Definitions containing ægis`thus

We've found 250 definitions:

Thus

Thus

to this degree or extent; so far; so; as, thus wise; thus peaceble; thus bold

— Webster Dictionary

Turn

Turn

an embellishment or grace (marked thus, /), commonly consisting of the principal note, or that on which the turn is made, with the note above, and the semitone below, the note above being sounded first, the principal note next, and the semitone below last, the three being performed quickly, as a triplet preceding the marked note. The turn may be inverted so as to begin with the lower note, in which case the sign is either placed on end thus /, or drawn thus /

— Webster Dictionary

plumper

plumper

In elections, a vote given to one candidate only, when two or more are to be elected, thus giving him or her the advantage over the others; a person who gives his or her vote thus is said to plump, or to plump his or her vote.

— Wiktionary

normally black

normally black

for LCD to be opaque and thus black when voltage is not applied to a pixel electrode and transparent and thus white when voltage is applied. Less common than normally white.

— Wiktionary

normally white

normally white

for LCD to be transparent and thus white when voltage is not applied to a pixel electrode and opaque and thus black when voltage is applied. More common than normally black.

— Wiktionary

Apodosis

Apodosis

the consequent clause or conclusion in a conditional sentence, expressing the result, and thus distinguished from the protasis or clause which expresses a condition. Thus, in the sentence, "Though he slay me, yet will I trust in him," the former clause is the protasis, and the latter the apodosis

— Webster Dictionary

Degree

Degree

state as indicated by sum of exponents; more particularly, the degree of a term is indicated by the sum of the exponents of its literal factors; thus, a2b3c is a term of the sixth degree. The degree of a power, or radical, is denoted by its index, that of an equation by the greatest sum of the exponents of the unknown quantities in any term; thus, ax4 + bx2 = c, and mx2y2 + nyx = p, are both equations of the fourth degree

— Webster Dictionary

Mineralizer

Mineralizer

an element which is combined with a metal, thus forming an ore. Thus, in galena, or lead ore, sulphur is a mineralizer; in hematite, oxygen is a mineralizer

— Webster Dictionary

Plumper

Plumper

a vote given to one candidate only, when two or more are to be elected, thus giving him the advantage over the others. A person who gives his vote thus is said to plump, or to plump his vote

— Webster Dictionary

Shall

Shall

as an auxiliary, shall indicates a duty or necessity whose obligation is derived from the person speaking; as, you shall go; he shall go; that is, I order or promise your going. It thus ordinarily expresses, in the second and third persons, a command, a threat, or a promise. If the auxillary be emphasized, the command is made more imperative, the promise or that more positive and sure. It is also employed in the language of prophecy; as, "the day shall come when . . . , " since a promise or threat and an authoritative prophecy nearly coincide in significance. In shall with the first person, the necessity of the action is sometimes implied as residing elsewhere than in the speaker; as, I shall suffer; we shall see; and there is always a less distinct and positive assertion of his volition than is indicated by will. "I shall go" implies nearly a simple futurity; more exactly, a foretelling or an expectation of my going, in which, naturally enough, a certain degree of plan or intention may be included; emphasize the shall, and the event is described as certain to occur, and the expression approximates in meaning to our emphatic "I will go." In a question, the relation of speaker and source of obligation is of course transferred to the person addressed; as, "Shall you go?" (answer, "I shall go"); "Shall he go?" i. e., "Do you require or promise his going?" (answer, "He shall go".) The same relation is transferred to either second or third person in such phrases as "You say, or think, you shall go;" "He says, or thinks, he shall go." After a conditional conjunction (as if, whether) shall is used in all persons to express futurity simply; as, if I, you, or he shall say they are right. Should is everywhere used in the same connection and the same senses as shall, as its imperfect. It also expresses duty or moral obligation; as, he should do it whether he will or not. In the early English, and hence in our English Bible, shall is the auxiliary mainly used, in all the persons, to express simple futurity. (Cf. Will, v. t.) Shall may be used elliptically; thus, with an adverb or other word expressive of motion go may be omitted

— Webster Dictionary

Synthesis

Synthesis

the art or process of making a compound by putting the ingredients together, as contrasted with analysis; thus, water is made by synthesis from hydrogen and oxygen; hence, specifically, the building up of complex compounds by special reactions, whereby their component radicals are so grouped that the resulting substances are identical in every respect with the natural articles when such occur; thus, artificial alcohol, urea, indigo blue, alizarin, etc., are made by synthesis

— Webster Dictionary

Tide

Tide

the alternate rising and falling of the waters of the ocean, and of bays, rivers, etc., connected therewith. The tide ebbs and flows twice in each lunar day, or the space of a little more than twenty-four hours. It is occasioned by the attraction of the sun and moon (the influence of the latter being three times that of the former), acting unequally on the waters in different parts of the earth, thus disturbing their equilibrium. A high tide upon one side of the earth is accompanied by a high tide upon the opposite side. Hence, when the sun and moon are in conjunction or opposition, as at new moon and full moon, their action is such as to produce a greater than the usual tide, called the spring tide, as represented in the cut. When the moon is in the first or third quarter, the sun's attraction in part counteracts the effect of the moon's attraction, thus producing under the moon a smaller tide than usual, called the neap tide

— Webster Dictionary

To

To

as sign of the infinitive, to had originally the use of last defined, governing the infinitive as a verbal noun, and connecting it as indirect object with a preceding verb or adjective; thus, ready to go, i.e., ready unto going; good to eat, i.e., good for eating; I do my utmost to lead my life pleasantly. But it has come to be the almost constant prefix to the infinitive, even in situations where it has no prepositional meaning, as where the infinitive is direct object or subject; thus, I love to learn, i.e., I love learning; to die for one's country is noble, i.e., the dying for one's country. Where the infinitive denotes the design or purpose, good usage formerly allowed the prefixing of for to the to; as, what went ye out for see? (Matt. xi. 8)

— Webster Dictionary

antibody

antibody

any of a large variety of proteins normally present in the body or produced in response to an antigen which it neutralizes, thus producing an immune response

— Princeton's WordNet

aphonic

aphonic, voiceless

being without sound through injury or illness and thus incapable of all but whispered speech

— Princeton's WordNet

atherosclerosis

atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease

a stage of arteriosclerosis involving fatty deposits (atheromas) inside the arterial walls, thus narrowing the arteries

— Princeton's WordNet

bartholomeu dias

Dias, Diaz, Bartholomeu Dias, Bartholomeu Diaz

Portuguese explorer who in 1488 was the first European to get round the Cape of Good Hope (thus establishing a sea route from the Atlantic to Asia) (1450-1500)

— Princeton's WordNet

bartholomeu diaz

Dias, Diaz, Bartholomeu Dias, Bartholomeu Diaz

Portuguese explorer who in 1488 was the first European to get round the Cape of Good Hope (thus establishing a sea route from the Atlantic to Asia) (1450-1500)

— Princeton's WordNet

battle of hastings

Hastings, battle of Hastings

the decisive battle in which William the Conqueror (duke of Normandy) defeated the Saxons under Harold II (1066) and thus left England open for the Norman Conquest

— Princeton's WordNet

beatified

beatified, blessed

Roman Catholic; proclaimed one of the blessed and thus worthy of veneration

— Princeton's WordNet

bessemer process

Bessemer process

an industrial process for making steel using a Bessemer converter to blast air through molten iron and thus burning the excess carbon and impurities; the first successful method of making steel in quantity at low cost

— Princeton's WordNet

blessed

beatified, blessed

Roman Catholic; proclaimed one of the blessed and thus worthy of veneration

— Princeton's WordNet

casteless

outcaste, casteless

not belonging to or having been expelled from a caste and thus having no place or status in society

— Princeton's WordNet

checkmate

checkmate, mate

place an opponent's king under an attack from which it cannot escape and thus ending the game

— Princeton's WordNet

coronary artery disease

atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease

a stage of arteriosclerosis involving fatty deposits (atheromas) inside the arterial walls, thus narrowing the arteries

— Princeton's WordNet

crossbreeding

hybridization, hybridisation, crossbreeding, crossing, cross, interbreeding, hybridizing

(genetics) the act of mixing different species or varieties of animals or plants and thus to produce hybrids

— Princeton's WordNet

cross

hybridization, hybridisation, crossbreeding, crossing, cross, interbreeding, hybridizing

(genetics) the act of mixing different species or varieties of animals or plants and thus to produce hybrids

— Princeton's WordNet

crossing

hybridization, hybridisation, crossbreeding, crossing, cross, interbreeding, hybridizing

(genetics) the act of mixing different species or varieties of animals or plants and thus to produce hybrids

— Princeton's WordNet

dealignment

dealignment

a process whereby voters are moved toward nonpartisanship thus weakening the structure of political parties

— Princeton's WordNet

dias

Dias, Diaz, Bartholomeu Dias, Bartholomeu Diaz

Portuguese explorer who in 1488 was the first European to get round the Cape of Good Hope (thus establishing a sea route from the Atlantic to Asia) (1450-1500)

— Princeton's WordNet

diaz

Dias, Diaz, Bartholomeu Dias, Bartholomeu Diaz

Portuguese explorer who in 1488 was the first European to get round the Cape of Good Hope (thus establishing a sea route from the Atlantic to Asia) (1450-1500)

— Princeton's WordNet

existentialism

existentialism, existential philosophy, existentialist philosophy

(philosophy) a 20th-century philosophical movement chiefly in Europe; assumes that people are entirely free and thus responsible for what they make of themselves

— Princeton's WordNet

existentialist philosophy

existentialism, existential philosophy, existentialist philosophy

(philosophy) a 20th-century philosophical movement chiefly in Europe; assumes that people are entirely free and thus responsible for what they make of themselves

— Princeton's WordNet

glucagon

glucagon

a hormone secreted by the pancreas; stimulates increases in blood sugar levels in the blood (thus opposing the action of insulin)

— Princeton's WordNet

hastings

Hastings, battle of Hastings

the decisive battle in which William the Conqueror (duke of Normandy) defeated the Saxons under Harold II (1066) and thus left England open for the Norman Conquest

— Princeton's WordNet

hybridisation

hybridization, hybridisation, crossbreeding, crossing, cross, interbreeding, hybridizing

(genetics) the act of mixing different species or varieties of animals or plants and thus to produce hybrids

— Princeton's WordNet

hybridization

hybridization, hybridisation, crossbreeding, crossing, cross, interbreeding, hybridizing

(genetics) the act of mixing different species or varieties of animals or plants and thus to produce hybrids

— Princeton's WordNet

hybridizing

hybridization, hybridisation, crossbreeding, crossing, cross, interbreeding, hybridizing

(genetics) the act of mixing different species or varieties of animals or plants and thus to produce hybrids

— Princeton's WordNet

interbreeding

hybridization, hybridisation, crossbreeding, crossing, cross, interbreeding, hybridizing

(genetics) the act of mixing different species or varieties of animals or plants and thus to produce hybrids

— Princeton's WordNet

iron lung

iron lung

respirator that produces alternations in air pressure in a chamber surrounding a patient's chest to force air into and out of the lungs thus providing artificial respiration

— Princeton's WordNet

jdam

Joint Direct Attack Munition, JDAM

a pinpoint bomb guidance device that can be strapped to a gravity bomb thus converting dumb bombs into smart bombs

— Princeton's WordNet

joint direct attack munition

Joint Direct Attack Munition, JDAM

a pinpoint bomb guidance device that can be strapped to a gravity bomb thus converting dumb bombs into smart bombs

— Princeton's WordNet

mate

checkmate, mate

place an opponent's king under an attack from which it cannot escape and thus ending the game

— Princeton's WordNet

maxwell's demon

Maxwell's demon

an imaginary creature that controls a small hole in a partition that divides a chamber filled with gas into two parts and allows fast molecules to move in one direction and slow molecules to move in the other direction through the hole; this would result in one part of the container becoming warmer and the other cooler, thus decreasing entropy and violating the second law of thermodynamics

— Princeton's WordNet

neutralize

neutralize

make politically neutral and thus inoffensive

— Princeton's WordNet

one-celled

single-celled, one-celled

having a single cell (and thus not divided into cells)

— Princeton's WordNet

outcaste

outcaste, casteless

not belonging to or having been expelled from a caste and thus having no place or status in society

— Princeton's WordNet

overwrite

overwrite

write new data on top of existing data and thus erase the previously existing data

— Princeton's WordNet

pareve

pareve, parve

containing no meat or milk (or their derivatives) and thus eatable with both meat and dairy dishes according to the dietary laws of Judaism

— Princeton's WordNet

parve

pareve, parve

containing no meat or milk (or their derivatives) and thus eatable with both meat and dairy dishes according to the dietary laws of Judaism

— Princeton's WordNet

pauli

Pauli, Wolfgang Pauli

United States physicist (born in Austria) who proposed the exclusion principle (thus providing a theoretical basis for the periodic table) (1900-1958)

— Princeton's WordNet

reduce

reduce

destress and thus weaken a sound when pronouncing it

— Princeton's WordNet

renin

renin

a proteolytic enzyme secreted by the kidneys; catalyzes the formation of angiotensin and thus affects blood pressure

— Princeton's WordNet

salt depletion

salt depletion

loss of salt from the body without replacement (loss by vomiting or profuse perspiration or urination or diarrhea) thus upsetting the electrolyte balance

— Princeton's WordNet

sell short

sell short

sell securities or commodities or foreign currency that is not actually owned by the seller, who hopes to cover (buy back) the sold items at a lower price and thus to earn a profit

— Princeton's WordNet

single-celled

single-celled, one-celled

having a single cell (and thus not divided into cells)

— Princeton's WordNet

stock issue

stock issue

(corporation law) the authorization and delivery of shares of stock for sale to the public or the shares thus offered at a particular time

— Princeton's WordNet

tar pit

tar pit

a natural accumulation of bitumens at the surface of the earth; often acts as a trap for animals whose bones are thus preserved

— Princeton's WordNet

thallophyte

thallophyte

any of a group of cryptogamic organisms consisting principally of a thallus and thus showing no differentiation into stem and root and leaf

— Princeton's WordNet

tricyclic antidepressant drug

tricyclic, tricyclic antidepressant, tricyclic antidepressant drug

an antidepressant drug that acts by blocking the reuptake of norepinephrine and serotonin and thus making more of those substances available to act on receptors in the brain

— Princeton's WordNet

tricyclic antidepressant

tricyclic, tricyclic antidepressant, tricyclic antidepressant drug

an antidepressant drug that acts by blocking the reuptake of norepinephrine and serotonin and thus making more of those substances available to act on receptors in the brain

— Princeton's WordNet

tricyclic

tricyclic, tricyclic antidepressant, tricyclic antidepressant drug

an antidepressant drug that acts by blocking the reuptake of norepinephrine and serotonin and thus making more of those substances available to act on receptors in the brain

— Princeton's WordNet

voiceless

aphonic, voiceless

being without sound through injury or illness and thus incapable of all but whispered speech

— Princeton's WordNet

wolfgang pauli

Pauli, Wolfgang Pauli

United States physicist (born in Austria) who proposed the exclusion principle (thus providing a theoretical basis for the periodic table) (1900-1958)

— Princeton's WordNet

Proper acceleration

Proper acceleration

In relativity theory, proper acceleration is the physical acceleration experienced by an object. It is thus acceleration relative to a free-fall, or inertial, observer who is momentarily at rest relative to the object being measured. Gravitation therefore does not cause proper acceleration, since gravity acts upon the inertial observer that any proper acceleration must depart from. A corollary is that all inertial observers always have a proper acceleration of zero. Proper acceleration contrasts with coordinate acceleration, which is dependent on choice of coordinate systems and thus upon choice of observers. In the standard inertial coordinates of special relativity, for unidirectional motion, proper acceleration is the rate of change of proper velocity with respect to coordinate time. The proper acceleration 3-vector, combined with a null time-component, yields the object's four-acceleration, which makes proper-acceleration's magnitude Lorentz-invariant. Thus the concept is useful: with accelerated coordinate systems, at relativistic speeds, and in curved spacetime. In an accelerating rocket after launch, or even in a rocket standing at the gantry, the proper acceleration is the acceleration felt by the occupants, and which is described as g-force. The "acceleration of gravity" never contributes to proper acceleration in any circumstances, and thus the proper acceleration felt by observers standing on the ground is due to the mechanical force from the ground, not due to the "force" or "acceleration" of gravity. If the ground is removed and the observer allowed to free-fall, the observer will experience coordinate acceleration, but no proper acceleration, and thus no g-force. Generally, objects in such a fall or generally any such ballistic path, including objects in orbit, experience no proper acceleration. This state is also known as "zero gravity," or "free-fall," and it always produces a sensation of weightlessness.

— Freebase

Ten, Powers of

Ten, Powers of

This adjunct to calculations has become almost indispensable in working with units of the C. G. S. system. It consists in using some power of 10 as a multiplier which may be called the factor. The number multiplied may be called the characteristic. The following are the general principles.

The power of 10 is shown by an exponent which indicates the number of ciphers in the multiplier. Thus 10^2 indicates 100; 10^3 indicates 1,000 and so on.

The exponent, if positive, denotes an integral number, as shown in the preceding paragraph. The exponent, if negative, denotes the reciprocal of the indicated power of 10. Thus 10^-2 indicates 1/100; 10^-3 indicates 1/1000 and so on.

The compound numbers based on these are reduced by multiplication or division to simple expressions. Thus: 3.14 X 10^7 = 3.14 X 10,000,000 = 31,400,000. 3.14 X 10^-7 = 3.14/10,000,000 or 314/1000000000. Regard must be paid to the decimal point as is done here.

To add two or more expressions in this notation if the exponents of the factors are alike in all respects, add the characteristics and preserve the same factor. Thus:

  (51X 10^6) + (54 X 10^6) = 105 X 10^6.   (9.1 X 10^-9) + (8.7 X 10^-9) = 17.8 X 10^-9.

To subtract one such expression from another, subtract the characteristics and preserve the same factor. Thus:

  (54 X 10^6) - (51 X 10^6) = 3 X 10^6.

If the factors have different exponents of the same sign the factor or factors of larger exponent must be reduced to the smaller exponent, by factoring. The characteristic of the expression thus treated is multiplied by the odd factor. This gives a new expression whose characteristic is added to the other, and the factor of smaller exponent is preserved for both,

Thus:   (5 X 10^7) + (5 X10^9) = (5 X 10^7) + (5 X 100 X 10^7) = 505 X 10^7.

The same applies to subtraction. Thus:   (5 X 10^9) - (5 X 10^7) = (5 X 100 X 10^7) - (5 X 10^7) = 495 X 10^7.

If the factors differ in sign, it is generally best to leave the addition or subtraction to be simply expressed. However, by following the above rule, it can be done. Thus:

Add   5 X 10^-2 and 5 X 10^3.   5 X 10^3 = 5 X 10^5 X 10^-2   (5 X 10^5 X 10^-2) + (5 X 10^-2) = 500005 X 10^-2

This may be reduced to a fraction 500000/100 = 5000.05.

To multiply add the exponents of the factors, for the new factor, and multiply the characteristics for a new characteristic. The exponents must be added algebraically; that is, if of different signs the numerically smaller one is subtracted from the other one, and its sign is given the new exponent.

Thus;   (25 X 10^6) X (9 X 10^8) = 225 X 10^14.   (29 X 10^ -8) X (11 X 10^7) = 319 X 10^-1   (9 X 10^8) X (98 X 10^2) = 882 X 10^1

529  

To divide, subtract (algebraically) the exponent of the divisor from that of the dividend for the exponent of the new factor, and divide the characteristics one by the other for the new characteristic. Algebraic subtraction is effected by changing the sign of the subtrahend, subtracting the numerically smaller number from the larger, and giving the result the sign of the larger number. (Thus to subtract 7 from 5 proceed thus; 5 - 7 = -2.)

Thus;   (25 X 10^6) / (5 X 10^8) = 5 X 10^-2   (28 X 10^-8) / (5 X 10^3) = 5.6 X 10^-11

[Transcriber's note: I have replaced ordinary exponential notation by the more compact and simpler "programming" representation. The last two example would be:   25E6 / 5E8  = 5E-2   28E-8 / 5E3 = 5.6E-11 ]

— The Standard Electrical Dictionary

Euphemism

Euphemism

is in speech or writing the avoiding of an unpleasant or indelicate word or expression by the use of one which is less direct, and which calls up a less disagreeable image in the mind. Thus for "he died" is substituted "he fell asleep," or "he is gathered to his fathers"; thus the Greeks called the "Furies" the "Eumenides," "the benign goddesses," just as country people used to call elves and fairies "the good folk neighbours."

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Hegelianism

Hegelianism

the philosophy of Hegel, which resolves being into thought, and thought into the unity of the logical moments of simple apprehension, judgment, and reason, all purely spiritual acts, whereby being in itself, or seyn, becomes other than itself, or daseyn, and returns into itself, or für sich seyn, the universal being first by separating from itself particularised, and then by return into itself individualised, the whole being what Hegel characterises as Der Process des Geistes, "The Process of the Spirit." Something like this is what Dr. Stirling calls "The Secret of Hegel," and an open secret it is, for he finds it pervading the whole system; "open where you will in Hegel," he says, "you find him always engaged in saying pretty well the same thing"; always identity by otherness passing into selfness, or making that for itself which is at first in itself;—a philosophy which is anticipated by the doctrine of St. Paul, which represents God as the One from whom are all things as Father, and through whom are all things as Son, and to whom are all things as Spirit, the One who is thus All; it is also involved in the doctrine of Christ when He says God is Spirit, or the Living One who lives, and manifests Himself in life, for Himself, from Himself, and through Himself, who, so to say, thus concretes Himself throughout the universe.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Spinoza, Benedict

Spinoza, Benedict

great modern philosopher, born in Amsterdam, of Jews of Portuguese extraction in well-to-do circumstances, and had been trained as a scholar; began with the study of the Bible and the Talmud, but soon exchanged the study of theology in these for that of physics and the works of Descartes, in which study he drifted farther and farther from the Jewish creed, and at length openly abandoned it; this exposed him to a persecution which threatened his life, so that he left Amsterdam and finally settled at The Hague, where, absorbed in philosophic study, he lived in seclusion, earning a livelihood by polishing optical glasses, which his friends disposed of for him; his days were short; he suffered from ill-health, and died of consumption when he was only 44; he was a man of tranquil temper, moderate desires, purity of motive, and kindly in heart; his great work, his "Ethica," was published a year after his death; he had held it back during his lifetime because he foresaw it would procure him the name of atheist, which he shrank from with horror; Spinoza's doctrine is summed up by Dr. Stirling thus, "Whatever is, is; and that is extension and thought. These two are all that is; and besides these there is nought. But these two are one; they are attributes of the single substance (that which, for its existence, stands in need of nothing else), very God, in whom, then, all individual things and all individual ideas (modes of extension those, of thought these) are comprehended and take place"; thus we see Spinoza includes under the term extension all individual objects, and under thought all individual ideas, and these two he includes in God, as He in whom they live and move and have their being,—a great conception and a pregnant, being the speculative ground of the being of all that lives and is; not without good reason does Novalis call him "Der Gott-getrunkene Mensch," the God-intoxicated man (1632-1677).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Protein Deficiency

Protein Deficiency

A nutritional condition produced by a deficiency of proteins in the diet, characterized by adaptive enzyme changes in the liver, increase in amino acid synthetases, and diminution of urea formation, thus conserving nitrogen and reducing its loss in the urine. Growth, immune response, repair, and production of enzymes and hormones are all impaired in severe protein deficiency. Protein deficiency may also arise in the face of adequate protein intake if the protein is of poor quality (i.e., the content of one or more amino acids is inadequate and thus becomes the limiting factor in protein utilization). (From Merck Manual, 16th ed; Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 12th ed, p406)

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Disintegrins

Disintegrins

A family of polypeptides purified from snake venoms, which contain the arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) sequence. The RGD tripeptide binds to integrin receptors and thus competitively inhibits normal integrin-ligand interactions. Disintegrins thus block adhesive functions and act as platelet aggregation inhibitors.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

TDP-43 Proteinopathies

TDP-43 Proteinopathies

Diseases characterized by the presence of abnormally phosphorylated, ubiquitinated, and cleaved DNA-binding protein TDP-43 in affected brain and spinal cord. Inclusions of the pathologic protein in neurons and glia, without the presence of AMYLOID, is the major feature of these conditions, thus making these proteinopathies distinct from most other neurogenerative disorders in which protein misfolding leads to brain amyloidosis. Both frontotemporal lobar degeneration and AMYOTROPHIC LATERAL SCLEROSIS exhibit this common method of pathogenesis and thus they may represent two extremes of a continuous clinicopathological spectrum of one disease.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

SueEasy

SueEasy

SueEasy has become the de facto tool for online dispute resolution.It empowers the common man to register for free any genuine compliant against a corporation, service or product and seek the best legal representation. With over 1 Million hits in its first month and a steady rate of 800,000 hits each month, SueEasy has resolved a wide variety of legal problems for the North American population. At the same time, it™s also a paid, membership based, Client Directory For Lawyers… as described by the Wall Street Journal recently. Customer Problem: Currently, people seeking good legal help are forced to make confusing online searches, scramble through Yellow Pages, make frantic phone calls or ask somebody for referrals. SueEasy solves this problem by being a “..Matchmaker For Would-Be Plaintiffs”(ABA Journal " American Bar Association). Product/Services: People with legal problems, mainly potential Class Actions can file their case and then VIRALLY spread the user-generated page on 72 of the hottest Social Networks & Bookmarking sites such as Facebook, Digg, MySpace etc. This is consumer activism at a whole new level, giving people the power to fight corporate wrongdoing and keep checks & balances. Complaints received range from deaths resulting from FDA recalled drugs to bad gaskets from a major automobile company to unfair NSF/overdraft charges from certain US. Banks. Interested attorneys contact potential litigants for Class Action, personal injury and 62 other types of cases, thus creating a transparent, streamlined and efficient process. Market Trends: Lawyers spend roughly $4.5 billion on advertising. Most of that occurs in traditional media, with $1.3 billion going to print ads in Yellow Pages. They have gone the way of the dinosaurs. We feel these are wasted marketing dollars.Sales/Marketing Strategy: For the litigants, SueEasy aims to be a name synonymous with Ëœlegal help™ and the first place they turn to. Successful viral marketing (10 YouTube ads created by the founders), PR are already in place using founders contacts; (trade publications, journals, TV & Radio spots planned). Competitive Advantage: SueEasy is a pioneer in bringing Web 2.0 & litigation together, thus creating massive lead generation for attorneys. Featured on the Wall Street Journal, Fox News, CNN, CNBC, KillerStartups, San Francisco Daily Journal, LA Times, Lawyers USA, American Bar Association Journal, Mountain View Voice, United Press International (syndicated to thousands of news outlets). TechCrunch40 Semi-Finalist; hand-picked by Michael Arrington (TIME™s 100 Most Influential People). Over 5000 registered litigants. Over 500 emerging Class Actions, and 2000 potential cases (in 60 categories)

— CrunchBase

Chart datum

Chart datum

A chart datum is the level of water that charted depths displayed on a nautical chart are measured from. A chart datum is generally a tidal datum; that is, a datum derived from some phase of the tide. Common chart datums are lowest astronomical tide and mean lower low water. The Chart Datum always refers to the date at which the soundings were taken regardless of method. Thus all NOAA charts, say in the SE United States, will indicate "North American Datum 1983". This is of great importance where tidal current or meteorological events like hurricanes, can and will change the depth contour. This is also of great importance where the Chart Datum was collected more than fifty years prior, as for example in the Bahamas or in Cuba and has not since been updated, verified, or sounded electronically. Chart datums achieved via dragging of chains adversely impacted the ecosystem and were rarely executed over sensitive bottoms, say coral reefs. Thus an older Datum will often be purposefully incorrect. They also relied on optical triangulation from fixed land points, and thus if taken over the horizon, fixes were taken from floating objects and are not necessarily correct. Lat/Longs determined via Satellite of land masses can be off by as much as 90ft in the Bahamas, Caribbean and Cuba. Datum is also the latin word for given, thus, "It is given that in 1984 the depth contour is such" does not indicate that in 2014 the depth contour is as indicated. Chart Datums boxes on paper charts will also usually indicate "updates" from the issuing organization, "corrections" to official charts by the publisher, and suppliers of electronic charts will also provide their own "corrections" that deviate from data 'given' from official charts. GPS receivers also provide offsets to reconcile the Datum to satellite triangulation. Where the chart indicates "Entry by visual navigation only", it must be assumed that the bottom contour is not 'given'.

— Freebase

Order of operations

Order of operations

In mathematics and computer programming, the order of operations is a rule used to clarify which procedures should be performed first in a given mathematical expression. For example, in mathematics and most computer languages multiplication is done before addition; in the expression 2 + 3 × 4, the answer is 14. Brackets, ", { and }, or [ and ]", which have their own rules, may be used to avoid confusion, thus the preceding expression may also be rendered 2 +, but the brackets are unnecessary as multiplication still has precedence without them. Since the introduction of modern algebraic notation, multiplication has taken precedence over addition. Thus 3 + 4 × 5 = 4 × 5 + 3 = 23. When exponents were first introduced in the 16th and 17th centuries, exponents took precedence over both addition and multiplication and could be placed only as a superscript to the right of their base. Thus 3 + 5² = 28 and 3 × 5² = 75. To change the order of operations, originally a vinculum was used. Today, parentheses or brackets are used to explicitly denote precedence by grouping parts of an expression that should be evaluated first. Thus, to force addition to precede multiplication, we write × 4 = 20, and to force addition to precede exponentiation, we write ² = 64.

— Freebase

HAKMEM

HAKMEM

MIT AI Memo 239 (February 1972). A legendary collection of neat mathematical and programming hacks contributed by many people at MIT and elsewhere. (The title of the memo really is “HAKMEM”, which is a 6-letterism for ‘hacks memo’.) Some of them are very useful techniques, powerful theorems, or interesting unsolved problems, but most fall into the category of mathematical and computer trivia. Here is a sampling of the entries (with authors), slightly paraphrased:Item 41 (Gene Salamin): There are exactly 23,000 prime numbers less than 218.Item 46 (Rich Schroeppel): The most probable suit distribution in bridge hands is 4-4-3-2, as compared to 4-3-3-3, which is the most evenly distributed. This is because the world likes to have unequal numbers: a thermodynamic effect saying things will not be in the state of lowest energy, but in the state of lowest disordered energy.Item 81 (Rich Schroeppel): Count the magic squares of order 5 (that is, all the 5-by-5 arrangements of the numbers from 1 to 25 such that all rows, columns, and diagonals add up to the same number). There are about 320 million, not counting those that differ only by rotation and reflection.Item 154 (Bill Gosper): The myth that any given programming language is machine independent is easily exploded by computing the sum of powers of 2. If the result loops with period = 1 with sign +, you are on a sign-magnitude machine. If the result loops with period = 1 at -1, you are on a twos-complement machine. If the result loops with period greater than 1, including the beginning, you are on a ones-complement machine. If the result loops with period greater than 1, not including the beginning, your machine isn't binary — the pattern should tell you the base. If you run out of memory, you are on a string or bignum system. If arithmetic overflow is a fatal error, some fascist pig with a read-only mind is trying to enforce machine independence. But the very ability to trap overflow is machine dependent. By this strategy, consider the universe, or, more precisely, algebra: Let X = the sum of many powers of 2 = ...111111 (base 2). Now add X to itself: X + X = ...111110. Thus, 2X = X - 1, so X = -1. Therefore algebra is run on a machine (the universe) that is two's-complement.Item 174 (Bill Gosper and Stuart Nelson): 21963283741 is the only number such that if you represent it on the PDP-10 as both an integer and a floating-point number, the bit patterns of the two representations are identical.Item 176 (Gosper): The “banana phenomenon” was encountered when processing a character string by taking the last 3 letters typed out, searching for a random occurrence of that sequence in the text, taking the letter following that occurrence, typing it out, and iterating. This ensures that every 4-letter string output occurs in the original. The program typed BANANANANANANANA.... We note an ambiguity in the phrase, “the Nth occurrence of.” In one sense, there are five 00's in 0000000000; in another, there are nine. The editing program TECO finds five. Thus it finds only the first ANA in BANANA, and is thus obligated to type N next. By Murphy's Law, there is but one NAN, thus forcing A, and thus a loop. An option to find overlapped instances would be useful,

— The New Hacker's Dictionary

ablaut

ablaut

The substitution of one root vowel for another, thus indicating a corresponding modification of use or meaning; vowel permutation; as, get, gat, and got; sing and song; hang and hung, distinct from the phonetic influence of a succeeding vowel.

— Wiktionary

abrasion

abrasion

The substance thus rubbed off.

— Wiktionary

acronym

acronym

A pronounceable word formed from the beginnings (letter or syllable) of other words and thus representing the phrase so formed, e.g. Benelux = the countries Belgium, Netherlands and Luxembourg considered as a political or economic whole.

— Wiktionary

Australia

Australia

The continent of Australia-New Guinea. New Guinea and the intervening islands are also on the Australian tectonic plate and are thus geologically considered part of the continent.

— Wiktionary

Indo-European

Indo-European

A member of the original ethnolinguistic group hypothesized to have spoken Proto-Indo-European and thus to have been the ancestor for most of India and Western Eurasia.

— Wiktionary

night

night

The period between sunset and sunrise, when a location faces far away from the sun, thus when the sky is dark.

— Wiktionary

magenta

magenta

A light purple, purplish-red, or pinkish purple colour obtained by mixing red and blue light (thus a secondary colour), but primary in the CMYK colour system used in printing.

— Wiktionary

weekend

weekend

The break in the working week, usually two days including the traditional holy or sabbath day. Thus in western countries, Saturday and Sunday. Occasionally abbreviated to w/e.

— Wiktionary

bite

bite

To bite a baited hook or other lure and thus be caught.

— Wiktionary

voice

voice

Sound uttered by the mouth, especially that uttered by human beings in speech or song; steven; sound thus uttered considered as possessing some special quality or character; as, the human voice; a pleasant voice; a low voice.

— Wiktionary

banshee

banshee

In Irish folklore, a female spirit, usually taking the form of a woman whose mournful wailing warns of an impending death. Originally a fairy woman singing a caoineadh (lament) for recently-deceased members of the Ou2019Grady, the Ou2019Neill, the Ou2019Brien, the Ou2019Connor, and the Kavanagh families, translations into English made a distinction between the banshee and other fairy folk that the original language and original stories do not seem to have, and thus the current image of the banshee.

— Wiktionary

avenue

avenue

The principal walk or approach to a house which is withdrawn from the road, especially, such approach bordered on each side by trees; any broad passageway thus bordered.

— Wiktionary

experience

experience

The knowledge thus gathered.

— Wiktionary

graduate

graduate

A graduated (marked) cup or other container, thus fit for measuring

— Wiktionary

rod

rod

A hot rod, an automobile or other passenger motor vehicle modified to run faster and often with exterior cosmetic alterations, especially one based originally on a pre-1940s model or (currently) denoting any older vehicle thus modified.

— Wiktionary

show

show

To have an enlarged belly and thus be recognizable as pregnant.

— Wiktionary

screwdriver

screwdriver

A hand or machine tool which engages with the head of a screw and allows torque to be applied to turn the screw, thus driving it in or loosening it.

— Wiktionary

smoke

smoke

A particulate of solid or liquid particles dispersed into the air on the battlefield to degrade enemy ground or for aerial observation. Smoke has many uses--screening smoke, signaling smoke, smoke curtain, smoke haze, and smoke deception. Thus it is an artificial aerosol.

— Wiktionary

seam

seam

Of a bowler, to make the ball move thus.

— Wiktionary

suspension

suspension

The act of or discord produced by prolonging one or more tones of a chord into the chord which follows, thus producing a momentary discord, suspending the concord which the ear expects.

— Wiktionary

pipe

pipe

An anonymous satire or essay, insulting and frequently libelous, written on a piece of paper and left somewhere public where it could be found and thus spread, to embarrass the author's enemies.

— Wiktionary

call

call

(of a fielder): To shout to other fielders that he intends to take a catch (thus avoiding collisions.)

— Wiktionary

ping

ping

A packet which a remote host is expected to echo, thus indicating its presence.

— Wiktionary

carbon copy

carbon copy

A copy produced in an alternated stack of ordinary sheets of paper and carbon papers. The pression applied on the top sheet (by a pen or typewriter) causes every carbon paper to release its carbon cover, thus reproducing the writing on the subjacent layers of paper.

— Wiktionary

expose

expose

to subject photographic film to light thus ruining it or taking a picture if controlled

— Wiktionary

monopoly

monopoly

The market thus controlled

— Wiktionary

blessed

blessed

In Catholicism, a title indicating the beatification of a person, thus allowing public veneration of those who have lived in sanctity or died as martyrs.

— Wiktionary

turn over

turn over

To give up control (of the ball and thus the ability to score).

— Wiktionary

horn

horn

A diacritical mark that may be attached to the top right corner of the letters o and u when writing in Vietnamese, thus forming u01A1 and u01B0.

— Wiktionary

reference

reference

A previously published written work thus indicated; a source.

— Wiktionary

squeegee

squeegee

A tool used in silk-screen printing for forcing the ink through the stencil and thus printing the desired image.

— Wiktionary

ambassador

ambassador

A trick to duck some ignorant fellow or landsman, frequently played on board ships in the warm latitudes. It is thus managed: A large tub is filled with water, and two stools placed on each side of it. Over the whole is thrown a tarpaulin, or old sail: this is kept tight by two persons, who are to represent the king and queen of a foreign country, and are seated on the stools. The person intended to be ducked plays the Ambassador, and after repeating a ridiculous speech dictated to him, is led in great form up to the throne, and seated between the king and queen, who rising suddenly as soon as he is seated, he falls backwards into the tub of water. (1811 Dictionary of Vulgar Tongue)

— Wiktionary

-illion

-illion

Combined with Latin prefixes for names of integers in order to form names of powers of a million or of a thousand greater than 1,000,000. Thus we have the names billion, trillion, etc.

— Wiktionary

on the bubble

on the bubble

Holding the last qualifying position with qualification still in progress, and thus liable to lose that position.

— Wiktionary

webmail

webmail

The email thus stored.

— Wiktionary

demarcation

demarcation

A limit thus fixed, in full demarcation line.

— Wiktionary

agglutination

agglutination

The act of uniting by glue or other tenacious substance; the state of being thus united; adhesion of parts.

— Wiktionary

sol-fa

sol-fa

a method of sight singing music that uses the syllables do (originally ut), re, mi, fa, sol (or so), la, and si (or ti) to represent the pitches of the scale, most commonly the major scale. The fixed-do system uses do for C, and the movable-do system uses do for whatever key the melody uses (thus B is do if the piece is in the key of B).

— Wiktionary

avoid

avoid

To defeat or evade; to invalidate. Thus, in a replication, the plaintiff may deny the defendant's plea, or confess it, and avoid it by stating new matter.

— Wiktionary

deflate

deflate

To reduce the amount of available currency or credit and thus lower prices.

— Wiktionary

proof

proof

A measure of the alcohol content of liquor. Originally, in Britain, 100 proof was defined as 57.1% by volume (not used anymore). In the US, 100 proof means that the alcohol content is 50% of the total volume of the liquid, and thus, absolute alcohol would be 200 proof.

— Wiktionary

dozen

dozen

A large, unspecified number of, comfortably estimated in small multiples of twelve, thus generally implied to be significantly more than ten or twelve, but less than perhaps one or two hundred; many.

— Wiktionary

meteor

meteor

Any atmospheric phenomenon. (Thus the derivation of meteorology.) These were sometimes classified as aerial or airy meteors (winds), aqueous or watery meteors (hydrometeors: clouds, rain, snow, hail, dew, frost), luminous meteors (rainbows and aurora), and igneous or fiery meteors (lightning and shooting stars [next]).

— Wiktionary

significant

significant

Having a low probability of occurring by chance (for example, having high correlation and thus likely to be related).

— Wiktionary

rap

rap

Any of the tokens that passed current for a halfpenny in Ireland in the early part of the eighteenth century; thus, any coin of trifling value.

— Wiktionary

yea

yea

Thus, so (now often accompanied by a hand gesture)

— Wiktionary

bayonet

bayonet

(Machinery) A pin which plays in and out of holes made to receive it, and which thus serves to engage or disengage parts of the machinery.

— Wiktionary

nasal

nasal

Having a quality imparted by means of the nose; and specifically, made by lowering the soft palate, in some cases with closure of the oral passage, the voice thus issuing (wholly or partially) through the nose, as in the consonants m, n, ng; characterized by resonance in the nasal passage; as, a nasal vowel; a nasal utterance.

— Wiktionary

baryon

baryon

A heavy subatomic particle created by the binding of quarks by gluons; a hadron containing three quarks. Baryons have half-odd integral spin and are thus fermions. This category includes the common proton and neutron of the atomic nucleus.

— Wiktionary

canopy

canopy

In a parachute, the cloth that fills with air and thus limits the falling speed.

— Wiktionary

resplendent

resplendent

Shiny and colourful, and thus pleasing to the eye.

— Wiktionary

deviation

deviation

The voluntary and unnecessary departure of a ship from, or delay in, the regular and usual course of the specific voyage insured, thus releasing the underwriters from their responsibility.

— Wiktionary

determination

determination

The addition of a differentia to a concept or notion, thus limiting its extent; -- the opposite of generalization.

— Wiktionary

dislocation

dislocation

The act of dislocating, or putting out of joint; also, the condition of being thus displaced.

— Wiktionary

dominant

dominant

The fifth major tone of a musical scale (five major steps above the note in question); thus G is the dominant of C, A of D, and so on.

— Wiktionary

emancipation

emancipation

The state of being thus set free; liberation; used of slaves, minors, of a person from prejudices, of the mind from superstition, of a nation from tyranny or subjection.

— Wiktionary

exclamation

exclamation

A mark or sign by which outcry or emphatic utterance is marked; thus [!]; u2013 also called an exclamation point.

— Wiktionary

fake

fake

To modify fraudulently, so as to make an object appear better or other than it really is; as, to fake a bulldog, by burning his upper lip and thus artificially shortening it.

— Wiktionary

foolscap

foolscap

Such a sheet folded or cut in half, thus approximately 8 x 13.25 inches.

— Wiktionary

couple

couple

Two forces that are equal in magnitude but opposite in direction (and acting along parallel lines), thus creating the turning effect of a torque or moment.

— Wiktionary

interrogation

interrogation

A point, mark, or sign, thus ?, indicating that the sentence with which it is connected is a question. It is used to express doubt, or to mark a query. Called also interrogation point.

— Wiktionary

leach

leach

A quantity of wood ashes, through which water passes, and thus imbibes the alkali.

— Wiktionary

scraper

scraper

In the printing press, a board or blade, the edge of which is made to rub over the tympan sheet, thus producing an impression.

— Wiktionary

smoothie

smoothie

A drink made from whole fruit, thus thicker than fruit juice.

— Wiktionary

undefined

undefined

That does not have a meaning and is thus not assigned an interpretation

— Wiktionary

fragile

fragile

easily broken or destroyed, and thus often of subtle or intricate structure

— Wiktionary

semantic memory

semantic memory

(Advertising) the memory system which stores information relating to brands, thus where brand positioning is established.

— Wiktionary

Sanskrit

Sanskrit

A classical language of India ("Indian Latin"), a liturgical language of Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, Jainism, and one of the 23 official languages of India. Member of Indo-Iranian and thus Indo-European language family.

— Wiktionary

remove

remove

A dish thus replaced, or the replacement

— Wiktionary

SEO

SEO

, the use of various techniques to improve a web site's ranking in the search engines and thus attract more visitors.

— Wiktionary

all out

all out

The state of a side having no more men to bat, thus ending its innings.

— Wiktionary

sickle cell anaemia

sickle cell anaemia

A severe hereditary form of anaemia, mainly affecting people of African origin, in which mutated haemoglobin distorts red blood cells into a crescent shape, causing the cells to become stuck in capillaries. Downstream tissues are thus deprived of oxygen causing ischaemia and infarction.

— Wiktionary

bowl out

bowl out

To take all the opponents wickets (in whatever way) and thus end their innings.

— Wiktionary

synoptic

synoptic

In general, pertaining to or affording an overall view. In meteorology, this term has become somewhat specialized in referring to the use of meteorological data obtained simultaneously over a wide area for presenting a comprehensive and nearly instantaneous picture of the state of the atmosphere. Thus, to a meteorologist, synoptic takes the additional connotation of simultaneity.

— Wiktionary

rifled slug

rifled slug

shotgun cartridge having only a single projectile , with oblique grooves on the projectile causing it to spin and thus increase accuracy.

— Wiktionary

conversion

conversion

Under the common law, the tort of the taking of someone's personal property with intent to permanently deprive them of it, or damaging property to the extent that the owner is deprived of the utility of that property, thus making the tortfeasor liable for the entire value of the property.

— Wiktionary

oxytocic

oxytocic

Serving to promote uterine contractions, thus accelerating childbirth.

— Wiktionary

orthochromatic

orthochromatic

Being uniformly sensitive across the entire visible range, and thus reproducing colours faithfully

— Wiktionary

uguisubari

uguisubari

Wooden floors specifically designed to creak or "chirp" at the slightest pressure, thus warning the inhabitants of any surreptitious approach. The most famous surviving floors are in Kyoto at Nijo Castle, Japan.

— Wiktionary

Dvorak

Dvorak

Describing an optimized keyboard layout in which the alphabet is arranged in the order PYFGCRL on the top row, AOEUIDHTNS on the middle, or home, row, and QJKXBMWVZ on the bottom row, thus placing the letters most frequently used in the home row. Many variants on Dvorak layouts also exist, including keyboards for right-hand-only and left-hand-only-typists.

— Wiktionary

erroneous

erroneous

signifies a deviation from the requirements of the law, but does not connote a lack of legal authority, and is thus distinguished from illegal.

— Wiktionary

genotoxic

genotoxic

Capable of damaging genetic material such as DNA, and thus causing mutations or possibly cancer.

— Wiktionary

multithreaded

multithreaded

Of an application program, having more than one thread of execution; thus taking advantage of multi-tasking operating systems and hardware.

— Wiktionary

bitter end

bitter end

that part of an anchor cable which is abaft the bitts and thus remains inboard when a ship is riding at anchor

— Wiktionary

sempiternal

sempiternal

everlasting, that is having infinite temporal duration; as opposed to eternal, outside time and thus lacking temporal duration

— Wiktionary

thusly

thusly

thus (in this way).

— Wiktionary

astringent

astringent

A substance which draws tissue together, thus restricting the flow of blood.

— Wiktionary

in the dark

in the dark

Without looking at one's hole cards, thus not knowing what they are.

— Wiktionary

donkey bid

donkey bid

A fake bid at an auction, used by the auctioneer to raise the price and thus raise the commission.

— Wiktionary

key logger

key logger

Software or hardware designed to record keyboard entries, thus stealing passwords or other sensitive data.

— Wiktionary

defragment

defragment

To run a process that collects fragments of files and sorts them into contiguous sections on one or more hard disks or hard disk partitions, thus speeding up file management.

— Wiktionary

heft

heft

An animal that has become hefted thus.

— Wiktionary

numerator

numerator

The number or expression written above the line in a fraction (thus 1 in ).

— Wiktionary

denominator

denominator

The number or expression written below the line in a fraction (thus 2 in ).

— Wiktionary

libation

libation

The wine or liquid thus poured out.

— Wiktionary

ducks arse

ducks arse

A hairstyle in which the hair at the is swept back along the sides of the head to meet in a point at the back, thus resembling the tail feathers of a duck.

— Wiktionary

cluster bomb

cluster bomb

Explosive munition designed to explode in the air and release a cluster of smaller explosives, thus spreading the blast over a larger area.

— Wiktionary

Croydon facelift

Croydon facelift

A hairstyle in which the hair is pulled tightly back from the face and fastened behind the head, thus pulling the features up and back and (unintentionally) giving an effect similar to a facelift.

— Wiktionary

hospital pass

hospital pass

A poorly executed pass to a team-mate causing the receiver to present an easy target for a defender, and thus be tackled hard.

— Wiktionary

hospital pass

hospital pass

A throw that stays in the air long enough that it allows too many people to get underneath it, increasing the risk of injury and a trip to the hospital. Thus, a hospital pass.

— Wiktionary

stability

stability

The condition of being stable or in equilibrium, and thus resistant to change

— Wiktionary

patrol

patrol

Any perambulation of a particular line or district to guard it; also, the men thus guarding; as, a customs patrol; a fire patrol.

— Wiktionary

kicking strap

kicking strap

A piece of rope that connects the lower end of the mast and the boom in order to provide a means for exerting downward force on the boom and thus controlling the shape of the sail.

— Wiktionary

clothing compulsive

clothing compulsive

Disallowing or discouraging nudity, thus requiring the wearing of clothes, especially swimsuits, e.g. on beaches, as opposed to clothing optional and clothes free. Textile.

— Wiktionary

massively parallel

massively parallel

having many individual or distributed processing units and thus able to carry out many simultaneous calculations

— Wiktionary

ionize

ionize

To dissociate atoms or molecules into electrically charged species; to be thus dissociated.

— Wiktionary

epicycle

epicycle

Any circle whose circumference rolls around that of another circle, thus creating a hypocycloid or epicycloid.

— Wiktionary

premunire

premunire

The offense under English law of appealing to or obeying a foreign court or authority, thus challenging the supremacy of the Crown.

— Wiktionary

bilious

bilious

Suffering from real or supposed liver disorder, thus making one ill-natured.

— Wiktionary

lofted drive

lofted drive

A drive that sends the ball flying through the air, instead of along the ground, thus increasing the possibility of a catch.

— Wiktionary

long hop

long hop

a relatively slow ball that bounces short of the batsman and is thus relatively easy to hit

— Wiktionary

Bulverism

Bulverism

The fallacy of reason which deals with secondary questions about ideas rather than the primary one, thus avoiding the basic question or evading the issues raised by trains of reasoning.

— Wiktionary

play on

play on

of a batsman, to hit the ball into his own wicket, thus being out bowled

— Wiktionary

indeterminate

indeterminate

Of growth: with no genetically defined end, and thus theoretically limitless.

— Wiktionary

friable

friable

Likely to crumble and become airborne, thus becoming a health risk

— Wiktionary

feeder

feeder

A player who is killed by the opposing player or team more than once through lack of skills and experience, thus helping the opposing side.

— Wiktionary

amphiprotic

amphiprotic

being able to both donate and accept a proton, and thus being able to react both as an acid and a base; amphoteric

— Wiktionary

electronegativity

electronegativity

the tendency, or a measure of the ability, of an atom or molecule to attract electrons and thus form bonds

— Wiktionary

ejection seat

ejection seat

A seat in an aircraft which can be ejected from the cockpit and thus save the pilots life when a crash is imminent.

— Wiktionary

feedforward control

feedforward control

A mechanism in a system that monitors performance inputs rather than outputs, and reacts so as to maintain a specified state, thus preventing or minimising problems before they occur.

— Wiktionary

US pint

US pint

A unit of volume used for liquids, equivalent to 16 fluid ounces. This is in contrast to the imperial pint (UK) which is equivalent to 20 fluid ounces. Thus the US pint is about 20% smaller than the imperial pint.

— Wiktionary

backcomb

backcomb

to hold the hair away from the head and comb it towards the head, thus giving it a thicker look

— Wiktionary

immobilization

immobilization

The process in which organic soil matter is decomposed and absorbed by microorganisms, and thus not available to plants.

— Wiktionary

sandfly

sandfly

Any of various small flies of the genera Lutzomyia and Phlebotomus whose females suck the blood of vertebrates and thus spread leishmaniasis.

— Wiktionary

immunize

immunize

To inoculate someone, as thus produce immunity from a disease.

— Wiktionary

Greek numeral

Greek numeral

One of the Greek numerals. A symbol formed from one or more of the letters of the Greek alphabet which has been modified by the addition of a mark, thus: . These are used to numerate monarchs, chapters, etc as Roman numerals are used in English.

— Wiktionary

over-the-counter

over-the-counter

Direct interaction between two parties without an intermediary. Thus, any market where items such as stocks or currency are bought and sold at a distance, rather than on the exchange.

— Wiktionary

combining form

combining form

A form of a word used for combining with other words or other combining forms to make new words. A combining form may conjoin with an independent word (e.g., mini- + skirt), another combining form (e.g., photo- + -graphy) or an affix (e.g., cephal + -ic); it is thus distinguished from an affix, which can be added to either a free word or a combining form but not solely to another affix (e.g., Iceland + -ic but not pro- + -ic). It can also be distinguished historically from an affix when it is borrowed from another language in which it is descriptively a word (e.g., the French mal gave the English mal- in malodorous) or a combining form (e.g., the Greek kako-, a combining form of kakos, gave the English caco- in cacography).

— Wiktionary

intercalary

intercalary

of a meristem: situated between zones of permanent tissue, thus a shoot growing at the base of a leaf, in comparison with apical growth at the tip of a root or plant.

— Wiktionary

isamiashi

isamiashi

a situation in which an attacking rikishi accidentally steps too far forward and out of the ring, his opponent thus winning

— Wiktionary

fumidashi

fumidashi

a situation in which a defending rikishi accidentally steps too far back and out of the ring, his opponent thus winning

— Wiktionary

koshikudake

koshikudake

a situation in which a rikishi accidentally falls over, his opponent thus winning

— Wiktionary

okuriashi

okuriashi

a situation in which a rikishi accidentally steps out of ring whilst carrying his opponent out, his opponent thus winning

— Wiktionary

tsukihitza

tsukihitza

a situation in which a rikishi accidentally touches the dohyo with his knee, his opponent thus winning

— Wiktionary

tsukite

tsukite

a situation in which a rikishi accidentally touches the dohyo with his hand, his opponent thus winning

— Wiktionary

knocking

knocking

An act in which something is knocked on, or the sound thus produced

— Wiktionary

aeolipile

aeolipile

a steam engine powered by rocket propulsion due to escaping steam; which consists of a pressure vessel mounted on a bearing, with one or more tubes which exhaust steam tangentially to the rotation axis thus creating rotation.

— Wiktionary

crux simplex

crux simplex

The style of pole (simple) that common criminals were impaled on, typically including a block for the feet, thus using only one nail through the hands (below the palm), and reducing the cost of materials involved, and hastening death by asphyxia most often following the breaking of the legs.

— Wiktionary

mass spectrometry

mass spectrometry

An analytical technique that measures the mass / charge ratio of the ions formed when a molecule or atom is ionized, vaporized and introduced into a vacuum. Mass spectrometry may also involve breaking molecules into fragments - thus enabling its structure to be determined.

— Wiktionary

equilibrant

equilibrant

A force equal to, but opposite of, the resultant sum of vector forces; that force which balances other forces, thus bringing an object to equilibrium.

— Wiktionary

across variable

across variable

A variable whose value is determined by measuring a difference of the values at two extreme points of an element; thus voltage is a difference in two levels of potential.

— Wiktionary

entextualisation

entextualisation

A process of formal study of writings, removing texts from their context thus rendering them coherent, effective and memorable.

— Wiktionary

as yet

as yet

Up to the present; thus far.

— Wiktionary

hydrofoil

hydrofoil

A wing attached to the hull of a ship that raises it out of the water when travelling at speed and thus reduces drag.

— Wiktionary

cobweb site

cobweb site

a website that has not been updated for a very long time (and has thus figuratively grown cobwebs)

— Wiktionary

radiation pyrometer

radiation pyrometer

a device that measures the intensity of radiation from, and thus the temperature of, a hot body

— Wiktionary

paceline

paceline

A formation in which riders (especially cycle racers) travel in a line one close behind the other in order to conserve energy by riding in the draft of the riders in front thus enabling the group to travel at a faster rate than any of the riders in the group could do alone.

— Wiktionary

lead out

lead out

A race tactic, used to set up a rider for a sprint finish, in which one rider on a team will ride at a very high rate of speed with a teammate (the sprinter) following directly behind in his slipstream thus enabling the following rider to gain speed without expending as much energy as he normally would. See drafting.

— Wiktionary

trekker

trekker

One who treks; thus, a hiker

— Wiktionary

quadruple thread

quadruple thread

a screw or worm gear having four equal threads and can thus be started in four places

— Wiktionary

Kelvin bridge

Kelvin bridge

A specialized form of a Wheatstone bridge network designed to eliminate the effect of lead and contact resistance and thus permit accurate measurement of low resistances.

— Wiktionary

sandbank

sandbank

a ridge of sand along a shore that is partially or totally submerged and thus a hazard to shipping

— Wiktionary

criminal negligence

criminal negligence

Failure to use reasonable care, and thus put someone at risk of injury or death.

— Wiktionary

sulfur dioxide

sulfur dioxide

A toxic gas, of molecular formula SO that is found in the emissions of volcanos and those of burning coal or petroleum; dissolves in water to form sulfurous acid and, in the presence of oxygen, sulfuric acid, and is thus responsible for acid rain.

— Wiktionary

magic number

magic number

the number of neutrons or protons in nuclei which are required to fill the major quantum shells, and thus produce exceptionally stable nuclei - 2, 8, 20, 28, 50, 82 & 126

— Wiktionary

magnetron

magnetron

a device in which electrons are made to resonate in a specially shaped chamber and thus produce microwave radiation; used in radar, and in microwave ovens

— Wiktionary

reducing sugar

reducing sugar

Any sugar that has a potential aldehyde or ketone functional group and thus reacts as a reducing agent.

— Wiktionary

blank end

blank end

An end in which no stones are touching the house, and thus no points are scored.

— Wiktionary

longboat

longboat

Among the boats carried by a ship the largest, thus the most capable of boats carried on a ship.

— Wiktionary

flight data recorder

flight data recorder

a device which records various performance parameters of an aircraft; especially one designed to survive an impact and thus help in finding the causes of an accident; along with the cockpit voice recorder, it is part of the flight recorder

— Wiktionary

scoriation

scoriation

A sloppily cut groove, furrow, or trench, characterised by the presence of refuse material from which it was cut. The word is derived from the Latin scoria, which means slag or dross , and thus is related to the english words scoria and scorify, which both refer to the waste left over from smelting ore.

— Wiktionary

monoamine oxidase

monoamine oxidase

Either of two enzymes, found in the outer membrane of mitochondria, that degrade biogenic amines and are thus responsible for the destruction of transmitter substances at neuronal synapses.

— Wiktionary

redeemed

redeemed

Of a coupon or offer, spent; used in a purchase, and thus no longer usable.

— Wiktionary

aryne

aryne

any hydrocarbon, normally a transient species, derived from an arene by removal of two hydrogen atoms from adjacent carbon atoms, and thus possessing a formal triple bond; the simplest is benzyne

— Wiktionary

uricosuric

uricosuric

Pertaining to gout suppressants that act directly on the renal tubule to increase the excretion of uric acid, thus reducing its concentrations in plasma.

— Wiktionary

gendered knowledge

gendered knowledge

In feminist studies and gender studies, the concept that mainstream knowledge is mainly produced by men and thus privileges the masculine over the feminine.

— Wiktionary

grip tape

grip tape

sandpaper with an adhesive on one side that is used to affix it to the surface of a skateboard deck and thus provide added friction.

— Wiktionary

air drainage

air drainage

General term for gravity-induced, downslope flow of relatively cold air. Winds thus produced are called gravity winds.

— Wiktionary

security market line

security market line

A line representing the relationship between expected return and systematic risk, thus a graphical representation of the CAPM. It is valid both for portfolios and individual assets.

— Wiktionary

pedometer

pedometer

A device, often electronic, that measures the number of steps taken, and thus estimates the distance walked.

— Wiktionary

straitjacket

straitjacket

A jacket-like garment with very long sleeves which can be secured in place, thus preventing the wearer from moving his or her arms. Often used in psychiatric hospitals to prevent patients from injuring themselves or others.

— Wiktionary

night watchman

night watchman

The last batsman in a three or five day game to play on a particular day and thus carry over the batting to the following day.

— Wiktionary

gridlock

gridlock

On a smaller scale: the situation in which cars enter a signal-controlled intersection too late during the green light cycle, and are unable to clear the intersection (due to congestion in the next block) when the light turns red, thus blocking the cross traffic when it's their turn to go. Repeated at enough intersections, this phenomenon can lead to citywide gridlock.

— Wiktionary

geostrophic wind

geostrophic wind

That horizontal wind velocity for which the Coriolis force exactly balances the horizontal pressure gradient force. The geostrophic wind is thus directed along the contour lines on a constant-pressure surface (or along the isobars in a geopotential surface) with low elevations (or low pressure) to the left in the northern hemisphere and to the right in the southern hemisphere.

— Wiktionary


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