Definitions containing æ`olus

We've found 11 definitions:

Aulus

Aulus

Aulus is a Latin praenomen, or personal name, which was common throughout Roman history from the earliest times to the end of the Western Empire in the fifth century. The feminine form is Aula. An alternative pronunciation leads to the variant spellings Olus or Ollus and Olla. Aulus was widely used by both patrician and plebeian gentes. The name gave rise to the patronymic gens Aulia, and perhaps also to gens Avilia and the cognomen Avitus. The name was usually abbreviated A., but occasionally Av. or Avl. For most of Roman history, Aulus was one of the ten most common praenomina, being less common than Titus, the sixth most common praenomen, and comparable in frequency to Gnaeus, Spurius, and Sextus.

— Freebase

Alcy`one

Alcy`one

daughter of Æolus, who threw herself into the sea after her husband, who had perished in shipwreck, and was changed into the kingfisher.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Eolus

Eolus

. See Æolus.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Alveolar

Alveolar

al′ve-o-lar, adj. (anat.) of or belonging to the sockets of the teeth, as the alveolar arch, the part of the upper jaw in which the teeth are placed—also Al′veolary.—n. Al′veole, the hollow or socket of a tooth—more common Alvē′olus.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Flageolet

Flageolet

flaj′o-let, n. the modern form of the old flute-à-bec, or straight flute, the simplest kind of which is the tin whistle with six holes. [Fr., dim. of O. Fr. flageol, flajol, a pipe; not through a supposed Low L. flautīolus—from flauta, a flute.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Nucleus

Nucleus

nū′klē-us, n. the central mass round which matter gathers: (astron.) the head of a comet:—pl. Nuclei (nū′klē-ī).adjs. Nū′clēal, Nū′clēar, pertaining to a nucleus.—v.t. Nū′clēāte, to gather into or around a nucleus.—adjs. Nū′clēate, -d, having a nucleus; Nū′clēiform.—ns. Nū′clēin, a colourless amorphous proteid, a constituent of cell-nuclei; Nū′cleobranch, one of an order of molluscs which have the gills packed in the shell along with the heart:—pl. Nucleobranchiă′ta; Nū′clēōle, a little nucleus: a nucleus within a nucleus—also Nuclē′olus:—pl. Nuclē′oli. [L.,—nux, nucis, a nut.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Obol

Obol

ob′ol, n. in ancient Greece, a small coin, worth rather more than three-halfpence: also a weight, the sixth part of a drachma—also Ob′olus:—pl. Ob′oli (ī).—adj. Ob′olary, consisting of obols: extremely poor. [Gr. obelos, a spit.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Paranucleus

Paranucleus

par-a-nū′klē-us, n. (biol.) an accessory nucleus in some protozoans.—adjs. Paranū′clear, Paranū′cleate.—n. Paranūclē′olus, a mass of substance extruded from the nucleus, in pollen and spore mother-cells before division.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Petiole

Petiole

pet′i-ōl, n. the stalk which joins a leaf to the twig or branch: a footstalk—also Petī′olus.—adjs. Pet′iolar, -y, pertaining to, or growing upon, a petiole; Pet′iolāte, -d, Pet′ioled, growing on a petiole.—n. Pet′iolule, a little or partial petiole. [Fr.,—L. petiolus, a little foot—pes, pedis, a foot.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Pileus

Pileus

pil′ē-us, n. a Roman conical cap: (bot.) the summit of the stipe bearing the hymenium in some fungi:—pl. Pil′ei (-ī).—adjs. Pil′ēate, -d, fitted with a cap: having the form of a cap or hat; Pil′ēiform.—n. Pilē′olus, a little pileus:—pl. Pilē′oli. [L. pileatuspileus, a cap of felt.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Radiate

Radiate

rā′di-āt, v.i. to emit rays of light: to shine: to proceed in direct lines from any point or surface.—v.t. to send out in rays: to furnish with rays.—adjs. Rā′diāte, -d, formed of rays diverging from a centre: (bot.) consisting of a disc in which the florets are tubular: (min.) having crystals diverging from a centre: belonging to the Radiata: in coins, represented with rays proceeding from a centre, as a head or bust.—adv. Rā′diately, in a radiate manner: with radiation from a centre.—adj. Rādiā′tiform, having the appearance of being radiate.—adv. Rā′diatingly.—n. Rādiā′tion, act of radiating: the emission and diffusion of rays of light or heat.—adj. Rā′diative.—n. Rā′diator, a body which radiates or emits rays of light or heat: a part of a heating apparatus for a room.—adj. Rā′diatory.—ns. Rādioflagell′ata, marine animalcules; Rā′diograph, an instrument by which solar radiation is measured.—adj. Rādiolā′rian, pertaining to the ooze at the bottom of the sea, composed of the shells of Radiolā′rians, a class of marine rhizopod Protozoa, so called from their having thread-like processes of living matter radiating outwards on all sides.—ns. Rādī′olus, one of the barbules of the main shaft of a feather; Rādiom′eter, an instrument consisting of four horizontal arms of very fine glass, carefully poised so as to revolve easily on a point, the whole contained in a glass vessel almost exhausted of air—the arms move round under light or heat, more or less swiftly according to the strength of the rays.—adj. Rādiomet′ric.—ns. Rādiomicrom′eter, an instrument for measuring very small amounts of heat; Rā′diophone, an instrument for producing or transmitting sound by heat-rays.—adj. Rādiophon′ic.—ns. Rādiophon′ics, Rā′diophony, the production of sound by radiant heat; Rā′dium, a rare element whose radiations act upon photographic plates and have properties like the X-rays.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary