Definitions containing æpyor`nis

We've found 56 definitions:

Network Information Service

Network Information Service

The Network Information Service, or NIS is a client–server directory service protocol for distributing system configuration data such as user and host names between computers on a computer network. Sun Microsystems developed the NIS; the technology is licensed to virtually all other Unix vendors. Because British Telecom PLC owned the name "Yellow Pages" as a registered trademark in the United Kingdom for its paper-based, commercial telephone directory, Sun changed the name of its system to NIS, though all the commands and functions still start with “yp”. A NIS/YP system maintains and distributes a central directory of user and group information, hostnames, e-mail aliases and other text-based tables of information in a computer network. For example, in a common UNIX environment, the list of users for identification is placed in /etc/passwd, and secret authentication hashes in /etc/shadow. NIS adds another “global” user list which is used for identifying users on any client of the NIS domain. Administrators have the ability to configure NIS to serve password data to outside processes to authenticate users using various versions of the Unix crypt hash algorithms. However in such cases, any NIS client can retrieve the entire password database for offline inspection. Kerberos was designed to handle authentication in a more secure manner.

— Freebase

Niš

Niš

Niš is the largest city of southern Serbia and the third-largest city in Serbia. According to the 2011 census, the city has an urban population of 187,544 inhabitants, while its administrative area has a population of 260,237. The city covers an area of 597 km², including the urban core, town of Niška Banja and 68 suburbs. Niš is the administrative center of the Nišava District. It is one of the oldest cities in the Balkans and Europe, and has from ancient times been considered a gateway between the East and the West. It was named Navissos by the Scordisci in 279 BC, after an invasion of the Balkans. The city was among several taken in the Roman conquest in 75 BC; the Romans built the Via Militaris in the 1st century, with Naissus being one of its key towns; it is also the birthplace of Constantine the Great, the first Christian Emperor and the founder of Constantinople, and Constantius III and Justin I. It is home to one of Serbia's oldest churches, dating to the 4th century, located in the suburb of Mediana. Niš is one of the most important industrial centers in Serbia, a center of electronics industry, industry of mechanical engineering, textile and tobacco industry. Constantine the Great Airport is its international airport. In 2013 the city will host the celebration of 1700 years of Constantine's Edict of Milan.

— Freebase

Network information system

Network information system

Network Information System is an information system for managing networks, such as electricity network, water supply network, gas supply network, or telecommunications network. NIS may manage all data relevant to the network, e.g.- all components and their attributes, the connectivity between them and other information, relating to the operation, design and construction of such networks. NIS for electricity may manage any, some or all voltage levels- Extra High, High, Medium and low voltage. It may support only the distribution network or also the transmission network. NIS may be built on top of a GIS.

— Freebase

Unison

Unison

ū′ni-son, n. oneness or agreement of sound: concord: harmony—adj. U′nisōnal.—adv. U′nisōnally.—n. U′nisōnance, state of being unisonant: accordance of sounds.—adjs. U′nisōnant, U′nisōnous, being in unison. [L. unus, one, sonus a sound, sonāre, to sound.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Mediana

Mediana

Mediana is an important archeological site from the late Roman period, located in the eastern suburb of the Serbian city of Niš. It represents a luxurious residence with a highly organised economy. Excavatations have revealed a villa with peristyle, thermae, granary and water tower. The residence dates to the reign of Constantine the Great 306 to 337. Although Roman artefacts can be found scattered all over the area of present-day Niš, Mediana represents the best-preserved part of Roman Naissus. In 1979, Mediana was added to the Archaeological Sites of Exceptional Importance list, protected by Republic of Serbia.

— Freebase

millerite

millerite

A nickel sulfide mineral, NiS, that occurs as hairlike tufts

— Wiktionary

new sheqel

new sheqel

The official designation of the Israeli currency since 1 January 1986 (in order to distinguish it from the abolished 1980-1985 sheqel). Divided into 100 agorot and represented by u20AA. In English, also represented by the initialism NIS (for "New Israeli Sheqel"). ISO 4217 code: ILS.

— Wiktionary

Nys

Nys

is not. See Nis

— Webster Dictionary

Cornice

Cornice

kor′nis, n. (classical archit.) the uppermost member of the entablature, surmounting the frieze: plaster mouldings round the ceiling of rooms at its junction with the walls.—v.t. to furnish with a cornice.—p.adj. Cor′niced.—ns. Cor′nice-hook, -pole, -rail, a hook, pole, rail, for hanging pictures, curtains, &c.—n. Cor′nice-ring, a ring or moulding on a cannon next below the muzzle-ring. [Fr.,—It., perh. Gr. korōnis, a curved line; cf. L. corona.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Fivepenny

Fivepenny

Fivepenny is one of the many villages in the Lewis district of Ness and part of the Isle of Lewis, Outer Hebrides, Scotland. There are two separate places with this name, both in the north-west of Lewis. Furthest north in Ness the full name of the village there is Còig Peighinnean Nis, and in the Borve area further south the village there is Còig Peighinnean Bhuirgh. Both are known locally as Na Còig Peighinnean, the full name only being used to distinguish one from the other.

— Freebase

Millerite

Millerite

Millerite is a nickel sulfide mineral, NiS. It is brassy in colour and has an acicular habit, often forming radiating masses and furry aggregates. It can be distinguished from pentlandite by crystal habit, its duller colour, and general lack of association with pyrite or pyrrhotite.

— Freebase

Reformist Party

Reformist Party

The Reformist Party is a Niš-based political party in Serbia. Party leader is Dr Aleksandar Višnjić. It took part in the 2007 parliamentary election as an independent list and won no seats finishing the last with only 0.05 percent of vote or 1,881 votes. It is one of four parties that won less than 10,000 votes even though they had to submit exactly the same number of signatures in order to be able to run in the elections. It had a candidate for the 2008 presidential election, its vice-president is Jugoslav Dobričanin.

— Freebase

Tran

Tran

Tran is a small town in Pernik Province, western Bulgaria. It is 27 kilometres away from the town of Breznik and 15 km from the border with Serbia. The town was first mentioned in 1451 as Tran; its name was also rendered as Turun, Tuin, Turan, Taran throughout the 15th–16th centuries. Under the Ottoman Empire it belonged to the Sanjak of Niš. One distinctive feature of the town is the dialect of the Bulgarian language spoken in Tran, which is part of the Torlakian dialect group. The Erma River which flows from the town has formed a magnificent george known as Transko Zhdrelo. Tran holds the Bulgarian lowest temperature record at −38.3°C registered in the winter of 1947.

— Freebase

Čegar

Čegar

Čegar is a location in Serbia where the Battle of Čegar Hill took place. It was first marked on July 4, 1878 with the following inscription: Today's monument in the shape of a tower - a symbol of the soldiers' fortification - was erected for the fiftieth anniversary of the liberation of Niš from the Turks, on June 1, 1927. In 1938 a bronze bust of Stevan Sinđelić was positioned in the semicircular niche of the monument.

— Freebase

Dùn Èistean

Dùn Èistean

Dùn Èistean is a multi-period archaeological site on an inter- tidal sea stack on the north east coast of the Isle of Lewis, near the village of Knockaird in the area of Nis in the Western Isles of Scotland. It is accorded the status of traditional stronghold of Clan Morrison - once a highly powerful family within the Lordship of the Isles - in local oral tradition. The ruins of two large buildings and groups of inter-connecting cellular structures can be seen amongst the grassy tussocks on the top of the island, as well as an artificial pond and a low turf wall enclosing the site. The most prominent feature of the site is a large circular mound of rubble situated on the highest point of the stack, on the north east side of the site. The topographical survey of the site shows these buildings. The island would have provided all that was needed for occupation, having its own fresh water supply in the form of the artificial pond, and numerous buildings serving an array of purposes, from storage to sleeping quarters. Historically and archaeologically the Western Isles in the medieval period differed from mainland Scotland .

— Freebase

Skanderbeg

Skanderbeg

George Castriot, commonly known as Skanderbeg, was a 15th-century Albanian nobleman. Skanderbeg was born in 1405 to the noble Kastrioti family. Sultan Murad II took him hostage at a young age and he served the Ottoman Empire during the next twenty years. He was appointed as sanjakbey of the Sanjak of Dibra by the Ottomans in 1440. In 1443, he deserted the Ottomans during the Battle of Niš and became the ruler of Krujë, Svetigrad, and Modrič. In 1444, he was appointed as a commander of the short-lived League of Lezhë, which proclaimed him Chief of the League of the Albanian people. He was admired for defending the region of Albania against the Ottoman Empire for 25 years. Despite his military valor he was not able to do more than to hold his own possessions within the very small area in the North Albania where almost all his victories against the Ottomans took place. Skanderbeg's rebellion was not a general uprising of Albanians, due to the fact that he did not gain support in the Ottoman-controlled south of Albania or Venetian-controlled north of Albania. His followers, along with Albanians, included Slavs, Vlachs, and Greeks.

— Freebase

Adonis

Adonis

a-dō′nis, n. a beautiful youth, beloved by Aphrodite (Venus): a beau or dandy.—v.t. and v.i. Ad′onise, to make beautiful.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Bipennis

Bipennis

bī-pen′nis, n. an axe with two blades, one on each side of the handle, usually seen depicted in the hands of the Amazons. [L.—bis, twice, penna, wing.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Compunction

Compunction

kom-pungk′shun, n. uneasiness of conscience: remorse: regret: pity.—adj. Compunc′tious, feeling or causing compunction: repentant: remorseful.—adv. Compunc′tiously.—Without compunction, with no feeling of sorrow or regret. [O. Fr.,—L. compunctio, -niscom, inten., and pungĕre, punctum, to prick.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Condition

Condition

kon-dish′un, n. state in which things exist: a particular manner of being: quality: rank, as 'a person of condition:' pre-requisite: temper: a term of a contract: proposal: arrangement: (logic) that which must precede the operation of a cause: (law) a provision that upon the occurrence of an uncertain event an obligation shall come into force, or shall cease, or that the obligation shall not come into force until a certain event.—v.i. to make terms.—v.t. to agree upon: to restrict, limit: to determine.—adj. Condi′tional, depending on conditions.—n. Conditional′ity.—adv. Condi′tionally.—v.t. Condi′tionate, to condition: to qualify.—adj. Condi′tioned, having a certain condition, state, or quality: circumstanced: depending: relative—the opposite of absolute.—Conditioning House, an establishment in which the true weight, length, and condition of articles of trade and commerce are determined scientifically—the first in England established at Bradford in 1891. [L. condicio, -nis, a compact (later false spelling conditio)—condicĕrecon, together, dicĕre, to say.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Corona

Corona

ko-rō′na, n. (archit.) the large, flat, projecting member of a cornice which crowns the entablature: (bot.) the crown-like appendage at the top of compound flowers: (astron.) the luminous circle or halo which surrounds the moon during a solar total eclipse: (anat.) a term used to signify the upper surface of certain parts of the body: a round pendent chandelier:—pl. usually Corō′næ.—n. Cor′onal, a crown or garland: the frontal bone of the skull.—adjs. Cor′onal, Cor′onary, pertaining to a crown, or to the top of the head; Cor′onāte, -d, crowned, applied to shells with a row of projections round the apex.—ns. Coronā′tion, the act of crowning a sovereign; Corō′nis, a sign (′) marking a crasis, as κἄν = καὶ ἄν; Cor′onule (bot.), an appendage like a small crown. [L. corona, a crown.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Deception

Deception

de-sep′shun, n. act of deceiving: the means by which it is sought to deceive.—n. Deceptibil′ity.—adjs. Decept′ible, capable of being deceived; Decep′tious (Shak.), deceitful; Decep′tive, tending to deceive: misleading.—adv. Decep′tively.—n. Decep′tiveness.—adj. Decep′tory, tending to deceive. [O. Fr.,—Low L. deceptio, -nisdecipĕre, to deceive.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Dinornis

Dinornis

dī-nor′nis, n. a genus of large extinct birds, the bones of which are found in New Zealand. [Formed from Gr. deinos, terrible, and ornis, a bird.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Erinys

Erinys

e-rī′nis, n. one of the Furies:—pl. Erinyes (e-rin′i-ēz).

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Finis

Finis

fī′nis, n. the end: conclusion. [L.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Genista

Genista

jē-nis′ta, n. a large genus of shrubby, leguminous plants, with simple leaves and yellow flowers. [L. genista, broom.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Hesperornis

Hesperornis

hes-per-ōr′nis, n. an extinct form of bird, the remains of which have been met with in the American cretaceous deposits. [Gr. hesperos, western, ornis, a bird.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Ichthyornis

Ichthyornis

ik-thi-or′nis, n. a fossil bird with vertebræ like those of fishes, and with teeth set in sockets. [Gr. ichthys, a fish, ornis, a bird.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Ignis-fatuus

Ignis-fatuus

ig′nis-fat′ū-us, n. a light which misleads travellers, often seen over marshy places, also called 'Will-o'-the-Wisp:'—pl. Ignes-fatui (ig′nēz-fat′ū-ī). [L. ignis, fire, fatuus, foolish.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Johannisberger

Johannisberger

jō-hän′nis-bėr-gėr, n. a white Rhenish wine grown at Johannisberg ('St John's Mountain'), near Wiesbaden.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Konistra

Konistra

kō-nis′tra, n. the orchestra or dancing-place in the ancient Greek theatre, a circular area between the stage and the auditorium.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Lemniscate

Lemniscate

lem-nis′kāt, n. a curve in general form like the figure 8—also adj.n. Lemnis′cus, a woollen fillet attached to the back of crowns, diadems, &c. [Gr. lēmniskos.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Lychnis

Lychnis

lik′nis, n. a genus of erect ornamental herbs of the pink family—campions or wall-flowers. [L.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Macaroni

Macaroni

mak-a-rō′ni, n. a kind of paste or dough prepared from the glutinous granular flour of hard varieties of wheat, pressed out through a perforated vessel into long tubes, and then dried: a medley: something fanciful and extravagant: a fool: a fop:—pl. Macarō′nis, Macarō′nies.—n. Macaron′ic, a confused heap, a medley: a macaronic poem.—adjs. Macaron′ic, Macarō′nian, like a macaroni, trifling, affected: of a kind of burlesque verse, consisting of modern words Latinised, or Latin words modernised, intermixed with genuine Latin words. [Old It. maccaronimaccare, to crush.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Manis

Manis

mā′nis, n. the pangolin or scaly ant-eater.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Meniscus

Meniscus

mē-nis′kus, n. a crescent or a new moon: a lens hollow on one side and bulging on the other.—adjs. Menis′cal; Menis′cate; Menis′ciform; Menis′coid. [Gr. mēnē, the moon, -iskos, small.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Municipal

Municipal

mū-nis′i-pal, adj. pertaining to a corporation or city.—n. Municipalisā′tion.—v.t. Munic′ipalise.—ns. Munic′ipalism; Municipal′ity, a town or city possessed of self-government: a district governed like a city: in France, a division of the country.—adv. Munic′ipally. [Fr.,—L. municipalismunicipium, a free town—munia, official duties, capĕre, to take.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Naseberry

Naseberry

nāz′ber-i, n. an American tropical tree.—Also Nees′berry, Nis′berry. [Sp. níspero—L. mespilus, medlar.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Nis

Nis

nis (Spens.), is not. [A contr. of ne is.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Nis

Nis

nis, n. a hobgoblin. [Same as Nix.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Nominal

Nominal

nom′in-al, adj. pertaining to a name: existing only in name: having a name.—ns. Nom′inalism, the doctrine that general terms have no corresponding reality either in or out of the mind, being mere words; Nom′inalist, one of a sect of philosophers who held the doctrine of nominalism.—adj. Nominalist′ic, pertaining to nominalism.—adv. Nom′inally. [L. nominalisnomen, -ĭnis, a name.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Notornis

Notornis

nō-tor′nis, n. a genus of gigantic ralline birds, with wings so much reduced as to be incapable of flight, which have within historical times become extinct in New Zealand, &c. [Gr. nōtos, the south, ornis, a bird.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Nys

Nys

nis (Spens.), none is. [Ne, not, and is.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Nystagmus

Nystagmus

nis-tag′mus, n. a spasmodic, lateral, oscillatory movement of the eyes, found in miners, &c. [Gr., nystazein, to nap.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Orison

Orison

or′i-zun, n. a prayer. [O. Fr. orison (Fr. oraison)—L. oratio, -ōnisorāre, to pray.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Ornis

Ornis

or′nis, n. the birds collectively of a region, its avifauna.—adj. Ornith′ic.—ns. Ornithich′nite (geol.), the footmark of a bird found impressed on sandstone, &c.; Ornithodel′phia, the lowest of the three sub-classes of mammals, same as Monotremata—from the ornithic character of the urogenital organs.—adjs. Ornithodel′phian (also n.), Ornithodel′phic, Ornithodel′phous; Or′nithoid, somewhat ornithic.—ns. Ornith′olite (geol.), the fossil remains of a bird: a stone occurring of various colours and forms bearing the figures of birds.—adj. Ornitholog′ical, pertaining to ornithology.—adv. Ornitholog′ically.—ns. Ornithol′ogist, one versed in ornithology, or who makes a special study of birds; Ornithol′ogy, the science and study of birds; Or′nithomancy, divination by means of birds, by observing their flight, &c.—adjs. Ornithoman′tic; Ornithoph′ilous, bird-fertilised; Or′nithopod, Ornithop′odous, having feet like a bird.—ns. Ornithorhyn′chus, an animal in Australia, with a body like an otter and a snout like the bill of a duck, also called Duck-bill; Ornithos′copy, observation of birds or of their habits; Ornithot′omy, the act of dissecting birds. [Gr. ornis, ornithos, a bird.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Penis

Penis

pē′nis, n. the characteristic external male organ.—adj. Pē′nial. [L., a tail.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Pern

Pern

pėrn, n. a honey-buzzard.—Also Per′nis.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Reminiscence

Reminiscence

rem-i-nis′ens, n. recollection: an account of what is remembered: the recurrence to the mind of the past.—n. Reminis′cent, one who calls past events to mind.—adj. capable of calling to mind.—adjs. Reminiscen′tial, Reminis′citory, tending to remind. [Fr.,—Low L. reminiscentiæ, recollections—L. reminisci, to recall to mind.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Salpornis

Salpornis

sal-por′nis, n. a genus of creepers inhabiting Asia and Africa. [Gr. salpingx, a trumpet, ornis, a bird.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Sayornis

Sayornis

sā-or′nis, n. the pewit fly-catchers. [Thomas Say, an American ornithologist.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Scotograph

Scotograph

skot′ō-graf, n. an instrument for writing in the dark, or for the use of the blind.—ns. Scotō′ma, a defect in the vision (obs. Scot′omy); Scot′ophis, a genus of carinated serpents of North America; Scotor′nis, a genus of African birds with very long tails; Scot′oscope, a night-glass. [Gr. skotos, darkness, graphein, to write.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Spheniscus

Spheniscus

sfē-nis′kus, n. a genus of penguins, of the family Spheniscidæ, the jackass-penguins.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Spleen

Spleen

splēn, n. a soft, pulpy, blood-modifying gland near the large extremity of the stomach, supposed by the ancients to be the seat of anger and melancholy—hence spite: ill-humour: melancholy.—adj. Spleen′ful, displaying spleen, angry, fretful.—adv. Spleen′fully.—adj. Spleen′ish, affected with spleen, fretful, peevish.—adv. Spleen′ishly, in a spleenish manner.—ns. Spleen′ishness, the state of being spleenish; Spleen′-stone, jade or nephrite; Spleen′wort, any fern of the genus Asplenium.—adj. Spleen′y (Shak.), spleenish.—ns. Splēnal′gia, pain in the region of the spleen; Splen′cule, Splen′cūlus, a supplementary spleen; Splēnec′tomist, one who excises the spleen; Splēnec′tomy, excision of the spleen; Splēnectō′pia, displacement of the spleen; Splēn′etic, a splenetic person.—adjs. Splēnet′ic, -al, affected with spleen: peevish: melancholy.—adv. Splēnet′ically.—adj. Splen′ic, pertaining to the spleen.—n. Splēnisā′tion, a diseased condition of the lung, in which its tissue resembles that of the spleen, in softness, &c.—adj. Splēnit′ic.—n. Splēnī′tis, inflammation of the spleen.—adj. Splen′itive, full of spleen, passionate, irritable.—ns. Splen′ocele, a splenic tumour; Splēnog′raphy, the description of the spleen.—adjs. Splē′noid, like the spleen; Splēnolog′ical.—ns. Splēnol′ogy, knowledge about the spleen; Splēnop′athy, disease of the spleen; Splēnot′omy, splenological anatomy.—Splenic fever (see Anthrax). [L. splen—Gr. splēn.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Unicity

Unicity

ū-nis′i-ti, n. state of being unique, sameness.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Uraniscus

Uraniscus

ū-ra-nis′kus, n. the vault or roof of the mouth. [Gr. ouraniskos, dim. of ouranos, the vault of heaven.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary