinus squeeze or sinus barotrauma is a painful inflammation and sometimes bleeding of the membrane of the paranasal sinus cavities, normally the frontal sinus. It is caused by a difference in air pressures inside and outside the cavities.

— Freebase

Indoprofen

Indoprofen

Indoprofen is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug. It was withdrawn worldwide in the 1980s after postmarketing reports of severe gastrointestinal bleeding. A 2004 study using high-throughput screening found indoprofen to increase production of the survival of motor neuron protein, suggesting it may provide insight into treatments for spinal muscular atrophies.

— Freebase

Thecoma

Thecoma

Thecomas or theca cell tumors are benign ovarian neoplasms composed only of theca cells. Histogenetically they are classified as sex cord-stromal tumours. They are typically estrogen-producing and they occur in older women. Sixty percent of patients present with abnormal uterine bleeding, and 20% have endometrial carcinoma.

— Freebase

Oral irrigator

Oral irrigator

An oral irrigator is a home care device that uses a stream of pulsating water to remove plaque and food debris between teeth and below the gumline and improve gingival health. The first oral irrigator was developed in 1962 by a dentist and an engineer, both from Fort Collins, CO. Since that time, the oral irrigators have been evaluated in more than 50 scientific studies. It has been tested and shown effective on people in periodontal maintenance, and those with gingivitis, diabetes, orthodontic appliances, crowns, and implants. The strongest evidence on the oral irrigator shows that it is extremely effective at reducing bleeding and gingivitis. Recent studies have demonstrated that it is superior to dental floss in reducing bleeding and as effective in reducing plaque. A study at the University of Southern California found that a 3 second treatment of pulsating water at medium pressure removed 99.9% of plaque biofilm from treated areas. Clinical efficacy has been shown through the medium setting and above.

— Freebase

Duodenitis

Duodenitis

Inflammation of the DUODENUM section of the small intestine (INTESTINE, SMALL). Erosive duodenitis may cause bleeding in the UPPER GI TRACT and PEPTIC ULCER.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Platelet

Platelet

Platelets, or thrombocytes, are small, disk shaped clear cell fragments, 2–3 µm in diameter, which are derived from fragmentation of precursor megakaryocytes. The average lifespan of a platelet is normally just 5 to 9 days. Platelets are a natural source of growth factors. They circulate in the blood of mammals and are involved in hemostasis, leading to the formation of blood clots. If the number of platelets is too low, excessive bleeding can occur. However, if the number of platelets is too high, blood clots can form, which may obstruct blood vessels and result in such events as a stroke, myocardial infarction, pulmonary embolism or the blockage of blood vessels to other parts of the body, such as the extremities of the arms or legs. An abnormality or disease of the platelets is called a thrombocytopathy, which could be either a low number of platelets, a decrease in function of platelets, or an increase in the number of platelets. There are disorders that reduce the number of platelets, such as heparin-induced thrombocytopenia or thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura that typically cause thromboses, or clots, instead of bleeding.

— Freebase

Vasa Previa

Vasa Previa

Pregnancy complication where fetal blood vessels, normally inside the umbilical cord, are left unprotected and cross FETAL MEMBRANES. It is associated with antepartum bleeding and FETAL DEATH and STILLBIRTH due to exsanguination.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Oral Hemorrhage

Oral Hemorrhage

Bleeding from the blood vessels of the mouth, which may occur as a result of injuries to the mouth, accidents in oral surgery, or diseases of the gums.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Angiodysplasia

Angiodysplasia

In medicine, angiodysplasia is a small vascular malformation of the gut. It is a common cause of otherwise unexplained gastrointestinal bleeding and anemia. Lesions are often multiple, and frequently involve the cecum or ascending colon, although they can occur at other places. Treatment may be with endoscopic interventions, medication, or occasionally surgery.

— Freebase

FemmePharma Global Healthcare

FemmePharma Global Healthcare

FemmePharma Global Healthcare, Inc., a pharmaceutical company, engages in developing drugs for diseases and disorders affecting women internationally. It focuses on developing therapeutic regimens for various women’s health issues, such as urinary incontinence, mastalgia, dysmenorrhea, dysfunctional uterine bleeding, endometriosis, and sexually transmitted diseases/HIV. The company was founded in 1996 and is based in Wayne, Pennsylvania. FemmePharma Global Healthcare, Inc. operates as a subsidiary of FemmePharma, Inc.

— CrunchBase

Abruptio Placentae

Abruptio Placentae

Premature separation of the normally implanted PLACENTA from the UTERUS. Signs of varying degree of severity include UTERINE BLEEDING, uterine MUSCLE HYPERTONIA, and FETAL DISTRESS or FETAL DEATH.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Terlipressin

Terlipressin

Terlipressin is an analogue of vasopressin used as a vasoactive drug in the management of hypotension. It has been found to be effective when norepinephrine does not help. Indications for use include norepinephrine-resistant septic shock and hepatorenal syndrome. In addition, it is used to treat bleeding esophageal varices.

— Freebase

Carbetocin

Carbetocin

Carbetocin is an obstetric drug used to control postpartum hemorrhage and bleeding after giving birth, particularly following Cesarean section. It is an eight amino long oxytocin analogue and its action is similar to that of oxytocin. Carbetocin primarily agonizes peripherally expressed oxytocin receptors. Carbetocin is manufactured by Ferring Pharmaceuticals and is available in Canada and the United Kingdom, but not in the United States.

— Freebase

Reflectance Medical

Reflectance Medical

Reflectance Medical Inc. is an early stage company developing new technology to revolutionize the care of critically ill patients by reducing medical costs and deaths associated with conditions which result in poor tissue perfusion and acidosis. The company’s noninvasive CareGuide patient monitor continuously and quantitatively displays levels of microvascular oxygen, pH and hematocrit to provide treatment goals to assure rapid and successful reversal of microvascular abnormalities associated with internal bleeding, trauma, cardiac failure and sepsis.

— CrunchBase

Hemorrhagic Disorders

Hemorrhagic Disorders

Spontaneous or near spontaneous bleeding caused by a defect in clotting mechanisms (BLOOD COAGULATION DISORDERS) or another abnormality causing a structural flaw in the blood vessels (HEMOSTATIC DISORDERS).

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Gelatin Sponge, Absorbable

Gelatin Sponge, Absorbable

Sterile, gelatin-base surgical sponge applied topically as an adjunct to hemostasis when the control of bleeding by conventional procedures is ineffective to reduce capillary ooze or is impractical. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p797)

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Subarachnoid Hemorrhage, Traumatic

Subarachnoid Hemorrhage, Traumatic

Bleeding into the SUBARACHNOID SPACE due to CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA. Minor hemorrhages may be asymptomatic; moderate to severe hemorrhages may be associated with INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION and VASOSPASM, INTRACRANIAL.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Congenital afibrinogenemia

Congenital afibrinogenemia

Congenital afibrinogenemia is a rare inherited blood disorder in which the blood does not clot normally due to a lack of or a malfunction involving fibrinogen, a protein necessary for coagulation. Fibrinogen is also known as Factor I. Its lack is inherited in an autosomic recessive way. It can express itself with excessive bleeding since birth

— Freebase

Bloody show

Bloody show

Bloody show is the passage of a small amount of blood or blood-tinged mucus through the vagina near the end of pregnancy. It can occur just before labor or in early labor as the cervix changes shape, freeing mucus and blood that occupied the cervical glands or cervical os. Bloody show is a relatively common feature of pregnancy, and it does not signify increased risk to the mother or baby. A larger amount of bleeding, however, may signify a more dangerous, abnormal complication of pregnancy, such as placental abruption or placenta previa. Large amounts of bleeding during or after childbirth itself may come from uterine atony or laceration of the cervix, vagina, or perineum. 3 common signs of the onset of labor are: ⁕A bloody show ⁕Rupture of membranes ⁕Onset of tightenings or contractions However, these may occur at any time and in any order. Some women neither experience a bloody show nor have their "water break" until well into advanced labor. Therefore, neither bloody show nor rupture of membranes are required to establish labor.

— Freebase

Arch Therapeutics

Arch Therapeutics

Arch Therapeutics, Inc. (Arch) is a medical device company offering an innovative, elegant, and superior approach to the rapid cessation of bleeding (hemostasis*) and control of fluid leakage (sealant) during surgery and trauma care. The underlying technology, exclusively licensed from a leading university, supports an innovative platform of smart materials that fulfill the criteria as a solution for a specialized field we call, "stasis and barrier applications." - See more at: http://www.archtherapeutics.com/company/about-arch-therapeutics#sthash.fIw94WNC.dpuf

— CrunchBase

Coagulation

Coagulation

Coagulation is the process by which blood forms clots. It is an important part of hemostasis, the cessation of blood loss from a damaged vessel, wherein a damaged blood vessel wall is covered by a platelet and fibrin-containing clot to stop bleeding and begin repair of the damaged vessel. Disorders of coagulation can lead to an increased risk of bleeding or obstructive clotting. Coagulation is highly conserved throughout biology; in all mammals, coagulation involves both a cellular and a protein component. The system in humans has been the most extensively researched and is the best understood. Coagulation begins almost instantly after an injury to the blood vessel has damaged the endothelium lining the vessel. Exposure of the blood to proteins such as tissue factor initiates changes to blood platelets and the plasma protein fibrinogen, a clotting factor. Platelets immediately form a plug at the site of injury; this is called primary hemostasis. Secondary hemostasis occurs simultaneously: Proteins in the blood plasma, called coagulation factors or clotting factors, respond in a complex cascade to form fibrin strands, which strengthen the platelet plug.

— Freebase

Antifibrinolytic

Antifibrinolytic

Antifibrinolytics, such as aminocaproic acid and tranexamic acid are used as inhibitors of fibrinolysis. These lysine-like drugs interfere with the formation of the fibrinolytic enzyme plasmin from its precursor plasminogen by plasminogen activators which takes place mainly in lysine rich areas on the surface of fibrin. These drugs block the binding sites of the enzymes or plasminogen respectively and thus stop plasmin formation. They are used in menorrhagia and bleeding tendency due to various causes. Their application may be beneficial in patients with hyperfibrinolysis because they arrest bleeding rapidly if the other components of the haemostatic system are not severely affected. This may help to avoid the use of blood products such as fresh frozen plasma with its associated risks of infections or anaphylactic reactions. In 2010, the CRASH-2 trial showed that the antifibrinolytic drug tranexamic acid safely reduces mortality in bleeding trauma patients. The antifibrinolytic drug aprotinin was abandoned after identification of major side effects, especially on kidney. The indication for use of antifibrinolytic drugs is made with various methods. The most rapid and suitable one is thromboelastometry in whole blood, which is even possible in patients on heparin. With various assays, an enhanced fibrinolysis becomes visible in the curve signature and from the calculated values, e.g. the maximum lysis parameter. A special test for the identification of increased fibrinolysis compares the TEM in the absence or presence of the fibrinolysis inhibitor aprotinin. In severe cases of activated fibrinolysis, this assay confirms the syndrome already in less than 15 min during the early phases of clot formation

— Freebase

Vitamin K Deficiency

Vitamin K Deficiency

A nutritional condition produced by a deficiency of VITAMIN K in the diet, characterized by an increased tendency to hemorrhage (HEMORRHAGIC DISORDERS). Such bleeding episodes may be particularly severe in newborn infants. (From Cecil Textbook of Medicine, 19th ed, p1182)

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Brain Stem Hemorrhage, Traumatic

Brain Stem Hemorrhage, Traumatic

Bleeding into structures of BRAIN STEM, including the MIDBRAIN; PONS; or MEDULLA OBLONGATA, as the result of CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA. DIFFUSE AXONAL INJURY is commonly associated. Clinical manifestations may include OCULAR MOTILITY DISORDERS; ATAXIA; PARALYSIS; PERSISTENT VEGETATIVE STATE; and COMA.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

Bleeding into the intracranial or spinal SUBARACHNOID SPACE, most resulting from INTRACRANIAL ANEURYSM rupture. It can occur after traumatic injuries (SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE, TRAUMATIC). Clinical features include HEADACHE; NAUSEA; VOMITING, nuchal rigidity, variable neurological deficits and reduced mental status.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Platelet storage pool deficiency

Platelet storage pool deficiency

Platelet storage pool deficiency is a type of coagulopathy characterized by defects in the granules in platelets, particularly a lack of granular non-metabolic ADP. Patients with ADP deficient "Storage Pool Disease" present a prolongued bleeding time due to impaired aggregation response to fibrillar collagen. It may involve the alpha granules or the dense granules.

— Freebase

Cervical polyp

Cervical polyp

A cervical polyp is a common benign polyp or tumour on the surface of the cervical canal. They can cause irregular menstrual bleeding but often show no symptoms. Treatment consists of simple removal of the polyp and prognosis is generally good. About 1% of cervical polyps will show neoplastic change which may lead to cancer. They are most common in post-menstrual, pre-menopausal women who have been pregnant.

— Freebase

Intracranial Hemorrhages

Intracranial Hemorrhages

Bleeding within the SKULL, including hemorrhages in the brain and the three membranes of MENINGES. The escape of blood often leads to the formation of HEMATOMA in the cranial epidural, subdural, and subarachnoid spaces.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Spodium

Spodium

Spodium, refers to burned bone, or the act of divination with ash. Spodium may also refer to other types of ash, such as the scrapings from the inside of a furnace. Spodium has a long history of medical usage, mentioned by Hippocrates and, for example, in the Medical Poem of Salerno "...Who knows the cause why Spodium stancheth bleeding?...".

— Freebase

PEAK Surgical

PEAK Surgical

PEAK Surgical is a medical device company that is committed to providing physicians with surgical tools that have the precision of a scalpel and the bleeding control of traditional electrosurgery without the extensive collateral damage " a revolutionary benefit that fills a critical market gap.The PEAK Surgery System is cleared for use in general, plastic and reconstructive, ENT, gynecologic, orthopedic, arthroscopic, spinal and neurological surgical procedures in the United States and for use in general surgery in the EU.PEAK Surgical is headquartered in Palo Alto, California.

— CrunchBase

Uterine Artery Embolization

Uterine Artery Embolization

The use of embolizing agents to block the arterial blood supply to parts or all of the UTERUS. The procedures are done to control bleeding or to cause destruction of uterine tissues.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Telangiectasia, Hereditary Hemorrhagic

Telangiectasia, Hereditary Hemorrhagic

An autosomal dominant vascular anomaly characterized by telangiectases of the skin and mucous membranes and by recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding. This disorder is caused by mutations of a gene (on chromosome 9q3) which encodes endoglin, a membrane glycoprotein that binds TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR BETA.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Norethindrone

Norethindrone

A synthetic progestational hormone with actions similar to those of PROGESTERONE but functioning as a more potent inhibitor of ovulation. It has weak estrogenic and androgenic properties. The hormone has been used in treating amenorrhea, functional uterine bleeding, endometriosis, and for contraception.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Melena

Melena

In medicine, melena or melæna refers to the black, "tarry" feces that are associated with gastrointestinal hemorrhage. The black color is caused by oxidation of the iron in hemoglobin during its passage through the ileum and colon. Iron supplements may cause a grayish-black stool that should be distinguished from the black, tarlike stool that occurs from bleeding ulcer.

— Freebase

Ephes Dammim

Ephes Dammim

Ephes Dammim or Pas Dammim — means boundary of blood. Mentioned in the Bible, a place in the tribe of Judah where the Philistines camped when David fought with Goliath. Probably so called as having been the scene of frequent bloody conflicts between Israel and the Philistines. It has been identified with the modern Beit Fased, i.e., "house of bleeding", near Shochoh.

— Freebase

Intracranial Hemorrhage, Traumatic

Intracranial Hemorrhage, Traumatic

Bleeding within the SKULL induced by penetrating and nonpenetrating traumatic injuries, including hemorrhages into the tissues of CEREBRUM; BRAIN STEM; and CEREBELLUM; as well as into the epidural, subdural and subarachnoid spaces of the MENINGES.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Brain Hemorrhage, Traumatic

Brain Hemorrhage, Traumatic

Bleeding within the brain as a result of penetrating and nonpenetrating CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA. Traumatically induced hemorrhages may occur in any area of the brain, including the CEREBRUM; BRAIN STEM (see BRAIN STEM HEMORRHAGE, TRAUMATIC); and CEREBELLUM.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Intracranial Hemorrhage, Hypertensive

Intracranial Hemorrhage, Hypertensive

Bleeding within the SKULL that is caused by systemic HYPERTENSION, usually in association with INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOSCLEROSIS. Hypertensive hemorrhages are most frequent in the BASAL GANGLIA; CEREBELLUM; PONS; and THALAMUS; but may also involve the CEREBRAL CORTEX, subcortical white matter, and other brain structures.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Putaminal Hemorrhage

Putaminal Hemorrhage

Intracranial bleeding into the PUTAMEN, a BASAL GANGLIA nucleus. This is associated with HYPERTENSION and lipohyalinosis of small blood vessels in the putamen. Clinical manifestations vary with the size of hemorrhage, but include HEMIPARESIS; HEADACHE; and alterations of consciousness.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Subarachnoid hemorrhage

Subarachnoid hemorrhage

A subarachnoid hemorrhage, or subarachnoid haemorrhage in British English, is bleeding into the subarachnoid space—the area between the arachnoid membrane and the pia mater surrounding the brain. This may occur spontaneously, usually from a ruptured cerebral aneurysm, or may result from head injury. Symptoms of SAH include a severe headache with a rapid onset, vomiting, confusion or a lowered level of consciousness, and sometimes seizures. The diagnosis is generally confirmed with a CT scan of the head, or occasionally by lumbar puncture. Treatment is by prompt neurosurgery or radiologically guided interventions with medications and other treatments to help prevent recurrence of the bleeding and complications. Surgery for aneurysms was introduced in the 1930s, but since the 1990s many aneurysms are treated by a less invasive procedure called "coiling", which is carried out by instrumentation through large blood vessels. SAH is a form of stroke and comprises 1–7% of all strokes. It is a medical emergency and can lead to death or severe disability—even when recognized and treated at an early stage. Up to half of all cases of SAH are fatal and 10–15% of casualties die before reaching a hospital, and those who survive often have neurological or cognitive impairment.

— Freebase

Placenta Previa

Placenta Previa

Abnormal placentation in which the PLACENTA implants in the lower segment of the UTERUS (the zone of dilation) and may cover part or all of the opening of the CERVIX. It is often associated with serious antepartum bleeding and PREMATURE LABOR.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Norethynodrel

Norethynodrel

A synthetic progestational hormone with actions and uses similar to those of PROGESTERONE. It has been used in the treatment of functional uterine bleeding and endometriosis. As a contraceptive, it has usually been administered in combination with MESTRANOL.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Wet Macular Degeneration

Wet Macular Degeneration

A form of RETINAL DEGENERATION in which abnormal CHOROIDAL NEOVASCULARIZATION occurs under the RETINA and MACULA LUTEA, causing bleeding and leaking of fluid. This leads to bulging and or lifting of the macula and the distortion or destruction of central vision.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura

Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura

Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, also known as primary immune thrombocytopenic purpura and autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura, is defined as isolated low platelet count with normal bone marrow and the absence of other causes of thrombocytopenia. It causes a characteristic purpuric rash and an increased tendency to bleed. Two distinct clinical syndromes manifest as an acute condition in children and a chronic condition in adults. The acute form often follows an infection and has a spontaneous resolution within 2 months. Chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura persists longer than 6 months without a specific cause. ITP is an autoimmune condition with antibodies detectable against several platelet surface antigens. ITP is diagnosed by a low platelet count in a complete blood count. However, since the diagnosis depends on the exclusion of other causes of a low platelet count, additional investigations may be necessary in some cases. In mild cases, only careful observation may be required but very low counts or significant bleeding may prompt treatment with corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulin, anti-D immunoglobulin, or immunosuppressive drugs. Refractory ITP may require splenectomy, the surgical removal of the spleen. Platelet transfusions may be used in severe bleeding together with a very low count. Sometimes the body may compensate by making abnormally large platelets.

— Freebase

Angiodysplasia

Angiodysplasia

Acquired degenerative dilation or expansion (ectasia) of normal BLOOD VESSELS, often associated with aging. They are isolated, tortuous, thin-walled vessels and sources of bleeding. They occur most often in mucosal capillaries of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT leading to GASTROINTESTINAL HEMORRHAGE and ANEMIA.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Anorectal anomalies

Anorectal anomalies

Not to be confused with anorexia. Anorectal anomalies are medical problems affecting the structure of the anus and rectum. A person with an anorectal problem would have some sort of deformative feature of the anus or rectum, collectively known as an anorectal malformation. Examples of anorectal anomalies include: ⁕Anal stenosis ⁕Imperforate anus ⁕Proctitis ⁕Anal Bleeding ⁕Anal fistula ⁕Anal cancer ⁕Anal itching ⁕Hemorrhoid

— Freebase

Dermabrasion

Dermabrasion

Dermabrasion is a true surgical procedure typically performed only in a professional medical setting by a dermatologist or plastic surgeon trained specifically in this invasive procedure . Dermabrasion is a type of surgical skin planing that has been practiced for many years and involves the controlled deeper abrasion of the upper to mid layers of the skin with any variety of strong abrasive devices including a wire brush, diamond wheel or fraise, sterilized sandpaper, salt crystals, or other mechanical means . Dermabrasion should not be confused with microdermabrasion which is a newer and non-surgical cosmetic procedure performed by non-physician personnel, nurses, estheticians, medical assistants, and most recently untrained individuals in their homes. Dermabrasion procedures are surgical, invasive procedures that typically require a local anaesthetic. Often they are performed in surgical suites or in professional medical centers. Since the procedure can typically remove the top to deeper layers of the epidermis, and extend into the reticular dermis, there is always minor skin bleeding. The procedure carries risks of scarring, skin discoloration, infections, and facial herpes virus reactivation. In aggressive dermabrasion cases, there is often tremendous skin bleeding and spray during the procedure that has to be controlled with pressure. Afterward, the skin is normally very red and raw-looking. Depending of the level of skin removal with dermabrasion, it takes an average of 7–30 days for the skin to fully heal. Often this procedure was performed for deeper acne scarring and deep surgical scars. Dermabrasion is rarely practiced currently and there are very few doctors who are trained and still perform this surgery. Dermabrasion has largely been replaced all over the world by newer and somewhat simpler technologies including lasers CO2 or Erbium:YAG laser. Laser technologies carry the advantage of no to little bleeding and are often much less operator dependent than dermabrasion.

— Freebase

Menstruation

Menstruation

The periodic shedding of the ENDOMETRIUM and associated menstrual bleeding in the MENSTRUAL CYCLE of humans and primates. Menstruation is due to the decline in circulating PROGESTERONE, and occurs at the late LUTEAL PHASE when LUTEOLYSIS of the CORPUS LUTEUM takes place.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Fibrin Foam

Fibrin Foam

A dry artificial sterile sponge of fibrin prepared by clotting with thrombin a foam or solution of fibrinogen. It is used in conjunction with thrombin as a hemostatic in surgery at sites where bleeding cannot be controlled by more common methods. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p648)

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Mifepristone

Mifepristone

A progestational and glucocorticoid hormone antagonist. Its inhibition of progesterone induces bleeding during the luteal phase and in early pregnancy by releasing endogenous prostaglandins from the endometrium or decidua. As a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, the drug has been used to treat hypercortisolism in patients with nonpituitary CUSHING SYNDROME.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Electrocoagulation

Electrocoagulation

Procedures using an electrically heated wire or scalpel to treat hemorrhage (e.g., bleeding ulcers) and to ablate tumors, mucosal lesions, and refractory arrhythmias. It is different from ELECTROSURGERY which is used more for cutting tissue than destroying and in which the patient is part of the electric circuit.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Endometrial Carcinoma

Endometrial Carcinoma

A malignant tumor arising from the epithelium that lines the cavity of the uterine body. The vast majority of endometrial carcinomas are adenocarcinomas; squamous cell and adenosquamous carcinomas represent a minority of the cases. Endometrioid adenocarcinoma is the most frequently seen variant of endometrial adenocarcinoma. Uterine bleeding is an initial clinical sign. The prognosis depends on the stage of the tumor, the depth of myometrial wall invasion, and the degree of differentiation. -- 2004

— Freebase

Fatty Acids, Omega-3

Fatty Acids, Omega-3

A group of fatty acids, often of marine origin, which have the first unsaturated bond in the third position from the omega carbon. These fatty acids are believed to reduce serum triglycerides, prevent insulin resistance, improve lipid profile, prolong bleeding times, reduce platelet counts, and decrease platelet adhesiveness.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Scurvy

Scurvy

An acquired blood vessel disorder caused by severe deficiency of vitamin C (ASCORBIC ACID) in the diet leading to defective collagen formation in small blood vessels. Scurvy is characterized by bleeding in any tissue, weakness, ANEMIA, spongy gums, and a brawny induration of the muscles of the calves and legs.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

von Willebrand Diseases

von Willebrand Diseases

Group of hemorrhagic disorders in which the VON WILLEBRAND FACTOR is either quantitatively or qualitatively abnormal. They are usually inherited as an autosomal dominant trait though rare kindreds are autosomal recessive. Symptoms vary depending on severity and disease type but may include prolonged bleeding time, deficiency of factor VIII, and impaired platelet adhesion.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Portasystemic Shunt, Surgical

Portasystemic Shunt, Surgical

Surgical venous shunt between the portal and systemic circulation to effect decompression of the portal circulation. It is performed primarily in the treatment of bleeding esophageal varices resulting from portal hypertension. Types of shunt include portacaval, splenorenal, mesocaval, splenocaval, left gastric-caval (coronary-caval), portarenal, umbilicorenal, and umbilicocaval.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Hematoma, Epidural, Cranial

Hematoma, Epidural, Cranial

Accumulation of blood in the EPIDURAL SPACE between the SKULL and the DURA MATER, often as a result of bleeding from the MENINGEAL ARTERIES associated with a temporal or parietal bone fracture. Epidural hematoma tends to expand rapidly, compressing the dura and underlying brain. Clinical features may include HEADACHE; VOMITING; HEMIPARESIS; and impaired mental function.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Hemorrhoids

Hemorrhoids

Swollen veins in the lower part of the RECTUM or ANUS. Hemorrhoids can be inside the anus (internal), under the skin around the anus (external), or protruding from inside to outside of the anus. People with hemorrhoids may or may not exhibit symptoms which include bleeding, itching, and pain.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Hematospermia

Hematospermia

Hematospermia or the presence of blood in semen, is most often a benign and idiopathic symptom, but can sometimes result from medical problems such as a urethral stricture, infection of the prostate, or a congenital bleeding disorder, and can occur transiently after surgical procedures such as a prostate biopsy. It is present in less than 2% of urology referrals, although prevalence in the overall population is unknown. Hematospermia can be a distressing symptom for patients, but most cases are effectively managed by a primary care physician. Although the condition is usually benign, significant underlying pathology must be excluded by history, physical examination, laboratory evaluation, and, in select cases, other diagnostic modalities. In men younger than 40 years without risk factors and in men with no associated symptoms, hematospermia is often self-limited and requires no further evaluation or treatment other than patient reassurance. Many cases are attributable to sexually transmitted infections or other urogenital infections in men younger than 40 years who present with hematospermia associated with lower urinary tract symptoms. Workup in these patients can be limited to urinalysis and testing for sexually transmitted infections, with treatment as indicated. In men 40 years and older, iatrogenic hematospermia from urogenital instrumentation or prostate biopsy is the most common cause of blood in the semen. However, recurrent or persistent hematospermia or associated symptoms should prompt further investigation, starting with a prostate examination and prostate-specific antigen testing to evaluate for prostate cancer. Other etiologies to consider in those 40 years and older include genitourinary infections, inflammations, vascular malformations, stones, tumors, and systemic disorders that increase bleeding risk.

— Freebase

Placenta accreta

Placenta accreta

Placenta accreta is a severe obstetric complication involving an abnormally deep attachment of the placenta to the myometrium, without penetrating it. Thus, the placenta grows completely through the endometrium. The placenta usually detaches from the uterine wall relatively easily, but women who encounter placenta accreta during childbirth are at great risk of hemorrhage during its removal. This commonly requires surgery to stem the bleeding and fully remove the placenta, and in severe forms can often lead to a hysterectomy or be fatal.

— Freebase

Sodium Salicylate

Sodium Salicylate

A non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent that is less effective than equal doses of ASPIRIN in relieving pain and reducing fever. However, individuals who are hypersensitive to ASPIRIN may tolerate sodium salicylate. In general, this salicylate produces the same adverse reactions as ASPIRIN, but there is less occult gastrointestinal bleeding. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1992, p120)

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Embolization, Therapeutic

Embolization, Therapeutic

A method of hemostasis utilizing various agents such as Gelfoam, silastic, metal, glass, or plastic pellets, autologous clot, fat, and muscle as emboli. It has been used in the treatment of spinal cord and INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS, renal arteriovenous fistulas, gastrointestinal bleeding, epistaxis, hypersplenism, certain highly vascular tumors, traumatic rupture of blood vessels, and control of operative hemorrhage.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Jayhawker

Jayhawker

Jayhawkers is a term that came to prominence just before the American Civil War in Bleeding Kansas, where it was adopted by militant bands affiliated with the free-state cause. These bands, known as "Jayhawkers", were guerrilla fighters who often clashed with pro-slavery groups from Missouri known at the time as "Border Ruffians". After the Civil War, the word "Jayhawker" became synonymous with the people of Kansas. Today the term is infrequently used as a nickname for a native-born Kansan.

— Freebase

Uterine Cervical Incompetence

Uterine Cervical Incompetence

Incompetent UTERINE CERVIX is usually diagnosed in the second trimester of PREGNANCY. It is characterized by passive painless cervical dilation in the absence of UTERINE CONTRACTION; BLEEDING; INFECTION; and sometimes with the amniotic sac (AMNIOTIC MEMBRANE) bulging through the partially dilated cervix. Left untreated, this condition may lead to premature pregnancy loss, such as HABITUAL ABORTION.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Bronchoscopy

Bronchoscopy

Bronchoscopy is a technique of visualizing the inside of the airways for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. An instrument is inserted into the airways, usually through the nose or mouth, or occasionally through a tracheostomy. This allows the practitioner to examine the patient's airways for abnormalities such as foreign bodies, bleeding, tumors, or inflammation. Specimens may be taken from inside the lungs. The construction of bronchoscopes ranges from rigid metal tubes with attached lighting devices to flexible optical fiber instruments with realtime video equipment.

— Freebase

Waterhouse–Friderichsen syndrome

Waterhouse–Friderichsen syndrome

Waterhouse–Friderichsen syndrome or hemorrhagic adrenalitis or Fulminant meningococcemia, is defined as adrenal gland failure due to bleeding into the adrenal glands, caused by severe bacterial infection. The bacterial infection leads to massive hemorrhage into one or both adrenal glands. It is characterized by overwhelming bacterial infection meningococcemia leading to massive blood invasion, organ failure, coma, low blood pressure and shock, disseminated intravascular coagulation with widespread purpura, rapidly developing adrenocortical insufficiency and death.

— Freebase

Aminocaproic acid

Aminocaproic acid

Aminocaproic acid is a derivative and analogue of the amino acid lysine, which makes it an effective inhibitor for enzymes that bind that particular residue. Such enzymes include proteolytic enzymes like plasmin, the enzyme responsible for fibrinolysis. For this reason it is effective in treatment of certain bleeding disorders, and it is marketed as Amicar. Aminocaproic acid is also an intermediate in the polymerization of Nylon-6, where it is formed by ring-opening hydrolysis of caprolactam.

— Freebase

Macroglobulinemia

Macroglobulinemia

Macroglobulinemia is the presence of increased levels of macroglobulins in the circulating blood. It is a Plasma cell dyscrasia, resembling leukemia, with cells of lymphocytic, plasmacytic, or intermediate morphology, which secrete a monoclonal immunoglobulin M component. There is diffuse infiltration by the malignant cells of the bone marrow and also, in many cases, of the spleen, liver, or lymph nodes. The circulating macroglobulin can produce symptoms of hyperviscosity syndrome: weakness, fatigue, bleeding disorders, and visual disturbances. Peak incidence of macroglobulinemia is in the sixth and seventh decades of life.

— Freebase

Uterine rupture

Uterine rupture

Uterine rupture is a potentially catastrophic event during childbirth by which the integrity of the myometrial wall is breached. In an incomplete rupture the peritoneum is still intact. With a complete rupture the contents of the uterus may spill into the peritoneal cavity or the broad ligament. A uterine rupture is a life-threatening event for mother and baby. A uterine rupture typically occurs during active labor, but may already develop during late pregnancy. Uterine dehiscence is a similar condition, but involves fewer layers, less bleeding, and less risk.

— Freebase


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