Definitions containing æ`qui

We've found 18 definitions:

Qui tam

Qui tam

In common law, a writ of qui tam is a writ whereby a private individual who assists a prosecution can receive all or part of any penalty imposed. Its name is an abbreviation of the Latin phrase qui tam pro domino rege quam pro se ipso in hac parte sequitur, meaning "[he] who sues in this matter for the king as [well as] for himself." A more literal translation would be "who as much for [our] lord the king as for himself in this action pursues" or "follows." The writ fell into disuse in England and Wales following the Common Informers Act 1951 but, as of 2010, remains current in the United States under the False Claims Act, 31 U.S.C. § 3729 et seq., which allows a private individual, or "whistleblower," with knowledge of past or present fraud committed against the federal government to bring suit on its behalf. There are also qui tam provisions in 18 U.S.C. § 962 regarding arming vessels against friendly nations, 25 U.S.C. § 201 regarding violating Indian protection laws, 46a U.S.C. 723 regarding the removal of undersea treasure from the Florida coast to foreign nations, and 35 U.S.C. § 292 regarding false marking. In February 2011, the qui tam provision regarding false marking was held to be unconstitutional by a U.S. District Court, and in September of that year, the enactment of the Leahy-Smith America Invents Act effectively removed qui tam remedies from § 292.

— Freebase

Laetare Sunday

Laetare Sunday

Laetare Sunday, so called from the incipit of the Introit at Mass, "Laetare Jerusalem", is a name often used to denote the fourth Sunday of the season of Lent in the Christian liturgical calendar. This Sunday is also known as Mothering Sunday, Refreshment Sunday, Mid-Lent Sunday, and Rose Sunday. The term "Laetare Sunday" is used predominantly, though not exclusively, by Roman Catholics and some Anglicans. The word translates from the Latin laetare, singular imperative of laetari to rejoice. The full Introit reads: «Laetare Jerusalem: et conventum facite omnes qui diligitis eam: gaudete cum laetitia, qui in tristitia fuistis: ut exsultetis,et satiemini ab uberibus consolationis vestrae. Psalm: Laetatus sum in his quae dicta sunt mihi: in domum Domini ibimus.» «Rejoice, O Jerusalem: and come together all you that love her: rejoice with joy, you that have been in sorrow: that you may exult, and be filled from the breasts of your consolation. Psalm: I rejoiced when they said to me: "we shall go into God's House!"

— Freebase

Honi soit qui mal y pense

Honi soit qui mal y pense

"Honi soit qui mal y pense" is an Anglo-Norman phrase, loosely meaning: "Shamed be he who thinks evil of it." Archaic spellings include "Honi soit quy mal y pense," and "Hony soyt qe mal y pense," and various other phoneticizations. It is the motto of the British chivalric Order of the Garter. In Modern French it is rendered as "Honni soit qui mal y pense". It is also written at the end of the manuscript Sir Gawain and the Green Knight but it appears to have been a later addition. Its literal translation from Old French is "Shame be to him who thinks evil of it." It is sometimes re-interpreted as "Evil be to him who evil thinks."

— Freebase

Cincinnatus, Lucius Quinctius

Cincinnatus, Lucius Quinctius

an old hero of the Roman republic, distinguished for the simplicity and austerity of his manners; was consul in 460 B.C., and on the defeat of a Roman army by the Æqui, called to the dictatorship from the plough, to which he returned on the defeat of the Æqui; he was summoned to fill the same post a second time, when he was 80, on the occasion of the conspiracy of Mælius, with the like success.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Quorum

Quorum

A quorum is the minimum number of members of a deliberative assembly necessary to conduct the business of that group. According to Robert's Rules of Order Newly Revised, the "requirement for a quorum is protection against totally unrepresentative action in the name of the body by an unduly small number of persons." The term quorum is from a Middle English wording of the commission formerly issued to justices of the peace, derived from Latin quorum, "of whom", genitive plural of qui = "who". As a result, quora as plural of quorum is not a valid Latin formation.

— Freebase

Legal burden of proof

Legal burden of proof

The burden of proof is the obligation resting on a party in a trial to produce the evidence that will shift the conclusion away from the default position to one's own position. The burden of proof is often associated with the Latin maxim semper necessitas probandi incumbit ei qui agit, the best translation of which seems to be: "the necessity of proof always lies with the person who lays charges." He who does not carry the burden of proof carries the benefit of assumption, meaning he needs no evidence to support his claim. Fulfilling the burden of proof effectively captures the benefit of assumption, passing the burden of proof off to another party.

— Freebase

Muscadet

Muscadet

Muscadet is a white French wine. It is made at the western end of the Loire Valley, near the city of Nantes in the Pays de la Loire region neighboring the Brittany Region. More Muscadet is produced than any other Loire wine. It is made from the Melon de Bourgogne grape, often referred to simply as melon. As a rule in France, Appellation d'origine contrôlée wines are named either after their growing region or after their variety. The name 'Muscadet' is therefore an exception. The name seems to refer to a characteristic of the wine produced by the melon grape variety: vin qui a un goût musqué - 'wine with a musk-like taste'. Though wine expert Tom Stevenson notes that Muscadet wines do not have much, if any, "muskiness" or Muscat-like flavors or aromas. The sole variety used to produce Muscadet, Melon de Bourgogne, was initially planted in the region sometime in or before the 17th century. It became dominant after a hard freeze in 1709 killed most of the region's vines. Dutch traders who were major actors in the local wine trade encouraged the planting of this variety and distilled much of the wine produced into eau de vie for sale in Northern Europe. The generic 'Muscadet' appellation, officially established in 1937, contains three regional sub-appellations: Muscadet-Sèvre et Maine, officially established in 1936, covering 20,305 acres with 21 villages in the Loire-Atlantique department and 2 in the Maine-et-Loire department. This appellation produces 80% of all Muscadets. Muscadet-Coteaux de la Loire, officially established in 1936, covering 467 acres with 24 villages spread across the Loire-Atlantique and Maine-et-Loire departments. Muscadet-Côtes de Grandlieu, officially established in 1994, benefits from the Grandlieu lake's microclimate. This sub appellation covers 717 hectares with 17 villages in the Loire-Atlantique department and 2 villages in the Vendée department.

— Freebase

Pacific Time

Pacific Time

Pacific Time was a weekly radio program that covered a wide range of Asian American, East Asian and Southeast Asian issues, including economics, language, politics, public policy, business, the arts and sports. With news bureaus in Bangkok, Beijing, and Tokyo, it was the only public radio program devoted to Asian-American issues. Produced by KQED in San Francisco, California, the show was syndicated by as many as 37 other public radio stations in markets around the United States. The show premiered in 2000 and was hosted by Nguyen Qui Duc until September, 2006, when Nguyen returned to Vietnam. After Nguyen's departure it was hosted by K. Oanh Ha. Citing financial difficulties, KQED cancelled the show and its last broadcast was October 11, 2007. At the time it was cancelled the program cost $500,000 per year to produce and had a weekly audience of 190,000.

— Freebase

Law of agency

Law of agency

The law of agency is an area of commercial law dealing with a set of contractual, quasi-contractual and non-contractual relationships that involve a person, called the agent, that is authorized to act on behalf of another to create a legal relationship with a third party. Succinctly, it may be referred to as the relationship between a principal and an agent whereby the principal, expressly or implicitly, authorizes the agent to work under his control and on his behalf. The agent is, thus, required to negotiate on behalf of the principal or bring him and third parties into contractual relationship. This branch of law separates and regulates the relationships between: ⁕Agents and principals; ⁕Agents and the third parties with whom they deal on their principals' behalf; and ⁕Principals and the third parties when the agents purport to deal on their behalf. The common law principle in operation is usually represented in the Latin phrase, qui facit per alium, facit per se, i.e. the one who acts through another, acts in his or her own interests and it is a parallel concept to vicarious liability and strict liability in which one person is held liable in criminal law or tort for the acts or omissions of another.

— Freebase

Watto

Watto

Watto is a fictional character in the Star Wars universe, featured in the films The Phantom Menace and Attack of the Clones. He is computer-generated and played by voice actor Andy Secombe. He is a mean-tempered, greedy Toydarian, and owner of a second-hand goods store in Mos Espa on the planet Tatooine. Among Watto's belongings are the slaves Shmi Skywalker and her son, Anakin. He acquires them after winning a podracing bet with Gardulla the Hutt, and he puts them both to work in his store. Anakin demonstrates an incredible aptitude for equipment repair, and Watto decides to profit from it by having the boy fix various broken equipment in the store. He eventually loses Anakin in a podracing bet with Qui-Gon Jinn when he bets on a competitor, Sebulba, who is defeated by Anakin.

— Freebase

Pangram

Pangram

A pangram or holoalphabetic sentence for a given alphabet is a sentence using every letter of the alphabet at least once. Pangrams have been used to display typefaces, test equipment, and develop skills in handwriting, calligraphy, and keyboarding. Some examples: ⁕English: "The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog". ⁕Polish: Pójdźże, kiń tę chmurność w głąb flaszy!. ⁕Dutch: Lynx c.q. vos prikt bh: dag zwemjuf!. ⁕German: Victor jagt zwölf Boxkämpfer quer über den großen Sylter Deich. ⁕French: Portez ce vieux whisky au juge blond qui fume. ⁕Turkish: Pijamalı hasta yağız şoföre çabucak güvendi. ⁕Spanish: El veloz murciélago hindú comía feliz cardillo y kiwi. La cigüeña tocaba el saxofón detrás del palenque de paja.. ⁕Swedish: Flygande bäckasiner söka hwila på mjuka tuvor. ⁕Russian: Любя, съешь щипцы, — вздохнёт мэр, — кайф жгуч.

— Freebase

Tonquin

Tonquin

The Tonquin was an American merchant ship involved with the Maritime Fur Trade of the early 19th Century. The ship was used by John Jacob Astor's Pacific Fur Company to establish fur trading outposts on the Northwest Coast of North America, including Fort Astoria at the mouth of the Columbia River. The 290-ton bark was destroyed and sunk at Clayoquot Sound a few weeks after leaving the Columbia River after a dispute with one of the groups who now make up the Tla-o-qui-aht, the indigenous people of the sound.

— Freebase

Qui ?

Qui ?

Qui ? is an album by French-Armenian singer Charles Aznavour. It was reissued as a CD on January 03, 1995 by EMI.

— Freebase

Derib

Derib

Derib is a Swiss francophone comics creator, one of the most famous in Europe, who started his professional career at Peyo's studio. He is probably best known for his Western comics such as the children's comic Yakari, and the more mature works Buddy Longway and Celui-qui-est-né-deux-fois. He draws in both a realistic style, and a cartoon style, with a fondness for drawing majestic landscapes of the American West. Many of his major works feature Sioux Native Americans in leading roles, and he has stated in interviews that he holds great admiration for the tribe.

— Freebase

Wallen

Wallen

Nawell Azzouz better known as Wallen is a French R&B singer. Her stage name comes from the rearrangement of the letters of her first name. She is in no way connected to the Wallen family of the United States. She was born in Saint-Denis, France, to Moroccan parents. As a child, she learned to play the violin and developed a passion for singing. She grew up listening to Funk, Hip hop, and R&B. She decided to become a singer after seeing Lauryn Hill in the movie Sister Act 2. Influenced by Aaliyah, Wallen made her recording debut with producer Sullee B Wax, and female rapper Sté Strass. In 1998, she was featured on the French RnB compilation "24 Carats", with "Je ne pleurs pas". Her first hit came with Celle Qui Dit Non with the rapper Shurik'n. In 2004, she released the album Avoir La Vie Devant Soi which includes the singles Bouge Cette Vie, L'Olivier, and Donna. She also sang with Usher on the French version of U Got It Bad. She is married to the French rapper Abd al Malik. With Abd al Malik and a few other rappers she created a group called Beni Snassen, who recorded an album under that name. In 2008, she released her 3rd album "Misericorde".

— Freebase

Zotto

Zotto

Zotto was the military leader of the Lombards in the Mezzogiorno. He is generally considered the founder of the Duchy of Benevento in 571 and its first duke : “…Fuit autem primus Langobardorum dux in Benevento nomine Zotto, qui in ea principatus est per curricula viginti annorum…”. With his troops, he penetrated Campania in August 570, confronting the Byzantines, whom he defeated consistently. He fixed his camp in Benevento, which became the capital of the new duchy. He tried to take Naples, but failed and had to lift the siege. As a duke he was quasi-independent, the north of the peninsula being under the control of the Lombard king Authari, who had little influence in the south. He finally submitted to royal authority in 589. He died in 591 and was succeeded by Arechis.

— Freebase

Délizia

Délizia

Délizia Adamo better known as Délizia is a singer of Italian-Belgian origin and sister of international singer Salvatore Adamo. She had her debut single "Prend le chien" at age 14. It was written by her brother Adamo. She followed courses in drawing and took part in a comedy production at Théatre de l'Ancre in Charleroi, where she interpreted Kataeiv's "Je veux voir Moscou". She also followed dramatic arts courses at the Royal Conservatory of Brussels. In 1974, Salvatore Adamo wrote her some songs releasing "Qui te retient" and "Aime-moi" as singles. The next year, she took part in some of his tours. In 1976 and again in 1978, she participated in pre-selections for the Belgian entry to Eurovision Song Contest but without success. She had a comeback in 1982 with "Une première danse", a song co-written by Michel Legrand and Charles Aznavour.

— Freebase

Garter, the most noble Order of the

Garter, the most noble Order of the

a celebrated order of knighthood instituted in 1344 by King Edward III.; the original number of the knights was 26, of whom the sovereign was head; but this number has been increased by extending the honour to descendants of George I., II., and III., and also to distinguished foreigners; it is the highest order of knighthood, and is designated K.G.; the insignia of the order includes surcoat, mantle, star, &c., but the knights are chiefly distinguished by a garter of blue velvet worn on the left leg below the knee, and bearing the inscription in gold letters Honi soit qui mal y pense, "Evil be to him that evil thinks"; election to the order lies with the sovereign.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia


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