Definitions containing æneas silvius

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Aeneas Silvius

Aeneas Silvius

Aeneas Silvius is the son of Silvius, in some versions grandson of Ascanius and great-grandson or grandson of Aeneas. He is the third in the list of the mythical kings of Alba Longa in Latium, and the Silvii regarded him as the founder of their house. Dionysius of Halicarnassus ascribes to him a reign of 31 years. Ovid does not mention him among the Alban kings. According to Livy and Dionysius the heir of Aeneas Silvius was named Latinus Silvius.

— Freebase

Silvius

Silvius

Silvius is a genus of fly in the family Tabanidae. It contains the following species: ⁕S. abdominalis Philip, 1954 ⁕S. algirus Meigen 1830 ⁕S. alpinus ⁕S. appendiculatus Macquart 1846 ⁕S. ceras ⁕S. gibsoni Philip, 1958 ⁕S. gigantulus Loew, 1872 ⁕S. inflaticornis Austen 1925 ⁕S. jeanae Pechuman, 1960 ⁕S. latifrons Olsufjev 1937 ⁕S. microcephalus Wehr, 1922 ⁕S. notatus ⁕S. philipi Pechuman, 1938 ⁕S. pollinosus Williston, 1880 ⁕S. quadrivittatus ⁕S. sayi Brennan, 1935 ⁕S. trifolium Osten Sacken, 1875 ⁕S. variegatus

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Piccolomini

Piccolomini

the name of an illustrious family of science in Italy, of which Æneas Silvius (Pope Pius II.) was a member; also Octavio I., Duke of Amalfi, who distinguished himself, along with Wallenstein, in the Thirty Years' War at Lützen in 1632, at Nordlinger in 1634, and at Thionville in 1639; was one of the most celebrated soldiers that had command of the imperial troops (1599-1656).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Lavinia

Lavinia

In Roman mythology, Lavinia is the daughter of Latinus and Amata and the last wife of Aeneas. Lavinia, the only child of the king and "ripe for marriage", had been courted by many men in Ausonia who hoped to become the king of Latium. Turnus, ruler of the Rutuli, was the most likely of the suitors, having the favor of Queen Amata. King Latinus is later warned by his father Faunus in a dream oracle that his daughter is not to marry a Latin. "Propose no Latin alliance for your daughter, Son of mine; distrust the bridal chamber Now prepared. Men from abroad will come And be your sons by marriage. Blood so mingled Lifts our name starward. Children of that stock Will see all earth turned Latin at their feet, Governed by them, as far as on his rounds The Sun looks down on Ocean, East or West." Lavinia has what is perhaps her most, or only, memorable moment in Book 7 of the Aeneid, lines 69–83: during sacrifice at the altars of the gods, Lavinia's hair catches fire, an omen promising glorious days to come for Lavinia and war for all Latins. Aeneas and Lavinia had one son, Silvius. Aeneas named the city Lavinium for her. According to an account by Livy, Ascanius was the son of Aeneas and Lavinia; and she ruled the Latins as a power behind the throne, for Ascanius was too young to rule.

— Freebase


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