Definitions containing æ`sop

We've found 18 definitions:

Sop

Sop

A sop is a piece of bread or toast that is soaked in liquid food and then eaten. In medieval cuisine, sops were very common. Sops were served with wine, soup or broth, and then picked apart into smaller pieces to soak in the liquid. At elaborate feasts, bread was often pre-cut into finger-sized pieces rather than broken off by the diners themselves. French onion soup, originating in its current form in the 18th century, can be considered a modern-day sop. The word "soup" is a cognate of "sop", both stemming ultimately from the same Germanic source. The word is mentioned prominently in the Bible, King James Version:

— Freebase

Sippet

Sippet

a small sop; a small, thin piece of toasted bread soaked in milk, broth, or the like; a small piece of toasted or fried bread cut into some special shape and used for garnishing

— Webster Dictionary

Sop

Sop

anything given to pacify; -- so called from the sop given to Cerberus, as related in mythology

— Webster Dictionary

Sopped

Sopped

of Sop

— Webster Dictionary

Sopping

Sopping

of Sop

— Webster Dictionary

Sopsavine

Sopsavine

see Sops of wine, under Sop

— Webster Dictionary

U

U

the twenty-first letter of the English alphabet, is a cursive form of the letter V, with which it was formerly used interchangeably, both letters being then used both as vowels and consonants. U and V are now, however, differentiated, U being used only as a vowel or semivowel, and V only as a consonant. The true primary vowel sound of U, in Anglo-Saxon, was the sound which it still retains in most of the languages of Europe, that of long oo, as in tool, and short oo, as in wood, answering to the French ou in tour. Etymologically U is most closely related to o, y (vowel), w, and v; as in two, duet, dyad, twice; top, tuft; sop, sup; auspice, aviary. See V, also O and Y

— Webster Dictionary

Oxtail soup

Oxtail soup

Oxtail soup is made with beef tails. The use of the word "ox" in this context is a legacy of nomenclature; no specialized stock of beef animals are used. It is believed by some that oxtail soup was invented in Spitalfields in London in the seventeenth century by French Huguenot and Flemish immigrants, from the tails of animals. Different versions of oxtail soup exist: Korean, Chinese, a fried/barbecued oxtail combined with soup variation which is a popular dish in Indonesia where it is called as sop buntut. An ethnic dish of the American South which traces its lineage back to the pre-revolutionary war era, and a thick, rich, gravy-like soup popular in the United Kingdom since the 18th century. Creole oxtail soup is made from a tomato base with oxtails, potatoes, green beans, corn, mirepoix, garlic, and herbs and spices.

— Freebase

Gruel

Gruel

Gruel is a type of food consisting of some type of cereal—oat, wheat or rye flour, or rice—boiled in water or milk. It is a thinner version of porridge that may be more often drunk than eaten and may not need to be cooked. Historically, gruel—often made from millet, hemp or barley, or in hard times, of chestnut flour and even the less tannic acorns of some oaks—has been a staple of the Western diet, especially for peasants. The importance of gruel as a form of sustenance is especially noted for invalids and for recently weaned children. Hot malted milk is a form of gruel, although manufacturers like Ovaltine and Horlicks avoid calling it gruel, due to the negative associations attached to the word through popular culture like Charles Dickens' novel Oliver Twist. From a literary, bourgeois, or modern point of view, gruel has often been associated with poverty. Gruel is a colloquial expression of any watery or liquidy food that is of unknown character, e.g., pea soup; soup is derived from sop, the slice of bread which was soaked with broth or thin gruel.

— Freebase

Red-eye gravy

Red-eye gravy

Red-eye gravy is a thin sauce often seen in the cuisine of the Southern United States and associated with the country ham of that region. Other names for this sauce include poor man's gravy, bird-eye gravy, bottom sop and red ham gravy. The gravy is made from the drippings of pan-fried country ham, bacon, or other pork, typically mixed with black coffee. The same drippings, when mixed with flour, make the flavoring for Sawmill gravy. Red-eye gravy is often served over ham, cornbread, grits, or biscuits. A common practice is to dip the inner sides of a split biscuit into the gravy in order to add flavor and keep the biscuit from being too dry when a piece of country ham is added between the two halves: the Southern "ham biscuit". Another popular way to serve red-eye gravy, especially in parts of Alabama, is with mustard or ketchup mixed in with the gravy. Biscuits are then dipped in the gravy. In Louisiana, Cajun-style gravy is often made with a roast beef instead of ham. Black coffee is always used, and it is frequently a strongly brewed chicory coffee. The gravy is ladled over the meat on a bed of rice, staining the rice a dark brown color. Often, French bread and some kind of beans are also served as a side, like butter beans, lima beans, or peas.

— Freebase

Annonacin

Annonacin

Annonacin is a chemical found in some fruits such as the custard apple and Sour Sop. It is a member of the class of compounds known as acetogenins. Recent reports have shown that regular consumption in rats caused brain lesions consistent with Parkinson's disease. Along with other acetogenins, annonacin is reported to block mitochondrial complex I, which is responsible for the conversion of NADH to NAD+ and the build-up of a proton gradient over the mitochondrial inner membrane. This effectively disables a cell's ability to generate ATP via an oxidative pathway, ultimately forcing a cell into apoptosis or necrosis.

— Freebase

standard operating procedure

standard operating procedure

A set of instructions covering those features of operations which lend themselves to a definite or standardized procedure without loss of effectiveness. The procedure is applicable unless ordered otherwise. Also called SOP.

— Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms

Ba`brius

Ba`brius

or Gabrius, a Greek poet of uncertain date; turned the fables of Æsop and of others into verse, with alterations.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Henryson, Robert

Henryson, Robert

an early Scottish poet, flourished in the 15th century; most of his life was spent as a schoolmaster in Dunfermline; his chief works, which are full of pathos, humour, and a fine descriptive power, include "Testament of Cresseid," a continuation of Chaucer's tale, "Robene and Makyne," the earliest Scottish pastoral, a metrical version of some of "Æsop's Fables," and the story of "Orpheus and Eurydice."

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Jâtaka

Jâtaka

a Pâli collection of stories recounting 550 previous "births" of the Buddha, the earliest collection of popular tales, and the ultimate source of many of Æsop's fables and Western folk-lore legends.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Phædrus

Phædrus

a Latin fabulist, of the age of Augustus, born in Macedonia, and settled in Rome; originally a slave, was manumitted by Augustus; his fables, 97 in number, were written in verse, and are mostly translations from Æsop, the best of them such as keep closely to the original.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Progress of the Species Magazines

Progress of the Species Magazines

Carlyle's name for the literature of the day which does nothing to help the progress in question, but keeps idly boasting of the fact, taking all the credit to itself, like Æsop's fly on the axle of the careering chariot soliloquising, "What a dust I raise!"

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Tenniel, John

Tenniel, John

a celebrated cartoonist who, since 1864, has week by week drawn the chief political cartoon in Punch, the merits of which are too well known to need comment; illustrations to "Æsop's Fables," "Ingoldsby Legends," "Alice in Wonderland," and other works, reveal the grace and delicacy of his workmanship; born in London, and practically a self-taught artist; joined the staff of Punch in 1851; was knighted in 1893; b. 1820.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia


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