Definitions containing æolian action

We've found 250 definitions:

follow-up

follow-up

an action to check or complete a previous action

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

give

give

used before some nouns of action to say that the action is done

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

by-play

by-play

Action carried on aside, commonly in dumb show, while the main action proceeds; action not intended to be observed by some of the persons present.

— Wiktionary

Reaction

Reaction

any action in resisting other action or force; counter tendency; movement in a contrary direction; reverse action

— Webster Dictionary

play

play

a particular action in a sport, or the action of playing a particular game

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

counteraction

neutralization, neutralisation, counteraction

action intended to nullify the effects of some previous action

— Princeton's WordNet

neutralization

neutralization, neutralisation, counteraction

action intended to nullify the effects of some previous action

— Princeton's WordNet

neutralisation

neutralization, neutralisation, counteraction

action intended to nullify the effects of some previous action

— Princeton's WordNet

countermeasure

countermeasure

an action taken to offset another action

— Princeton's WordNet

permit

let, allow, permit

make it possible through a specific action or lack of action for something to happen

— Princeton's WordNet

allow

let, allow, permit

make it possible through a specific action or lack of action for something to happen

— Princeton's WordNet

let

let, allow, permit

make it possible through a specific action or lack of action for something to happen

— Princeton's WordNet

actional

actional

Of, pertaining to, or depicting action, especially physical action

— Wiktionary

monkey humping a football

monkey humping a football

Energetic but useless action, or a person engaged in such action.

— Wiktionary

sue

sue

To file a legal action against someone, generally a non-criminal action.

— Wiktionary

-ade

-ade

Used to form nouns denoting action, or a person performing said action

— Wiktionary

hostility

hostility

A hostile action, especially a military action. See hostilities for specific plural definition.

— Wiktionary

counteraction

counteraction

Any action in opposition to a previous action.

— Wiktionary

action replay

replay, instant replay, action replay

the immediate rebroadcast of some action (especially sports action) that has been recorded on videotape

— Princeton's WordNet

replay

replay, instant replay, action replay

the immediate rebroadcast of some action (especially sports action) that has been recorded on videotape

— Princeton's WordNet

byplay

byplay

Any action, carried out onstage during a performance, apart from the main action.

— Wiktionary

theater

theater

A region where a particular action takes place; a specific field of action, usually with reference to war.

— Wiktionary

replevin

replevin

an action to recover personal property unlawfully taken; the writ or procedure of such action

— Wiktionary

gist

gist

The essential ground for action in a suit, without which there is no cause of action.

— Wiktionary

fact

fact

Action; the realm of action.

— Wiktionary

aorist

aorist

a verb tense in some languages (classical Greek and Sanskrit) expressing action (especially past action) without indicating its completion or continuation

— Princeton's WordNet

push

push, bear on

press, drive, or impel (someone) to action or completion of an action

— Princeton's WordNet

bear on

push, bear on

press, drive, or impel (someone) to action or completion of an action

— Princeton's WordNet

interpellation

interjection, interposition, interpolation, interpellation

the action of interjecting or interposing an action or remark that interrupts

— Princeton's WordNet

interjection

interjection, interposition, interpolation, interpellation

the action of interjecting or interposing an action or remark that interrupts

— Princeton's WordNet

interpolation

interjection, interposition, interpolation, interpellation

the action of interjecting or interposing an action or remark that interrupts

— Princeton's WordNet

interposition

interjection, interposition, interpolation, interpellation

the action of interjecting or interposing an action or remark that interrupts

— Princeton's WordNet

preparedness

readiness, preparedness, preparation

the state of having been made ready or prepared for use or action (especially military action)

— Princeton's WordNet

preparation

readiness, preparedness, preparation

the state of having been made ready or prepared for use or action (especially military action)

— Princeton's WordNet

readiness

readiness, preparedness, preparation

the state of having been made ready or prepared for use or action (especially military action)

— Princeton's WordNet

Action

Action

a right of action; as, the law gives an action for every claim

— Webster Dictionary

cartooney

cartooney

An empty and comically overstated threat of legal action, or a mock legal action.

— Wiktionary

actionable

actionable

Capable of being articulated as an action item or a set of action items.

— Wiktionary

two wrongs dont make a right

two wrongs dont make a right

A wrongful action is not a morally appropriate way to correct or cancel a previous wrongful action.

— Wiktionary

Underaction

Underaction

subordinate action; a minor action incidental or subsidiary to the main story; an episode

— Webster Dictionary

deterrence

deterrence

Action taken by states or alliances of nations against equally powerful alliances to prevent hostile action

— Wiktionary

Byplay

Byplay

action carried on aside, and commonly in dumb show, while the main action proceeds

— Webster Dictionary

imperfect tense

imperfect tense

A tense used to describe a past action that is ongoing, incomplete or continuous, or coincident with another action.

— Wiktionary

physiological

physiological

Relating to the action of a drug when given to a healthy person, as distinguished from its therapeutic action.

— Wiktionary

idempotence

idempotence

A quality of an action such that repetitions of the action have no further effect on outcome u2013 being idempotent.

— Wiktionary

Retroaction

Retroaction

action returned, or action backward

— Webster Dictionary

nuisance fee

nuisance fee

A nominal fee, fine or penalty charged to deter an action (rather than to compensate for the costs of that action).

— Wiktionary

public policy

public policy

The set of policies (laws, plans, actions, behaviors) of a government; plans and methods of action that govern that society; a system of laws, courses of action, and priorities directing a government action.

— Wiktionary

penicillin v

penicillin V, phenoxymethyl penicillin

a crystalline penicillin similar in action to penicillin G but more resistant to the action of gastric acids

— Princeton's WordNet

phenoxymethyl penicillin

penicillin V, phenoxymethyl penicillin

a crystalline penicillin similar in action to penicillin G but more resistant to the action of gastric acids

— Princeton's WordNet

Action

Action

an engagement between troops in war, whether on land or water; a battle; a fight; as, a general action, a partial action

— Webster Dictionary

cui bono

cui bono

The principle that the ultimate initiator of an action is likely he who stands to gain from the action.

— Wiktionary

get into trouble

get into trouble

To perform an action which is illegal, prohibited, forbidden or proscribed and to become subject to punishment for such action.

— Wiktionary

dramatic structure

dramatic structure

The sequence a 5-act play follows including exposition, rising action, climax or turning point, falling action, and denouement or catastrophe. credit Gustav Freytag 1863

— Wiktionary

side effect

side effect

An unintended consequence of any action in addition to the intended consequence of that action.

— Wiktionary

mind-body

mind-body

Describing the physical action of the mind on the body, especially the mode in which a thought can cause an action

— Wiktionary

waiting game

waiting game

A strategy or course of action in which one or more parties refrain from direct action until circumstances change in their favor.

— Wiktionary

word

word

The fact or action of speaking, as opposed to writing or to action.

— Wiktionary

concretion

concretion

The action of making something concrete or the result of such an action.

— Wiktionary

alienation

alienation

the action of alienating; the action of causing to become unfriendly

— Princeton's WordNet

preliminary injunction

preliminary injunction

: a court order prohibiting a party to litigation from carrying on a course of action until a trial has determined whether the course of action is proper.

— Wiktionary

conciliation

conciliation

The action of bringing peace and harmony; the action of ending strife.

— Wiktionary

Enigma

Enigma

an action, mode of action, or thing, which cannot be satisfactorily explained; a puzzle; as, his conduct is an enigma

— Webster Dictionary

agency

agency

The faculty of acting or of exerting power; the state of being in action; action; instrumentality.

— Wiktionary

stigmergy

stigmergy

A mechanism of spontaneous, indirect coordination between agents or actions, where the trace left in the environment by an action stimulates the performance of a subsequent action.

— Wiktionary

iterate

iterate

to perform or repeat an action on each item in a set or on the results of each such prior action

— Wiktionary

back projection

back projection

A cinematic technique in which live action is filmed in front of a screen on which the background action is projected.

— Wiktionary

potentiation

potentiation

The action of a substance, at a dose that does not itself have an adverse action, in enhancing the effect of another substance

— Wiktionary

hold with the hare and run with the hounds

hold with the hare and run with the hounds

To oppose an action or behavior and yet engage in the same action or behavior; to be a hypocrite.

— Wiktionary

put up ones dukes

put up ones dukes

To take firm action or to show oneself to be committed to such action, as when competing in a sporting event or other contest.

— Wiktionary

abomination

abomination

an action that is vicious or vile; an action that arouses disgust or abhorrence

— Princeton's WordNet

motive

motivation, motive, need

the psychological feature that arouses an organism to action toward a desired goal; the reason for the action; that which gives purpose and direction to behavior

— Princeton's WordNet

motivation

motivation, motive, need

the psychological feature that arouses an organism to action toward a desired goal; the reason for the action; that which gives purpose and direction to behavior

— Princeton's WordNet

need

motivation, motive, need

the psychological feature that arouses an organism to action toward a desired goal; the reason for the action; that which gives purpose and direction to behavior

— Princeton's WordNet

synergy

synergy

Combined action; the combined healthy action of every organ of a particular system; as, the digestive synergy.

— Wiktionary

active

active

Given to action; constantly engaged in action; energetic; diligent; busy; opposed to dull, sluggish, indolent, or inert; as, an active man of business; active mind; active zeal.

— Wiktionary

Play

Play

to bring into sportive or wanton action; to exhibit in action; to execute; as, to play tricks

— Webster Dictionary

AAR

AAR

After-action report; after-action review.

— Wiktionary

massage

massage

The action of rubbing, kneading or hitting someone's body, to help the person relax, prepare for muscular action (as in contact sports) or to relieve aches.

— Wiktionary

consequentialism

consequentialism

The belief that consequences form the basis for any valid moral judgment about an action. Thus, from a consequentialist standpoint, a morally right action is one that produces a good outcome, or consequence.

— Wiktionary

Mediation

Mediation

the act of mediating; action or relation of anything interposed; action as a necessary condition, means, or instrument; interposition; intervention

— Webster Dictionary

performance

performance

The act of performing; carrying into execution or action; execution; achievement; accomplishment; representation by action; as, the performance of an undertaking of a duty.

— Wiktionary

abuse of process

abuse of process

A cause of action in tort arising from one party making a malicious and deliberate misuse or perversion of regularly issued court process (civil or criminal) not justified by the underlying legal action.

— Wiktionary

Plaint

Plaint

a private memorial tendered to a court, in which a person sets forth his cause of action; the exhibiting of an action in writing

— Webster Dictionary

scene

scene

An exhibition of passionate or strong feeling before others; often, an artificial or affected action, or course of action, done for effect; a theatrical display.

— Wiktionary

Provoke

Provoke

to call forth; to call into being or action; esp., to incense to action, a faculty or passion, as love, hate, or ambition; hence, commonly, to incite, as a person, to action by a challenge, by taunts, or by defiance; to exasperate; to irritate; to offend intolerably; to cause to retaliate

— Webster Dictionary

Action item

Action item

In management, an action item is a documented event, task, activity, or action that needs to take place. Action items are discrete units that can be handled by a single person.

— Freebase

standing

standing

The right of a party to bring a legal action, based on the relationship between that party and the matter to which the action relates.

— Wiktionary

action stations

action stations

The positions or activity assumed by the crew of a warship immediately in advance of combat or other hostile action; also, the signal given to indicate such imminent action.

— Wiktionary

dilatory plea

dilatory plea

a plea that delays the action without settling the cause of action; it can challenge the jurisdiction or claim disability of the defendant etc. (such defenses are usually raised in the defendant's answer)

— Princeton's WordNet

Prompt

Prompt

to assist or induce the action of; to move to action; to instigate; to incite

— Webster Dictionary

Agency

Agency

the faculty of acting or of exerting power; the state of being in action; action; instrumentality

— Webster Dictionary

-ence

-ence

a noun suffix signifying action, state, or quality; also, that which relates to the action or state; as in emergence, diffidence, diligence, influence, difference, excellence. See -ance

— Webster Dictionary

Cause

Cause

a suit or action in court; any legal process by which a party endeavors to obtain his claim, or what he regards as his right; case; ground of action

— Webster Dictionary

Associate

Associate

to unite in action, or to be affected by the action of a different part of the body

— Webster Dictionary

Verb

Verb

a word which affirms or predicates something of some person or thing; a part of speech expressing being, action, or the suffering of action

— Webster Dictionary

Active

Active

given to action; constantly engaged in action; energetic; diligent; busy; -- opposed to dull, sluggish, indolent, or inert; as, an active man of business; active mind; active zeal

— Webster Dictionary

past iterative

past iterative

A tense in the Lithuanian language that indicates complete iterative action in the past, similar to the English used to but with the possibility of the action still continuing in the present.

— Wiktionary

time

clock, time

measure the time or duration of an event or action or the person who performs an action in a certain period of time

— Princeton's WordNet

clock

clock, time

measure the time or duration of an event or action or the person who performs an action in a certain period of time

— Princeton's WordNet

Work

Work

to set in motion or action; to direct the action of; to keep at work; to govern; to manage; as, to work a machine

— Webster Dictionary

Scene

Scene

an exhibition of passionate or strong feeling before others; often, an artifical or affected action, or course of action, done for effect; a theatrical display

— Webster Dictionary

Impulse

Impulse

the action of a force during a very small interval of time; the effect of such action; as, the impulse of a sudden blow upon a hard elastic body

— Webster Dictionary

Embarrass

Embarrass

to hinder from freedom of thought, speech, or action by something which impedes or confuses mental action; to perplex; to discompose; to disconcert; as, laughter may embarrass an orator

— Webster Dictionary

Rest

Rest

to cease from action or motion, especially from action which has caused weariness; to desist from labor or exertion

— Webster Dictionary

Coordinate

Coordinate

to give a common action, movement, or condition to; to regulate and combine so as to produce harmonious action; to adjust; to harmonize; as, to coordinate muscular movements

— Webster Dictionary

Stagnation

Stagnation

the cessation of action, or of brisk action; the state of being dull; as, the stagnation of business

— Webster Dictionary

Reaction

Reaction

an action induced by vital resistance to some other action; depression or exhaustion of vital force consequent on overexertion or overstimulation; heightened activity and overaction succeeding depression or shock

— Webster Dictionary

Performance

Performance

the act of performing; the carrying into execution or action; execution; achievement; accomplishment; representation by action; as, the performance of an undertaking of a duty

— Webster Dictionary

move

act, move

perform an action, or work out or perform (an action)

— Princeton's WordNet

act

act, move

perform an action, or work out or perform (an action)

— Princeton's WordNet

Mode of action

Mode of action

A mode of action describes a functional or anatomical change, at the cellular level, resulting from the exposure of a living organism to a substance. In comparison, a mechanism of action describes such changes at the molecular level. A mode of action is important in classifying chemicals as it represents an intermediate level of complexity in between molecular mechanisms and physiological outcomes, especially when the exact molecular target has not yet been elucidated or is subject to debate. A mechanism of action of a chemical could be "binding to DNA" while its broader mode of action would be "transcriptional regulation". However, there is no clear consensus and the term mode of action is often used, especially in the study of pesticides, to also describe molecular mechanisms such as action on specific nuclear receptors or enzymes.

— Freebase

declaration

declaration

In common law, the formal document specifying plaintiffu2019s cause of action, including the facts necessary to sustain a proper cause of action, and to advise the defendant of the grounds upon which he is being sued.

— Wiktionary

Actuate

Actuate

to put into action or motion; to move or incite to action; to influence actively; to move as motives do; -- more commonly used of persons

— Webster Dictionary

make a virtue of necessity

make a virtue of necessity

To make the best of a difficult situation; to recast or portray an action or situation in which one has no alternatives as an action or situation which was deliberately chosen on its merits.

— Wiktionary

Excitement

Excitement

the act of exciting, or the state of being roused into action, or of having increased action; impulsion; agitation; as, an excitement of the people

— Webster Dictionary

Excito-secretory

Excito-secretory

exciting secretion; -- said of the influence exerted by reflex action on the function of secretion, by which the various glands are excited to action

— Webster Dictionary

Reflection

Reflection

the transference of an excitement from one nerve fiber to another by means of the nerve cells, as in reflex action. See Reflex action, under Reflex

— Webster Dictionary

Figure

Figure

a person, thing, or action, conceived of as analogous to another person, thing, or action, of which it thus becomes a type or representative

— Webster Dictionary

Action research

Action research

Action research is a research initiated to solve an immediate problem or a reflective process of progressive problem solving led by individuals working with others in teams or as part of a "community of practice" to improve the way they address issues and solve problems. There are two types of action research: participatory action research, and practical action research. Action research involves the process of actively participating in an organization change situation whilst conducting research. Action research can also be undertaken by larger organizations or institutions, assisted or guided by professional researchers, with the aim of improving their strategies, practices and knowledge of the environments within which they practice. As designers and stakeholders, researchers work with others to propose a new course of action to help their community improve its work practices. Kurt Lewin, then a professor at MIT, first coined the term “action research” in 1944. In his 1946 paper “Action Research and Minority Problems” he described action research as “a comparative research on the conditions and effects of various forms of social action and research leading to social action” that uses “a spiral of steps, each of which is composed of a circle of planning, action and fact-finding about the result of the action”.

— Freebase

Multiplier

Multiplier

an instrument for multiplying or increasing by repetition or accumulation the intensity of a force or action, as heat or electricity. It is particularly used to render such a force or action appreciable or measurable when feeble. See Thermomultiplier

— Webster Dictionary

-ion

-ion

an action or process, or the result of an action or process

— Wiktionary

Do

Do

to perform, as an action; to execute; to transact to carry out in action; as, to do a good or a bad act; do our duty; to do what I can

— Webster Dictionary

object

object

The noun phrase which is an internal complement of a verb phrase or a prepositional phrase. In a verb phrase with a transitive action verb, it is typically the receiver of the action.

— Wiktionary

offense

offense

an illegal action

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

exercise

exercise

a repeated physical action

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

Discontinuance

Discontinuance

the termination of an action in practice by the voluntary act of the plaintiff; an entry on the record that the plaintiff discontinues his action

— Webster Dictionary

maintenance

maintenance, criminal maintenance

the unauthorized interference in a legal action by a person having no interest in it (as by helping one party with money or otherwise to continue the action) so as to obstruct justice or promote unnecessary litigation or unsettle the peace of the community

— Princeton's WordNet

Instrumental action

Instrumental action

Instrumental action is a social action pursued after evaluating its consequences and consideration of the various means to achieve it. They are usually planned and taken after considering costs and consequences. An example would be most economic transactions of Homo economicus. When employing this type of action, a person views his/her opponent as if he/she were a mere object or organizational resource and attempts to manipulate the opponent to act according to his/her wishes. Depending on the authority and status of the relationships between these two persons within the organizational context, one could issue an order to the opponent or use other means to obtain compliance. In trying to enact coherent meaning of the action and the action situation, the person who is subjected to instrumental action will normally reflect upon the appropriateness of the action. Is the action efficient for achieving the required ends.

— Freebase

Matter

Matter

that with regard to, or about which, anything takes place or is done; the thing aimed at, treated of, or treated; subject of action, discussion, consideration, feeling, complaint, legal action, or the like; theme

— Webster Dictionary

Exercise

Exercise

to set in action; to cause to act, move, or make exertion; to give employment to; to put in action habitually or constantly; to school or train; to exert repeatedly; to busy

— Webster Dictionary

act

act

an action by sb

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

thing

thing

a situation, action, or event

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

concrete verb

concrete verb

Concrete verb refers to a verbal aspect in verbs of motion that is unidirectional (as opposed to multidirectional), a definitely directed motion, or a single, completed action (instead of a repeated action or series of actions). Concrete verbs may be either imperfective or perfective.

— Wiktionary

Action Force

Action Force

Action Force was a 1980's range of European action figures initially based on Action Man and later used to introduce G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero toys to European markets. Several publishing companies have produced comic books based on the figures.

— Freebase

Tort

Tort

any civil wrong or injury; a wrongful act (not involving a breach of contract) for which an action will lie; a form of action, in some parts of the United States, for a wrong or injury

— Webster Dictionary

quiescence

quiescence

The action of bringing something to rest or making it quiescent; the action of coming to rest or to a quiescent state.

— Wiktionary

Medium

Medium

a substance through which an effect is transmitted from one thing to another; as, air is the common medium of sound. Hence: The condition upon which any event or action occurs; necessary means of motion or action; that through or by which anything is accomplished, conveyed, or carried on; specifically, in animal magnetism, spiritualism, etc., a person through whom the action of another being is said to be manifested and transmitted

— Webster Dictionary

Preclude

Preclude

to shut out by anticipative action; to prevent or hinder by necessary consequence or implication; to deter action of, access to, employment of, etc.; to render ineffectual; to obviate by anticipation

— Webster Dictionary

insult

insult

an offensive remark or action

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

arrest

arrest

the action of arresting sb

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

assumption

assumption

the action of taking responsibility

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

up

up

being considered for a particular action

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

grasp

grasp

the action of holding tightly

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

burst

burst

a sudden action, emotion or activity

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

recommendation

recommendation

a suggestion to take a particular action

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

Scope

Scope

room or opportunity for free outlook or aim; space for action; amplitude of opportunity; free course or vent; liberty; range of view, intent, or action

— Webster Dictionary

provoke

provoke

to cause a particular feeling or action

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

rotation

rotation

the action of rotating in a circle

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

reaction

reaction

an action done in opposition to

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

move

move

an action intended to achieve sth

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

to

to

indicates the aim of an action

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

court

court

to start legal action against sb

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

approach

approach

the action of offering or proposing

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

step

step

an action designed to achieve sth

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

stunt

stunt

an action done to attract attention

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

bounce

bounce

the action of springing off a surface

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

Pluperfect

Pluperfect

more than perfect; past perfect; -- said of the tense which denotes that an action or event was completed at or before the time of another past action or event

— Webster Dictionary

Restraint

Restraint

the act or process of restraining, or of holding back or hindering from motion or action, in any manner; hindrance of the will, or of any action, physical or mental

— Webster Dictionary

verb

verb

a word that expresses an action or state

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

merit

merit

(of an action) to be worth doing

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

trick

trick

an action in which you perform magic

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

incite

incite

to provoke an emotion or violent action

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

sin

sin

an action considered to be morally wrong

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

gesture

gesture

an action done to show your feelings

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

compelling

compelling

strong enough to result in an action

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

cue

cue

an action or remark that signals sth

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

do

do

to perform an action, activity, or task

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

delivery

delivery

the action or process of delivering sth

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

past imperfect tense

past imperfect tense

A grammatical tense which expresses the past as an action which was still going on at the point in time described, say someone "was ...ing" something, as opposed to the already accomplished counterpart past perfect tense (where the action took place even further in the past)

— Wiktionary

turn

turn

the action of turning sth around a central point

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

signal

signal

an action, sound, etc. that sends people a message

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

challenge

challenge

an action showing you do not accept sth

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

mechanical

mechanical

(of an action) automatic and done without thought

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

Actinism

Actinism

the chemical action of sunlight.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

scene

scene

The place, time, circumstance, etc., in which anything occurs, or in which the action of a story, play, or the like, is laid; surroundings amid which anything is set before the imagination; place of occurrence, exhibition, or action.

— Wiktionary

Agonist

Agonist

An agonist is a chemical that binds to some receptor of a cell and triggers a response by that cell. Agonists often mimic the action of a naturally occurring substance. Whereas an agonist causes an action, an antagonist blocks the action of the agonist and an inverse agonist causes an action opposite to that of the agonist.

— Freebase

to

to

indicates the person or thing affected by an action

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

slow motion

slow motion

when a film is run so that action slows down

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

cue

cue

an actor's action or remark that signals other actors

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

exercise

exercise

an action practicing or testing a way of doing sth

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

meaning

meaning

(of a word) the object, action, idea, etc. it represents

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

scene

scene

The decorations and fittings of a stage, representing the place in which the action is supposed to go on; one of the slides, or other devices, used to give an appearance of reality to the action of a play; as, to paint scenes; to shift the scenes; to go behind the scenes.

— Wiktionary

completion

completion, culmination, closing, windup, mop up

a concluding action

— Princeton's WordNet

mop up

completion, culmination, closing, windup, mop up

a concluding action

— Princeton's WordNet

thing

thing

an action

— Princeton's WordNet

windup

completion, culmination, closing, windup, mop up

a concluding action

— Princeton's WordNet

closing

completion, culmination, closing, windup, mop up

a concluding action

— Princeton's WordNet

culmination

completion, culmination, closing, windup, mop up

a concluding action

— Princeton's WordNet

Run

Run

to move, proceed, advance, pass, go, come, etc., swiftly, smoothly, or with quick action; -- said of things animate or inanimate. Hence, to flow, glide, or roll onward, as a stream, a snake, a wagon, etc.; to move by quicker action than in walking, as a person, a horse, a dog

— Webster Dictionary

by

by

indicates who did an action when used with a passive verb

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

suicide

suicide

an action that is likely to have very serious consequences

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

direct object

direct object

a noun or pronoun that receives the action of a transitive verb

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

àwith

àwith

indicates sth done at the same time as another action

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

push

push

the action of pushing sth ahead or away from you

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

but for

but for

Pertaining to a test of causation whereby an agent or action is considered to have caused an event (and therefore to be responsible and/or liable for said event) if, had said agent or action not existed, the event would not have taken place.

— Wiktionary

abstract verb

abstract verb

Abstract verb refers to a verbal aspect in verbs of motion that is multidirectional (as opposed to unidirectional), an indirect motion, or a repeated action or series of actions (instead of a single, completed action). Abstract verbs are always imperfective in aspect, even if they have prefixes normally associated with the perfective aspect.

— Wiktionary

acture

acture

Action.

— Wiktionary

pressing

pressing, urgent

compelling immediate action

— Princeton's WordNet

motivative

motivative(a), motive(a), motivating

impelling to action

— Princeton's WordNet

repressive

inhibitory, repressive, repressing

restrictive of action

— Princeton's WordNet

motivating

motivative(a), motive(a), motivating

impelling to action

— Princeton's WordNet

aroused

aroused

aroused to action

— Princeton's WordNet

course of action

course, course of action

a mode of action

— Princeton's WordNet

getting even

return, paying back, getting even

a reciprocal group action

— Princeton's WordNet

goose

goose

prod into action

— Princeton's WordNet

motive

motivative(a), motive(a), motivating

impelling to action

— Princeton's WordNet

actuated

actuated

moved to action

— Princeton's WordNet

ready

ready

poised for action

— Princeton's WordNet

course

course, course of action

a mode of action

— Princeton's WordNet

cry

cry

demand immediate action

— Princeton's WordNet

paying back

return, paying back, getting even

a reciprocal group action

— Princeton's WordNet

dissuasive

dissuasive

deterring from action

— Princeton's WordNet

return

return, paying back, getting even

a reciprocal group action

— Princeton's WordNet

innervate

innervate

stimulate to action

— Princeton's WordNet

urgent

pressing, urgent

compelling immediate action

— Princeton's WordNet

repressing

inhibitory, repressive, repressing

restrictive of action

— Princeton's WordNet

inhibitory

inhibitory, repressive, repressing

restrictive of action

— Princeton's WordNet

Lever-action

Lever-action

Lever-action is a type of firearm action which uses a lever located around the trigger guard area to load fresh cartridges into the chamber of the barrel when the lever is worked. This contrasts to bolt action, semi-automatic, or selective fire weapons. Most lever-action firearms are rifles, but lever-action shotguns and a few pistols have also been made. One of the most famous lever-action firearm is undoubtedly the Winchester rifle, but many manufacturers–notably Marlin and Savage–also produce lever-action rifles. Mossberg produces the 464 in center fire .30-30 and rim fire .22. While the term lever-action generally implies a repeating firearm, it is also sometimes applied to a variety of single-shot, or falling-block actions that use a lever for cycling, such as the Martini-Henry or the Ruger No. 1.

— Freebase

Scenery

Scenery

assemblage of scenes; the paintings and hangings representing the scenes of a play; the disposition and arrangement of the scenes in which the action of a play, poem, etc., is laid; representation of place of action or occurence

— Webster Dictionary

Super Heat Games

Super Heat Games

Super Heat Games, a division of Ahead of the Game, Inc. designs, develops and markets collectible action sports Trading Card Games, showcasing the world’s top professional Athletes in Action Sports including Skateboarding, Snowboarding, Motocross, Surfing and BMX.

— CrunchBase

scene

scene

a part of a movie or play in which a particular action takes place

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

better off

better off

indicates what you think the best situation or action would be

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

siege

siege

military action

— Wiktionary

fribble

fribble

A trifling action.

— Wiktionary

mechanicalness

mechanicalness

A mechanical action.

— Wiktionary

working

working

Operation; action.

— Wiktionary

smooth

smooth

A smoothing action.

— Wiktionary

-osis

-osis

process, action

— Wiktionary

hurry

hurry

Rushed action.

— Wiktionary

eupraxy

eupraxy

right action.

— Wiktionary

liable

liable(p)

subject to legal action

— Princeton's WordNet

intermit

pause, intermit, break

cease an action temporarily

— Princeton's WordNet

bouncing

bouncing, bouncy, peppy, spirited, zippy

marked by lively action

— Princeton's WordNet

contusion

contusion

the action of bruising

— Princeton's WordNet

cooperation

cooperation

joint operation or action

— Princeton's WordNet

bouncy

bouncing, bouncy, peppy, spirited, zippy

marked by lively action

— Princeton's WordNet

break

break

invalidate by judicial action

— Princeton's WordNet

interplay

interplay

reciprocal action and reaction

— Princeton's WordNet

break

pause, intermit, break

cease an action temporarily

— Princeton's WordNet

corroding

corrosion, corroding, erosion

erosion by chemical action

— Princeton's WordNet

corrosion

corrosion, corroding, erosion

erosion by chemical action

— Princeton's WordNet

depredation

ravage, depredation

(usually plural) a destructive action

— Princeton's WordNet

repress

repress

block the action of

— Princeton's WordNet

signal

signal

any incitement to action

— Princeton's WordNet

ravage

ravage, depredation

(usually plural) a destructive action

— Princeton's WordNet

imperative

imperative

requiring attention or action

— Princeton's WordNet

feint

feint

deceive by a mock action

— Princeton's WordNet

erosion

corrosion, corroding, erosion

erosion by chemical action

— Princeton's WordNet

indirection

indirection

indirect procedure or action

— Princeton's WordNet


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