Definitions containing æso`pus

We've found 185 definitions:

suppuration

suppuration

Decay in tissue producing pus, or the pus itself.

— Wiktionary

pustule

pustule

a small inflamed elevation of skin containing pus; a blister filled with pus

— Princeton's WordNet

purulent

purulent

Consisting of pus, or matter; partaking of the nature of pus; attended with suppuration; as, purulent inflammation.

— Wiktionary

Purulent

Purulent

consisting of pus, or matter; partaking of the nature of pus; attended with suppuration; as, purulent inflammation

— Webster Dictionary

Empyema

Empyema

a medical term signifying a diseased condition of the chest, in which pus accumulates in the pleura, cures of which are sometimes effected by drawing off the pus by means of tubes.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Purulency

Purulency

the quality or state of being purulent; the generation of pus; also, the pus itself

— Webster Dictionary

Pyoid

Pyoid

of or pertaining to pus; of the nature of, or like, pus

— Webster Dictionary

purulence

purulence

Pus.

— Wiktionary

puslike

puslike

Resembling pus.

— Wiktionary

pyorrhea

pyorrhea

A discharge of pus

— Wiktionary

pustule

pustule

A pimple filled with pus

— Wiktionary

mucopurulent

mucopurulent

Characterized by mucus and pus.

— Wiktionary

pustulent

pustulent

Filled or oozing with pus

— Wiktionary

gather

gather

To be filled with pus

— Wiktionary

suppurate

suppurate

To form or discharge pus.

— Wiktionary

mucopus

mucopus

a mixture of mucus and pus

— Wiktionary

microabscess

microabscess

A very small, localised collection of pus.

— Wiktionary

mattery

mattery

pussy, purulent (containing or secreting pus)

— Wiktionary

pyorrhoea

pyorrhoea

Flowing or discharge of pus; periodontitis

— Wiktionary

pussy

purulent, pussy

containing pus

— Princeton's WordNet

pyogenic

pyogenic

producing pus

— Princeton's WordNet

purulent

purulent, pussy

containing pus

— Princeton's WordNet

purulence

purulence

The condition of containing or discharging pus.

— Wiktionary

pyogenic

pyogenic

referring to bacterial infections that make pus

— Wiktionary

seropurulent

seropurulent

That consists of both serum and pus

— Wiktionary

furuncle

furuncle

a boil or infected, inflamed, pus-filled sore

— Wiktionary

pyorrhoea

pyorrhea, pyorrhoea

discharge of pus

— Princeton's WordNet

pyorrhea

pyorrhea, pyorrhoea

discharge of pus

— Princeton's WordNet

nonpurulent

nonpurulent

not containing pus

— Princeton's WordNet

moist

moist

Characterised by the presence of pus, mucus etc.

— Wiktionary

head

head

The end of an abscess where pus collects.

— Wiktionary

Pus

Pus

Pus is an exudate, typically white-yellow, yellow, or yellow-brown, formed at the site of inflammation during infection. An accumulation of pus in an enclosed tissue space is known as an abscess, whereas a visible collection of pus within or beneath the epidermis is known as a pustule or pimple. Pus consists of a thin, protein-rich fluid, known as liquor puris, and dead leukocytes from the body's immune response. During infection, macrophages release cytokines which trigger neutrophils to seek the site of infection by chemotaxis. There, the neutrophils engulf and destroy the bacteria and the bacteria resist the immune response by releasing toxins called leukocidins. As the neutrophils die off from toxins and old age, they are destroyed by macrophages, forming the viscous pus. Bacteria that cause pus are called suppurative, pyogenic, or purulent. If the agent also creates mucus, it is called mucopurulent. Purulent infections can be treated with an antiseptic. Despite normally being of a whitish-yellow hue, changes in the color of pus can be observed under certain circumstances. Pus is sometimes green because of the presence of myeloperoxidase, an intensely green antibacterial protein produced by some types of white blood cells. Green, foul-smelling pus is found in certain infections of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The greenish color is a result of the pyocyanin bacterial pigment it produces. Amoebic abscesses of the liver produce brownish pus, which is described as looking like "anchovy paste". Pus can also have a foul odor.

— Freebase

abscess

abscess

To form a pus filled cavity typically from an infection.

— Wiktionary

pustule

pustule

A small accumulation of pus in the epidermis or dermis.

— Wiktionary

maturate

fester, maturate, suppurate

ripen and generate pus

— Princeton's WordNet

fester

fester, maturate, suppurate

ripen and generate pus

— Princeton's WordNet

suppurate

fester, maturate, suppurate

ripen and generate pus

— Princeton's WordNet

pyoxanthose

pyoxanthose

A greenish-yellow crystalline colouring matter found with pyocyanin in pus.

— Wiktionary

pericementoclasia

pericementoclasia

pus pocket formation around a tooth

— Princeton's WordNet

abscessed

abscessed

infected and filled with pus

— Princeton's WordNet

Pyogenic

Pyogenic

producing or generating pus

— Webster Dictionary

Digestion

Digestion

generation of pus; suppuration

— Webster Dictionary

sanies

sanies

a thin mixture of pus and blood serum discharged from a wound; ichor

— Wiktionary

suppurate

suppurate, mature

cause to ripen and discharge pus

— Princeton's WordNet

mature

suppurate, mature

cause to ripen and discharge pus

— Princeton's WordNet

Running

Running

discharging pus; as, a running sore

— Webster Dictionary

Mattery

Mattery

generating or containing pus; purulent

— Webster Dictionary

Puriform

Puriform

in the form of pus

— Webster Dictionary

purulent pleurisy

purulent pleurisy

a collection of pus in the lung cavity

— Princeton's WordNet

neisseria gonorrhoeae

gonococcus, Neisseria gonorrhoeae

the pus-producing bacterium that causes gonorrhea

— Princeton's WordNet

mucopurulent

mucopurulent

containing or composed of mucus and pus

— Princeton's WordNet

gonococcus

gonococcus, Neisseria gonorrhoeae

the pus-producing bacterium that causes gonorrhea

— Princeton's WordNet

Suppuration

Suppuration

the matter produced by suppuration; pus

— Webster Dictionary

hydrometrocolpos

hydrometrocolpos

distension of the vagina and uterus by fluid other than blood or pus

— Wiktionary

purulence

purulence, purulency

symptom of being purulent (containing or forming pus)

— Princeton's WordNet

purulency

purulence, purulency

symptom of being purulent (containing or forming pus)

— Princeton's WordNet

pyocyanin

pyocyanin

a toxic blue crystalline antibiotic found in green pus

— Princeton's WordNet

fester

fester, suppurating sore

a sore that has become inflamed and formed pus

— Princeton's WordNet

suppurating sore

fester, suppurating sore

a sore that has become inflamed and formed pus

— Princeton's WordNet

papule

papule

A small, inflammatory, irritated spot on skin; similar in appearance to a pimple, without containing pus.

— Wiktionary

Suppurate

Suppurate

to generate pus; as, a boil or abscess suppurates

— Webster Dictionary

suppurative

suppurative

Causing suppuration: producing, or causing the production of, pus.

— Wiktionary

atter

atter

Pus, corrupt or morbid matter from a sore or wound.

— Wiktionary

putrefy

putrefy

To become filled with a pus-like or bile-like substance.

— Wiktionary

pyaemia

pyemia, pyaemia

septicemia caused by pus-forming bacteria being released from an abscess

— Princeton's WordNet

pyemia

pyemia, pyaemia

septicemia caused by pus-forming bacteria being released from an abscess

— Princeton's WordNet

darier's disease

keratosis follicularis, Darier's disease

a rare hereditary condition marked by dark crusted patches (sometimes containing pus)

— Princeton's WordNet

keratosis follicularis

keratosis follicularis, Darier's disease

a rare hereditary condition marked by dark crusted patches (sometimes containing pus)

— Princeton's WordNet

pyuria

pyuria

The presence of pus in the urine.

— Wiktionary

Mucopurulent

Mucopurulent

having the character or appearance of both mucus and pus

— Webster Dictionary

Run

Run

to discharge pus or other matter; as, an ulcer runs

— Webster Dictionary

Pyoxanthose

Pyoxanthose

a greenish yellow crystalline coloring matter found with pyocyanin in pus

— Webster Dictionary

myeloperoxidase

myeloperoxidase

A peroxidase enzyme most abundantly present in neutrophil granulocytes, responsible for the greenish colour of pus and mucus.

— Wiktionary

Pleural empyema

Pleural empyema

Pleural empyema, also known as pyothorax or purulent pleuritis, is an accumulation of pus in the pleural cavity that can develop when bacteria invade the pleural space, usually in the context of a pneumonia. There are three stages: exudative, when there is an increase in pleural fluid with or without the presence of pus; fibrinopurulent, when fibrous septa form localized pus pockets; and the final organizing stage, when there is scarring of the pleura membranes with possible inability of the lung to expand. Simple pleural effusions occur in up to 40% of bacterial pneumonias. They are usually small and resolves with appropriate antibiotic therapy. If however an empyema develops additional intervention is required.

— Freebase

carbuncle

carbuncle

an infection larger than a boil and with several openings for discharge of pus

— Princeton's WordNet

suppurate

suppurate

To cause to generate pus.

— Wiktionary

Abscess

Abscess

An abscess is a collection of pus that has accumulated within a tissue because of an inflammatory process in response to either an infectious process or other foreign materials. It is a defensive reaction of the tissue to prevent the spread of infectious materials to other parts of the body. The organisms or foreign materials kill the local cells, resulting in the release of cytokines. The cytokines trigger an inflammatory response, which draws large numbers of white blood cells to the area and increases the regional blood flow. The final structure of the abscess is an abscess wall, or capsule, that is formed by the adjacent healthy cells in an attempt to keep the pus from infecting neighboring structures. However, such encapsulation tends to prevent immune cells from attacking bacteria in the pus, or from reaching the causative organism or foreign object. Abscesses must be differentiated from empyemas, which are accumulations of pus in a preexisting rather than a newly formed anatomical cavity.

— Freebase

laudable

laudable

Healthy; salubrious; normal; having a disposition to promote healing; not noxious; as, laudable juices of the body; laudable pus.

— Wiktionary

head

head

the tip of an abscess (where the pus accumulates)

— Princeton's WordNet

furuncle

boil, furuncle

a painful sore with a hard core filled with pus

— Princeton's WordNet

boil

boil, furuncle

a painful sore with a hard core filled with pus

— Princeton's WordNet

empyema

empyema

A collection of pus within a naturally existing anatomical cavity (as opposed to an abscess, which occurs in a newly formed cavity).

— Wiktionary

discharge

discharge

(uncountable) pus or exudate (other than blood) from a wound or orifice, usually due to infection or pathology

— Wiktionary

abscess

abscess

symptom consisting of a localized collection of pus surrounded by inflamed tissue

— Princeton's WordNet

pock

pock

A pus filled swelling on the surface on the skin caused by an eruptive disease.

— Wiktionary

Digest

Digest

to suppurate; to generate pus, as an ulcer

— Webster Dictionary

Matter

Matter

to form pus or matter, as an abscess; to maturate

— Webster Dictionary

Apostemate

Apostemate

to form an abscess; to swell and fill with pus

— Webster Dictionary

Pyuria

Pyuria

a morbid condition in which pus is discharged in the urine

— Webster Dictionary

peritonsillar abscess

quinsy, peritonsillar abscess

a painful pus filled inflammation of the tonsils and surrounding tissues; usually a complication of tonsillitis

— Princeton's WordNet

quinsy

quinsy, peritonsillar abscess

a painful pus filled inflammation of the tonsils and surrounding tissues; usually a complication of tonsillitis

— Princeton's WordNet

abscess

abscess

A cavity caused by tissue destruction, usually because of infection, filled with pus and surrounded by inflamed tissue.

— Wiktionary

hypopyon

hypopyon

Collection of pus in the anterior chamber of the eye.

— Wiktionary

rhinotomy

rhinotomy

surgical procedure in which an incision is made in the nose to drain accumulated pus

— Princeton's WordNet

myringotomy

myringotomy

surgical incision into the eardrum (to relieve pressure or release pus from the middle ear)

— Princeton's WordNet

Pyopneumothorax

Pyopneumothorax

accumulation of air, or other gas, and of pus, in the pleural cavity

— Webster Dictionary

Fester

Fester

to generate pus; to become imflamed and suppurate; as, a sore or a wound festers

— Webster Dictionary

Pustule

Pustule

a vesicle or an elevation of the cuticle with an inflamed base, containing pus

— Webster Dictionary

carbuncle

carbuncle

An abscess larger than a boil, usually with one or more openings draining pus onto the skin. It is usually caused by bacterial infection.

— Wiktionary

pimple

pimple

An inflamed (raised and colored) spot on the surface of the skin that is usually painful and fills with pus.

— Wiktionary

Globule

Globule

a minute spherical or rounded structure; as blood, lymph, and pus corpuscles, minute fungi, spores, etc

— Webster Dictionary

Sinus

Sinus

a narrow, elongated cavity, in which pus is collected; an elongated abscess with only a small orifice

— Webster Dictionary

Suppuration

Suppuration

A pathologic process consisting in the formation of pus.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Pyin

Pyin

an albuminoid constituent of pus, related to mucin, possibly a mixture of substances rather than a single body

— Webster Dictionary

Empyema

Empyema

Presence of pus in a hollow organ or body cavity.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Laudable

Laudable

healthy; salubrious; normal; having a disposition to promote healing; not noxious; as, laudable juices of the body; laudable pus

— Webster Dictionary

Suppurate

Suppurate

to cause to generate pus; as, to suppurate a sore

— Webster Dictionary

sepsis

sepsis

the presence of pus-forming bacteria or their toxins in the blood or tissues

— Princeton's WordNet

pyocyanase

pyocyanase

a yellow-green mixture of antibiotics obtained from the bacillus of green pus

— Princeton's WordNet

empyema

empyema

a collection of pus in a body cavity (especially in the lung cavity)

— Princeton's WordNet

festering

festering, suppuration, maturation

(medicine) the formation of morbific matter in an abscess or a vesicle and the discharge of pus

— Princeton's WordNet

maturation

festering, suppuration, maturation

(medicine) the formation of morbific matter in an abscess or a vesicle and the discharge of pus

— Princeton's WordNet

suppuration

festering, suppuration, maturation

(medicine) the formation of morbific matter in an abscess or a vesicle and the discharge of pus

— Princeton's WordNet

Boil

Boil

a hard, painful, inflamed tumor, which, on suppuration, discharges pus, mixed with blood, and discloses a small fibrous mass of dead tissue, called the core

— Webster Dictionary

Digest

Digest

to dispose to suppurate, or generate healthy pus, as an ulcer or wound

— Webster Dictionary

sputum

sputum

Matter coughed up and expectorated from the mouth, composed of saliva and discharges from the respiratory passages such as mucus, phlegm or pus.

— Wiktionary

Imposthume

Imposthume

a collection of pus or purulent matter in any part of an animal body; an abscess

— Webster Dictionary

Drainage

Drainage

the act, process, or means of drawing off the pus or fluids from a wound, abscess, etc

— Webster Dictionary

Crust

Crust

a hard mass, made up of dried secretions blood, or pus, occurring upon the surface of the body

— Webster Dictionary

quinsy

quinsy

A painful pus-filled inflammation or abscess of the tonsils and surrounding tissues, usually a complication of tonsillitis, caused by bacterial infection and often accompanied by fever.

— Wiktionary

actinomycosis

actinomycosis

disease of cattle that can be transmitted to humans; results from infection with actinomycetes; characterized by hard swellings that exude pus through long sinuses

— Princeton's WordNet

myringotomy

myringotomy

The surgical procedure of making a tiny incision in the eardrum, to relieve pressure caused by the excessive buildup of fluid, or to drain pus.

— Wiktionary

Matter

Matter

substance excreted from living animal bodies; that which is thrown out or discharged in a tumor, boil, or abscess; pus; purulent substance

— Webster Dictionary

Gather

Gather

to concentrate; to come to a head, as a sore, and generate pus; as, a boil has gathered

— Webster Dictionary

Empyema

Empyema

a collection of blood, pus, or other fluid, in some cavity of the body, especially that of the pleura

— Webster Dictionary

Pyocyanin

Pyocyanin

a blue coloring matter found in the pus from old sores, supposed to be formed through the agency of a species of bacterium (Bacillus pyocyaneus)

— Webster Dictionary

issue

issue

An artificial ulcer, usually made in the fleshy part of the arm or leg, to produce the secretion and discharge of pus for the relief of some affected part.

— Wiktionary

corpuscle

corpuscle

A protoplasmic animal cell; esp., such as float free, like blood, lymph, and pus corpuscles; or such as are embedded in an intercellular matrix, like connective tissue and cartilage corpuscles.

— Wiktionary

Abscess

Abscess

a collection of pus or purulent matter in any tissue or organ of the body, the result of a morbid process

— Webster Dictionary

Liver abscess

Liver abscess

A liver abscess is a pus-filled mass inside the liver. Common causes are abdominal infections such as appendicitis or diverticulitis due to haematogenous spread through the portal vein.

— Freebase

Paracentesis

Paracentesis

the perforation of a cavity of the body with a trocar, aspirator, or other suitable instrument, for the evacuation of effused fluid, pus, or gas; tapping

— Webster Dictionary

Pyometra

Pyometra

An accumulation of PUS in the uterine cavity (UTERUS). Pyometra generally indicates the presence of infections.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Issue

Issue

an artificial ulcer, usually made in the fleshy part of the arm or leg, to produce the secretion and discharge of pus for the relief of some affected part

— Webster Dictionary

Liver Abscess

Liver Abscess

Solitary or multiple collections of PUS within the liver as a result of infection by bacteria, protozoa, or other agents.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Lung Abscess

Lung Abscess

Solitary or multiple collections of PUS within the lung parenchyma as a result of infection by bacteria, protozoa, or other agents.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Peritonsillar abscess

Peritonsillar abscess

Peritonsillar abscess, also known as a quinsy or quinsey, is a recognized complication of tonsillitis and consists of a collection of pus beside the tonsil in what is referred to as Peritonsilar space.

— Freebase

dysentery

dysentery

A disease characterised by inflammation of the intestines, especially the colon (large intestine), accompanied by pus (white blood cells) in the feces, fever, pain in the abdomen, low volume of diarrhea, and possible blood in the feces.

— Wiktionary

Pyonephrosis

Pyonephrosis

Pyonephrosis is an infection of the renal collecting system. Pus collects in the renal pelvis and causes distension of the kidney. It can cause kidney failure.

— Freebase

Maturation

Maturation

the process of bringing, or of coming, to maturity; hence, specifically, the process of suppurating perfectly; the formation of pus or matter

— Webster Dictionary

Liver Abscess, Amebic

Liver Abscess, Amebic

Single or multiple areas of PUS due to infection by any ameboid protozoa (AMEBIASIS). A common form is caused by the ingestion of ENTAMOEBA HISTOLYTICA.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Cupping

Cupping

the operation of drawing blood to or from the surface of the person by forming a partial vacuum over the spot. Also, sometimes, a similar operation for drawing pus from an abscess

— Webster Dictionary

Corpuscle

Corpuscle

a protoplasmic animal cell; esp., such as float free, like blood, lymph, and pus corpuscles; or such as are imbedded in an intercellular matrix, like connective tissue and cartilage corpuscles. See Blood

— Webster Dictionary

Sputum

Sputum

Material coughed up from the lungs and expectorated via the mouth. It contains MUCUS, cellular debris, and microorganisms. It may also contain blood or pus.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Anal fistula

Anal fistula

Anal fistula, or fistula-in-ano, is an abnormal connection between the epithelialised surface of the anal canal and the perianal skin. Anal fistulae originate from the anal glands, which are located between the two layers of the anal sphincters and which drain into the anal canal. If the outlet of these glands becomes blocked, an abscess can form which can eventually point to the skin surface. The tract formed by this process is the fistula. Abscesses can recur if the fistula seals over, allowing the accumulation of pus. It then points to the surface again, and the process repeats. Anal fistulas per se do not generally harm, but can be very painful, and can be irritating because of the pus-drain; additionally, recurrent abscesses may lead to significant short term morbidity from pain, and create a nidus for systemic spread of infection. Surgery is considered essential in the decompression of acute abscesses; repair of the fistula itself is considered an elective procedure which many patients elect to undertake due to the discomfort and inconvenience associated with a draining tract.

— Freebase

Psoas Abscess

Psoas Abscess

Abscess of the PSOAS MUSCLES resulting usually from disease of the lumbar vertebrae, with the pus descending into the muscle sheath. The infection is most commonly tuberculous or staphylococcal.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Propionibacterium acnes

Propionibacterium acnes

A bacteria isolated from normal skin, intestinal contents, wounds, blood, pus, and soft tissue abscesses. It is a common contaminant of clinical specimens, presumably from the skin of patients or attendants.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Pyomyositis

Pyomyositis

Pyomyositis, also known as tropical pyomyositis or myositis tropicans, is a bacterial infection of the skeletal muscles which results in a pus-filled abscess. Pyomyositis is most common in tropical areas but can also occur in temperate zones.

— Freebase

Liver Abscess, Pyogenic

Liver Abscess, Pyogenic

Single or multiple areas of PUS due to bacterial infection within the hepatic parenchyma. It can be caused by a variety of BACTERIA, local or disseminated from infections elsewhere such as in APPENDICITIS; CHOLECYSTITIS; PERITONITIS; and after LIVER TRANSPLANTATION.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Cyst

Cyst

A cyst is a closed sac, having a distinct membrane and division compared to the nearby tissue. It may contain air, fluids, or semi-solid material. A collection of pus is called an abscess, not a cyst. Once formed, a cyst could go away on its own or may have to be removed through surgery.

— Freebase

Ulcer

Ulcer

a solution of continuity in any of the soft parts of the body, discharging purulent matter, found on a surface, especially one of the natural surfaces of the body, and originating generally in a constitutional disorder; a sore discharging pus. It is distinguished from an abscess, which has its beginning, at least, in the depth of the tissues

— Webster Dictionary

Uveitis, Suppurative

Uveitis, Suppurative

Intraocular infection caused mainly by pus-producing bacteria and rarely by fungi. The infection may be caused by an injury or surgical wound (exogenous) or by endogenous septic emboli in such diseases as bacterial endocarditis or meningococcemia.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Periapical Abscess

Periapical Abscess

Acute or chronic inflammation of tissues surrounding the apical portion of a tooth, associated with the collection of pus, resulting from infection following pulp infection through a carious lesion or as a result of an injury causing pulp necrosis. (Dorland, 27th ed)

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Pyonephrosis

Pyonephrosis

Distention of KIDNEY with the presence of PUS and suppurative destruction of the renal parenchyma. It is often associated with renal obstruction and can lead to total or nearly total loss of renal function.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Myeloperoxidase

Myeloperoxidase

Myeloperoxidase is a peroxidase enzyme that in humans is encoded by the MPO gene. Myeloperoxidase is most abundantly expressed in neutrophil granulocytes. It is a lysosomal protein stored in azurophilic granules of the neutrophil. MPO has a heme pigment, which causes its green color in secretions rich in neutrophils, such as pus and some forms of mucus.

— Freebase

Hypopyon

Hypopyon

Hypopyon is pus in the eye. It is a leukocytic exudate, seen in the anterior chamber, usually accompanied by redness of the conjunctiva and the underlying episclera. It is a sign of inflammation of the anterior uvea and iris, i.e. iritis, which is a form of anterior uveitis. The exudate settles at the bottom due to gravity.

— Freebase

Sputum

Sputum

Sputum is mucus that is coughed up from the lower airways. In medicine, sputum samples are usually used for microbiological investigations of respiratory infections and cytological investigation of respiratory systems. The best sputum samples contain very little saliva, as this contaminates the sample with oral bacteria. This event is assessed by the clinical microbiologist by examining a Gram stain of the sputum. More than 25 squamous epithelial cells at low enlargement indicates salivary contamination. When a sputum specimen is plated out, it is best to get the portion of the sample that most looks like pus onto the swab. If there is any blood in the sputum, this should also be on the swab. Microbiological sputum samples are usually used to look for infections by Moraxella catarrhalis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae. Other pathogens can also be found. Purulent Sputum contains pus, composed of white blood cells, cellular debris, dead tissue, serous fluid and viscous liquid. Mostly, it is yellow in color, as well as green. It is seen in cases of bronchiectasis, lung abscess, or advanced stage of bronchitis, acute upper respiratory tract infection.

— Freebase

Involucrum

Involucrum

Involucrum is a layer of new bone growth outside existing bone seen in pyogenic osteomyelitis. It results from the stripping off of the periosteum by the accumulation of pus within the bone, and new bone growing from the periosteum. It can be seen radiographically, but is extremely rare in developed countries as osteomyelitis is rarely left untreated.

— Freebase

Frei test

Frei test

The Frei test was developed in 1925 by Wilhelm Siegmund Frei, a German dermatologist, to identify lymphogranuloma inguinale. Antigen made from sterile pus aspirated from previously unruptured abscesses, produced a reaction in patients with lymphogranuloma inguinale when injected intradermally. Other sources of antigen have been explored, most deriving from various tissues of mice infected with Chlamydia. The test is no longer used but stands as a milestone in our understanding of immunology.

— Freebase

Hydrothorax

Hydrothorax

Hydrothorax is a condition that results from serous fluid accumulating in the pleural cavity. This specific condition can be related to cirrhosis with ascites in which ascitic fluid leaks into the pleural cavity. Hepatic hydrothorax is often difficult to manage in end-stage liver failure and often fails to respond to therapy. In similar pleural effusions, the fluid is blood in hemothorax, pus in pyothorax, and lymph in chylothorax.

— Freebase

Blister

Blister

A blister is a small pocket of fluid within the upper layers of the skin, typically caused by forceful rubbing, burning, freezing, chemical exposure or infection. Most blisters are filled with a clear fluid called serum or plasma. However, blisters can be filled with blood or with pus. The word "blister" entered English in the 14th century. It came from the Middle Dutch "bluyster", and was a modification of the Old French "blostre" which meant a leprous nodule—a rise in the skin due to leprosy.

— Freebase

Lung abscess

Lung abscess

Lung abscess is necrosis of the pulmonary tissue and formation of cavities containing necrotic debris or fluid caused by microbial infection. This pus-filled cavity is often caused by aspiration, which may occur during altered consciousness. Alcoholism is the most common condition predisposing to lung abscesses. Lung abscess is considered primary when it results from existing lung parenchymal process and is termed secondary when it complicates another process e.g. vascular emboli or follows rupture of extrapulmonary abscess into lung.

— Freebase

Kerion

Kerion

Kerion is the result of the host's response to a fungal ringworm infection of the hair follicles of the scalp and beard accompanied by secondary bacterial infection. It usually presents itself as raised, spongy lesions. This honeycomb is severely painful inflammatory reaction with deep suppurative lesion on the scalp. The follicle may be seen discharging pus. there may be sinus formation and rarely mycetoma like grains are produced.It is usually caused by Zoophilic dermatophytes like Trichophyton verrucosum and T. mentagrophytes.

— Freebase

Furuncle

Furuncle

A boil, also called a furuncle, is a deep folliculitis, infection of the hair follicle. It is most commonly caused by infection by the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, resulting in a painful swollen area on the skin caused by an accumulation of pus and dead tissue. Individual boils clustered together are called carbuncles. Most human infections are caused by coagulase-positive S. aureus strains, notable for the bacteria's ability to produce coagulase, an enzyme that can clot blood. Almost any organ system can be infected by S. aureus.

— Freebase

Adenoiditis

Adenoiditis

Adenoiditis is the inflammation of the adenoid tissue, usually caused by an infection. Adenoiditis is treated using medication or surgical intervention. Adenoiditis may present with cold like symptoms. However, adenoiditis symptoms often persist for ten or more days, and often include pus like discharge from nose. The infection cause is usually viral. However, if the adenoiditis is caused by a bacterial infection, antibiotics may be prescribed for treatment. A steroidal nasal spray may also be prescribed in order to reduce nasal congestion. Severe or recurring adenoiditis may require surgical removal of the adenoids.

— Freebase

Hidradenitis suppurativa

Hidradenitis suppurativa

Hidradenitis suppurativa is a skin disease that most commonly affects areas bearing apocrine sweat glands or sebaceous glands, such as the underarms, under the breasts, inner thighs, groin and buttocks. The non-contagious disease manifests as clusters of chronic abscesses, epidermoid cysts, sebaceous cysts, pilonidal cyst or multilocalised infections, which can be as large as baseballs or as small as a pea. It can also start as a single abscess and once it pops, can make tracts of many more abscesses. These cysts can be extremely painful to the touch and may persist for years with occasional to frequent periods of inflammation, culminating in incision and drainage of pus, often leaving open wounds that will not heal. For unknown reasons, people with hidradenitis develop plugging or clogging of their apocrine glands. HS causes chronic scarring and pus formation of the underarms and groin/inner thigh areas. The simple procedure of incision and drainage provides some relief from severe, often debilitating, pressure and pain. Flare-ups may be triggered by perspiration, hormonal changes, humidity and heat, and friction from clothing. Persistent lesions may lead to scarring and the formation of sinus tracts, or tunnels connecting the abscesses or infections under the skin. At this stage, complete healing is usually not possible, and progression varies from person to person, with some experiencing remission anywhere from months to years at a time, while others may worsen and require multiple surgeries in order to live comfortably. Wound dehiscence, a premature "bursting" open of a wound, often complicates the healing process. Occurrences of bacterial infections and cellulitis may occur at these sites. Hidradenitis suppurativa pain and depression can be difficult to manage.

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Uroscopy

Uroscopy

Uroscopy is the historic medical practice of visually examining a patient's urine for pus, blood, or other symptoms of disease. It dates back to ancient Egypt, Babylon, and India. It was particularly emphasized in Byzantine medicine. By modern medical standards, uroscopy is considered to be a very limited means of obtaining evidence for the correct diagnosis of a patient's condition. In addition, many of the assumptions made by ancient physicians regarding uroscopy have proved to be quite incorrect and unscientific. However, visual examination of a patient's urine may provide preliminary evidence for a diagnosis, but is generally limited to conditions that affect the urinary system such as infection turbidity or blood infection or haemorrhage.

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Pyuria

Pyuria

In medicine, pyuria is the condition of urine containing pus. Defined as the presence of 6-10 or more neutrophils per high power field of unspun, voided mid-stream urine. It can be a sign of a bacterial urinary tract infection. Pyuria may be present in the septic patient, or in an older patient with pneumonia. Sterile pyuria is urine which contains white blood cells while appearing sterile by standard culturing techniques. Sterile pyuria is listed as a side effect from some medications such as paracetamol. Its occurrence is also associated with certain disease processes, such as Kawasaki Disease and renal TB. However, there are many known causes, including systemic or infectious disease, structural and physiological reasons, intrinsic renal pathology, or drugs.

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Pyaemia

Pyaemia

Pyaemia is a type of septicaemia that leads to widespread abscesses of a metastatic nature. It is usually caused by the staphylococcus bacteria by pus-forming organisms in the blood. Apart from the distinctive abscesses, pyaemia exhibits the same symptoms as other forms of septicaemia. It was almost universally fatal before the introduction of antibiotics. Sir William Osler included a three-page discussion of pyaemia in his textbook The Principles and Practice of Medicine, published in 1892. He defined pyaemia as follows: Earlier still, Ignaz Semmelweis - who would later die of the disease - included a section entitled "Childbed fever is a variety of pyaemia" in his treatise, The Etiology of Childbed Fever. Jane Grey Swisshelm, in her autobiography entitled Half a Century, describes the treatment of pyaemia in 1862 during the American Civil War.

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Receptors, Leukocyte-Adhesion

Receptors, Leukocyte-Adhesion

Family of proteins associated with the capacity of LEUKOCYTES to adhere to each other and to certain substrata, e.g., the C3bi component of complement. Members of this family are the LYMPHOCYTE FUNCTION-ASSOCIATED ANTIGEN-1; (LFA-1), the MACROPHAGE-1 ANTIGEN; (Mac-1), and the INTEGRIN ALPHAXBETA2 or p150,95 leukocyte adhesion protein. They all share a common beta-subunit which is the CD18 antigen. All three of the above antigens are absent in inherited LEUKOCYTE-ADHESION DEFICIENCY SYNDROME, which is characterized by recurrent bacterial infections, impaired pus formation, and wound healing as well as abnormalities in a wide spectrum of adherence-dependent functions of granulocytes, monocytes, and lymphoid cells.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Myringotomy

Myringotomy

Myringotomy is a surgical procedure in which a tiny incision is created in the eardrum to relieve pressure caused by excessive buildup of fluid, or to drain pus from the middle ear. A tympanostomy tube is inserted into the eardrum to keep the middle ear aerated for a prolonged time and to prevent reaccumulation of fluid. Without the insertion of a tube, the incision usually heals spontaneously in two to three weeks. Depending on the type, the tube is either naturally extruded in 6 to 12 months or removed during a minor procedure. Those requiring myringotomy usually have an obstructed or dysfunctional Eustachian tube that is unable to perform drainage or ventilation in its usual fashion. Before the invention of antibiotics, myringotomy without tube placement was also used as a major treatment of severe acute otitis media.

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Skin ulcer

Skin ulcer

An ulcer is a sore on the skin or a mucous membrane, accompanied by the disintegration of tissue. Ulcers can result in complete loss of the epidermis and often portions of the dermis and even subcutaneous fat. Ulcers are most common on the skin of the lower extremities and in the gastrointestinal tract. An ulcer that appears on the skin is often visible as an inflamed tissue with an area of reddened skin. A skin ulcer is often visible in the event of exposure to heat or cold, irritation, or a problem with blood circulation. They can also be caused due to a lack of mobility, which causes prolonged pressure on the tissues. This stress in the blood circulation is transformed to a skin ulcer, commonly known as bedsores or decubitus ulcers. Ulcers often become infected, and pus forms.

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Stye

Stye

An external stye or sty, also hordeolum, is an infection of the sebaceous glands of Zeis at the base of the eyelashes, or an infection of the apocrine sweat glands of Moll. External styes form on the outside of the lids and can be seen as small red bumps. Internal styes are infections of the meibomian sebaceous glands lining the inside of the eyelids. They also cause a red bump underneath the lid with only generalized redness and swelling visible on the outside. Styes are similar to chalazia, but tend to be of smaller size and are more painful and usually produce no lasting damage. They contain water and pus and the bacteria will spread if the stye is forcefully ruptured. Styes are characterized by an acute onset and usually short in duration compared to chalazia that are chronic and usually do not resolve without intervention. Styes are usually caused by staphylococcus aureus bacterium.

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Valsalva maneuver

Valsalva maneuver

The Valsalva maneuver or Valsalva manoeuvre is performed by moderately forceful attempted exhalation against a closed airway, usually done by closing one's mouth, pinching one's nose shut while pressing out as if blowing up a balloon. Variations of the maneuver can be used either in medical examination as a test of cardiac function and autonomic nervous control of the heart, or to "clear" the ears and sinuses when ambient pressure changes, as in diving, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, or aviation. The technique is named after Antonio Maria Valsalva, a 17th-century physician and anatomist from Bologna whose principal scientific interest was the human ear. He described the Eustachian tube and the maneuver to test its patency. He also described the use of this maneuver to expel pus from the middle ear. A modified version is done by expiring against a closed glottis. This will elicit the cardiovascular responses described below but will not force air into the Eustachian tubes.

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Comedo

Comedo

A comedo is a clogged hair follicle in the skin. It is caused by the hormone androgen increasing sebum production. The excess oil glues bits of shedded keratin together, blocking the pore. Comedones are not infected with bacteria. The chronic inflammatory condition that usually includes both comedones and inflamed papules and pustules is called acne. Infection causes inflammation and the development of pus. Whether or not a skin condition classifies as acne depends on the amount of comedones and infection. A comedo may be open to the air or closed by skin. Being open to the air causes oxidization, which turns it black. A small, forming comedo is called a microplug or microcomedo. Comedones that are 1mm or larger are called macrocomedones. They are closed comedones and are more frequent on the face than neck. Comedo-type ductal carcinoma in situ is not related to the skin conditions discussed here. DCIS is a non-invasive form of breast cancer, but comedo-type DCIS may be more aggressive and so may be more likely to become invasive.

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Phlegmon

Phlegmon

Phlegmon is a spreading diffuse inflammatory process with formation of suppurative/purulent exudate or pus. This is the result of acute purulent inflammation which may be related to bacterial infection, however the term 'phlegmon' mostly refers to a walled-off inflammatory mass without bacterial infection, one that may be palpable on physical examination. An example would be phlegmon of diverticulitis. In this case a patient would present to the emergency department with left lower-quadrant abdominal tenderness, and the diagnosis of sigmoid diverticulitis would be high on the differential diagnosis, yet the best test to confirm it would be CT scan. Another example, phlegmon affecting the spine, is known as spondylodiscitis and is associated with endplate destruction and loss of disc height. In adults, the bone marrow is affected first, while in children, the disease starts in the disc itself and spreads rapidly to the adjacent vertebral bodies. Phlegmon in the spine can be a diffuse enhancement, or localized abscess, in the epidural, subligamentous or paraspinous spaces. Under MRI examination, phlegmon will show dark with T1, and high signal with T2.

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Exudate

Exudate

An exudate is any fluid that filters from the circulatory system into lesions or areas of inflammation. It can apply to plants as well as animals. Its composition varies but generally includes water and the dissolved solutes of the main circulatory fluid such as sap or blood. In the case of blood it will contain some or all plasma proteins, white blood cells, platelets, and in the case of local vascular damage: red blood cells. In plants, it can be a healing and defensive response to repel insect attack, or it can be an offensive habit to repel other incompatible or competitive plants. Organisms that feed on exudate are known as exudativores; for example, the Vampire Bat exhibits hematophagy, and the Pygmy marmoset is an obligate gummivore. In humans, exudate can be a pus-like or clear fluid. When an injury occurs, leaving skin exposed, it leaks out of the blood vessels and into nearby tissues. The fluid is composed of serum, fibrin, and white blood cells. Exudate may ooze from cuts or from areas of infection or inflammation.

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Ingrown hair

Ingrown hair

Ingrown hair is a condition where hair curls back or grows sideways into the skin. The ingrown hair condition is seen primarily among people having curly hair. It may or may not be accompanied by an infection of the hair follicle or "razor bumps", which vary in size. While ingrown hair most commonly appears in areas where the skin is shaved or waxed, it can appear anywhere. Anything which causes the hair to be broken off unevenly with a sharp tip can cause ingrown hairs. Shaving is the leading cause, followed by waxing and tight clothing. Symptoms include rash, itching skin, hair which remains in spite of shaving, and infection and pus collecting under skin. Treatments for ingrown hairs include putting a warm washcloth over the ingrown hair, shaving in a different direction, tweezing, exfoliating with facial scrubs, sponges, towels, or creams containing acids, and ibuprofen or other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Prophylactic treatments include twice daily topical application of diluted glycolic acid. Applying salicylic acid solution is also a common remedy for ingrown hairs caused by waxing or shaving.

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Rheum

Rheum

Rheum is thin mucus naturally discharged as a watery substance from the eyes, nose or mouth during sleep. Rheum dries and gathers as a crust in the corners of the eyes or mouth, on the eyelids, or under the nose. It is formed by a combination of mucus, nasal mucus, blood cells, skin cells, or dust. Rheum from the eyes is particularly common. Dried rheum is in common usage called eye gunk, sleepydust, sleep, sleepys, sleepers, eye goop, eye crud, eye jelly,eye crust, eye bogeys, eye boogers, eye-sand, grumbles, etc In the waking individual, blinking of the eyelid causes rheum to be washed away with tears via the nasolacrimal duct. The absence of this action during sleep, however, results in a small amount of dry rheum accumulating in corners of the eye, most notably in children. A number of conditions can cause an increase in the production of rheum in the eye. In the case of allergic conjunctivitis, the buildup of rheum can be considerable, many times preventing the sufferer opening the eye upon waking without prior cleansing of the eye area. The presence of pus in an instance of heavy rheum buildup can indicate dry eye or conjunctivitis, among other infections.

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Kidney stone

Kidney stone

A kidney stone, also known as a renal calculus is a solid concretion or crystal aggregation formed in the kidneys from dietary minerals in the urine. Urinary stones are typically classified by their location in the kidney, ureter, or bladder, or by their chemical composition. About 80% of those with kidney stones are men. Kidney stones typically leave the body by passage in the urine stream, and many stones are formed and passed without causing symptoms. If stones grow to sufficient size they can cause obstruction of the ureter. Ureteral obstruction causes postrenal azotemia and hydronephrosis, as well as spasm of the ureter. This leads to pain, most commonly felt in the flank, lower abdomen, and groin. Renal colic can be associated with nausea, vomiting, fever, blood in the urine, pus in the urine, and painful urination. Renal colic typically comes in waves lasting 20 to 60 minutes, beginning in the flank or lower back and often radiating to the groin or genitals. The diagnosis of kidney stones is made on the basis of information obtained from the history, physical examination, urinalysis, and radiographic studies. Ultrasound examination and blood tests may also aid in the diagnosis.

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Cardiac tamponade

Cardiac tamponade

Cardiac tamponade, also known as pericardial tamponade, is an acute type of pericardial effusion in which fluid accumulates in the pericardium. Cardiac tamponade is pressure on the heart muscle which occurs when the pericardial space fills up with fluid faster than the pericardial sac can stretch. If the amount of fluid increases slowly the pericardial sac can expand to contain a liter or more of fluid prior to tamponade occurring. If the fluid occurs rapidly as little as 100 ml can cause tamponade. Causes of increased pericardial effusion include hypothyroidism, physical trauma, pericarditis, iatrogenic trauma, and myocardial rupture. One of the most common cause is after heart surgery, when post operative bleeding fails to be cleared by clogged chest tubes. Cardiac tamponade is caused by a large or uncontrolled pericardial effusion, i.e. the buildup of fluid inside the pericardium. This commonly occurs as a result of chest trauma, but can also be caused by myocardial rupture, cancer, uraemia, pericarditis, or cardiac surgery, and rarely occurs during retrograde aortic dissection, or whilst the patient is taking anticoagulant therapy. The effusion can occur rapidly, or over a more gradual period of time. The fluid involved is often blood, but pus is also found in some circumstances.

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Seroma

Seroma

A seroma is a pocket of clear serous fluid that sometimes develops in the body after surgery. When small blood vessels are ruptured, blood plasma can seep out; inflammation caused by dying injured cells also contributes to the fluid. Seromas are different from hematomas, which contain red blood cells, and from abscesses, which contain pus and result from an infection. Serous fluid is also different from lymph. Seromas can sometimes be caused by a new type of partial-breast radiation therapy, as explained in a recent article in the International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics. Seromas can also sometimes be caused by injury, such as when the initial swelling from a blow or fall does not fully subside. The remaining serous fluid causes a seroma that the body usually gradually absorbs over time; however, a knot of calcified tissue sometimes remains. Seromas are particularly common after mastectomies, abdominal surgeries, and plastic surgery like face lifts. The neck area is usually affected and swells requiring it to be drained. Many patients find that it makes their initial recovery period more difficult, and some need repeated visits to their doctor to have the seroma fluid drained.

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Avipoxvirus

Avipoxvirus

Avipoxvirus is a member of the Poxviridae family. The Poxviridae family is the family of viruses which cause the victim organism to have poxes as a symptom. Poxviruses have generally large genomes, and other such examples include smallpox and monkeypox. Members of the avipoxvirus genus infect specifically birds. Avipoxviruses are unable to complete their replication cycle in non avian species. Although it is comparably slow-spreading, Avipoxvirus is known to cause symptoms like pustules full of pus lining the skin and diphtheria-like symptoms. These diphtheria-like symptoms might include dipitheric necrotic membranes lining the mouth and the upper respiratory tract. This disease can be transmitted to humans by unusually close contact with birds that are infected or the consuming of liquids or solids that have been in extremely close contact with an infected bird. Like other avian viruses, it can be transmitted through vectors mechanically such as through mosquitoes. Avipoxvirus is a virus that is brick shaped and is usually 200 nanometers in diameter. This is much larger than normal viruses which are around 60 nanometers in diameter. This virus can only be contracted through vectors and consumption of infected items, but they can be filtered by a special water filter. This filter is called a Large Volume Water Sampler.

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Swinepox

Swinepox

Swinepox is a worldwide disease of the pig, caused by a virus of the family Poxviridae and the genus Suipoxvirus. It is the most common cause of pox disease in pigs, with vaccinia virus being the next most common cause of outbreaks. It is a mild to severe disease depending on the louse it was contracted from. Symptoms include papules and pustules on the skin of the abdomen. Characteristic lesions on the lower abdomen have dark hemorrhagic centers. Swinepox is transmitted by direct contact and by the pig louse, Hematopinus suis. Often the hooves go crusty due to the animals water content in its body being used for fighting the infection. This in serious Swine pox cases can cause malformed hoofs and damage the ability for the pig to walk properly. In some extremely rare cases, the genetics of the animal can be changed by this disease but go unnoticed in terms of physical symptoms; this, if contracted by breeding pigs is very threatening for the potential baby piglets to be born. Piglets born from parents that both have the severest strain of the disease will be born frequently with disfigurements such as a tail that is bulbous, and crooked snouts. The inside of the animal is also affected by the genetic strain by making the muscles and fat of the animal pus filled and also weakens the piglets organs overtime resulting in death.

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Staphylococcus aureus

Staphylococcus aureus

Staphylococcus aureus is a bacterium that is a member of the Firmicutes, and is frequently found in the human respiratory tract and on the skin. Although S. aureus is not always pathogenic, it is a common cause of skin infections, respiratory disease, and food poisoning. Disease-associated strains often promote infections by producing potent protein toxins, and expressing cell-surface proteins that bind and inactivate antibodies. The emergence of antibiotic-resistant forms of pathogenic S. aureus is a worldwide problem in clinical medicine. Staphylococcus was first identified in Aberdeen, Scotland by the surgeon Sir Alexander Ogston in pus from a surgical abscess in a knee joint. This name was later appended to Staphylococcus aureus by Rosenbach who was credited by the official system of nomenclature at the time. It is estimated that 20% of the human population are long-term carriers of S. aureus which can be found as part of the normal skin flora and in anterior nares of the nasal passages. S. aureus is the most common species of staphylococcus to cause Staph infections and is a successful pathogen due to a combination of nasal carriage and bacterial immuno-evasive strategies. S. aureus can cause a range of illnesses, from minor skin infections, such as pimples, impetigo, boils, cellulitis folliculitis, carbuncles, scalded skin syndrome, and abscesses, to life-threatening diseases such as pneumonia, meningitis, osteomyelitis, endocarditis, toxic shock syndrome, bacteremia, and sepsis. Its incidence ranges from skin, soft tissue, respiratory, bone, joint, endovascular to wound infections. It is still one of the five most common causes of nosocomial infections and is often the cause of postsurgical wound infections. Each year, some 500,000 patients in American hospitals contract a staphylococcal infection.

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Myopericarditis

Myopericarditis

Myopericarditis is a combination of both myocarditis and pericarditis appearing in a single individual. It involves the presence of fluid in the heart. Myopericarditis refers primarily to a pericarditis with lesser myocarditis, as opposed to a perimyocarditis, though the two terms are often used interchangeably. Both will be reflected on an ECG. thefreedictonary.com/myopericarditis myopericarditis /myo•peri•car•di•tis/ myocarditis combined with pericarditis. Myocarditis Definition Myocarditis is an inflammatory disease of the heart muscle that can result from a variety of causes. While most cases are produced by a viral infection, an inflammation of the heart muscle may also be instigated by toxins, drugs, and hypersensitive immune reactions. Myocarditis is a rare but serious condition that affects both males and females of any age Inflammation of the muscular wall of the heart and of the enveloping pericardium pericardium [per′ikär′dē•əm] pl. pericardia Etymology: Gk, peri + kardia, heart a fibroserous sac that surrounds the heart and the roots of the great vessels. It consists of the serous pericardium and the fibrous pericardium. The serous pericardium consists of the parietal layer, which lines the inside of the fibrous pericardium, and the visceral layer, which adheres to the surface of the heart. Between the two layers is the pericardial space, which contains a few drops of pericardial fluid to lubricate opposing surfaces of the space and allow the heart to move easily during contraction. Injury or disease may cause fluid to accumulate in the space, causing a wide separation between the heart and the outer pericardium. The fibrous pericardium, which constitutes the outermost sac and is composed of tough, white fibrous tissue lined by the parietal layer of the serous pericardium, fits loosely around the heart and attaches to large blood vessels emerging from the top of the heart but not to the heart itself. It is relatively inelastic and protects the heart and the serous membranes. If pericardial fluid or pus accumulates in the pericardial space, the fibrous pericardium cannot stretch, causing a rapid increase of pressure around the heart. pericardial, adj.

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