Definitions containing æe`tis

We've found 163 definitions:

Parotid

Parotid

par-ot′id, n. the largest of the three pairs of salivary glands, situated immediately in front of the ear—also Parō′tis.—adj. Parot′ic, auricular, situated about the outer ear.—ns. Parotidī′tis, Parotī′tis, inflammation of the parotic gland. [L.,—Gr. parōtis, -idospara, beside, ous, ōtos, ear.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Alceste

Alceste

the chief character in Molière's Misanthrope.

Alces`tis

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Inclusion body myositis

Inclusion body myositis

Inclusion body myositis is an inflammatory muscle disease, characterized by slowly progressive weakness and wasting of both distal and proximal muscles, most apparent in the muscles of the arms and legs. There are two types: sporadic inclusion body myositis and hereditary inclusion body myopathy. In sporadic inclusion body myositis [MY-oh-sigh-tis] muscle, two processes, one autoimmune and the other degenerative, appear to occur in the muscle cells in parallel. The inflammation aspect is characterized by the cloning of T cells that appear to be driven by specific antigens to invade muscle fibers. The degeneration aspect is characterized by the appearance of holes in the muscle cell vacuoles, deposits of abnormal proteins within the cells and in filamentous inclusions. sIBM is a rare yet increasingly prevalent disease, being the most common cause of inflammatory myopathy in the over 50s; the most recent research, done in Australia, indicates that the incidence of IBM varies and is different in different populations and different ethnic groups. The authors found that the current prevalence was 14.9 per million in the overall population, with a prevalence of 51.3 per million population in people over 50 years of age. As seen in these numbers, sIBM is an age-related disease – its incidence increases with age and symptoms usually begin after 50 years of age. It is the most common acquired muscle disorder seen in people over 50, although about 20% of cases display symptoms before the age of 50. Weakness comes on slowly and progresses steadily and usually leads to severe weakness and wasting of arm and leg muscles. It is slightly more common in men than women. Patients may become unable to perform daily living activities and most require assistive devices within 5 to 10 years of symptom onset. sIBM is not considered a fatal disorder – barring complications, all things being equal, sIBM will not kill. One common and potentially fatal complication is dysphagia. There is no effective treatment for the disease.

— Freebase

'Tis: A Memoir

'Tis: A Memoir

'Tis is a memoir written by Frank McCourt. Published in 1999, it begins where McCourt ended Angela's Ashes, his Pulitzer Prize winning memoir of his impoverished childhood in Ireland and his return to America.

— Freebase

Cheering

Cheering

Cheering is the uttering or making of sounds encouraging, stimulating or exciting to action, indicating approval or acclaiming or welcoming persons, announcements of events and the like. The word cheer meant originally face, countenance, expression, and came through Old French into Middle English in the 13th century from Low Latin cara, head; this is generally referred to the Greek καρα;. Cara is used by the 6th-century poet Flavius Cresconius Corippus, Postquam venere verendam Caesilris ante caram. Cheer was at first qualified with epithets, both of joy and gladness and of sorrow; compare She thanked Dyomede for ale ... his gode chere with If they sing ... tis with so dull a cheere. An early transference in meaning was to hospitality or entertainment, and hence to food and drink, good cheer. The sense of a shout of encouragement or applause is a late use. Defoe speaks of it as a sailor's word, and the meaning does not appear in Johnson. Of the different words or rather sounds that are used in cheering, "hurrah", though now generally looked on as the typical British form of cheer, is found in various forms in German, Scandinavian, Russian, French. It is probably onomatopoeic in origin; From the Norse battle cry "Huer Av", meaning "Heads Off", but some connect it with such words as hurry, whirl ; the meaning would then be haste, to encourage speed or onset in battle. The English hurrah was preceded by huzza, stated to be a sailors word, and generally connected with heeze, to hoist, probably being one of the cries that sailors use when hauling or hoisting. The German hoch, seen in full in Hoch lebe der Kaiser, &c., the French vive, Italian and Spanish viva, evviva, are cries rather of acclamation than encouragement. The Japanese shout banzai became familiar during the Russo-Japanese War. In reports of parliamentary and other debates the insertion of cheers at any point in a speech indicates that approval was shown by members of the House by emphatic utterances of hear hear. Cheering may be tumultuous, or it may be conducted rhythmically by prearrangement, as in the case of the Hip-hip-hip by way of introduction to a simultaneous hurrah. The saying "hip hip hurrah" is alleged to have roots going back to the crusaders, then meaning "Jerusalem is lost to the infidel, and we are on our way to paradise. The abbreviation HEP would then stand for Hierosolyma est perdita, "Jerusalem is lost" in Latin.

— Freebase

God Save the Queen

God Save the Queen

"God Save the Queen" is an anthem used in a number of Commonwealth realms, their territories, and the British Crown Dependencies. The words and title are adapted to the gender of the current monarch, e.g., replacing "Queen" with "King", "she" with "he", and so forth, when a king reigns. The author of the tune is unknown, and it may originate in plainchant, but a 1619 attribution to John Bull is sometimes made. God Save the Queen is the de facto British national anthem and has this role in some British territories. It is one of two national anthems for New Zealand and for several of Britain's territories that have their own additional local anthem. It is the royal anthem of Australia, Canada, Barbados, Jamaica, and Tuvalu. In countries not previously part of the British Empire, the tune of "God Save the Queen" has provided the basis for various patriotic songs, though still generally connected with royal ceremony. In the United States, the British anthem's melody is used for the patriotic "My Country, 'Tis of Thee." Beyond its first verse, which is consistent, it has many historic and extant versions: Since its first publication, different verses have been added and taken away and, even today, different publications include various selections of verses in various orders. In general, only one verse is sung. Sometimes two verses are sung, and on rare occasions, three.

— Freebase

Alfred Tennyson, 1st Baron Tennyson

Alfred Tennyson, 1st Baron Tennyson

Alfred Tennyson, 1st Baron Tennyson, FRS was Poet Laureate of Great Britain and Ireland during much of Queen Victoria's reign and remains one of the most popular British poets. Tennyson excelled at penning short lyrics, such as "Break, Break, Break", "The Charge of the Light Brigade", "Tears, Idle Tears" and "Crossing the Bar". Much of his verse was based on classical mythological themes, such as Ulysses, although In Memoriam A.H.H. was written to commemorate his best friend Arthur Hallam, a fellow poet and fellow student at Trinity College, Cambridge, who was engaged to Tennyson's sister, but died from a brain haemorrhage before they could marry. Tennyson also wrote some notable blank verse including Idylls of the King, "Ulysses", and "Tithonus". During his career, Tennyson attempted drama, but his plays enjoyed little success. A number of phrases from Tennyson's work have become commonplaces of the English language, including "Nature, red in tooth and claw", "'Tis better to have loved and lost / Than never to have loved at all", "Theirs not to reason why, / Theirs but to do and die", "My strength is as the strength of ten, / Because my heart is pure", "To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield", "Knowledge comes, but Wisdom lingers", and "The old order changeth, yielding place to new". He is the ninth most frequently quoted writer in The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations.

— Freebase

Witching hour

Witching hour

With a modern literal meaning of "midnight," the term witching hour refers to the time of day when supernatural creatures such as witches, demons, and ghosts are thought to appear and to be at their most powerful and black magic to be most effective. It may be used to refer to any arbitrary time of bad luck or in which something bad has a greater likelihood to occur. One of the earliest, if not the first, appearances this term makes is in Washington Irving's short story The Legend of Sleepy Hollow. Here, Irving uses "witching hour" and "witching time" interchangeably. Both terms reference midnight, and are used to conjure in readers a sense of supernatural anxiety. There is little evidence the term had any practical use prior to this; Irving may have coined the phrase after having grown up around New England and touring areas where the Salem Witch Trials took place. In several of Shakespeare's plays – specifically Macbeth and Julius Caesar – ghosts and other supernatural phenomena take place around midnight, but the term "witching hour" never appears. In the play Hamlet, we hear young Hamlet saying, "'Tis now the very witching time of night."

— Freebase

Myopericarditis

Myopericarditis

Myopericarditis is a combination of both myocarditis and pericarditis appearing in a single individual. It involves the presence of fluid in the heart. Myopericarditis refers primarily to a pericarditis with lesser myocarditis, as opposed to a perimyocarditis, though the two terms are often used interchangeably. Both will be reflected on an ECG. thefreedictonary.com/myopericarditis myopericarditis /myo•peri•car•di•tis/ myocarditis combined with pericarditis. Myocarditis Definition Myocarditis is an inflammatory disease of the heart muscle that can result from a variety of causes. While most cases are produced by a viral infection, an inflammation of the heart muscle may also be instigated by toxins, drugs, and hypersensitive immune reactions. Myocarditis is a rare but serious condition that affects both males and females of any age Inflammation of the muscular wall of the heart and of the enveloping pericardium pericardium [per′ikär′dē•əm] pl. pericardia Etymology: Gk, peri + kardia, heart a fibroserous sac that surrounds the heart and the roots of the great vessels. It consists of the serous pericardium and the fibrous pericardium. The serous pericardium consists of the parietal layer, which lines the inside of the fibrous pericardium, and the visceral layer, which adheres to the surface of the heart. Between the two layers is the pericardial space, which contains a few drops of pericardial fluid to lubricate opposing surfaces of the space and allow the heart to move easily during contraction. Injury or disease may cause fluid to accumulate in the space, causing a wide separation between the heart and the outer pericardium. The fibrous pericardium, which constitutes the outermost sac and is composed of tough, white fibrous tissue lined by the parietal layer of the serous pericardium, fits loosely around the heart and attaches to large blood vessels emerging from the top of the heart but not to the heart itself. It is relatively inelastic and protects the heart and the serous membranes. If pericardial fluid or pus accumulates in the pericardial space, the fibrous pericardium cannot stretch, causing a rapid increase of pressure around the heart. pericardial, adj.

— Freebase

Artemisia maritima

Artemisia maritima

Artemisia maritima is a species of wormwood known as sea wormwood and old woman. In its many variations of form it has an extremely wide distribution in the northern hemisphere of the Old World, occurring mostly in saltish soils. It is found in the salt marshes of the British Isles, on the coasts of the Baltic, of France and the Mediterranean, and on saline soils in Hungary; thence it extends eastwards, covering immense tracts in Southern Russia, the region of the Caspian Sea and Central Siberia to Chinese Mongolia. In Britain it is found as far as Wigton on the West and Aberdeen on the East; also in north-east Ireland and in the Channel Islands. The plant somewhat resembles Artemisia absinthium, the absinthe wormwood, but is smaller. The stems rise about a foot or 18 inches in height. The leaves are twice pinnatifid, with narrow, linear segments, and, like the whole plant, are covered on both sides with a coat of white cottony fibers. The small, oblong flower heads, each containing three to six tubular florets, are of a yellowish or brownish tint; they are produced in August and September, and are arranged in racemes, sometimes drooping, sometimes erect. Popularly this species is called Old Woman, in distinction to Old Man or southernwood, Artemisia abrotanum, which it somewhat resembles, though it is more delicate-looking and lacks the peculiar refreshing scent of 'Old Man.' Dr. Hill says of this species: This is a very noble bitter: its peculiar province is to give an appetite, as that of the Common Wormwood is to assist digestion; the flowery tops and the young shoots possess the virtue: the older Leaves and the Stalk should be thrown away as useless .... The apothecaries put three times as much sugar as of the ingredient in their Conserves; but the virtue is lost in the sweetness, those will not keep so well that have less sugar, but 'tis easy to make them fresh as they are wanted.

— Freebase

To be or not to be

To be or not to be

"To be or not to be, that is the question.Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to sufferThe slings and arrows of outrageous fortuneOr to take arms against a sea of troubles,And by opposing end them?" -- From Hamlet (III, i, 56-61)

— Freebase

Ceratitis

Ceratitis

ser-a-tī′tis, n. inflammation of the cornea.—Also Keratī′tis.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Enteric

Enteric

en-ter′ik, adj. of or pertaining to the intestines.—ns. Enteradenog′raphy, description of the intestinal glands; Enteradenol′ogy, the branch of anatomy relating to the intestinal glands; Enteral′gia, intestinal neuralgia; Enterī′tis, inflammation of the intestines; En′terocele, a hernial tumour containing part of the intestines; Enterogastrī′tis, inflammation of the stomach and bowels; En′terolite, En′terolith, an intestinal concretion or calculus; Enterol′ogy, a treatise on the internal parts of the body; En′teron, the entire intestine or alimentary canal:—pl. En′tera; Enterop′athy, disease of the intestines; Enteropneust′a, a class of worm-like animals, having the paired respiratory pouches opening from the front part of the alimentary canal; Enterot′omy, dissection or incision of the intestines. [Gr. enterikosenteron, intestine.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Haliotis

Haliotis

hal-i-ō′tis, n. a genus of univalve shells, the ear-shells, supplying mother-of-pearl.—adj. Hal′iotoid. [Gr. hals, sea, ous, ōtis, ear.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Iris

Iris

ī′ris, n. the rainbow: an appearance resembling the rainbow: the contractile curtain perforated by the pupil, and forming the coloured part of the eye (also I′rid): the fleur-de-lis, or flagflower:—pl. I′rises.—adjs. I′ridal, Irid′ian, exhibiting the colours of the iris or rainbow: prismatic.—ns. Irides′cence, Iridisā′tion.—adjs. Irides′cent, coloured like the iris or rainbow; I′ridine, iridescent.—v.t. Ir′idise.—adjs. I′risāted, rainbow-coloured; Ir′ised, showing colours like the rainbow.—ns. Irī′tis, Iridī′tis, inflammation of the iris of the eye. [L. iris, iridis—Gr. iris, iridos, the rainbow.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Myelitis

Myelitis

mī-e-lī′tis, n. inflammation of the substance of the spinal cord.—ns. Myelasthenī′a, spinal exhaustion; Myelatrō′phia, atrophy of the spinal cord.—adjs. Myelit′ic, My′eloid, medullary.—ns. Myelomalā′cia, softening of the spinal cord; Myelomeningī′tis, spinal meningitis; My′elon, the spinal cord.—adjs. My′elonal, Myelon′ic. [Gr. myelos, marrow.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Phacitis

Phacitis

fā-sī′tis, n. inflammation of the crystalline lens of the eye.—n. Phacocystī′tis, inflammation of the capsule of the crystalline lens of the eye.—adj. Phā′coid, lentil-shaped.—n. Phā′coscope. [Gr. phakos, a lentil.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Pyelitis

Pyelitis

pī-e-lī′tis, n. inflammation of the pelvis of the kidney—also Endonephritis.—adjs. Pyelit′ic; Pyelonephrit′ic.—n. Pyelonephrī′tis, inflammation of the kidney and renal pelvis. [Gr. pyelos, the pelvis, nephros, the kidney.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Trachea

Trachea

tra-kē′a, n. that part of the air-passages which lies between the larynx and the bronchi:—pl. Trachē′æ.—adjs. Trā′chēal, pertaining to the trachea; Trā′chēan, having tracheæ.—n.pl. Trāchēā′ria, the tracheate arachnidans.—adjs. Trāchēā′rian, pertaining to the tracheate arachnidans; Tra′chēāry, pertaining to the trachea; Trā′chēāte, -d, having a trachea.—ns. Trāchench′yma, tracheary tissue; Trāchēōbranch′ia, a breathing-organ of certain aquatic insect larvæ.—adj. Trāchēōbronch′ial, pertaining to the trachea and the bronchi.—n. Trāchē′ōcēle, an enlargement of the thyroid gland.—adj. Trāchēōscop′ic, pertaining to tracheoscopy.—ns. Trāchē′ōscopist, one who practises tracheoscopy; Trāchē′ōscōpy, the inspection of the trachea; Trā′cheotome, a knife used in tracheotomy; Trāchēot′ōmist, one who practices tracheotomy; Trācheot′omy, the operation of making an opening in the trachea; Trāchī′tis, Trachēī′tis, inflammation of the trachea. [L. trachīa—Gr. trachys, tracheia, rough.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Typhlitis

Typhlitis

tif-lī′tis, n. inflammation of the cæcum and vermiform appendix—also Typhloënterī′tis.—adj. Typhlit′ic. [Gr. typhlos, blind.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Vulva

Vulva

vul′va, n. the orifice of the external organs of generation of the female.—adjs. Vul′var, Vul′vate; Vul′viform, oval.—ns. Vulvis′mus, vaginismus; Vulvī′tis, inflammation of the vulva.—adjs. Vulvo-ū′terine, pertaining to the vulva and the uterus; Vulvovag′inal, pertaining to the vulva and the vagina.—n. Vulvovaginī′tis, inflammation of both the vulva and the vagina.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Adenitis

Adenitis

ad-en-ī′tis, n. inflammation of the lymphatic glands. [Gr. adēn, a gland, -itis, denoting inflammation.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Altaltissimo

Altaltissimo

alt-al-tis′si-mo, n. the very highest summit. [It. reduplicated comp. of alto, high, and altissimo, highest.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Altissimo

Altissimo

al-tis′si-mo, adj. (mus.) in phrase 'in altissimo,' in the second octave above the treble stave beginning with G. [It. altissimo, superl. of alto, high.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Anticipate

Anticipate

an-tis′ip-āt, v.t. to be beforehand with (another person or thing), to forestall or preoccupy: to take in hand, or consider, before the due time: to foresee: realise beforehand, or count upon as certain: to expect.—v.t. and v.i. to accelerate: to occur earlier than.—adj. and n. Antic′ipant, anticipating, anticipative.—n. Anticipā′tion, act of anticipating: assignment to too early a time: foretaste: previous notion, or presentiment: expectation.—adjs. Anti′cipātive, Anti′cipātory.—advs. Anticipā′tively, Anticipā′torily (rare). [L. anticipāre, -ātumānte, before, cap-ĕre, to take.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Antistrophe

Antistrophe

an-tis′trōf-e, n. (poet.) the returning movement from left to right in Greek choruses and dances, the movement of the strophe being from right to left: the stanza of a song alternating with the strophe: an inverse relation.—adj. Antistroph′ic, pertaining to the antistrophe. [Gr.; anti, against, and streph-ein, to turn.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Append

Append

ap-pend′, v.t. to hang one thing to another: to add.—n. Append′age, something appended.—adj. Append′ant, attached, annexed, consequent.—n. an adjunct, quality.—n. Appendicī′tis, inflammation of the vermiform appendix of the cæcum.—adj. Appendic′ular, of the nature of or belonging to an appendix.—n. Appendiculā′ria, a genus of Ascidians whose members retain the larval vertebrate characters which are lost in the more or less degenerate sea-squirts.—adj. Appendic′ulate, furnished with appendages.—n. Append′ix, something appended or added: a supplement: an addition to a book or document, containing matter explanatory, but not essential to its completeness: (anat.) a process, prolongation, or projection:—pl. Append′ixes, Append′ices.—Appendix auriculæ, the appendix of the auricle of the heart; Appendices epiploicæ, saccular processes, containing fat attached to the serous covering of the large intestine; Appendix vermiformis, or Vermiform appendix, a blind process terminating the cæcum in man. [L. ad, to, pendĕre, to hang.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Appentice

Appentice

a-pen′tis, n. (archit.) a pent-house.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Aqua-fortis

Aqua-fortis

ā′kwa-for′tis, n. nitric acid, a powerful solvent, hence used figuratively.—ns. Aquafort′ist, one who prepares etchings or engravings by means of aqua-fortis; A′qua-mirab′ilis, a preparation distilled from cloves, nutmeg, ginger, and spirit of wine; A′qua-rē′gia, a mixture of nitric and hydrochloric acids, so called because it dissolves the royal metal, gold; A′qua Tofa′na, a poisonous fluid (prepared from arsenic) made in Palermo in the 17th cent. by a woman Tofana; A′qua-vi′tæ, an old name for alcohol, used of brandy, whisky, &c.; cf. Fr. eau de vie, and usquebaugh. [L. aqua, water, fortis, strong.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Artery

Artery

är′tėr-i, n. a tube or vessel which conveys blood from the heart (see Aorta)—also metaphorically: any main channel of communication.—adj. Artēr′ialv.t. Artēr′ialise, to make arterial.—ns. Artēriot′omy, the cutting or opening of an artery, to let blood; Arterī′tis, inflammation of an artery. [L.—Gr. artēria, orig. the windpipe most probably—Gr. air-ein, to raise. The ancient conception of the artery as an air-duct gave rise to the derivation from Gr. aēr, air.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Arthritis

Arthritis

ar-thrī′tis, n. inflammation of a joint: gout.—adj. Arthrit′ic, relating to or affecting the joints: gouty. [Gr. arthritikosarthron, a joint.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Atlantean

Atlantean

at-lan-tē′an, adj. relating to or like Atlas, gigantic: also relating to Atlan′tis, according to ancient tradition, a vast island in the Atlantic Ocean, or to Bacon's ideal commonwealth of that name. [See Atlas.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Bronchiæ

Bronchiæ

brongk′i-ē, n.pl. a name given to the ramifications of the windpipe which carry air into the lungs.—adjs. Bronch′ic, Bronch′ial.—n. Bronchī′tis, inflammation of the bronchiæ. [L.—Gr. bronchia, the bronchial tubes.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Buprestis

Buprestis

bū-pres′tis, n. a genus of beetles, typical of a large family, Buprestidæ, those occurring in warmer countries having lively colour and metallic sheen—some known as Golden Beetles. [L.,—Gr. bouprestis, bous, an ox, prēthein, to swell.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Cephalic

Cephalic

se-fal′ik, adj. belonging to the head—also Cephalis′tic.—ns. Cephalag′ra, gout in the head; Cephalal′gia, Ceph′algy, headache.—adjs. Cephalal′gic; Ceph′alate, having a head, as a mollusc.—n. Cephalī′tis, inflammation of the brain.—adjs. Ceph′aloid, in the form of the head: spherical.—ns. Ceph′alo-thō′rax, the anterior division of the body in arthropods; Cephalot′omy, the dissection of the head.—adj. Ceph′alous, having a head. [Gr. kephalikoskephalē, the head.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Cerebrum

Cerebrum

ser′e-brum, n. the front and larger part of the brain.—adjs. Cerebell′ar, Cerebell′ous.—n. Cerebell′um, the hinder and lower part of the brain.—adj. Cer′ebral, pertaining to the cerebrum.—ns. Cer′ebralism, the theory that all mental operations originate in the cerebrum; Cer′ebralist.—v.i. Cer′ebrate, to show brain action.—n. Cerebrā′tion, action of the brain, conscious or unconscious, marked by molecular changes in the cerebrum.—adjs. Cer′ebric, cerebral; Cereb′riform, brain-shaped.—ns. Cer′ebrin, a name given to several nitrogenous non-phosphorised substances obtained from the brain; Cerebrī′tis, inflammation of the cerebrum.—adj. Cer′ebro-spīn′al, relating to the brain and spinal cord together.—Cerebral hemispheres, the two great divisions of the cerebrum. [L. cerebrum, the brain; prob. cog. with Gr. kara, the head, kranion, the cranium.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Chondroid

Chondroid

kon′droid, adj. cartilaginous.—ns. Chon′drin, the proper substance of cartilage; Chondrī′tis, inflammation of cartilage; Chondrogen′esis, the formation of cartilage.—adj. Chondrogenet′ic.—ns. Chondrog′raphy, a description of the cartilages; Chondrol′ogy, the knowledge of the cartilages.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Chrematistic

Chrematistic

krē-ma-tis′tik, adj. pertaining to finance.—n. Chrematis′tics, the science of wealth. [Gr.,—chrēma, a thing.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Clematis

Clematis

klem′a-tis, n. a creeping plant, called also Virgin's Bower and Traveller's Joy. [L.,—Gr. klēmatisklēma, a twig.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Clitoris

Clitoris

klī′tō-ris, n. a homologue of the penis present, as a rudimentary organ, in the female of many higher vertebrates.—ns. Clī′torism; Clitorī′tis. [Gr.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Colic

Colic

kol′ik, n. a disease attended with severe pain and flatulent distension of the abdomen, without diarrhœa.—adj. Col′icky, suffering or causing colic.—n. Colī′tis (see Colonitis under Colon). [Fr.,—L.,—Gr. kolikoskolon, the large intestine.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Colon

Colon

kō′lon, n. that portion of the large intestine which extends from the cæcum to the rectum, which is the terminal portion of the intestinal canal.—n. Colonī′tis, inflammation of the colon. [L.,—Gr. kolon, the large intestine.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Conticent

Conticent

kon′tis-ent, adj. (Thackeray) silent. [L. conticent-em, con, and tacēre, to be silent.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Cotise

Cotise

Cottise, kō′tis, n. (her.) one of the diminutives of the bend (q.v.).—v.t. to border a bend, &c., with cotises, barrulets, &c. [Fr. cotice; origin obscure.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Cutis

Cutis

kū′tis, n. the skin: the true skin, as distinguished from the cuticle.—adj. Cutān′eous, belonging to the skin.—n. Cū′ticle, the outermost or thin skin.—adj. Cutic′ular, belonging to the cuticle. [L.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Cyst

Cyst

sist, n. a bag in animal bodies containing morbid matter.—adjs. Cyst′ic, Cyst′iform, Cystoid′, having the form of, or contained in, a cyst or bag.—ns. Cys′ticle, a small cyst; Cystī′tis, inflammation of the bladder; Cys′tocele, a hernia formed by the protrusion of the bladder; Cystō′ma, a tumour containing cysts; Cystot′omy, the operation of cutting into the bladder to remove extraneous matter. [Low L. cystis—Gr. kystis, a bladder.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Diaphragm

Diaphragm

dī′a-fram, n. a thin partition or dividing membrane: the midriff, a structure separating the chest from the abdomen: a metal plate with a central hole, for cutting off side-rays in a camera, &c.—adjs. Diaphragmat′ic, Diaphrag′mal.—n. Diaphragmatī′tis, inflammation of the diaphragm. [Gr. diaphragmadia, across, phragnynai, to fence.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Dolichotis

Dolichotis

dol-i-kō′tis, n. a genus of long-eared South American rodents. [Gr. dolichos, long, ous, ōtos, the ear.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Dytiscus

Dytiscus

dī-tis′kus, n. a genus of water-beetles, including a common large British species, D. marginalis—also Dyt′icus.—adj. Dytis′cid. [Formed from Gr. dytēs, a diver.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Encephalon

Encephalon

en-sef′al-on, n. the brain.—adj. Encephal′ic, belonging to the head or brain.—ns. Encephalī′tis, inflammation of the brain; Enceph′alocele, a protrusion of portion of the brain through the skull, where the bones are incomplete in infancy.—adj. Enceph′aloid, resembling the matter of the brain.—n. Encephalot′omy, dissection of the brain.—adj. Enceph′alous, cephalous. [Gr.,—en, in, kephalē, the head.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Endocardium

Endocardium

en-do-kar′di-um, n. the lining membrane of the heart.—adjs. Endocar′diac, Endocar′dial.—n. Endocardī′tis, disease of the internal surface of the heart, resulting in the deposit of fibrin on the valves. [Gr. endon, within, kardia, heart.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Endosteum

Endosteum

en-dos′tē-um, n. (anat.) the internal periosteum.—adj. Endos′tēal.—n. Endostī′tis, inflammation of the endosteum.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Fatiscent

Fatiscent

fā-tis′ent, adj. gaping.—n. Fatis′cence.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Forenotice

Forenotice

fōr-nō′tis, n. notice of anything before it happens.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Frantic

Frantic

fran′tik, adj. mad, furious: wild.—advs. Fran′tically, Fran′ticly (Shak.).—adj. Fran′tic-mad, raving mad.—n. Fran′ticness, the state of being frantic. [O. Fr. frenetique—L. phreneticus—Gr. phrenētikos, mad, phrenītis, inflammation of the brain—phrēn, the mind; see Frenzy.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Gastric

Gastric

gas′trik, adj. belonging to the stomach—also Gas′tral.—ns. Gastrī′tis, inflammation of the stomach; Gastrol′oger.—adj. Gastrolog′ical.—n. Gastrol′ogy, cookery, good eating.—Gastric fever, a bilious remittent fever; Gastric juice, the digestive liquid secreted by the glands of the stomach. [Gr. gastēr, the belly.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Gingival

Gingival

jin-jī′val, adj. pertaining to the gums.—n. Gingivī′tis, inflammation of the gums. [L. gingivæ.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Gloss

Gloss

glos, n. a remark to explain a subject: a comment.—v.i. to comment or make explanatory remarks.—adj. Glossā′rial, relating to a glossary: containing explanation.—ns. Gloss′arist, a writer of a glossary; Gloss′ary, a vocabulary of words requiring special explanation: a dictionary; Glossā′tor, Gloss′er, a writer of glosses or comments, a commentator; Gloss′ic, a phonetic alphabet devised by Mr A. J. Ellis (1814-90) for the scientific expression of speech-sounds—to be used concurrently with the Nomic or existing English orthography; Glossī′tis, inflammation of the tongue; Gloss′ocele, swelled tongue; Glossog′rapher.—adj. Glossograph′ical.—n. Glossog′raphy, the writing of glossaries or comments.—adj. Glossolog′ical.—ns. Glossol′ogist; Glossol′ogy, the science of language, comparative philology: the knowledge of the definition of technical terms—also Glottol′ogy; Glossot′omy, dissection of the tongue. [L. glossa, a word requiring explanation—Gr. glōssa, the tongue.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Gnathic

Gnathic

nath′ik, adj. of the jaws—also Gnā′thal.—ns. Gnath′ism, the classification of mankind based on measurements of the jaw; Gnathī′tis, inflammation of the cheek or upper jaw; Gnathoplast′y, the formation of a cheek by plastic surgery; Gnathop′oda, the xiphosura: the arthropoda. [Gr. gnathos, the jaw.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Gonagra

Gonagra

gon′a-gra, n. gout in the knee.—ns. Gonal′gia, any painful affection of the knee; Gonarthrī′tis, inflammation of the knee-joint. [Gr. gony, knee, agra, a taking, algos, pain.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Gratis

Gratis

grā′tis, adv. for nothing: without payment or recompense. [L., contr. of gratiis, abl. pl. of gratia, favour—gratus.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Hamarthritis

Hamarthritis

ham-ar-thrī′tis, n. gout in all the joints. [Gr. hama, together, arthritis, gout.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Hepar

Hepar

hē′par, n. the name given by the older chemists to various compounds of sulphur, from their brown, liver-like colour.—adj. Hepat′ic, belonging to the liver.—ns.pl. Hepat′ica, medicines which affect the liver and its appendages; Hepat′icæ, the liver-worts, a sub-class of bryophytic or moss-like plants.—n. Hepatisā′tion, consolidation of tissue, as of the lungs in pneumonia, resulting in a liver-like solidification.—v.t. Hep′atise, to convert into a substance resembling liver.—ns. Hep′atīte, a variety of barium sulphate or barite, with a characteristic stink; Hepatī′tis, inflammation of the liver; Hep′atocele, hernia of the liver; Hepatol′ogist, a specialist in diseases of the liver; Hepatol′ogy, the science of, or a treatise on, the liver; Hepatorrhœ′a, a morbid flow of bile; Hepatos′copy, divination by inspection of the livers of animals. [Gr. hēpar, hēpătos, the liver.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Inartistic

Inartistic

-al, in-ar-tis′tik, -al, adj. not artistic: deficient in appreciation of works of art.—adv. Inartis′tically.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Injustice

Injustice

in-jus′tis, n. violation or withholding of another's rights or dues: wrong: iniquity.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Isatine

Isatine

ī′sa-tin, n. a substance capable of being crystallised, obtained by oxidising indigo.—adj. Isat′ic.—n. I′sātis, a genus of Cruciferæ.—Isatis tinctoria, woad. [Gr. isatis, woad.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Justice

Justice

jus′tis, n. quality of being just: integrity: impartiality: desert: retribution: a judge: a magistrate.—ns. Jus′ticeship, office or dignity of a justice or judge; Justic′iary, Justic′iar, an administrator of justice: a chief-justice.—Justice of the Peace (abb. J.P.), an inferior magistrate; Justices' justice, a term sarcastically applied to the kind of justice sometimes administered by the unpaid and amateur magistracy of England.—Lord Chief-justice, the chief judge of the King's (or Queen's) Bench Division of the High Court of Justice; Lord Justice-clerk, the Scottish judge ranking next to the Lord-Justice-general, presiding over the Outer House or Second Division of the Court of Session, vice-president of the High Court of Justiciary; Lord Justice-general, the highest judge in Scotland, called also the Lord President of the Court of Session.—High Court of Justiciary, the supreme criminal court of justice in Scotland. [Fr.,—L. justitia.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Keratitis

Keratitis

ker-a-tī′tis, n. inflammation of the cornea, either acute or chronic.—n. Keratal′gia, pain in the cornea.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Lamina

Lamina

lam′i-na, n. a thin plate: a thin layer or coat lying over another:—pl. Lam′inæ.—adjs. Lam′inable; Lam′inar, Lam′inary, in laminæ or thin plates: consisting of, or resembling, thin plates.—n. Laminā′ria, a genus of dark-spored seaweeds, with large expanded leathery-stalked fronds.—adjs. Lam′ināte, -d, in laminæ or thin plates: consisting of scales or layers, over one another.—ns. Laminā′tion, the arrangement of stratified rocks in thin laminæ or layers.—adjs. Laminif′erous, consisting of laminæ or layers; Lam′iniform, laminar.—n. Laminī′tis, inflammation of the laminæ of a horse's hoof. [L. lamina, a thin plate, a leaf.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Larynx

Larynx

lār′ingks, n. the upper part of the windpipe: the throat:—pl. Lar′ynges, Lar′ynxes (rare).—adjs. Laryn′geal, Laryn′gean.—n. Laryngis′mus, spasm of the glottis.—adj. Laryngit′ic.—n. Laryngī′tis, inflammation of the larynx.—adj. Laryngolog′ical.—ns. Laryngol′ogist; Laryngol′ogy, the science of the larynx; Laryngoph′ony, the sound of the voice as heard through the stethoscope applied over the larynx; Laryng′oscope, a mirror for examining the larynx and trachea.—adj. Laryngoscop′ic.—ns. Laryngos′copist; Laryngos′copy; Laryngot′omy, the operation of cutting into the windpipe to remove obstructions and assist respiration; Laryngotracheot′omy, the operation of cutting into the windpipe through the cricoid cartilage, the cricothyroid membrane, and the upper rings of the trachea. [L.,—Gr. larynx, laryngos.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Latissimus

Latissimus

lā-tis′i-mus, n. the broadest muscle which lies upon the back.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Lymph

Lymph

limf, n. water: a colourless or faintly-yellowish fluid in animal bodies, of a rather saltish taste, and with an alkaline reaction.—n. Lymphangī′tis (see Weed, 3).—adj. Lymphat′ic, pertaining to lymph.—n. a vessel which conveys the lymph.—adjs. Lymph′y, Lymph′oid. [L. lympha.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Malpractice

Malpractice

mal-prak′tis, n. evil practice or conduct: practice contrary to established rules.—n. Malpractit′ioner, a physician guilty of malpractice.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Mantis

Mantis

man′tis, n. a genus of orthopterous insects somewhat like locusts, carrying their large spinous forelegs in the attitude of prayer. [Gr. mantis.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Mastitis

Mastitis

mas-tī′tis, n. inflammation of the mammary gland.—n. Mastodyn′ia, pain in the breast.—adj. Mas′toid, like a nipple or teat: denoting a part or process of the temporal bone.—n. Mastol′ogy, mammology. [Gr. mastos, a nipple.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Mephitis

Mephitis

me-fī′tis, n. a poisonous exhalation from the ground or from decaying substances—also Mephī′tism.—adjs. Mephit′ic, -al. [L. mephitis.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Mesentery

Mesentery

mes′en-tėr-i, or mez′-, n. a membrane in the cavity of the abdomen, attached to the backbone, and serving to keep the intestines in their place.—adj. Mesenter′ic.—n. Mesenterī′tis, inflammation of the mesentery. [L.,—Gr. mesenterionmesos, middle, enteron, intestines.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Metif

Metif

mē′tif, n. the offspring of a white and a quadroon.—n. Mē′tis, a half-breed of French and Indian parentage in Canada. [Cf. Mastiff.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Metis

Metis

mē′tis, n. a Greek personification of prudence.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Mispractice

Mispractice

mis-prak′tis, n. misconduct.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Mortise

Mortise

mor′tis, n. a cavity cut into a piece of timber to receive the tenon, a projection on another piece made to fit it: stability, power of adhesion—also Mor′tice.—v.t. to cut a mortise in: to join by a mortise and tenon. [Fr. mortaise; ety. unknown.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Multisonous

Multisonous

mul-tis′ō-nus, adj. having many sounds, sounding much.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Myoid

Myoid

mī′oid, adj. like muscle.—n. My′oblast, a cell producing muscle-tissue.—adj. Myoblast′ic.—ns. Myocardī′tis, inflammation of the myocardium; Myocar′dium, the muscular substance of the heart; Myodynā′mia, muscular force; My′ogram, the tracing of a contracting and relaxing muscle by the myograph; My′ograph, an instrument for noting and recording muscular contractions.—adjs. Myograph′ic, -al, relating to myography.—ns. Myog′raphist; Myog′raphy, a description of the muscles of the body.—adj. Myolog′ical.—ns. Myol′ogist; Myol′ogy, the part of anatomy which treats of the muscles; Myō′ma, a tumour composed of muscular tissue; Myonic′ity, the contractile property of muscular tissue. [Gr. mys, myos, muscle.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Myositis

Myositis

mī-o-sī′tis, n. inflammation of a muscle—properly My′itis.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Myosotis

Myosotis

mī-ō-sō′tis, n. a genus of annual or perennial herbs of the borage family, with alternate leaves and simple or branched racemes of bractless blue, pink, or white flowers: a flower of this genus, as the common blue forget-me-not. [Gr. mys, myos, a mouse, ous, ōtos, an ear.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Nephralgia

Nephralgia

ne-fral′ji-a, n. pain or disease of the kidneys—also Nephral′gy.—ns. Neph′rite, a mineral usually called Jade, an old charm against kidney disease; Nephrit′ic, a medicine for the cure of diseases of the kidneys.—adjs. Nephrit′ic, -al, pertaining to the kidneys: affected with a disease of the kidneys: relieving diseases of the kidneys.—ns. Nephrī′tis, inflammation of the kidneys; Neph′rocele, hernia of the kidney; Nephrog′raphy, a description of the kidneys.—adj. Neph′roid, kidney-shaped.—ns. Nephrol′ogy, scientific knowledge of the kidneys; Nephrot′omy, the operation of excising the kidneys. [Gr. nephros, a kidney, algos, pain.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Neuritis

Neuritis

nū-rī′tis, n. inflammation of a nerve.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Nunc dimittis

Nunc dimittis

nungk di-mit′tis, n. 'now lettest thou depart:' the name given to the song of Simeon (Luke, ii. 29-32) in the R.C. Breviary and the Anglican evening service—from the opening words.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Nymph

Nymph

nimf, Nympha, nimf′a, n. the pupa or chrysalis of an insect.—n.pl. Nymphæ (nimf′ē), the labia minora.—adj. Nymphip′arous, producing pupæ.—ns. Nymphī′tis, inflammation of the nymphæ; Nymphot′omy, the excision of the nymphæ.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Œsophagus

Œsophagus

Esophagus, ē-sof′a-gus, n. the gullet, a membranous canal about nine inches in length, extending from the pharynx to the stomach, thus forming part of the alimentary canal.—n. Œsophagal′gia, pain, esp. neuralgia, in the œsophagus.—adj. Œsophageal (-faj′-).ns. Œsophagec′tomy, excision of a portion of the œsophagus; Œsophagis′mus, œsophageal spasm; Œsophagī′tis, inflammation of the œsophagus; Œsophag′ocele, hernia of the mucous membrane of the œsophagus through its walls; Œsophagodyn′ia, pain in the œsophagus; Œsophagop′athy, disease of the œsophagus; Œsophagoplē′gia, paralysis of the œsophagus; Œsophagorrhā′gia, hemorrhage from the œsophagus; Œsoph′agoscope, an instrument for inspecting the interior of the œsophagus; Œsophagospas′mus, spasm of the œsophagus; Œsophagostenō′sis, a constriction of the œsophagus. [Gr.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Omphalos

Omphalos

om′fal-us, n. the navel: a raised central point: a boss.—adj. Omphal′ic.—ns. Om′phalism, tendency to place the capital of a country at its geographical centre, or to increase the powers of central at the expense of local government; Omphalī′tis, inflammation of the umbilicus; Om′phalocele, umbilical hernia.—adj. Om′phaloid.—ns. Om′phalomancy, divination from the number of knots in the navel-string as to how many children the mother will bear; Omphalop′agus, a double monster united at the umbilicus; Omphalot′omy, cutting of the umbilical cord at birth. [Gr., the navel.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Onyx

Onyx

on′iks, n. (min.) an agate formed of layers of chalcedony of different colours, used for making cameos.—ns. Onych′ia, suppurative inflammation near the finger-nail; Onychī′tis, inflammation of the soft parts about the nail; Onych′ium, a little claw; On′ychomancy, divination by means of the finger-nails; Onychonō′sos, disease of the nails.—adj. Onychopath′ic, affected with such.—n. Onychō′sis, disease of the nails. [L.,—Gr. onyx, onychos, a finger-nail.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Ophthalmia

Ophthalmia

of-thal′mi-a, n. inflammation of the eye—also Ophthal′my.—adj. Ophthal′mic, pertaining to the eye.—ns. Ophthal′mist, Ophthalmol′ogist, one skilled in ophthalmology; Ophthalmī′tis, inflammation of the eyeball; Ophthalmodyn′ia, pain, esp. rheumatic pain, of the eye; Ophthalmog′raphy, a description of the eye.—adjs. Ophthalmolog′ic, -al.—ns. Ophthalmol′ogy, the science of the eye, its structure and functions; Ophthalmom′eter, an instrument for eye-measurements; Ophthalmom′etry, the making of such; Ophthalmoplē′gia, paralysis of one or more of the muscles of the eye; Ophthal′moscope, an instrument for examining the interior of the eye.—adjs. Ophthalmoscop′ic, -al.—adv. Ophthalmoscop′ically.—ns. Ophthal′moscopy, examination of the interior of the eye with the ophthalmoscope; Ophthalmot′omy, dissection of the eye: an incision into the eye. [Gr.,—ophthalmos, eye.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Orcheocele

Orcheocele

or-ke-o-sēl′, n. a tumour or inflammation of the testicle.—ns. Orchial′gia, pain, esp. neuralgia, in a testicle; Orchidec′tomy, Orchot′omy, the excision of a testicle; Orchiodyn′ia, pain in a testicle; Orchī′tis, inflammation of a testicle.—adj. Orchit′ic. [Gr. orchis, a testicle, kēlē, a tumour.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Oscheal

Oscheal

os′kē-al, adj. pertaining to the scrotum.—ns. Oscheī′tis, inflammation of the scrotum; Os′cheocele, a scrotal hernia; Os′cheoplasty, plastic surgery of the scrotum. [Gr. oschē, the scrotum.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Osseous

Osseous

os′ē-us, adj. bony: composed of, or resembling, bone: of the nature or structure of bone.—ns. Ossā′rium, an ossuary; Oss′ēin, the organic basis of bone; Oss′elet, a hard substance growing on the inside of a horse's knee; Oss′icle, a small bone.—adjs. Ossif′erous, producing bone: (geol.) containing bones; Ossif′ic.—n. Ossificā′tion, the process or state of being changed into a bony substance.—v.t. Oss′ify, to make into bone or into a bone-like substance.—v.i. to become bone:—pa.p. oss′ified.adj. Ossiv′orous, devouring or feeding on bones.—ns. Os′teoblast, a cell concerned in the formation of bone; Os′teoclast, an apparatus for fracturing bones; Osteocol′la, a deposited carbonate of lime encrusted on the roots and stems of plants; Osteoden′tine, one of the varieties of dentine, resembling bone; Osteogen′esis, the formation or growth of bone—also Osteog′eny; Osteog′rapher; Osteog′raphy, description of bones.—adj. Os′teoid, like bone: having the appearance of bone.—ns. Osteol′epis, a genus of fossil ganoid fishes peculiar to the Old Red Sandstone, so called from the bony appearance of their scales; Osteol′oger, Osteol′ogist, one versed in osteology.—adjs. Osteolog′ic, -al, pertaining to osteology.—adv. Osteolog′ically.—ns. Osteol′ogy, the science of the bones, that part of anatomy which treats of the bones; Osteomalā′cia, a disease in which the earthy salts disappear from the bones, which become soft and misshapen; Os′teophyte, an abnormal bony outgrowth.—adjs. Osteophyt′ic; Osteoplast′ic.—ns. Os′teoplasty, a plastic operation by which a loss of bone is remedied; Osteosarcō′ma, a tumour composed of intermingled bony and sarcomatous tissue; Os′teotome (surg.), a saw-like instrument for cutting bones; Osteot′omy, the division of, or incision into, a bone; Ostī′tis, inflammation of bone. [L. osseusos, ossis, bone; Gr. osteon, bone.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Otic

Otic

ō′tik, adj. of or pertaining to the ear.—ns. Otī′tis, inflammation of the internal ear; Ot′ocyst, an auditory vesicle; Ot′olith, a calcareous concretion within the membranous labyrinth of the ear; Otol′ogist, one skilled in otology; Otol′ogy, knowledge of the ear. [Gr. ous, ōtos, ear.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Ovary

Ovary

ō′var-i, n. the part of the female animal in which the egg of the offspring is formed, the female genital gland: (bot.) the part of the pistil which contains the seed.—n.pl. O′va, eggs.—adjs. Ovā′rial, Ovā′rian, of or pertaining to the ovary.—ns. Ovā′riōle; Ovariot′omist; Ovariot′omy (surg.), the removal of a diseased tumour from the ovary.—adj. Ovā′rious, consisting of eggs.—n. Ovarī′tis, inflammation of the ovary. [Low L. ovaria.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Panarthritis

Panarthritis

pan-är-thrī′tis, n. inflammation involving all the structures of a joint.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Panophthalmitis

Panophthalmitis

pan-of-thal-mī′tis, n. suppurative inflammation of the whole eye.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Panotitis

Panotitis

pan-ō-tī′tis, n. inflammation in both the middle and internal ear.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Papilla

Papilla

pa-pil′a, n. one of the minute elevations on the skin, esp. on the upper surface of the tongue and on the tips of the fingers, and in which the nerves terminate: (bot.) a nipple-like protuberance:—pl. Papill′æ.—adjs. Pap′illar, Pap′illary, like a papilla, provided with papillæ; Pap′illāte, formed into a papilla, studded with papillæ.—v.i. and v.t. to become a papilla, to cover with such.—adjs. Papillif′erous, papillate: bearing one or more fleshy excrescences; Papill′iform, like a papilla in form.—ns. Papillī′tis, inflammation of the optic papilla; Papillō′ma, a tumour formed by the hypertrophy of one papilla, or of several, including warts, corns, &c.—adjs. Papillom′atous; Pap′illōse, full of papillæ, warty—also Pap′illous; Papill′ūlate, finely papillose.—n. Pap′illūle, a very small papilla, a verruca or a variole. [L., a small pustule, dim. of papula.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Paracolpitis

Paracolpitis

par-a-kol-pī′tis, n. inflammation of the outer coat of the vagina. [Gr. para, beside, kolpos, the womb.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Participate

Participate

pär-tis′i-pāt, v.i. to partake: to have a share.—v.t. to receive a part or share of.—n. Pär′ticeps crim′inis, one who, although not present, helps in any way the commission of a crime, or who after the deed assists or hides the person who did it.—adjs. Partic′ipable, capable of being participated in or shared; Partic′ipant, participating: sharing.—n. a partaker.—adv. Partic′ipantly.—n. Participā′tion.—adj. Partic′ipātive, capable of participating.—n. Partic′ipātor, one who partakes with another: a sharer. [L. participāre, -ātumpars, part, capĕre, to take.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Pentice

Pentice

pen′tis, n. See Penthouse.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Pericardium

Pericardium

per-i-kär′di-um, n. (anat.) the bag or sac composed of two layers which surrounds the heart.—adjs. Pericar′diac, Pericar′dial, Pericar′dian.—n. Pericardī′tis, inflammation of the pericardium. [Late L.,—Gr. perikardionperi, around, kardia, heart.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Pericystitis

Pericystitis

per-i-sis-tī′tis, n. inflammation around the bladder. [Gr. peri, around, kystis, the bladder.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Periosteum

Periosteum

per-i-os′tē-um, n. a tough fibrous membrane which forms the outer coating of bones.—adjs. Perios′tēal, Perios′tēous; Periostit′ic.—n. Periostī′tis, inflammation of the periosteum. [Gr. periosteonperi, around, osteon, a bone.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Peritoneum

Peritoneum

Peritonæum, per-i-tō-nē′um, n. a serous membrane which encloses all the viscera lying in the abdominal and pelvic cavities.—adjs. Peritonē′al; Peritonit′ic.—n. Peritonī′tis, inflammation of the peritoneum. [Gr. peritoneionperi, around, teinein, to stretch.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Perityphlitis

Perityphlitis

per-i-tif-lī′tis, n. inflammation of the cæcum, appendix, and connective tissue, or of the peritoneum covering cæcum and appendix. [Gr. peri, round, typhlos, blind (the cæcum being the 'blind gut').]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Pharynx

Pharynx

far′ingks, n. the cleft or cavity forming the upper part of the gullet, and lying behind the nose, mouth, and larynx:—pl. Phar′ynges, Phar′ynxes.—adjs. Pharyn′gēal; Pharyngit′ic, pertaining to pharyngitis.—n. Pharyngī′tis, inflammation of the mucous membrane of the pharynx.—adjs. Pharyngoglos′sal, pertaining to the pharynx and the tongue; -laryn′geal, to that and the larynx; -nā′sal, and the nose; -ō′ral, and the mouth.—ns. Pharyngog′raphy, a description of the pharynx; Pharyng′ōscope, an instrument for inspecting the pharynx; Pharyng′oscopy; Pharyngot′omy, the operation of making an incision into the pharynx to remove a tumour. [Late L.,—Gr. pharyngkx, the pharynx.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Phlebitis

Phlebitis

flē-bī′tis, n. inflammation of a vein.—ns. Phleb′olite, a calcareous concretion found in a vein; Phlebol′ogy, science of the veins; Phleb′orrhage, venous hemorrhage.—adjs. Phlebotom′ic, -al.—v.t. Phlebot′omise.—ns. Phlebot′omist; Phlebot′omy, act of letting blood. [Gr. phleps, phlebos, a vein.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Phren

Phren

fren, n. the thinking principle, mind: the diaphragm:—pl. Phrenes.—ns. Phrēnal′gia, psychalgia; Phrenē′sis, delirium, frenzy.—adjs. Phrenet′ic, -al (also Frenet′ic, -al), having a disordered mind: frenzied: mad; Phreniat′ric, pertaining to the cure of mental diseases; Phren′ic, belonging to the diaphragm.—ns. Phren′ics, mental philosophy; Phren′ism, thought force.—adj. Phrenit′ic, affected with phrenitis.—ns. Phrenī′tis, inflammation of the brain; Phrenog′raphy, descriptive psychology; Phrenopath′ia, mental disease.—adj. Phrenopath′ic.—n. Phrenoplē′gia, sudden loss of mental power. [Gr. phrēn, the mind.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Placenta

Placenta

pla-sen′ta, n. the structure which unites the unborn mammal to the womb of its mother and establishes a nutritive connection between them: (bot.) the portion of the ovary which bears the ovules:—pl. Placen′tæ.—adj. Placen′tal.—n.pl. Placentā′lia, placental mammals.—adjs. Placentā′lian; Placen′tary, pertaining to, or having, a placenta.—n. a mammal having a placenta.—adjs. Placen′tate, Placentif′erous.—ns. Placentā′tion, the mode in which the placenta is formed and attached to the womb; Placentī′tis, inflammation of the placenta. [L., a flat cake, akin to Gr. plakous, a flat cake, from plax, plak-os, anything flat.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Pleura

Pleura

plōō′ra, n. a delicate serous membrane which covers the lungs and lines the cavity of the chest:—pl. Pleu′ræ.—adj. Pleu′ral.—ns. Pleurapoph′ysis, a lateral process of a vertebra, with the morphological character of a rib:—pl. Pleurapoph′yses; Pleurench′yma (bot.), the woody tissue of plants; Pleu′risy, inflammation of the pleura, the investing membrane of the lung; Pleu′risy-root, a plant common in the United States, of which the root has medicinal repute, the infusion being used as a diaphoretic and expectorant.—adjs. Pleurit′ic, -al, pertaining to, or affected with, pleurisy: causing pleurisy.—ns. Pleurī′tis, pleurisy; Pleurodyn′ia, neuralgia of the chest-wall, which may simulate closely the pain of pleurisy; Pleu′ro-pneumō′nia, inflammation of the pleura and lungs, a contagious disease peculiar to cattle. [Gr., a rib.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Pneumatic

Pneumatic

-al, nū-mat′ik, -al, adj. relating to air: consisting of air: moved by air or wind.—n. (coll.) a bicycle fitted with pneumatic tires.—adv. Pneumat′ically.—n.sing. Pneumat′ics, the science which treats of air and other elastic fluids or gases.—adj. Pneumatolog′ical.—ns. Pneumatol′ogist, one versed in pneumatology; Pneumatol′ogy, the science of elastic fluids: pneumatics: the branch of philosophy which treats of spirits or mind: (theol.) the doctrine of the Holy Spirit; Pneumatom′eter, Pneumom′eter, an instrument for measuring the quantity of air inhaled into the lungs at a single inspiration.—adj. Pneumogas′tric, pertaining to the lungs and the stomach.—n. Pneumō′nia, inflammation of the tissues of the lungs—also Pneu′monī′tis.—adj. Pneumon′ic, pertaining to the lungs.—n. a medicine for lung diseases.—Pneumatic despatch, a method of sending letters, telegrams, and small parcels through tubes by means of compressed air; Pneumatic railway, a railway along which the carriages are driven by compressed air; Pneumatic trough, a trough of wood or iron, filled with water and used for collecting gases for experiment or examination; Pneumatic tire, a flexible air-inflated tube used as a tire on cycles, &c. [L.,—Gr. pneumatikospneum-a, -atos, wind, air—pnein, to blow, to breathe.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Poultice

Poultice

pōl′tis, n. a soft composition of meal, bran, &c. applied to sores.—v.t. to put a poultice upon. [L. pultes, pl. of puls, pultis (Gr. poltos), porridge.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Practice

Practice

prak′tis, n. the habit of doing anything: frequent use: state of being used: regular exercise for instruction: performance: method: medical treatment: exercise of any profession: a rule or method in arithmetic.—ns. Practicabil′ity, Prac′ticableness, quality of being practicable.—adj. Prac′ticable, that may be practised, used, or followed: passable, as a road.—adv. Prac′ticably.—adj. Prac′tical, that can be put in practice: useful: applying knowledge to some useful end: derived from practice.—ns. Practical′ity; Prac′tical-joke, a trick of an annoying kind played on any one; Prac′tical-knowl′edge, knowledge which results in action.—adv. Prac′tically, in a practical way: actually: by actual trial.—n. Prac′ticalness. [M. E. praktike—O. Fr. practique—Gr. praktikos, fit for doing—prassein, to do.]

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Practise

Practise

prak′tis, v.t. to put into practice or to do habitually: to perform: to exercise, as a profession: to use or exercise: to teach by practice: to commit.—v.i. to have or to form a habit: to exercise any employment or profession: to try artifices.—n. Prac′tisant (Shak.), an agent.—adj. Prac′tised, skilled through practice.—n. Prac′tiser.—adj. Prac′tising, actively engaged in professional employment. [From practice.]

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Prentice

Prentice

pren′tis, n. Short for apprentice.

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Proctalgia

Proctalgia

prok-tal′ji-a, n. pain of the anus or rectum.—n. Proctī′tis, inflammation thereof. [Gr. proktos, the anus, algos, pain.]

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Prostate

Prostate

pros′tāt, adj. standing in front, applied to a gland in males at the neck of the bladder.—n. the gland at the neck of the bladder.—adj. Prostat′ic.—n. Prostatī′tis, inflammation of the prostate gland. [Gr. prostatēspro, before, sta, root of histēmi, I set up.]

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Protista

Protista

prō-tis′ta, n.pl. a proposed term for a zoological kingdom including Protozoa and Protophyta. [Gr. prōtistos, superl. of prōtos, first.]

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Rachis

Rachis

rā′kis, n. the spine: (bot.) a branch or axis of inflorescence which proceeds in nearly a straight line from the base to the apex:—pl. Rā′chidēs.—n. Rāchial′gia, pain in the spine.—adjs. Rāchial′gic; Rāchid′ial, Rāchid′ian.—n. Rāchil′la, a secondary rachis in a compound inflorescence.—adj. Rāchit′ic, rickety.—ns. Rāchī′tis, rickets in children (see Rickets): (bot.) a disease which produces abortion in the fruit; Rāch′itome, an anatomical instrument for opening the spinal canal. [Gr. rachis, the spine.]

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Rectitis

Rectitis

rek′tī-tis, n. inflammation of the rectum.—adj. Rectit′ic.

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Retina

Retina

ret′i-na, n. the innermost coating of the eye, consisting of a fine network of optic nerves.—adj. Ret′inal, pertaining to the retina of the eye.—n. Retinī′tis, inflammation of the retina. [Fr.,—L. rete, a net.]

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Rhachiomyelitis

Rhachiomyelitis

rā-ki-ō-mī-e-lī′tis, n. inflammation of the spinal cord—myelitis.ns. Rhachiot′omy, incision into the spinal canal; Rhachis′chisis, defective formation of the spinal canal—spina bifida. [Gr. rhachis, the spine, myelos, marrow.]

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Rhinitis

Rhinitis

ri-nī′tis, n. inflammation of the nose. [Gr. rhis, rhinos, nose.]

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Rhinopharyngitis

Rhinopharyngitis

rī-nō-far-in-jī′tis, n. inflammation of the mucous membrane of the nose. [Gr. rhis, rhinos, nose, pharyngx.]

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Rigor

Rigor

rī′gur, n. the same as Rigour: (med.) a sense of chilliness with contraction of the skin, a preliminary symptom of many diseases.—n. Rī′gor-mor′tis, the characteristic stiffening of the body caused by the contraction of the muscles after death.

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Salpingitis

Salpingitis

sal-pin-jī′tis, n. inflammation of a Fallopian tube.—adjs. Salpingit′ic, Salpin′gian, pertaining to a Fallopian or to a Eustachian tube.—n. Sal′pinx, a Eustachian tube or syrinx. [Gr. salpingx, a trumpet.]

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Sarcitis

Sarcitis

sar-sī′tis, n. myositis. [Gr. sarx, flesh.]

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Sarcocystis

Sarcocystis

sär-kō-sis′tis, n. a genus of parasitic sporozoa or Gregarinida, common but apparently harmless in butcher-meat.—n. Sarcocystid′ia, the division of sporozoa including the foregoing.—adj. Sarcocystid′ian. [Gr. sarx, sarkos, flesh, kystis, the bladder.]

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Sclera

Sclera

sklē′ra, n. the sclerotic coat of the eye-ball.—n. Sclē′ragogy, severe discipline.—adj. Sclē′ral.—ns. Sclēran′thus, a genus of apetalous plants, including the knawel or German knot-grass; Sclere, in sponges, a skeletal element; Sclērench′yma, the hard parts of corals or plants.—adj. Sclerenchym′atous.—ns. Sclē′ria, a genus of monocotyledonous plants, of the sedge family; Sclerī′asis, sclerodermia; Sclē′rite, any hard part of the integument of arthropods.—adj. Sclerit′ic.—n. Sclē′robase, a dense corneous mass, as in red coral.—adj. Sclerobā′sic.—ns. Sclērobrā′chia, an order of brachiopods; Sclē′roderm, hardened integument or exo-skeleton, esp. of a coral: a madrepore.—n.pl. Scleroder′mata, the scaly reptiles: the madrepores.—n. Sclēroder′mia, a chronic non-inflammatory affection of the skin, which becomes thick and rigid.—adjs. Scleroder′mic, Scleroder′mous, Sclerodermit′ic.—ns. Scleroder′mite; Sclē′rogen, the thickening matter of woody cells, as in walnut-shells, &c.—adjs. Sclerog′enous, producing sclerous tissue: mail-cheeked, as a fish; Sclē′roid, hard, scleritic.—ns. Sclērō′ma, sclerosis; Sclēromē′ninx, the dura mater; Sclērom′eter, an instrument for measuring the hardness of a mineral.—adjs. Sclērō′sal, Sclē′rosed.—ns. Sclērō′sis, a hardening: (bot.) the induration of a tissue; Sclēros′toma, a genus of nematode worms; Sclērō′tal, a bone of the eye-ball.—adj. relating to such.—adj. Sclērot′ic, hard, firm, applied esp. to the outer membrane of the eye-ball: pertaining to sclerosis: relating to ergot.—n. the outermost membrane of the eye-ball.—ns. Sclērotī′tis, inflammation of the sclerotic; Sclērō′tium, a hard, multicellular tuber-like body formed towards the end of the vegetative season by the close union of the ordinary mycelial filaments of Fungi.—adjs. Sclē′rous, hard or indurated: ossified or bony; Sclērur′ine, having stiff, hard tail-feathers, as a bird of the genus Sclerurus. [Gr. sklēros, hard.]

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Scrotum

Scrotum

skrō′tum, n. the bag which contains the testicles.—adjs. Scrō′tal, relating to the scrotum; Scrō′tiform, formed like a double bag.—ns. Scrotī′tis, inflammation of the scrotum; Scrō′tocele, a scrotal hernia. [L.]

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Sperm

Sperm

spėrm, n. animal seed: spawn of fishes or frogs: spermaceti.—ns. Sper′maduct, a spermatic duct; Sper′maphore (bot.), a placenta; Sper′mary, the male germ-gland; Spermathē′ca, a spermatic case or sheath—also Spermatothē′ca.—adjs. Spermathē′cal; Spermat′ic, -al, pertaining to, or consisting of, sperm or seed, seminal: connected with the male function, testicular.—v.i. Sper′matise, to yield or to discharge semen.—ns. Sper′matism=Spermism; Sper′matist=Spermist; Spermā′tium, a minute spore within a spermogonium:—pl. Spermā′tia.—adj. Spermatō′al, pertaining to a spermatoon.—n. Sper′matoblast, the germ of a spermatozoon.—adj. Spermatoblas′tic.—ns. Sper′matocele, swelling of the testicle; Sper′matocyst, a seminal vesicle; Spermatocys′tis, inflammation of the seminal vesicles.—adj. Spermatocy′tal.—ns. Sper′matocyte, a mother-cell from which spermatozoids are developed; Spermatogem′ma, a mass of spermatocytes; Spermatogen′esis, the formation of spermatozoa.—adjs. Spermatogenet′ic, Spermatog′enous.—ns. Spermatog′eny, the generation of spermatozoa; Spermatogō′nium, one of the primitive seminal cells that by division form the spermatocytes.—adjs. Sper′matoid, sperm-like; Spermatolog′ical, pertaining to spermatology.—ns. Spermatol′ogist, one versed in spermatology; Spermatol′ogy, the knowledge of the facts about semen; Spermatō′on, the nucleus of a spermatozoon; Spermat′ōphōre, a case which in some Invertebrata encloses the spermatozoa.—adj. Spermatoph′orous.—ns. Spermatorrhē′a, involuntary seminal discharge; Spermatō′vum, a fecundated ovum; Spermatozō′id, Spermatozō′on, one of the male reproductive cells of animals, the physiological complements of the egg-cells or ova:—pl. Spermatozō′a; Sperm′-cell, a spermatozoon: a spermatoblast or a spermatocyte.—adj. Sper′mic=Spermaticns. Sper′mism, a seminal discharge: the theory that the male sperm holds the whole germ of the future animal; Sper′mist, one who holds the theory of spermism; Sperm′-nū′cleus, t

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Spine

Spine

spīn, n. a thorn: a thin, pointed spike, esp. in fishes: the backbone of an animal: any ridge extending lengthways: the heart-wood of trees.—adjs. Spined, having spines; Spine′less, having no spine, weak; Spines′cent, somewhat spiny; Spīnif erous, bearing spines or thorns; Spī′niform, shaped like a spine or thorn; Spīnig′erous, bearing spines, as a hedgehog; Spī′nigrade, moving by means of spines, as an echinoderm.—n. Spī′niness.—adjs. Spīnirec′tor, erecting the spine of the muscles of the back; Spīnispir′ular, spiny and somewhat spiral.—ns. Spīnī′tis, inflammation of the spinal cord in the horse, &c; Spin′ney, Spin′ny, a small thicket with underwood.—adjs. Spī′nose, Spī′nous, full of spines: thorny.—ns. Spinos′ity, thorniness; Spin′ūla, Spin′ūle, a minute spine.—adjs. Spin′ūlāte, Spin′ūlōse, Spin′ūlous, covered with spinules or minute spines; Spī′ny, full of spines: thorny: troublesome: perplexed. [O. Fr. espine (Fr. épine)—L. spina, a thorn.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Spleen

Spleen

splēn, n. a soft, pulpy, blood-modifying gland near the large extremity of the stomach, supposed by the ancients to be the seat of anger and melancholy—hence spite: ill-humour: melancholy.—adj. Spleen′ful, displaying spleen, angry, fretful.—adv. Spleen′fully.—adj. Spleen′ish, affected with spleen, fretful, peevish.—adv. Spleen′ishly, in a spleenish manner.—ns. Spleen′ishness, the state of being spleenish; Spleen′-stone, jade or nephrite; Spleen′wort, any fern of the genus Asplenium.—adj. Spleen′y (Shak.), spleenish.—ns. Splēnal′gia, pain in the region of the spleen; Splen′cule, Splen′cūlus, a supplementary spleen; Splēnec′tomist, one who excises the spleen; Splēnec′tomy, excision of the spleen; Splēnectō′pia, displacement of the spleen; Splēn′etic, a splenetic person.—adjs. Splēnet′ic, -al, affected with spleen: peevish: melancholy.—adv. Splēnet′ically.—adj. Splen′ic, pertaining to the spleen.—n. Splēnisā′tion, a diseased condition of the lung, in which its tissue resembles that of the spleen, in softness, &c.—adj. Splēnit′ic.—n. Splēnī′tis, inflammation of the spleen.—adj. Splen′itive, full of spleen, passionate, irritable.—ns. Splen′ocele, a splenic tumour; Splēnog′raphy, the description of the spleen.—adjs. Splē′noid, like the spleen; Splēnolog′ical.—ns. Splēnol′ogy, knowledge about the spleen; Splēnop′athy, disease of the spleen; Splēnot′omy, splenological anatomy.—Splenic fever (see Anthrax). [L. splen—Gr. splēn.]

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Spondyl

Spondyl

-e, spon′dil, n. a joint, joining.—ns. Spondylal′gia, pain in the spine; Spondylī′tis, arthritis of a vertebra.—adj. Spon′dylous, vertebral. [Gr. spondylos, a joint.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Steatite

Steatite

stē′a-tīt, n. soapstone, a compact or massive variety of talc, a hydrous silicate of magnesia, white or yellow, soft and greasy to the touch—used by tailors for marking cloth, and called Briançon Chalk, French Chalk, and Venice Talc.—adj. Stēatit′ic.—ns. Stēatī′tis, inflammation of the fatty tissue; Stē′atocele, a fatty tumour in the scrotum; Stēatō′ma, a fatty encysted tumour.—adj. Stēatom′atous.—n. Stēatop′yga, an accumulation of fat on the buttocks of the Bushmen women.—adj. Stēatop′ygous, fat-buttocked.—n. Stēatō′sis, fatty degeneration of an organ, as the heart. [Gr. steatitēsstear, steatos, suet.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Stephanotis

Stephanotis

stef-a-nō′tis, n. a genus of shrubby twining plants of the milkweed family. [Gr. stephanos, a crown, ous, ōtos, the ear.]

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Stoma

Stoma

stō′ma, n. (bot.) one of the minute openings in the epidermis of leaves and tender green stems of plants, subserving the purpose of respiration: (zool.) one of the breathing-holes in the bodies of certain of the articulata:—pl. Stō′mata.—adjs. Stomat′ic; Stomatif′erous.—n. Stomatī′tis, inflammation of the interior of the mouth.—adj. Stō′matode, having a stoma.—ns. Stomatol′ogy, the scientific knowledge of the mouth; Stō′matoscope, an instrument for examining the interior of the mouth. [Gr. stoma, a mouth.]

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Struma

Struma

strōō′ma, n. scrofula:—pl. Stru′mæ.—adjs. Strumat′ic, Stru′mous, having scrofula: scrofulous—also Strumōse′; Strumif′erous, bearing strumæ or swellings; Stru′miform, having the form of a struma.—ns. Strumī′tis, inflammation of the thyroid gland; Strumō′sis, production of struma; Stru′mousness. [L. strumosusstruma, scrofula.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Suffete

Suffete

suf′ēt, n. one of the suffetes or chief administrative officials of ancient Carthage. [L. sufes, -ĕtis—Punic; cf. Heb. shôphet, a judge.]

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Synovial

Synovial

sin-ō′vi-al, adj. relating to Synō′via, an unctuous albuminous fluid, secreted from certain glands in the joints.—adv. Synō′vially.—n. Synovī′tis, inflammation of a synovial membrane. [Gr. syn, with, ōon, an egg.]

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Syrtis

Syrtis

sėr′tis, n. (Milt.) a quicksand—also Syrt.—adj. Syr′tic. [L.,—Gr.—syrein, to draw along.]

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Teres

Teres

tē′rēz, n. a terete muscle.—adjs. Terete′, cylindrical and tapering, columnar; Tereticau′date, round-tailed. [L. teres, terĕtis, smooth, terĕre, to rub.]

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Testicle

Testicle

tes′ti-kl, n. a gland which secretes the seminal fluid in males, a testis, one of the stones.—adjs. Tes′ticond, having the testes concealed; Testic′ular, pertaining to a testicle; Testic′ulate, -d, shaped like a testicle.—n. Tes′tis, a testicle, a rounded body resembling it:—pl. Tes′tes. [L. testiculus, dim. of testis, a testicle.]

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Tissue

Tissue

tish′ū, n. cloth interwoven with gold or silver, or with figured colours: (anat.) the substance of which organs are composed: a connected series.—v.t. to form, as tissue: to interweave: to variegate.—n. Tis′sue-pā′per, a thin, soft, semi-transparent kind of paper. [Fr. tissu, woven, pa.p. of tistre—L. texĕre, to weave.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Tonsil

Tonsil

ton′sil, n. one of two glands at the root of the tongue, so named from its shape.—n. Tonsilī′tis, inflammation of the tonsils.—adjs. Ton′sillar, Ton′silar, Tonsilit′ic. [L. tonsilla, a stake, a tonsil, dim. of tonsa, an oar.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Tortoise

Tortoise

tor′tis, or -tois, n. together with turtles, a well-defined order of reptiles, distinguished especially by the dorsal (carapace) and ventral (plastron) shields which protect the body.—n. Tor′toise-shell, the horny epidermic plate of a species of turtle.—adj. of the colour of the foregoing, mottled in yellow and black. [O. Fr. tortis—L. tortus, twisted.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Tympanum

Tympanum

tim′pan-um, n. (anat.) the membrane which separates the external from the internal ear, often called the drum of the ear: in certain birds, the labyrinth at the bottom of the windpipe: (archit.) the triangular space between sloping and horizontal cornices, or in the corners or sides of an arch: the panel of a door: a water-raising current wheel, originally drum-shaped.—adjs. Tym′panal, Tympan′ic, like a drum: pertaining to the tympanum.—n. a bone of the ear, supporting the drum-membrane.—adj. Tym′paniform, like a tympanum.—ns. Tym′panist, one who plays a drum; Tympanī′tēs, flatulent distension of the belly.—adj. Tympanit′ic.—ns. Tympanī′tis, inflammation of the membrane of the ear; Tym′pany, any swelling, turgidity: tympanites.—Tympanic membrane, the drum-membrane of the ear; Tympanic resonance, the peculiar high-pitched quality of sound produced by percussion over the intestines, &c., when they contain air; Tympanic ring, an annular tympanic bone, to which the tympanic membrane is attached. [L.,—Gr. tympanon, typanon, a kettledrum—typtein, to strike.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Ulitis

Ulitis

ū-lī′tis, n. inflammation of the gums.—ns. Ulon′cus, swelling of the gums; Ulorrhā′gia, bleeding from the gums. [Gr. oula, gums.]

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Unartistic

Unartistic

un-är-tis′tik, adj. inartistic.

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Unmortise

Unmortise

un-mor′tis, v.t. to loosen the mortises or joints of.

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Ureter

Ureter

ū-rē′tėr, n. the duct which conveys the urine from the kidneys to the bladder.—adjs. Urē′tal, Urē′teral, Urēter′ic.—n. Urēterī′tis, inflammation of the ureter. [Gr.,—ouron, urine.]

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Urethra

Urethra

ū-rē′thra, n. the canal by which the urine is discharged from the bladder:—pl. Urē′thræ.—adjs. Urē′thral; Urēthrit′ic affected with urethritis.—n. Urēthrī′tis, inflammation of the urethra. [Gr.,—ouron, urine.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Utas

Utas

ū′tas, n. (obs.) the time between a festival and the eighth day after it: festivity, stir.—Also U′tis. [Through O. Fr. from L. octo, eight.]

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Uterine

Uterine

ū′te-rin, adj. pertaining to the womb: born of the same mother by a different father.—ns. Uterī′tis, inflammation of the womb; U′terogestā′tion, the progressive development of the embryo within the womb; Uteromā′nia, nymphomania; U′terus, the womb. [Fr. uterin—L. uterinisuterus, the womb.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Vagina

Vagina

vā-jī′na, n. (anat.) the canal or passage which leads from the external orifice to the uterus, a sheath, case: the upper part of the pedestal of a terminus: (bot.) a leaf-stalk when it becomes thin and rolls round the stem to which it then forms a stalk, as in grasses.—adjs. Vag′inal; Vag′inant (bot.), investing as a sheath; Vag′ināte, -d (bot.), invested by the tubular base of a leaf or leaf-stalk, as a stem: denoting a certain order of sheathed polypes; Vaginic′oline, Vaginic′olous, living in a vagina; Vaginif′erous, bearing a vagina; Vaginipenn′ate, Vaginopenn′ous, sheath-winged.—ns. Vaginis′mus, spasmodic contraction of the vagina; Vaginī′tis, inflammation of the vagina; Vaginot′omy, cutting of the vagina; Vagin′ūla, Vag′inule, a diminutive vagina.—adj. Vagin′ulate, having a vaginula, sheathed. [L., 'a sheath.']

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Valve

Valve

valv, n. one of the leaves of a folding-door: a cover to an aperture which opens in one direction and not in the other: one of the pieces or divisions forming a shell: (anat.) a membraneous fold resembling a valve or serving as a valve in connection with the flow of blood, lymph, or other fluid—also Val′va.—adjs. Val′val, pertaining to a valve; Val′vāte, having or resembling a valve or valves: (bot.) meeting at the edges without overlapping, as the petals of flowers; Valved, having or composed of valves.—ns. Valve′-gear, the mechanism for working a valve; Valve′let, Val′vūla, Val′vūle, a little valve: (bot.) formerly used of the pieces which compose the outer covering of a pericarp.—adj. Val′vūlar.—n. Valvūlī′tis, inflammation of one of the valves of the heart. [Fr.,—L. valva, a folding-door.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Vaticinate

Vaticinate

va-tis′i-nāt, v.t. to prophesy.—adj. Vat′ic, prophetic, oracular, inspired—also Vatic′inal.—ns. Vaticinā′tion, prophecy: prediction; Vatic′inator, a prophet. [L. vaticināri, -ātus, to prophesy—vates, a seer.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Vitis

Vitis

vī′tis, n. a genus of plants, including the grape.—n. Vit′icide, a vine-destroyer, vine-pest.—adj. Vitic′olous, inhabiting, or produced upon, the vine.—ns. Vit′iculture, cultivation of the vine; Viticul′tūrist. [L. vitis, a vine—viēre, to twist.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary