Definitions containing à la king

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Billie Jean King

Billie Jean King

Billie Jean King is an American former World No. 1 professional tennis player. King won 39 Grand Slam titles, including 12 singles, 16 women's doubles, and 11 mixed doubles titles. King won the singles title at the inaugural WTA Tour Championships. King often represented the United States in the Federation Cup and the Wightman Cup. She was a member of the victorious United States team in seven Federation Cups and nine Wightman Cups. For three years, King was the United States' captain in the Federation Cup. King is an advocate for sexual equality. She won the Battle of the Sexes tennis match against Bobby Riggs in 1973 and was the founder of the Women's Tennis Association, World TeamTennis, and the Women's Sports Foundation. King was inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame in 1987. The Fed Cup Award of Excellence was bestowed on King in 2010. In 1972, King was the joint winner, with John Wooden, of the Sports Illustrated Sportsman of the Year award and was one of the Time Persons of the Year in 1975. King has also received the Presidential Medal of Freedom and was given the Sunday Times Sportswoman of the year lifetime achievement award. King was inducted into the National Women's Hall of Fame in 1990, and in 2006, the USTA National Tennis Center in New York City was renamed the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center.

— Freebase

King

King

one who, or that which, holds a supreme position or rank; a chief among competitors; as, a railroad king; a money king; the king of the lobby; the king of beasts

— Webster Dictionary

Trojan War

Trojan War

Decade long war waged by Sparta, under king Agamemnon, against the Trojans, to avenge the abduction of Helen, wife of king Menelaus, by Paris, son of Trojan king Priam; ended in the destruction of Troy.

— Wiktionary

big slick

big slick

An ace and a king as a starting hand in Texas hold 'em. (Originally used to denote only an ace and a king of the same suit, the term now includes any ace and king.)

— Wiktionary

Sölve

Sölve

Sölve was a sea-king who conquered Sweden by burning the Swedish king Östen to death inside his hall. The Heimskringla relates that he was the son Högne of Nærøy, and that he had his home in Jutland. He pillaged in the Baltic Sea and at night they made shore in the hundred of Lofond/Lovund where they surrounded a house and set it on fire killing everybody inside. In the house there was a feast where the Swedish king Östen was invited. Then Sölve and his men arrived in Sigtuna and declared that the Swedes had to accept him as king. The Swedes refused and fought Sölve for eleven days until they lost. Sölve then ruled Sweden until the Swedes rebelled and killed him. Historia Norwegiae only relates that the Geats burnt Östen and his people to death inside his house. Sölvi also appears in Half's saga, of which there is a version from the year 1300. This saga relates that Sölvi was the son of Högne the rich of Nærøy fyrir Naumundalsminni in Norway and that he was the brother of Hild the Slender. Sölvi's brother-in-law, Hjorleiv, was the king of Hordaland and Rogaland and Hjorleiv killed Hreidar, the king of Zealand. Then Hjorleiv put Sölvi as the jarl of Zealand. Later in the saga, Sölvi is no longer the jarl of Zealand, but the king of Sweden. Hjorleiv had a son named Half, and after the Norwegian king Asmund had killed Half, a couple of his champions go to Sweden and king Sölvi.

— Freebase

Dog king

Dog king

The Dog king is a Scandinavian tradition which appears in several Scandinavian sources: Chronicon Lethrense, Annals of Lund, Gesta Danorum, Heimskringla, Hversu Noregr byggðist and probably also in Skáldatal. The Chronicon Lethrense and Annals of Lund tell that on the death of the 6th century Danish king Halga, the Swedish King Eadgils sent a small dog to the Danes to take as their king but warned that whoever told him of the death of the dog would lose his life. One day, when larger dogs were fighting, the small dog sprang to the floor among them and was torn to death. Then Læ, the giant of Læsø, gave some advice on the matter to his herdsman Snow. Snow went to the Swedish king's court and by riddling talk eventually got the king himself to say that the dog was dead. Snow was then appointed king of Denmark in place of the dog. Snow was a vicious, oppressive, and dishonest king. Snow sent his servant named Roth 'Red', whom he disliked, to the giant Læ to ask about how Snow will die, intending that Læ would kill Roth who would be unable to pass his tests. Roth passed and Læ gave Roth two gloves to take to Snow in answer. Snow put them on in an assembly and lice suddenly attacked him and ate him to death. Thereupon Halga's son Hrólfr kraki was made king.

— Freebase

Mufasa

Mufasa

Mufasa was one of the secondary protagonists in the Lion King franchise. He was Simba's father, Sarabi's husband, Scar's older brother, Nala's father-in-law, Kiara and Kopa's grandfather, Ahadi's oldest son, and the former King of Pride Rock. In The Lion King, Mufasa and his mate Sarabi give birth to baby Simba, who grows up to be a spunky cub who can't wait to be king of Pride Rock. So Mufasa teaches his son about being king and shows him the whole kingdom. Eventually, Mufasa saves Simba and Nala from Shenzi, Banzai and Ed after being alerted by Zazu. Mufasa scolds Simba for almost getting him and Nala killed, but Simba said he was only trying to be brave like him; but Mufasa reveals he's only brave when he has to be. One day, Mufasa's younger brother Scar plots to kill him and Simba, with help from the hyenas. After giving the signal to Shenzi, Banzai and Ed, they cause a wildebeest stampede, in which Simba is almost killed, but is saved in time by Mufasa, who was alerted by Scar. With Simba watching on a safe hill, Mufasa struggles to climb his way back up. He sees Scar at the top and tells him to save him. But Scar grabs Mufasa with his claws (thus making him roar in pain), and with a wicked smile, Scar whispers, "Long live the king!". Horrified, Mufasa realizes Scar's true feelings toward him and he lets go of his brother, sending him flying into the stampede, thus getting trampled and killed. When Simba goes down to help his dad, he soon realizes he's dead and begins to cry. Scar shows up and tricks Simba into believing he caused his father's death and told him to run away and never return. He then sends Shenzi, Banzai and Ed to kill Simba, to which they fail, unbeknownst to Scar. Many years pass, and Simba is now an adult and afraid to go back home and confront Scar. But eventually, the ghost of Mufasa appears in the night sky and gives Simba confindence and tells him to remember who he is. At the end, Simba finally does go back to the Pride Lands and defeats Scar, taking his rightful place as the new king of Pride Rock and avenging his dad. In The Lion King II: Simba's Pride, Mufasa's ghost appears at the end to give Kiara and Kovu his blessing. At the end, Mufasa tells Simba that he's proud of him after Kiara and Kovu get married. In The Lion King 1½, we see Mufasa's story from Timon and Pumbaa's point of view, and they riff on Mufasa's scenes like how Mike, Joel, and the Bots used to do in Mystery Science Theater 3000. He also appeared as a guest in House of Mouse. Mufasa's ghost appears again in Kingdom Hearts II to once again give Simba confidence, and he has a flashback where he remembers what Mufasa told him about the stars when he was a kid. His character was similar to another character James Earl Jones played in Coming to America. Mufasa was voiced by James Earl Jones and by Keith David in House of Mouse.

— Freebase

Castling

Castling

Castling is a special move in the game of chess involving the king and either of the original rooks of the same color. It is the only move in chess in which a player moves two pieces at the same time. Castling consists of moving the king two squares towards a rook on the player's first rank, then moving the rook onto the square over which the king crossed. Castling can only be done if the king has never moved, the rook involved has never moved, the squares between the king and the rook involved are not occupied, the king is not in check, and the king does not cross over or end on a square in which it would be in check. Castling is one of the rules of chess and is technically a king move. The notation for castling, in both the descriptive and the algebraic systems, is 0-0 with the kingside rook and 0-0-0 with the queenside rook. Castling on the kingside is sometimes called castling short and castling on the queenside is called castling long; the difference being based on whether the rook moves a short distance or a long distance. Castling was added to European chess in the 14th or 15th century and did not develop into its present form until the 17th century. The Asian versions of chess do not have such a move.

— Freebase

Castle

Castle

to move the castle to the square next to king, and then the king around the castle to the square next beyond it, for the purpose of covering the king

— Webster Dictionary

Check

Check

a word of warning denoting that the king is in danger; such a menace of a player's king by an adversary's move as would, if it were any other piece, expose it to immediate capture. A king so menaced is said to be in check, and must be made safe at the next move

— Webster Dictionary

Kingly

Kingly

belonging to, suitable to, or becoming, a king; characteristic of, resembling, a king; directed or administered by a king; monarchical; royal; sovereign; regal; august; noble; grand

— Webster Dictionary

Oedipus

Oedipus

Oedipus was a mythical Greek king of Thebes. A tragic hero in Greek mythology, Oedipus fulfilled a prophecy that said he would kill his father, and thereby bring disaster on his city and family. The story of Oedipus is the subject of Sophocles's tragedy Oedipus the King, which was followed by Oedipus at Colonus and then Antigone. Together, these plays make up Sophocles's three Theban plays. Oedipus represents two enduring themes of Greek myth and drama: the flawed nature of humanity and an individual's powerlessness against the course of destiny in a harsh universe. Oedipus was born to King Laius and Queen Jocasta. In the most well-known version of the myth, Laius wished to thwart a prophecy saying that his child would grow up to murder his father. Thus, he fastened the infant's feet together with a large pin and left him to die on a mountainside. The baby was found on Kithairon by shepherds and raised by King Polybus and Queen Merope in the city of Corinth. Oedipus learned from the oracle at Delphi of the prophecy, but believing he was fated to murder Polybus and marry Merope he left Corinth. Heading to Thebes, Oedipus met an older man in a chariot coming the other way on a narrow road. The two quarreled over who should give way, which resulted in Oedipus killing the stranger and continuing on to Thebes. He found that the king of the city had been recently killed and that the city was at the mercy of the Sphinx. Oedipus answered the monster's riddle correctly, defeating it and winning the throne of the dead king and the hand in marriage of the king's widow, his mother, Jocasta.

— Freebase

Cyrus the Great

Cyrus the Great

Cyrus II of Persia, commonly known as Cyrus the Great, also known as Cyrus the Elder, was the founder of the Achaemenid Empire. Under his rule, the empire embraced all the previous civilized states of the ancient Near East, expanded vastly and eventually conquered most of Southwest Asia and much of Central Asia and the Caucasus. From the Mediterranean sea and Hellespont in the west to the Indus River in the east, Cyrus the Great created the largest empire the world had yet seen. His regal titles in full were The Great King, King of Persia, King of Anshan, King of Media, King of Babylon, King of Sumer and Akkad, King of the four corners of the World. He also pronounced what some consider to be one of the first historically important declarations of human rights via the Cyrus Cylinder sometime between 539 and 530 BC. The reign of Cyrus the Great lasted between 29 and 31 years. Cyrus built his empire by conquering first the Median Empire, then the Lydian Empire and eventually the Neo-Babylonian Empire. Either before or after Babylon, he led an expedition into central Asia, which resulted in major campaigns that were described as having brought "into subjection every nation without exception". Cyrus did not venture into Egypt, as he himself died in battle, fighting the Massagetae along the Syr Darya in December 530 BC. He was succeeded by his son, Cambyses II, who managed to add to the empire by conquering Egypt, Nubia, and Cyrenaica during his short rule.

— Freebase

Lit de justice

Lit de justice

In France under the Ancien Régime, the lit de justice was a particular formal session of the Parlement of Paris, under the presidency of the king, for the compulsory registration of the royal edicts. It was named thus because, rather than sit on a throne, the king would sit in an impromptu bed made up of five cushions. In the Middle Ages, not every appearance of the King of France in parlement occasioned a formal lit de justice. It was the custom of Philip IV and his three sons, of Charles V, of Charles VI, and of Louis XII to attend sessions of various parlements regularly. A lit de justice in Paris was normally held in the Grand Chambre du Parlement of the royal palace on the Île de la Cité, which remains the Palais de Justice even today. The king, fresh from his devotions in Sainte-Chapelle, would enter, accompanied by his chancellor, the princes of the blood, dukes and peers, cardinals and marshals, and take his place upon the cushions on a dais under a canopy of estate in a corner of the chamber. Five cushions formed the lit: the king sat on one, another formed a back, two more supported his arms and a cushion lay under his feet. Peers and prelates were ranged on benches at his right and left. Before the king a large space was kept empty, that the king might discuss matters privately. To preserve order, it was forbidden for anyone to leave his seat or approach the lit without being called.

— Freebase

Æthelred the Unready

Æthelred the Unready

Æthelred the Unready, or Æthelred II, was king of England. He was son of King Edgar and Queen Ælfthryth and was only about ten years old when his half-brother Edward was murdered. Æthelred was not personally suspected of participation, but as the murder was committed at Corfe Castle by the attendants of Ælfthryth, it made it more difficult for the new king to rally the nation against the military raids by Danes, especially as the legend of St Edward the Martyr grew. From 991 onwards, Æthelred paid tribute, or Danegeld, to the Danish King. In 1002, Æthelred ordered a massacre of Danish settlers. In 1003, King Sweyn invaded England, and in 1013, Æthelred fled to Normandy and was replaced by Sweyn, who was also king of Denmark. Æthelred returned as king, however, after Sweyn died in 1014. "Unready" is a mistranslation of Old English unræd —a twist on his name "Æthelred", meaning noble-counsel. A better translation would be ill-advised.

— Freebase

Remonstrances

Remonstrances

The Remonstrances were a set of complaints presented by a group of nobles in 1297, against the government of King Edward I of England. Foremost among the nobles were Roger Bigod, Earl of Norfolk, Marshal of England, and Humphrey de Bohun, Earl of Hereford, Constable of England. The complaints had their background in the heavy burden of taxation caused by King Edward's extensive warfare in the mid-1290s. In 1297 Edward was planning a campaign to protect his possessions in Flanders, and it was the opinion of many that this war was unnecessary and risky, in a time when the situation in both Wales and Scotland was threatening. Both Bohun and Bigod refused to serve in the campaign, claiming it was unclear where the expedition was going. Bigod argued in parliament that the earls' military obligation only extended to service alongside the king; if the king intended to sail to Flanders, he could not send his subjects to Gascony. The king nevertheless went on with the planned campaign, and demanded a grant of taxation from his subjects. This became the opposition's main grievance, since they claimed the tax was not raised in the proper manner. Rather than seeking the consent of the community of the realm in parliament, the king had been granted the tax by a small number of his closest supporters. As the king was on the coast preparing for the expedition, Bigod and Bohun turned up at the Exchequer demanding a stop to the collection of the tax, and at the same time presented the Remonstrances.

— Freebase

King Solarman

King Solarman

King Solarman is the premier provider of both residential and commerical solar panels and solar inverters and solar finance. Our wide variety of products are applicable and efficient in any application, from the family home, to some of the largest corporate campuses in the world and the utility company. We offer state-of-the-art products from the industries most dynamic and advanced manufacturers; all while being able to pass significant savings on to our customers. We consistently offer the lowest per watt price for our solar panels, and are on a mission to make solar a reality in a number of never-realized applications.King Solarman has the great relationship with manufactures and the financial services. It also has over 3,000 installers relationship nationwide. Warehoused in 48900 Milmont Dr. Fremont, CA. We have tons of solar products in LA and SF bay area. Offers the most state-of-art Logistics support and package.

— CrunchBase

king

king

To crown king, to make (a person) king.

— Wiktionary

opposition

opposition

A position in which the player on the move must yield with his king allowing his opponent to advance with his own king.

— Wiktionary

ambassador

ambassador

A trick to duck some ignorant fellow or landsman, frequently played on board ships in the warm latitudes. It is thus managed: A large tub is filled with water, and two stools placed on each side of it. Over the whole is thrown a tarpaulin, or old sail: this is kept tight by two persons, who are to represent the king and queen of a foreign country, and are seated on the stools. The person intended to be ducked plays the Ambassador, and after repeating a ridiculous speech dictated to him, is led in great form up to the throne, and seated between the king and queen, who rising suddenly as soon as he is seated, he falls backwards into the tub of water. (1811 Dictionary of Vulgar Tongue)

— Wiktionary

thane

thane

in Anglo-Saxon England, a man holding lands from the king, or from a superior in rank. There were two orders, the king's thanes, who attended the kings in their courts and held lands immediately of them, and the ordinary thanes, who were lords of manors and who had particular jurisdiction within their limits. After the Norman Conquest, this title was no longer used, and baron took its place.

— Wiktionary

honour

honour

In bridge, an ace, king, queen, jack, or ten especially of the trump suit. In some other games, an ace, king, queen or jack.

— Wiktionary

Eochaid Su00E1lbuide

Eochaid Su00E1lbuide

Irish mythology. The king of Ulster prior to the events of the Ulster Cycle in Irish mythology. Father of Ness. He was deposed as High King by Eochaid Feidlech.

— Wiktionary

Fergus mac Ru00F3ich

Fergus mac Ru00F3ich

The former king of Ulster during the events of the Ulster Cycle, who was ticked out of kingship by Ness, who made her 7-year-old son Conchobar mac Nessa replace him as king. The foster father of Cormac Cond Longas.

— Wiktionary

Andromeda

Andromeda

The daughter of Cepheus and Cassiopeia, king and queen of Eritrea, rescued from her sacrifice to a sea monster by Perseus who married her; mother of Perseus, ancient king of Persia.

— Wiktionary

King

King

, originally a nickname for someone who either acted as if he were a king or had worked in the king's household.

— Wiktionary

Eochaid Feidlech

Eochaid Feidlech

The High King of Ireland in the Ulster Cycle of Irish mythology who deposed the former High King Fachtna Fu00E1thach at the battle of Battle of Leitir Ruadh.

— Wiktionary

regency

regency

A system of government that substitutes for the reign of a king or queen when that king or queen becomes unable to rule.

— Wiktionary

Baldwin

Baldwin

King Baldwin IV, ruler of the Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem before the takeover of Saladin in 1187. He died in 1185 of complications of the socially unacceptable disease of leprosy. Also known as the leper king.

— Wiktionary

kingship

kingship

The dignity, rank or office of a king; the state of being a king.

— Wiktionary

discovered check

discovered check

A situation in a game of chess where the opponent's king is put in check, not by the piece that was just moved but by one whose line of sight to the king was opened by the move.

— Wiktionary

revealed check

revealed check

A situation in a game of chess where the opponent's king is put in check, not by the piece that was just moved but by one whose line of sight to the king was opened by the move.

— Wiktionary

Alaska hand

Alaska hand

A king and a three as a starting hand in Texas hold 'em (see king crab)

— Wiktionary

lord protector

lord protector

Title of the regent for the king(dom) of England and/or king(dom) of Scotland.

— Wiktionary

poet laureate

poet laureate

Formerly, an officer of the king's household, whose business was to compose an ode annually for the king's birthday, and other suitable occasions; now, a poet officially distinguished by such honorary title, the office being a sinecure. It is said this title was first given in the time of Edward IV

— Wiktionary

kinglet

kinglet

A petty king; a king ruling over a small or unimportant territory.

— Wiktionary

Williamite

Williamite

A follower of King William III of England who deposed King James II in the .

— Wiktionary

Zechariah of Israel

Zechariah of Israel

Zechariah was a king of the northern Israelite Kingdom of Israel, and son of Jeroboam II. Zechariah became king of Israel in Samaria in the thirty-eighth year of Azariah, king of Judah. William F. Albright has dated his reign to 746 BC – 745 BC, while E. R. Thiele offers the dates 753 BC – 752 BC. The account of his reign is briefly told in 2 Kings. Zachariah ruled Israel for only six months before Shallum murdered him and took the throne. This ended the dynasty of Jehu after four generations of his descendants, fulfilling the prophecy in 2 Kings 10:30. However, more recent research done by Walter R. Dolen and Floyd N. Jones suggests that Zachariah may have in fact reigned 12 years instead of six months. The argument in favor of this is a timeline of the Jewish kingdoms based on the Southern Kingdom of Judah as a reference point instead of the Northern Kingdom of Israel. Basing the research off of Judah rather than Israel results in a complete reworking of the Jewish Kingdom's chronology that upholds the Biblical narrative while making it significantly easier to reconcile seeming contradictions in Kings and Chronicles. Concerning Zachariah of Israel, the verse that refers to the figure of six months is absent a single, but very important word. Began. In this case, 2nd Kings 15:8 simply says that Zachariah reigned for six months in the 38th year of Azariah of Judah. Absent is the word began. All other references to a king's reign include that word. Example: "In the fifteenth year of Amaziah the son of Joash king of Judah, Jeroboam the son of Joash king of Israel BEGAN to reign in Samaria". 2 Kings 14:23. This nearly imperceptible difference could mean a great deal, indicating that Zachariah did not begin reigning in the 38th year of Azariah, but simply that he reigned 6 months into the 38th year of Azariah, with these months being the last six of what is in reality a much longer reign. Under this chronological scheme, Zachariah thus most likely reigned over Israel from 784-772 BC.

— Freebase

King Charles Spaniel

King Charles Spaniel

The King Charles Spaniel is a small dog breed of the spaniel type. In 1903, the Kennel Club combined four separate toy spaniel breeds under this single title. The other varieties merged into this breed were the Blenheim, Ruby and Prince Charles Spaniels, each of which contributed one of the four colours available in the breed. Thought to have originated in the Far East, toy spaniels were first seen in Europe during the 16th century. They were made famous by their association with King Charles II of England and have been linked with English royalty since the time of Queen Mary I. Members of the breed have been owned by Grand Duchess Anastasia Nikolaevna of Russia, Queen Victoria and Queen Elizabeth II. The King Charles Spaniel and the other types of toy spaniels were crossbred with the Pug in the early 19th century to reduce the size of the nose, as was the style of the day. The 20th century saw attempts to restore lines of King Charles Spaniels to the breed of Charles II's time. These included the unsuccessful Toy Trawler Spaniel and the now popular Cavalier King Charles Spaniel. The Cavalier is slightly larger, with a flat head and a longer nose, while the King Charles is smaller, with a domed head and a flat face.

— Freebase

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day is an American federal holiday marking the birthday of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. It is observed on the third Monday of January each year, which is around the time of King's birthday, January 15. The floating holiday is similar to holidays set under the Uniform Monday Holiday Act, though the act predated the establishment of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day by 15 years. King was the chief spokesman for nonviolent activism in the civil rights movement, which successfully protested racial discrimination in federal and state law. The campaign for a federal holiday in King's honor began soon after his assassination in 1968. President Ronald Reagan signed the holiday into law in 1983, and it was first observed three years later. At first, some states resisted observing the holiday as such, giving it alternative names or combining it with other holidays. It was officially observed in all 50 states for the first time in 2000.

— Freebase

Brian Boru

Brian Boru

Brian Boru was an Irish king who ended the domination of the High Kingship of Ireland by the Uí Néill. Building on the achievements of his father, Cennétig mac Lorcain, and especially his elder brother, Mathgamain, Brian first made himself King of Munster, then subjugated Leinster, making himself ruler of the south of Ireland. He is the founder of the O'Brien dynasty. With a population of under 500,000 people, Ireland had over 150 kings, with greater or lesser domains. The Uí Néill king Máel Sechnaill mac Domnaill, abandoned by his northern kinsmen of the Cenél nEógain and Cenél Conaill, acknowledged Brian as High King at Athlone in 1002. In the decade that followed, Brian campaigned against the northern Uí Néill, who refused to accept his claims, against Leinster, where resistance was frequent, and against the Norse Gaelic Kingdom of Dublin. Brian's hard-won authority was seriously challenged in 1013 when his ally Máel Sechnaill was attacked by the Cenél nEógain king Flaithbertach Ua Néill, with the Ulstermen as his allies. This was followed by further attacks on Máel Sechnaill by the Dubliners under their king Sihtric Silkbeard and the Leinstermen led by Máel Mórda mac Murchada. Brian campaigned against these enemies in 1013. In 1014, Brian's armies confronted the armies of Leinster and Dublin at Clontarf near Dublin on Good Friday. The resulting Battle of Clontarf was a bloody affair, with Brian, his son Murchad, and Máel Mórda among those killed. The list of the noble dead in the Annals of Ulster includes Irish kings, Norse Gaels, Scotsmen, and Scandinavians. The immediate beneficiary of the slaughter was Máel Sechnaill who resumed his interrupted reign.

— Freebase

Banquo

Banquo

Banquo is a character in William Shakespeare's 1606 play Macbeth. In the play, he is at first an ally to Macbeth and they are together when they meet the Three Witches. After prophesying that Macbeth will become king, the witches tell Banquo that he will not be king himself, but that his descendants will be. Later, Macbeth in his lust for power sees Banquo as a threat and has him murdered; Banquo's son, Fleance, escapes. Banquo's ghost returns in a later scene, causing Macbeth to react with alarm during a public feast. Shakespeare borrowed the character of Banquo from Holinshed's Chronicles, a history of Britain published by Raphael Holinshed in 1587. In Chronicles Banquo is an accomplice to Macbeth in the murder of the king, rather than a loyal subject of the king who is seen as an enemy by Macbeth. Shakespeare may have changed this aspect of his character in order to please King James, who was thought at the time to be a descendant of the real Banquo. Critics often interpret Banquo's role in the play as being a foil to Macbeth, resisting evil where Macbeth embraces it. Sometimes, however, his motives are unclear, and some critics question his purity. He does nothing to accuse Macbeth of murdering the king, even though he has reason to believe Macbeth is responsible.

— Freebase

Palamedes

Palamedes

Palamedes is a Knight of the Round Table in the Arthurian legend. He is a Saracen pagan who converts to Christianity later in his life, and his unrequited love for Iseult brings him into frequent conflict with Tristan. Palamedes' father is King Esclabor; his brothers Safir and Segwarides also join the Round Table. Palamedes first appears in the Prose Tristan, an early 13th-century prose expansion of the Tristan and Iseult legend. He is introduced as a knight fighting for Iseult's hand at a tournament in Ireland; he ultimately loses to Tristan, to the delight of the princess. Tristan spares him but forbids him to bear arms for a year or to pursue Iseult's love ever again. After Iseult's wedding to King Mark, Palamedes rescues Iseult's servant Brangaine, joins the Round Table and engages in a number of duels with Tristan that are usually postponed or end without a clear winner. They eventually reconcile, but share a love-hate relationship through the rest of the narrative. Palamedes also appears in the Post-Vulgate Cycle, Thomas Malory's Le Morte d'Arthur, and even gave his name to his own romance, the Palamedes. The Palamedes exists in fragments and as part of the vast Compilation of Rusticiano da Pisa, and details the adventures of two generations of Arthurian heroes. Some stories reveal Palamedes' background: his father was a king of Babylon who is sent to Rome where he saves the life of the Emperor; he then travels to Britain where he rescues and befriends King Pellinore. Many tales also have Palamedes as the hunter of the Questing Beast, an abomination only the chosen can kill. The hunt is as frustrating and fruitless as the pursuit of Iseult, and in most versions remains uncompleted. However, in the Post-Vulgate Palamedes' conversion to Christianity during the Grail Quest allows him release from his worldly entanglements, and Percival and Galahad help him trap the beast in a lake, where he finally slays it. Malory has Palamedes and Safir joining Lancelot after the great knight's affair with Queen Guinevere is exposed; the brothers eventually accompany Lancelot to France, where Palamedes is made Duke of Provence. According to the Post-Vulgate, Sir Gawain, once a friend to Sir Palamedes, had to kill Palamedes after the Grail Quest, since, Palamedes killed King Mark, who was said had killed Tristan; King Mark was provoked by the sinister Mordred to kill Tristan with Palamedes's spear .

— Freebase

Kingdom of Travancore

Kingdom of Travancore

The Kingdom of Travancore was a former Hindu feudal kingdom and Indian princely state that had been ruled by the Travancore Royal Family from the capital at Padmanabhapuram or Thiruvananthapuram. The Kingdom of Travancore at its zenith comprised most of modern day southern Kerala, Kanyakumari district, and the southernmost parts of Tamil Nadu. The official flag of the state was red with a dextrally-coiled silver conch shell at its centre. The king of the state was accorded 19-gun salute, the second highest among the honorary gun salutes that were granted by the British Empire to honour the heads of the princely states. The state government took many progressive steps in the socioeconomic front and the state was one among the best of princely states, with reputed achievements in education, political administration, public work and social reforms. King Marthanda Varma founded the modern Kingdom of Travancore by militarily expanding the Kingdom of Venad. He hailed from the Kingdom of Thrippappur, one of the branches of the Venad royal family, who trace their origin back to the Ay kingdom and the Later Chera kingdom. In 1741, Travancore won the Battle of Colachel against the Dutch East India Company, resulting in the complete eclipse of Dutch power in the region. In this battle, the admiral of the Dutch, Eustachius De Lannoy, was captured; later he joined the Travancore army and rose up to become the commander of the Tranvancore forces and modernised the Travancore army by introducing better firearms, artillery and the European style of military drills and discipline. The Travancore-Dutch War is the earliest example of an Asian state overcoming a European power in war. Travancore became the most dominant state in the Kerala region by defeating the powerful Zamorin of Calicut in the battle at Purakkad. Ramayyan Dalawa, the Prime Minister of Marthanda Varma, also played an important role in this consolidation and expansion. Travancore often allied with the English East India Company in military conflicts. During the reign of Dharma Raja, Marthanda Varma's successor, Tipu Sultan, the de facto ruler of Kingdom of Mysore and the son of Hyder Ali attacked Travancore as a part of the Mysorean invasion of Kerala; this led to the Third Anglo-Mysore War, as Travancore was an ally of the English East India Company. In 1804 and 1808–1809, Travancore witnessed two armed rebellions, the first one directed against the then Prime Minister of Tranvancore, Velu Thampi Dalawa and the second one against the East India Company under the leadership of Velu Thampi Dalawa. Following Dalawa Velu Thampi's request, the 1805 rebellion was put down by the English East India Company and the Company's forces put down Thampi's own 1808–1809 rebellion. Both of these were not directed against the king, who did not actively get involved in any of the two, till the issue had been decided. Chithira Thirunal, the last king of Travancore, made the Temple Entry Proclamation in 1936 abolishing the ban on low-caste people from entering Hindu Temples. At the same time, C. P. Ramaswami Iyer, Chithira Thirunal's Prime Minister, is remembered for the ruthless suppression of a local struggle organised by the Communists, known as the Punnapra-Vayalar uprising. When United Kingdom accepted demands for a partition and announced its intention to quit India, the king of Travancore, Chithira Thirunal, issued a declaration of independence on 18 June 1947. The declaration was unacceptable to the Government of India; many rounds of negotiation were conducted among the diwan, C. P. Ramaswami Iyer, and the Indian representatives. In 23 July 1947 they decided in favour of the accession to the Indian Union, pending approval by the king. An assassination attempt on the diwan by the Communists on 25 July 1947 caused to hasten the accession of Travancore state to the Indian Union. Travancore and the princely state of Cochin merged on 1 July 1949 to form the Indian state of Travancore-Cochin.

— Freebase

Amalaric

Amalaric

Amalaric, or in Spanish and Portuguese, Amalarico, was king of the Visigoths from 526 until his assassination in 531. He was a son of king Alaric II and his first wife Theodegotho, daughter of Theoderic the Great. When Alaric II was killed fighting Clovis I, king of the Franks, in the Battle of Vouillé, his kingdom fell into disarray. "More serious than the destruction of the Gothic army," writes Herwig Wolfram, "than the loss of both Aquitanian provinces and the capital of Toulose, was the death of the king." Alaric had made no provision for a successor, and although he had two sons, one was of age but illegitimate and the other the offspring of a legal marriage but still a child. The older son, Gesalec, was chosen king but his reign was disastrous. King Theoderic of the Ostrogoths sent an army, led by his sword-bearer Theudis, against Gesalec, ostensibly on behalf of Amalaric; Gesalec fled to Africa, and the Ostrogoths drove back the Franks and their Burgundian allies, regaining possession of "the south of Novempopulana, Rodez, probably even Albi, and even Toulose". Following the death of Clovis, Theoderic negotiated a peace with Clovis' successors, securing Visigothic control of the southernmost portion of Gaul for the rest of the existence of their kingdom.

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Edward the Martyr

Edward the Martyr

Edward the Martyr was king of the English from 975 until he was murdered in 978. Edward was the eldest son of King Edgar but was not his father's acknowledged heir. On Edgar's death, the leadership of England was contested, with some supporting Edward's claim to be king and others supporting his much younger half-brother Æthelred the Unready, recognized as a legitimate son of Edgar. Edward was chosen as king and was crowned by his main clerical supporters, the archbishops Dunstan and Oswald of Worcester. The great nobles of the kingdom, ealdormen Ælfhere and Æthelwine, quarrelled, and civil war almost broke out. In the so-called anti-monastic reaction, the nobles took advantage of Edward's weakness to dispossess the Benedictine reformed monasteries of lands and other properties that King Edgar had granted to them. Edward's short reign was brought to an end by his murder at Corfe Castle in circumstances that are not altogether clear. His body was reburied with great ceremony at Shaftesbury Abbey early in 980. In 1001 Edward's remains were moved to a more prominent place in the abbey, probably with the blessing of his half-brother King Æthelred. Edward was already reckoned a saint by this time.

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Richard of Dunkeld

Richard of Dunkeld

Richard was a 12th-century bishop of Dunkeld. He got the bishopric of Dunkeld, the second most prestigious bishopric in Scotland-north-of-the-Forth, after serving the King of Scots. He was capellanus Regis Willelmi, that is, chaplain of King William of Scotland, and had probably been the chaplain to William during the reign of King Máel Coluim IV. He was consecrated at St Andrews on 10 August 1170, by Richard, former chaplain of King Máel Coluim IV but now the bishop of St Andrews. Richard continued to have a close relationship with King William, and was in Normandy with the king in December 1174 when the Treaty of Falaise was signed. He died in 1178. He allegedly died at Cramond in Midlothian and was buried on Inchcolm. Both details may be the result of confusion with Richard de Prebenda, but buriel on Inchcolm was common for the bishops of Dunkeld.

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King crab

King crab

King crabs, also called stone crabs, are a superfamily of crab-like decapod crustaceans chiefly found in cold seas. Because of their large size and the taste of their meat, many species are widely caught and sold as food, the most common being the red king crab, Paralithodes camtschaticus. King crabs are generally thought to be derived from hermit crab-like ancestors, which may explain the asymmetry still found in the adult forms. Although some doubt still exists about this theory, king crabs are the most widely quoted example of carcinisation among the Decapoda. The evidence for this explanation comes from the asymmetry of the king crab's abdomen, which is thought to reflect the asymmetry of hermit crabs, which must fit into a spiral shell. Although formerly classified among the hermit crabs in the superfamily Paguroidea, king crabs are now placed in a separate superfamily, Lithodoidea.

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Servius Tullius

Servius Tullius

Servius Tullius was the legendary sixth king of ancient Rome, and the second of its Etruscan dynasty. He reigned 578-535 BC. Roman and Greek sources describe his servile origins and later marriage to a daughter of Lucius Tarquinius Priscus, Rome's first Etruscan king, who was assassinated in 579 BC. Servius was variously said to have been the first Roman king to accede without election by the Senate, having gained the throne by popular support, at the contrivance of his mother-in-law; and the first to be elected by the Senate without reference to the people. Several traditions describe Servius' father as divine. Livy depicts Servius' mother as a captured Latin princess enslaved by the Romans; her child is chosen as Rome's future king after a ring of fire is seen around his head. The Emperor Claudius discounted such origins and described him as an originally Etruscan mercenary, named Mastarna, who fought for Caelius Vibenna Servius was a popular king, and one of Rome's most significant benefactors. He had military successes against Veii and the Etruscans, and expanded the city to include the Quirinal, Viminal and Esquiline hills. He is credited with the institution of the Compitalia festivals, the building of temples to Fortuna and Diana, and the invention of Rome's first true coinage. Despite the opposition of Rome's patricians, he expanded the Roman franchise and improved the lot and fortune of Rome's lowest classes of citizens and non-citizens. According to Livy, he reigned for 44 years, until murdered by his treacherous daughter Tullia and son-in-law Tarquinius Superbus. In consequence of this "tragic crime" and his hubristic arrogance as king, Tarquinius was eventually removed. This cleared the way for the abolition of Rome's monarchy and the founding of the Roman Republic, whose groundwork had already been laid by Servius' reforms.

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Interrex

Interrex

The Interrex was literally a ruler "between kings" during the Roman Kingdom and the Roman Republic. He was in effect a short-term regent. The office of interrex was supposedly created following the death of Rome's first king Romulus, and thus its origin is obscured by legend. The Senate of the Roman Kingdom was at first unable to choose a new king. For the purpose of continuing the government of the city, the senate, which then consisted of one hundred members, was divided into ten decuriae; and from each of these decuriae one senator was nominated as decurio. Each of the ten decurios enjoyed in succession the regal power and its badges for five days as interrex; and if no king was appointed at the expiration of fifty days, the rotation began anew. The period during which they exercised their power was called an interregnum and at that time lasted for one year, after which Numa Pompilius was elected as the new king. After the death of each subsequent king an interrex was appointed by the senate. The interrex's function was to call a meeting of the Comitia Curiata which would elect a new king. Interreges were appointed under the Republic for holding the comitia for the election of the consuls when the consuls, through civil commotions or other causes such as death, had been unable to do so in their year of office. Each held the office for only five days, as under the kings. The comitia were, as a general rule, not held by the first interrex, who was originally the curio maximus; more usually by the second or third; but in one instance we read of an eleventh, and in another of a fourteenth interrex. The comitia for electing the first consuls were held by Sp. Lucretius as interrex was also called praefectus urbis. The interreges under the republic, at least from B.C. 482, were elected by the senate from the whole body, and were not confined to the decem primi or ten chief senators as under the kings. Plebeians, however, were not admissible to this office; and consequently when plebeians were admitted into the senate, the patrician senators met together without the plebeian members to elect an interrex. For this reason, as well as on account of the influence which the interrex exerted in the election of the magistrates, we find that the tribunes of the plebs were strongly opposed to the appointment of an interrex. The interrex had jurisdictio.

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Martin Luther King, Jr.

Martin Luther King, Jr.

Martin Luther King, Jr. was an American clergyman, activist, and leader in the African-American Civil Rights Movement. He is best known for his role in the advancement of civil rights using nonviolent civil disobedience. King has become a national icon in the history of American progressivism. A Baptist minister, King became a civil rights activist early in his career. He led the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott and helped found the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in 1957, serving as its first president. With the SCLC, King led an unsuccessful struggle against segregation in Albany, Georgia, in 1962, and organized nonviolent protests in Birmingham, Alabama, that attracted national attention following television news coverage of the brutal police response. King also helped to organize the 1963 March on Washington, where he delivered his "I Have a Dream" speech. There, he established his reputation as one of the greatest orators in American history. He also established his reputation as a radical, and became an object of the Federal Bureau of Investigation's COINTELPRO for the rest of his life. FBI agents investigated him for possible communist ties, recorded his extramarital liaisons and reported on them to government officials, and on one occasion, mailed King a threatening anonymous letter that he interpreted as an attempt to make him commit suicide.

— Freebase

Royal Marriage

Royal Marriage

Royal Marriage is a Patience game using a deck of 52 playing cards. The game is so called because the player seems to remove anything that comes between the Queen and the King of the same suit for them to "marry." Although the King and the Queen may be of any suit, commonly it is the King and Queen of Hearts that are being "wed." This game may also called Betrothal. The Queen of the chosen suit is placed immediately on the table while her corresponding King will always be dealt last. The remaining fifty cards are shuffled and placed on the top of the King. Cards are dealt one at a time to the right of the Queen. When a pair of cards with the same rank or suit are found to be separated by one or two cards, those in-between cards are discarded. Afterward, the player can look for any resulting pairs with in-between cards to be discarded. The game is won when the Queen and the King are brought together and all other cards discarded.

— Freebase

Sri Sulalai

Sri Sulalai

Chao Chom Manda Riam, later Krom Somdet Phra Sri Sulalai, was a royal concubine of King Buddha Loetla Nabhalai, the king of Siam. Her family was Muslim from the Southern part of the Kingdom, and her very name is the shortened version of "Maryam" an Arabic name. She married Prince Isarasundhorn as the second concubine and gave birth to Prince Tub in 1787. In 1809, Prince Isarasundhorn was crowned as King Buddha Loetla Nabhalai. Chao Chom Manda Riam then moved to the Royal Grand Palace and presided over the royal kitchen. Prince Jessadabodindra was trusted by the king to handle various state affairs. In 1824, King Buddha Loetla Nabhalai died. According to the tradition, the throne would go to Prince Mongkut, the son of Queen Sri Suriyendra. However, the nobility instead enthroned Prince Jessadabodindra because he had served the king in Krom Tha for years and was proved to be competent to rule. As her son was crowned, Chao Chom Manda Riam was raised to Krom Somdet Phra Sri Sulalai, thus a member of the royalty. She died in 1837.

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Fachtna Fáthach

Fachtna Fáthach

Fachtna Fáthach, son of Cas, son of Rudraige, was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, a High King of Ireland. He came to power when he defeated the previous High King, Dui Dallta Dedad, in the battle of Árd Brestine. According to some stories he was the lover of Ness, daughter of Eochaid Sálbuide, king of Ulster, and the father of her son, Conchobar mac Nessa, the king of Ulster in the stories of the Ulster Cycle. After he had reigned for sixteen or twenty-five years, he paid a visit to Ulster. While he was there, Eochu Feidlech, king of Connacht, raised an army and marched on Tara. With the support of the Ulstermen, Fachtna challenged him to battle. Eochu agreed, and named the battlefield as Leitir Ruad in the Corann, Connacht. During the battle Eochu surrounded and beheaded Fachtna, and became High King in his place. The Lebor Gabála Érenn synchronises Fachtna's reign with the Roman civil war between Caesar and Pompey and the reign of Cleopatra. The chronology of Geoffrey Keating's Foras Feasa ar Éireann dates his reign to 110-94 BC, that of the Annals of the Four Masters to 159-143 BC;

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Yolanda King

Yolanda King

Yolanda Denise King was the first-born child of Coretta Scott King and civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Her younger siblings are Martin Luther King III, Dexter Scott King, and Bernice Albertine King. She was 12 years old when her father was assassinated.

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King's Evil

King's Evil

The historic designation for scrofula (TUBERCULOSIS, LYMPH NODE). The disease is so called from the belief that it could be healed by the touch of a king. This term is used only for historical articles using the name "king's evil", and is to be differentiated from scrofula as lymph node tuberculosis in modern clinical medicine. (From Webster, 3d ed)

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

roycroft

roycroft

1. _Roy_ means "king"; and _croft_ means "home or craft." Thus, Roycroft means King-Craft; working for the highest; doing your work just as good as you can--making things for the King.

2. The dignity and the divinity of labor--peace, reciprocity, health, industry, persistency and endurance.

— The Roycroft Dictionary

Ban

Ban

a calling together of the king's (esp. the French king's) vassals for military service; also, the body of vassals thus assembled or summoned. In present usage, in France and Prussia, the most effective part of the population liable to military duty and not in the standing army

— Webster Dictionary

Butlerage

Butlerage

a duty of two shillings on every tun of wine imported into England by merchant strangers; -- so called because paid to the king's butler for the king

— Webster Dictionary

Checkmate

Checkmate

to check (an adversary's king) in such a manner that escape in impossible; to defeat (an adversary) by putting his king in check from which there is no escape

— Webster Dictionary

De facto

De facto

actually; in fact; in reality; as, a king de facto, -- distinguished from a king de jure, or by right

— Webster Dictionary

King

King

a playing card having the picture of a king; as, the king of diamonds

— Webster Dictionary

King

King

to supply with a king; to make a king of; to raise to royalty

— Webster Dictionary

Kingbird

Kingbird

the king tody. See under King

— Webster Dictionary

Kingdom

Kingdom

the territory or country subject to a king or queen; the dominion of a monarch; the sphere in which one is king or has control

— Webster Dictionary

Kinghood

Kinghood

the state of being a king; the attributes of a king; kingship

— Webster Dictionary

Kinglet

Kinglet

a little king; a weak or insignificant king

— Webster Dictionary

Milesian

Milesian

descended from King Milesius of Spain, whose two sons are said to have conquered Ireland about 1300 b. c.; or pertaining to the descendants of King Milesius; hence, Irish

— Webster Dictionary

Norroy

Norroy

the most northern of the English Kings-at-arms. See King-at-arms, under King

— Webster Dictionary

Post-fine

Post-fine

a duty paid to the king by the cognizee in a fine of lands, when the same was fully passed; -- called also the king's silver

— Webster Dictionary

Royally

Royally

in a royal or kingly manner; like a king; as becomes a king

— Webster Dictionary

Senator

Senator

a member of the king's council; a king's councilor

— Webster Dictionary

Teller

Teller

one of four officers of the English Exchequer, formerly appointed to receive moneys due to the king and to pay moneys payable by the king

— Webster Dictionary

Wellat

Wellat

the king parrakeet See under King

— Webster Dictionary

Check

Check

In games such as chess, shogi, and xiangqi, a check is a threat to capture the king on the next move turn. A king so threatened is said to be in check. On the very next move, the player whose king is in check must remove their king from check, if possible. Either the threat must be stopped or the king must be moved to a square where it is no longer in check. If the player has no move out of check, the game ends in checkmate and the player loses.

— Freebase

Semiramis

Semiramis

For ancient Greeks and Persians Semiramis was the legendary queen of king Ninus, succeeding him to the throne of Assyria. The legends narrated by Diodorus Siculus, Justin and others from Ctesias of Cnidus describe her and her relationship to King Ninus, himself a mythical king of Assyria, not attested in the Assyrian King List. The name of Semiramis came to be applied to various monuments in Western Asia and Asia Minor, the origin of which was forgotten or unknown. Nearly every stupendous work of antiquity by the Euphrates or in Iran seems to have ultimately been ascribed to her, even the Behistun Inscription of Darius. Herodotus ascribes to her the artificial banks that confined the Euphrates and knows her name as borne by a gate of Babylon. However, Diodorus stresses that the Hanging Gardens of Babylon were built long after Semiramis had reigned and not in her time. Various places in Assyria and throughout Mesopotamia as a whole, Medea, Persia, the Levant, Asia Minor, Arabia and the Caucasus bore the name of Semiramis, but slightly changed, even in the Middle Ages, and an old name of the city of Van was Shamiramagerd. A real and historical Shammuramat was the Assyrian queen of Shamshi-Adad V, king of Assyria and ruler of the Neo Assyrian Empire, and its regent for four years until her son Adad-nirari III came of age.

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Checkmate

Checkmate

Checkmate is a game position in chess in which a player's king is threatened with capture and there is no way to counter the threat. Or, simply put, the king is under direct attack and cannot avoid being captured. Delivering checkmate is the ultimate goal in chess: a player who is checkmated loses the game. In chess the king is never actually captured – the game ends as soon as the king is checkmated because checkmate leaves the defending player with no legal moves. In practice, most players resign an inevitably lost game before being checkmated, and it is considered bad etiquette to continue playing in a completely hopeless position. If a player's king is in check but the threat can be met, then it is not in checkmate. If a player is not in check but has no legal move, then it is stalemate, and the game immediately ends in a draw. A checkmating move is recorded in algebraic notation using the hash symbol – for example, 34.Qh8#.

— Freebase

Akaba of Dahomey

Akaba of Dahomey

Akaba was an early King of the Kingdom of Dahomey, in present-day Benin, from 1685 until c.1716. King Houegbadja had created the basic structure of the kingdom on the Abomey plateau. His first children were the twins of Akaba and Hangbe and they were followed by another son of Houegbadja who would become King Agaja. As the oldest son, Akaba became the king upon Houegbadja's death and ruled until 1716 when he died during battle in the Ouémé River Valley, either of small pox or in battle. When he died his sister, Hangbe, became the ruler and began preparing Akaba's oldest son, Agbo Sassa, for the throne. In 1718, Agaja, the next oldest son after Akaba from Houegbadja, fought with Agbo Sassa and Hangbe and became the next King of Dahomey.

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Divine right of kings

Divine right of kings

The divine right of kings, or divine-right theory of kingship, is a political and religious doctrine of royal and political legitimacy. It asserts that a monarch is subject to no earthly authority, deriving the right to rule directly from the will of God. The king is thus not subject to the will of his people, the aristocracy, or any other estate of the realm, including the Church. According to this doctrine, only God can judge an unjust king. The doctrine implies that any attempt to depose the king or to restrict his powers runs contrary to the will of God and may constitute a sacrilegious act. The remote origins of the theory are rooted in the medieval idea that God had bestowed earthly power on the king, just as God had given spiritual power and authority to the church, centering on the pope. The immediate author of the theory was Jean Bodin, who based it on the interpretation of Roman law. With the rise of nation-states and the Protestant Reformation, the theory of divine right justified the king's absolute authority in both political and spiritual matters. The theory came to the fore in England under the reign of James I of England. Louis XIV of France strongly promoted the theory as well.

— Freebase

Codrus

Codrus

Codrus was the last of the semi-mythical Kings of Athens. He was an ancient exemplar of patriotism and self-sacrifice. He was succeeded by his son Medon, who it is claimed ruled not as king but as the first Archon of Athens. Aristotle, however, in the Constitution of the Athenians states an alternative view that Medon was also King of Athens rather than first Archon. The earliest version of the story of Codrus comes from the 4th oration Against Leocrates by Lycurgus of Athens. During the time of the Dorian Invasion of Peloponnesus, the Dorians under Aletes, son of Hippotes had consulted the Delphic Oracle, who prophesied that their invasion would succeed as long as the king was not harmed. The news of this prophecy, that only the death of an Athenian king would ensure the safety of Athens, quickly found its way to the ears of Codrus. In devotion to his people, Codrus disguised himself as a peasant and made it to the vicinity of the Dorian encampment across the river, where he provoked a group of Dorian soldiers. He was put to death in the quarrel, and the Dorians, realizing Codrus had been slain, decided to retreat in fear of their prophesied defeat. In the aftermath of these events, it was claimed that no one thought himself worthy to succeed Codrus and so the title of king was abolished, and that of archon substituted for it.

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Bashan

Bashan

Bashan is a biblical place first mentioned in Genesis 14:5, where it is said that Chedorlaomer and his confederates "smote the Rephaim in Ashteroth", where Og the king of Bashan had his residence. At the time of Israel's entrance into the Promised Land, Og came out against them, but was utterly routed. This country extended from Gilead in the south to Hermon in the north, and from the Jordan river on the west to Salcah on the east. Along with the half of Gilead it was given to the half-tribe of Manasseh. Golan, one of its cities, became a city of refuge. According to the Bible, the Israelites invaded Bashan and conquered it from the Amorites. Dt 3:1: "Next we turned and went up along the road toward Bashan, and Og king of Bashan with his whole army marched out to meet us in battle at Edrei." Dt 3:2: "The LORD said to me, "Do not be afraid of him, for I have handed him over to you with his whole army and his land. Do to him what you did to Sihon king of the Amorites, who reigned in Heshbon." Dt 3:3: "So the LORD our God also gave into our hands Og king of Bashan and all his army. We struck them down, leaving no survivors." Dt 3:4: "At that time we took all his cities. There was not one of the sixty cities that we did not take from them—the whole region of Argob, Og's kingdom in Bashan." Dt 3:5:"All these cities were fortified with high walls and with gates and bars, and there were also a great many unwalled villages." Dt 3:6: "We completely destroyed [a] them, as we had done with Sihon king of Heshbon, destroying [b] every city—men, women and children." Dt 3:7: "But all the livestock and the plunder from their cities we carried off for ourselves."

— Freebase

Edward the Elder

Edward the Elder

Edward the Elder was an English king. He became king in 899 upon the death of his father, Alfred the Great. His court was at Winchester, previously the capital of Wessex. He captured the eastern Midlands and East Anglia from the Danes in 917 and became ruler of Mercia in 918 upon the death of Æthelflæd, his sister. All but two of his charters give his title as "Anglorum Saxonum rex" or "king of the Anglo-Saxons". He was the second king of the Anglo-Saxons as this title was created by Alfred. Edward's coinage reads "EADVVEARD REX." The chroniclers record that all England "accepted Edward as lord" in 920. But the fact that York continued to produce its own coinage suggests that Edward's authority was not accepted in Viking-ruled Northumbria. Edward's eponym "the Elder" was first used in Wulfstan's Life of St Æthelwold to distinguish him from the later King Edward the Martyr.

— Freebase

Simba

Simba

Simba is a fictional character in Disney's animated feature film The Lion King. He subsequently appears as a major supporting character in the film's direct-to-video sequel, The Lion King II: Simba's Pride, and direct-to-video parallel, The Lion King 1½. In the first film, Simba's speaking voice is provided by Matthew Broderick as an adult and Jonathan Taylor Thomas as a cub, while his singing voices are provided by Joseph Williams and Jason Weaver, respectively. Simba is the son of Mufasa and Sarabi, king and queen of the Pride Lands. In the first film, Simba is eager to follow in his father's pawprints and become king, but his inheritance is threatened by his treacherous uncle Scar. By the second film, Simba marries his childhood friend Nala, who becomes his queen, and together they have a daughter named Kiara. He has golden fur and when he grows into an adult, he has a red mane. The name "Simba" comes from the Swahili word for "lion".

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Glorious Revolution

Glorious Revolution

The Glorious Revolution, also called the Revolution of 1688, was the overthrow of King James II of England by a union of English Parliamentarians with the Dutch stadtholder William III of Orange-Nassau. William's successful invasion of England with a Dutch fleet and army led to his ascending of the English throne as William III of England jointly with his wife Mary II of England. King James's policies of religious tolerance after 1685 met with increasing opposition by members of leading political circles, who were troubled by the king's Catholicism and his close ties with France. The crisis facing the king came to a head in 1688, with the birth of the King's son, James Francis Edward Stuart, on 10 June. This changed the existing line of succession by displacing the heir presumptive, his daughter Mary, a Protestant and the wife of William of Orange, with young James as heir apparent. The establishment of a Roman Catholic dynasty in the kingdoms now seemed likely. Some of the most influential leaders of the Tories united with members of the opposition Whigs and set out to resolve the crisis by inviting William of Orange to England, which the stadtholder, who feared an Anglo-French alliance, had indicated as a condition for a military intervention.

— Freebase

Tenant-in-chief

Tenant-in-chief

In medieval and early modern Europe the term tenant-in-chief, denoted a person who held his lands under various forms of feudal land tenure directly from the king or territorial prince to whom he did homage, as opposed to holding them from another nobleman or senior member of the clergy. The tenure was one which denoted great honour, but also carried heavy responsibilities as the tenants-in-chief were originally responsible for providing knights and soldiers for the king's feudal army. Other names for tenant-in-chief were captal or baron, although the latter term came to mean specifically one who held in-chief by the tenure per baroniam, the feudal baron. The Latin term was tenens in capite; In most countries allodial property could be held by laypeople or the church, however in England after the Norman Conquest, the king became in law the only holder of land by allodial title; thus all the lands in England became the property of the Crown. A tenure by frankalmoin, which in other countries was regarded as a form of privileged allodial holding, was in England regarded as a feudal tenement. Every land-holding was deemed by feudal custom to be no more than an estate in land whether directly or indirectly held of the king; absolute title in land could only be held by the king himself, the most anyone else could hold was a right over land, not a title in land per se. In England, a tenant-in-chief could enfief, or grant fiefs carved out of his own holding, to his own followers. The creation of subfiefs under a tenant-in-chief or other fief-holder was known as subinfeudation. The Norman kings, however, eventually imposed on all free men who occupied a tenement a duty of fealty to the crown rather than to their immediate lord who had enfeoffed them. This was to diminish the possibility of sub-vassals being employed by tenants-in-chief against the crown.

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King Vulture

King Vulture

The King Vulture is a large bird found in Central and South America. It is a member of the New World vulture family Cathartidae. This vulture lives predominantly in tropical lowland forests stretching from southern Mexico to northern Argentina. It is the only surviving member of the genus Sarcoramphus, although fossil members are known. Large and predominantly white, the King Vulture has gray to black ruff, flight, and tail feathers. The head and neck are bald, with the skin color varying, including yellow, orange, blue, purple, and red. The King Vulture has a very noticeable yellow fleshy caruncle on its beak. This vulture is a scavenger and it often makes the initial cut into a fresh carcass. It also displaces smaller New World vulture species from a carcass. King Vultures have been known to live for up to 30 years in captivity. King Vultures were popular figures in the Mayan codices as well as in local folklore and medicine. Although currently listed as Least Concern by the IUCN, they are decreasing in number, due primarily to habitat loss.

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Eochu Feidlech

Eochu Feidlech

Eochu or Eochaid Feidlech, son of Finn, son of Rogen Ruad, son of Essamain Emna, son of Blathnachta, son of Labraid Lorc, son of Enna Aignech was, according to medieval Irish legends and historical traditions, a High King of Ireland. He is best known as the father of the legendary queen Medb of Connacht. According to the 12th century Lebor Gabála Érenn, he took power when he defeated the previous High King, Fachtna Fáthach, in the Battle of Leitir Rúaid. The Middle Irish saga Cath Leitrech Ruibhe tells the story of this battle. While Fachtna Fáthach was away from Tara on a visit to Ulster, Eochu, then king of Connacht, raised an army, had the provincial kings killed and took hostages from Tara. When news reached Fachtna at Emain Macha, he raised an army of Ulstermen and gave battle at Leitir Rúaid in the Corann, but was defeated and beheaded by Eochu. Eochaid Sálbuide, the king of Ulster, was also killed. Fergus mac Róich covered the Ulster army's retreat, and Eochu marched to Tara. Various Middle Irish tales give him a large family. His wife was Cloithfinn, and they had six daughters, Derbriu, Eile, Mugain, Eithne, Clothru and Medb, and four sons, a set of triplets known as the three findemna, and Conall Anglondach. Derbriu was the lover of Aengus of the Tuatha Dé Danann. Her mother-in-law, Garbdalb, turned six men into pigs for the crime of eating nuts from her grove, and Derbriu protected them for a year until they were killed by Medb. When Conchobar mac Nessa became king of Ulster, Eochu gave four of his daughters, Mugain, Eithne, Clothru and Medb, to him in marriage in compensation for the death of his supposed father, Fachtna Fáthach. Eithne bore him a son, Furbaide, who was born by posthumous caesarian section after Medb drowned her. Clothru, according to one tradition, bore him his eldest son Cormac Cond Longas, although other traditions make him the son of Conchobar by his own mother, Ness. Medb bore Conchobar a son called Amalgad, but later left him, and Eochu set her up as queen of Connacht. Some time after that, Eochu held an assembly at Tara, which both Conchobar and Medb attended. The morning after the assembly, Conchobar followed Medb down to the river Boyne where she had gone to bathe, and raped her. Eochu made war against Conchobar on the Boyne, but was defeated.

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Princess Royal

Princess Royal

Princess Royal is a style customarily awarded by a British monarch to his or her eldest daughter. The style is held for life, so a princess cannot be given the style during the lifetime of another Princess Royal. In particular, Queen Elizabeth II never held the title as her aunt, Princess Mary, was in possession of the title. There have been seven Princesses Royal. Princess Anne is the current Princess Royal. The title Princess Royal came into existence when Queen Henrietta Maria, daughter of Henry IV, King of France, and wife of King Charles I, wanted to imitate the way the eldest daughter of the King of France was styled "Madame Royale". The style is granted by Royal Warrant. Princess Mary, eldest daughter of King James II & VII, and Princess Sophia Dorothea, only daughter of King George I, were eligible for this honour but did not receive it. At the time she became eligible for the title, Princess Mary was already Princess of Orange, while Sophia Dorothea was already Queen in Prussia when she became eligible for the title.

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Hundred Years' War

Hundred Years' War

The Hundred Years' War was a series of conflicts waged from 1337 to 1453 between the Kingdom of England and the Kingdom of France for control of the French throne. Many allies of both sides were also drawn into the conflict. The war had its roots in a dynastic disagreement dating back to the time of William the Conqueror, who became King of England in 1066 while retaining possession of the Duchy of Normandy in France. As the rulers of Normandy and other lands on the continent, the English kings owed feudal homage to the king of France. In 1337, Edward III of England refused to pay homage to Philip VI of France, leading the French king to claim confiscation of Edward's lands in Aquitaine. Edward responded by declaring that he, not Philip, was the rightful king of France, a claim dating to 1328, when Charles IV of France died without a male heir. Edward was the closest male relative of Charles IV as son of Isabella of France, daughter of Philip IV of France and sister of Charles IV. But instead, Philip VI, the son of Philip IV's younger brother, Charles of Valois, was crowned king of France in accordance with Salic Law, which disqualified female succession and the succession of males descended through female lines. The question of legal succession to the French crown was central to the war over generations of English and French claimants.

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Kodok

Kodok

Kodok is a town in the north-eastern South Sudanese state of Upper Nile. Kodok is the capital of Shilluk country, formally known as the Shilluk Kingdom. Shilluk has been an independent kingdom for more than sixteen centuries. Fashoda is known as the place where the British and French nearly went to war in 1898. According to Shilluk belief, religion, tradition and constitution, Fashoda serves as the mediating city for the Shilluk King. It is a place where ceremonies and the coronation of each new Shilluk King takes place. For over 500 years, Fashoda was kept hidden and acted as a forbidden city for the Shilluk King, but as modern educations and traditions emerge, Fashoda is now known to the outside world. Fashoda is believed to be a place where the spirit of Juok, the spirit of Nyikango, the spirit of the deceased Shilluk kings and the spirit of the living Shilluk King come to mediate for the Kingdom of Shilluk's spiritual healing. Fashoda is preserved as a quiet place for the spirit of God, where the sounds and speeches of God can be heard and received by the King, leaders, and elders. For the Shilluk, Fashoda is a city of mediation and peace.

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Norodom Sihanouk

Norodom Sihanouk

Norodom Sihanouk was the King of Cambodia from 1941 to 1955 and again from 1993 to 2004. He was the effective ruler of Cambodia from 1953 to 1970. After his second abdication in 2004, he was known as "The King-Father of Cambodia", a position in which he retained many of his former responsibilities as constitutional monarch. The son of King Norodom Suramarit and Queen Sisowath Kossamak, Sihanouk held so many positions since 1941 that the Guinness Book of World Records identifies him as the politician who has served the world's greatest variety of political offices. These included two terms as king, two as sovereign prince, one as president, two as prime minister, as well as numerous positions as leader of various governments-in-exile. He served as puppet head of state for the Khmer Rouge government in 1975–1976. Most of these positions were only honorific, including the last position as constitutional king of Cambodia. Sihanouk's actual period of effective rule over Cambodia was from 9 November 1953, when Cambodia gained its independence from France, until 18 March 1970, when General Lon Nol and the National Assembly deposed him.

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Bres

Bres

In Irish mythology, Bres was a king of the Tuatha Dé Danann. His parents were Prince Elatha of the Fomorians and Eri, daughter of Delbaith. He was an unpopular king, and favoured his Fomorian kin. He grew so quickly that by the age of seven he was the size of a 14-year-old. In the First Battle of Magh Tuiredh, King Nuada of the Tuatha Dé Danann lost his hand; because he was imperfect, he could not be king. Hoping to reconcile relations between the Fomorians and the Tuatha Dé Danann, Bres was named king and Brigid of the Tuatha de Danann married him, giving him a son, Ruadan, who would later be killed trying to assassinate Goibniu. Bres made the Tuatha Dé Danann pay tribute to the Fomorians and work as slaves: Ogma was forced to carry firewood, and the Dagda had to dig trenches around forts. He neglected his duties of hospitality: the Tuatha Dé complained that after visiting his house their knives were never greased and their breaths did not smell of ale. Cairbre, poet of the Tuatha Dé, composed a scathing poem against him, which was the first satire in Ireland, and everything went wrong for Bres after that. After Bres had ruled for seven years, Nuada had his hand, which had formerly been replaced with a silver one by Dian Cecht and Creidhne, replaced with one of flesh and blood by Dian Cecht's son Miach, with the help of his sister Airmed; following the successful replacement, Nuada was restored to kingship and Bres was exiled. He went to his father for help to recover his throne, but Elatha would not help him gain by foul means what he had been unable to keep: "You have no right to get it by injustice when you could not keep it by justice". Bres was guided by his father to Balor, another leader of the Fomorians, for the help he sought.

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Cairbre Nia Fer

Cairbre Nia Fer

Cairbre Nia Fer, son of Rus Ruad, was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, a King of Tara from the Laigin. The earliest reference to Cairbre is in Tírechán's Memoir of St. Patrick, a 7th-century Latin text found in the Book of Armagh. Patrick finds an enormous grave and raises its giant occupant from the dead. The giant says he was killed by the sons of Mac Con during the reign of Cairbre Nia Fer, a hundred years previously – i.e. in the 4th century. The 11th century Lebor Gabála Érenn places him during the reign of the High King Eterscél, which it synchronises his reign with that of the Roman emperor Augustus and the birth of Christ, and makes him a contemporary of the provincial kings Conchobar mac Nessa of the Ulaid, Cú Roí of Munster and Ailill mac Máta of Connacht. Mac Con of the Dáirine, placed a generation before Cairbre by Tírechán, is dated many generations after him, to the late 2nd century, in the Lebor Gabála. Alongside Conchobar, Cú Roí and Ailill, Cairbre appears as king of Tara in stories of the Ulster Cycle, where he is the brother of Ailill mac Máta, husband of Medb of Connacht. His wife is Fedelm Noíchrothach, daughter of Conchobar, and they have a son, Erc, and a daughter, Achall. In Cath Ruis na Ríg, he and his brother Find mac Rossa, king of the Gailióin of Leinster, fight a battle against Conchobar and the Ulaid. The Ulaid hero Cúchulainn kills him with a spear from distance, then decapitates him before his body hits the ground. After the Ulaid win the battle, Cairbre's son Erc swears allegiance to Conchobar, marries Cúchulainn's daughter Finnscoth, and becomes king of Tara in his father's place.

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Remembrancer

Remembrancer

The Remembrancer was originally one of certain subordinate officers of the English Exchequer. The office itself is of great antiquity, the holder having been termed remembrancer, memorator, rememorator, registrar, keeper of the register, despatcher of business. The Remembrancer compiled memorandum rolls and thus “reminded” the barons of the Exchequer of business pending. There were at one time three clerks of the remembrance, styled King's Remembrancer, Lord Treasurer's Remembrancer and Remembrancer of First-Fruits and Tenths. In England, the latter two offices have become extinct, that of remembrancer of first-fruits by the diversion of the fund, and that of Lord Treasurer's Remembrancer on being merged in the office of King's Remembrancer in 1833. By the Queen's Remembrancer Act 1859 the office ceased to exist separately, and the queen's remembrancer was required to be a master of the court of exchequer. The Judicature Act 1873 attached the office to the Supreme Court, and the Supreme Court of Judicature Act 1879 transferred it to the central office of the Supreme Court. By section 8 of that Act, the king's remembrancer is a master of the Supreme Court, and the office is usually filled by the senior master. The king's remembrancer department of the central office is now amalgamated with the judgments and married women acknowledgments department. The king's remembrancer still assists at certain ceremonial functions relics of the former importance of the office such as the nomination of sheriffs, the swearing-in of the Lord Mayor of the City of London, the Trial of the Pyx and the acknowledgments of homage for crown lands.

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Zedekiah

Zedekiah

Zedekiah, also written Tzidkiyahu, was a biblical character, said to be the last king of Judah before the destruction of the kingdom by Babylon. He was installed as king of Judah by Nebuchadnezzar II, king of Babylon, after a siege of Jerusalem, to succeed his nephew, Jeconiah, who was overthrown as king after a reign of only three months and ten days. William F. Albright dates the reign of Zedekiah to 606 – 586 BC, while E. R. Thiele to 597 – 586 BC. On that reckoning, he was born c. 618 BC, being twenty-one on becoming king. The prophet Jeremiah was his counselor, yet "he did evil in the sight of the Lord".

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Catherine de' Medici

Catherine de' Medici

Catherine de' Medici, daughter of Lorenzo II de' Medici and of Madeleine de La Tour d'Auvergne, was an Italian noblewoman who was Queen consort of France from 1547 until 1559, as the wife of King Henry II of France. In 1533, at the age of fourteen, Caterina married Henry, second son of King Francis I and Queen Claude of France. Under the gallicised version of her name, Catherine de Médicis, she was Queen consort of France as the wife of King Henry II of France from 1547 to 1559. Throughout his reign, Henry excluded Catherine from participating in state affairs and instead showered favours on his chief mistress, Diane de Poitiers, who wielded much influence over him. Henry's death thrust Catherine into the political arena as mother of the frail fifteen-year-old King Francis II. When he died in 1560, she became regent on behalf of her ten-year-old son King Charles IX and was granted sweeping powers. After Charles died in 1574, Catherine played a key role in the reign of her third son, Henry III. He dispensed with her advice only in the last months of her life. Catherine's three sons reigned in an age of almost constant civil and religious war in France. The problems facing the monarchy were complex and daunting. At first, Catherine compromised and made concessions to the rebelling Protestants, or Huguenots, as they became known. She failed, however, to grasp the theological issues that drove their movement. Later, she resorted in frustration and anger to hard-line policies against them. In return, she came to be blamed for the excessive persecutions carried out under her sons' rule, in particular for the St. Bartholomew's Day massacre of 1572, in which thousands of Huguenots were killed in Paris and throughout France.

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Alcestis

Alcestis

Alcestis is a princess in Greek mythology, known for her love of her husband. Her story was popularised in Euripides's tragedy Alcestis. She was the daughter of Pelias, king of Iolcus, and either Anaxibia or Phylomache. In the story, many suitors appeared before King Pelias, her father, when she became of age to marry. It was declared she would marry the first man to yoke a lion and a boar to a chariot. The man who would do this, King Admetus, was helped by Apollo, who had been banished from Olympus for 9 years to serve as a shepherd to Admetus. With Apollo's help, Admetus completed the king's task, and was allowed to marry Alcestis. After the wedding, Admetus forgot to make the required sacrifice to Artemis, and found his bed full of snakes. Apollo again helped the newly wed king, this time by making the Fates drunk, extracting from them a promise that if anyone would want to die instead of Admetus, they would allow it. Since no one volunteered, not even his elderly parents, Alcestis stepped forth. Shortly after, Heracles rescued Alcestis from Hades, as a token of appreciation for the hospitality of Admetus. Admetus and Alcestis had a son, Eumelus, a participant in the siege of Troy, and a daughter, Perimele. Milton's famous sonnet, "Methought I Saw My Late Espoused Saint," alludes to the myth, with the speaker of the poem dreaming of his dead wife being brought to him "like Alcestis". In his poem "Past Ruin'd Ilion", English writer and poet Walter Savage Landor wrote the line "Alcestis rises from the shades" as having a double meaning, evoking her rise from Hades while demonstrating the ability of enduring poetry to give her vitality, drawing her into the light from the shadows of historical oblivion. The Viennese composer Gluck wrote an opera based on the story of Alceste, as did Handel, in his opera. H.P. Lovecraft wrote a play called Alcestis. Thornton Wilder wrote A Life in The Sun based on Euripides' play, later producing an operatic version called The Alcestiad. The American choreographer Martha Graham created a ballet entitled Alcestis in 1960.

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Ini

Ini

Ini was a king at Thebes, Egypt, during the 8th century BC. Menkheperre Ini or Iny Si-Ese Meryamun was probably Rudamun's successor at Thebes but was not a member of his predecessor's 23rd Dynasty. Unlike the 23rd dynasty rulers, he was a local king who ruled only at Thebes for at least 4–5 years after the death of Rudamun. His existence was first revealed with the publication of a dated Year 5 graffito at an Egyptian temple by Helen Jacquet-Gordon in 1979. Prior to 1989, he was conventionally attested by only three documents: ⁕Graffito No. 11 which dates to Year 5 III Shemu day 10 of an "Iny Si-Ese Meryamun" on the roof of Khonsu Temple; ⁕A bronze plaque in Durham University which preserves his nomen: "Son of Re Iny"; and ⁕A shard from Abydos. Then in 1989, Jean Yoyotte published an important new study on Ini/Iny's reign in a CRIPEL 11 paper. Below is a partial English summary of his article by Chris Bennett: Yoyotte's proposed identification of Menkheperre as the prenomen of King Ini/Iny, was based on his examination of the surviving traces of this king's nomen in the Louvre stela which he believed conformed better with the name Iny than the Nubian Dynasty 25 ruler Piy/Piye. His arguments here are today accepted by virtually all Egyptologists including Jürgen von Beckerath in the latter's 1999 book on royal Egyptian king's names.

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Unlearned Parliament

Unlearned Parliament

The Unlearned Parliament also known as the Lawless Parliament, Parliament of Dunces or the Parliamentum Indoctorum is the term used for the 1404 parliament called by Henry IV of England at the Great Hall of the Benedictine monastery in Coventry, Warwickshire, so called because the king refused to allow lawyers to stand as members, with "No Sheriff to be returned, nor any apprentice or other person at law" due to the King claiming that they were "troublesome", although more likely simply because they were familiar with the law. "Much ado there was; but to conclude, the worthy Archbishop standing stoutly for the good of the Church, preserved it at that time from the storm impending." During the Parliament, the House of Commons attempted to interfere with the running of the King's household, suggesting ways to spend less and to stop the bestowal of useless pensions, with the idea being that the Crown's holdings would be able to support the King's expenditure without draining the government's coffers. This parliament is seen by many historians as the central reason that Richard le Scrope, the Archbishop of York, became disillusioned with the king, after not commenting on Henry's seizure of the throne and the execution of William le Scrope, 1st Earl of Wiltshire, a relative of his. Scrope rebelled in the spring of 1405, raising 8,000 men and 3 knights after a propaganda campaign before being captured by Ralph de Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland after disbanding his force per the terms of a truce. There is some evidence that the politically unsavvy Archbishop was manipulated throughout these events by Henry Percy, 1st Earl of Northumberland to legitimize his revenge campaign against Henry.

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Icel

Icel

The Iclingas were a dynasty of Kings of Mercia during the 7th and 8th centuries, named for Icel, great-grandson of Offa of Angel, a legendary or semi-legendary migration age figure who was in turn considered a descendant of Woden. The Iclingas reached the height of their power under Offa of Mercia, who achieved hegemony over the other Anglo-Saxon states, and proclaimed himself "King of the English", but the dynasty lost control of Mercia soon after his death. Penda, who became king of Mercia in about 626 and is the first king named in the regnal lists of the Anglian collection, and at the same time the last pagan king of Mercia, gave rise to a dynasty that supplied at least eleven kings to the throne of Mercia. Four additional monarchs were given an Icling pedigree in later genealogical sources but are now believed to have descended from the family by way of Penda's sister. Icel himself is of doubtful historicity; if historical he would have flourished during the first half of the 6th century, during the later phase, or within living memory, of the Anglo-Saxon migration; despite the claims of ties from continental Angeln, Brooks has suggested the Iclings more likely to have come from local origins in Mercia. He suggested that before Penda they may have been rulers of a "small Midlands people" with around 300 to 600 hides of land. Icel's ancestry in genealogical tradition is as follows: Icel son of Eomer son of Angeltheow son of Offa son of Wermund son of Wihtlæg son of Woden. In this tradition, Icel is the leader of the Angles who migrated to Britain. Icel is then separated from the establishment of Mercia by three generations: Icel's son was Cnebba, whose son was Cynewald, whose son was Creoda, first king of Mercia.

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Fisher King

Fisher King

In Arthurian legend, the Fisher King, or the Wounded King, is the latest in a long line charged with keeping the Holy Grail. Versions of his story vary widely, but he is always wounded in the legs or groin and incapable of moving on his own. When he is injured, his kingdom suffers as he does, his impotence affecting the fertility of the land and reducing it to a barren Wasteland. Little is left for him to do but fish in the river near his castle Corbenic. Knights travel from many lands to heal the Fisher King, but only the chosen can accomplish the feat. This is Percival in earlier stories; in later versions, he is joined by Galahad and Bors. Confusingly, many works have two wounded Grail Kings who live in the same castle, a father and son. The more seriously wounded father stays in the castle, sustained by the Grail alone, while the more active son can meet with guests and go fishing. For the purposes of clarity in the remainder of this article, where both appear, the father will be called the Wounded King, the son the Fisher King.

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Duke of Normandy

Duke of Normandy

Duke of Normandy was the title given to the rulers of the Duchy of Normandy in northern France, a fief created in AD 911 by King Charles III "the Simple" of France for Rollo, a Scandinavian nobleman and leader of Northmen. In 1066 the reigning duke, William II the Conqueror, conquered Brittany and then England, whereupon he became known as King William I "the Conqueror" of England. From then on, the duke of Normandy and the king of England were usually the same man, until the king of France seized Normandy from King John in 1204. John's son Henry III renounced the ducal claim in the Treaty of Paris. Thereafter, the duchy was given at least four times to members of the French royal family, until the French Revolution and the dissolution of the French monarchy in 1792.

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Sugungga

Sugungga

Sugungga is one of the five surviving stories of the Korean pansori storytelling tradition. The other stories are Simcheongga, Heungbuga, Jeokbyeokga, and Chunhyangga. The pansori Sugungga is an adaptation of "A Tale of Rabbit and Turtle." Sugungga is considered to be more exciting and farcical than the other pansoris because of its personification of animals. The satire is more frank and humorous. It has serious parts as well in the characters of the king and loyal retainers. Therefore Sugungga is regarded as the "small Jeokbyeokga;" so Pansori singers sing those parts earnestly. Sugungga is based on the story of the Dragon King of the Southern Sea, a terrapin, and a wily rabbit. This story is believed to have stemmed from a tale about a terrapin and a rabbit in the early period of the Silla Dynasty. The theme of this story is the relationship of subject to king. The Dragon King of the Southern Sea is suffering from an ailment that can be cured only with the liver of a rabbit. The king thereupon summons all the ministers to look for the liver of a rabbit on the ground. The terrapin volunteers his service to journey to a forest and return with a rabbit.

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calais

Calais

a town in northern France on the Strait of Dover that serves as a ferry port to England; in 1347 it was captured by the English king Edward III after a long siege and remained in English hands until it was recaptured by the French king Henry II in 1558

— Princeton's WordNet

canute

Canute, Cnut, Knut, Canute the Great

king of Denmark and Norway who forced Edmund II to divide England with him; on the death of Edmund II, Canute became king of all England (994-1035)

— Princeton's WordNet

canute the great

Canute, Cnut, Knut, Canute the Great

king of Denmark and Norway who forced Edmund II to divide England with him; on the death of Edmund II, Canute became king of all England (994-1035)

— Princeton's WordNet

castle

castle

move the king two squares toward a rook and in the same move the rook to the square next past the king

— Princeton's WordNet

cnut

Canute, Cnut, Knut, Canute the Great

king of Denmark and Norway who forced Edmund II to divide England with him; on the death of Edmund II, Canute became king of all England (994-1035)

— Princeton's WordNet

edward the elder

Edward the Elder

king of Wessex whose military success against the Danes made it possible for his son Athelstan to become the first king of all England (870-924)

— Princeton's WordNet

henry iii

Henry III

son of King John and king of England from 1216 to 1272; his incompetence aroused baronial opposition led by Simon de Montfort (1207-1272)

— Princeton's WordNet

henry tudor

Henry VII, Henry Tudor

first Tudor king of England from 1485 to 1509; head of the house of Lancaster in the War of the Roses; defeated Richard III at Bosworth Field and was proclaimed king; married the daughter of Edward IV and so united the houses of York and Lancaster (1457-1509)

— Princeton's WordNet

henry vi

Henry VI

son of Henry V who as an infant succeeded his father and was King of England from 1422 to 1461; he was taken prisoner in 1460 and Edward IV was proclaimed king; he was rescued and regained the throne in 1470 but was recaptured and murdered in the Tower of London (1421-1471)

— Princeton's WordNet

henry vii

Henry VII, Henry Tudor

first Tudor king of England from 1485 to 1509; head of the house of Lancaster in the War of the Roses; defeated Richard III at Bosworth Field and was proclaimed king; married the daughter of Edward IV and so united the houses of York and Lancaster (1457-1509)

— Princeton's WordNet

iseult

Iseult, Isolde

(Middle Ages) the bride of the king of Cornwall who (according to legend) fell in love with the king's nephew (Tristan) after they mistakenly drank a love potion that left them eternally in love with each other

— Princeton's WordNet

james

James, James I, King James, King James I

the first Stuart to be king of England and Ireland from 1603 to 1625 and king of Scotland from 1567 to 1625; he was the son of Mary Queen of Scots and he succeeded Elizabeth I; he alienated the British Parliament by claiming the divine right of kings (1566-1625)

— Princeton's WordNet

james i

James, James I, King James, King James I

the first Stuart to be king of England and Ireland from 1603 to 1625 and king of Scotland from 1567 to 1625; he was the son of Mary Queen of Scots and he succeeded Elizabeth I; he alienated the British Parliament by claiming the divine right of kings (1566-1625)

— Princeton's WordNet

knut

Canute, Cnut, Knut, Canute the Great

king of Denmark and Norway who forced Edmund II to divide England with him; on the death of Edmund II, Canute became king of all England (994-1035)

— Princeton's WordNet

louis ix

Louis IX, Saint Louis, St. Louis

king of France and son of Louis VIII; he led two unsuccessful Crusades; considered an ideal medieval king (1214-1270)

— Princeton's WordNet

saint louis

Louis IX, Saint Louis, St. Louis

king of France and son of Louis VIII; he led two unsuccessful Crusades; considered an ideal medieval king (1214-1270)

— Princeton's WordNet

st. louis

Louis IX, Saint Louis, St. Louis

king of France and son of Louis VIII; he led two unsuccessful Crusades; considered an ideal medieval king (1214-1270)

— Princeton's WordNet

Familia

Familia

Familia was the name of a Polish political party led by the Czartoryski magnates and families allied with them, and formed toward the end of the reign of King August II. The Familia's principal leaders were Michał Fryderyk Czartoryski, Great Chancellor of Lithuania, his brother August Aleksander Czartoryski, voivode of Ruthenia, and their brother-in-law, Stanisław Poniatowski, Castellan of Kraków. During the 1733 interregnum, the Familia supported Stanisław Leszczyński for king, then reconciled with August III and became a party of the royal court. Following unsuccessful attempts at reforming the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth undertaken at sejms between 1744 and 1750, the Familia distanced itself from the royal court. In foreign affairs, they represented a pro-Russian orientation. During the 1763–1764 interregnum, armed Russian intervention allowed the Familia to overcome their opponents. When in 1764 Adam Kazimierz Czartoryski declined to seek the throne, the Czartoryskis agreed to the election, as king, of their kinsman, Stanisław August Poniatowski, one-time lover of Russian Empress Catherine II. In this period the Familia partially enacted their program of reforms, including the creation of treasury and military commissions limiting the power of treasurers and hetmans. Also, the liberum veto was suspended. Further reforms, however, were blocked by Russia and Prussia; and conservative opponents of the Familia and the King, backed by Russia's Catherine II, in 1767 formed the Radom Confederation and at the infamous Repnin Sejm abolished part of the recently introduced reforms.

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Morgan le Fay

Morgan le Fay

Morgan le Fay, alternatively known as Morgan le Faye, Morgane, Morgaine, Morgana and other names, is a powerful sorceress in the Arthurian legend. Early works featuring Morgan do not elaborate her character beyond her role as a fay or magician. She became much more prominent in the later cyclical prose works such as the Lancelot-Grail and the Post-Vulgate Cycle, in which she becomes an antagonist to King Arthur and Queen Guinevere. Morgan is said to be the daughter of Arthur's mother, the Lady Igraine, and her first husband, Gorlois, Duke of Cornwall, so that Arthur is her half-brother. She has at least two elder sisters, Elaine and Morgause, the latter of whom is the mother of Gawain, Gaheris, Gareth, Agravain, by King Lot and usually the traitor Mordred, by Arthur. In Sir Thomas Malory's Le Morte d'Arthur and elsewhere, she is married, unhappily, to King Urien of Gore and Ywain is her son. The early accounts of Geoffrey of Monmouth and Gerald of Wales refer to Morgan in conjunction with the Isle of Apples to which the fatally wounded Arthur was carried. To the former, she was an enchantress, one of nine sisters; to the latter, she was the ruler and patroness of an area near Glastonbury and a close blood-relation of King Arthur. In the early romances of Chrétien de Troyes, she also figures as a healer. In later stories, Morgan becomes an adversary of the Round Table when Guinevere discovers her adultery with one of her husband's knights, though she eventually reconciles with her brother and even retains her original role, serving as one of the four enchantresses who carry him to Avalon after his final Battle of Camlann.

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Battle of Hastings

Battle of Hastings

The Battle of Hastings occurred on 14 October 1066 during the Norman conquest of England, between the Norman-French army of Duke William II of Normandy and the English army under King Harold II. It took place at Senlac Hill, approximately 7 miles northwest of Hastings, close to the present-day town of Battle, East Sussex, and was a decisive Norman victory. The background to the battle was the death of the childless King Edward the Confessor in January 1066, which set up a succession struggle between a number of claimants. Harold was crowned king shortly after Edward's death, but faced invasions by not only William but also his brother Tostig and the Norwegian King Harald Hardrada. Hardrada and Tostig defeated a hastily gathered army of Englishmen at the Battle of Fulford on 20 September 1066, but were in turn defeated by Harold at the Battle of Stamford Bridge on 25 September 1066. The deaths of Tostig and Hardrada at Stamford left William as the only serious opponent to Harold. But while Harold and his forces were recovering from Stamford, William landed his invasion forces in the south of England at Pevensey on 28 September 1066 and established a beachhead for his conquest of the kingdom. Harold was forced to march south swiftly, gathering forces as he went.

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Clovis I

Clovis I

Clovis, or Chlodowech, was the first king of the Franks to unite all of the Frankish tribes under one ruler, changing the form of leadership from a group of royal chieftains to rule by a single king and ensuring that the kingship was passed down to his heirs. He was also the first Christian king to rule Gaul, known today as France. Clovis was the son of Childeric I, a Merovingian king of the Salian Franks, and Basina, Queen of Thuringia. He succeeded his father in 481, at the age of fifteen. He is considered the founder of the Merovingian dynasty, which ruled the Franks for the next two centuries.

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Solomon

Solomon

Solomon, also called Jedidiah, was, according to the Book of Kings, the Book of Chronicles, Hidden Words and the Qur'an a king of Israel and the son of David. The conventional dates of Solomon's reign are circa 970 to 931 BC. He is described as the third king of the United Monarchy, and the final king before the northern Kingdom of Israel and the southern Kingdom of Judah split. Following the split, his patrilineal descendants ruled over Judah alone. According to the Talmud, Solomon is one of the 48 prophets. In the Qur'an, he is considered a major prophet, and Muslims generally refer to him by the Arabic variant Sulayman, son of David. The Hebrew Bible credits Solomon as the builder of the First Temple in Jerusalem and portrays him as great in wisdom, wealth, and power, but ultimately as a king whose sin, including idolatry and turning away from Yahweh, leads to the kingdom's being torn in two during the reign of his son Rehoboam. Solomon is the subject of many other later references and legends, most notably in the 1st-century apocryphal work known as the Testament of Solomon. In later years, Solomon also came to be known as a magician and an exorcist, with numerous amulets and medallion seals dating from the Hellenistic period invoking his name.

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Memucan

Memucan

According to the biblical book of Esther, Memucan was one of the seven vice-regents of the Persian King Ahasuerus. It is not stated in the text explicitly, but it is the generally accepted belief that Memucan and Haman were the same person. When Queen Vashti, Ahasuerus' consort, refused his order to display herself at the king's banquet, Memucan advised the king to depose her and replace her with a more worthy wife. Memucan further advised the king to issue a decree throughout his domain declaring his action, so that all women would learn a lesson and honor and respect their husbands. The decree was translated and transcribed into each language and script of the empire, so that each man would be "master in his own house." [1]

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Ansa, Queen of the Lombards

Ansa, Queen of the Lombards

Ansa or Ansia belonged to an aristocratic family of Brescia and was the wife of Desiderius, King of the Lombards. The Latin name does not imply a Romano-Italic origin, as Romans and Lombards in the eighth century tended to take either German or Latin names. She was probably a Lombard, the daughter of Verissimo and sister of King Hildeprand, Arechis, and Donnolo, and niece of King Liutprand. In or around 753, she founded the monastery of S. Michele and S. Pietro at Brescia. Desire, meanwhile, had become an authoritative person and the couple moved first to Italy, at the royal court, and in Tuscany, when desire became 'Duke of Tuscia'. The death of King Aistulf, Desire managed to seize the throne. Ansa, become queen, actively collaborated with her husband, especially in religious matters. In Brescia, expanded the previously founded monastery, which became the monastery of San Salvatore, endowed him with an exceptional wealth and made abbess daughter Anselperga. The jurisdiction of San Salvatore was subjugated an entire network of monasteries in Lombardy, Emilia and Tuscany, creating a federation directly controlled by the sovereign. After 759, she appeared frequently in Desiderius' diplomas and was probably the architect of his religious policy.

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Thinner

Thinner

Thinner is a 1984 novel by Stephen King, published under his pseudonym, Richard Bachman. It would be the last novel which King released under the Richard Bachman pseudonym until the release of The Regulators in 1996, and the last released prior to Bachman being outed as being Stephen King's pseudonym. The initial hardcover release of Thinner included a fake jacket photo of "Bachman". The photo is claimed to have been taken by Claudia Inez Bachman. The actual subject of the photo is Richard Manuel, the insurance agent of Kirby McCauley, who was King's literary agent. The novel was adapted for the screenplay of a 1996 film of the same title.

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Cnut the Great

Cnut the Great

Cnut the Great, more commonly known as Canute, was a king of Denmark, England, Norway, and parts of Sweden, together often referred to as the Anglo-Scandinavian or North Sea Empire. After the death of his heirs within a decade of his own and the Norman conquest of England in 1066, his legacy was largely lost to history. Historian Norman Cantor has made the statement that he was "the most effective king in Anglo-Saxon history", despite his not being Anglo-Saxon. Cnut was of Danish and Slavic descent. His father was Sweyn Forkbeard, King of Denmark. Cnut's mother was the daughter of the first duke of the Polans, Mieszko I; her name may have been Świętosława, but the Oxford DNB article on Cnut states that her name is unknown. As a prince of Denmark, Cnut won the throne of England in 1016 in the wake of centuries of Viking activity in northwestern Europe. His accession to the Danish throne in 1018 brought the crowns of England and Denmark together. Cnut maintained his power by uniting Danes and Englishmen under cultural bonds of wealth and custom, rather than by sheer brutality. After a decade of conflict with opponents in Scandinavia, Cnut claimed the crown of Norway in Trondheim in 1028. The Swedish city Sigtuna was held by Cnut. He had coins struck there that called him king, but there is no narrative record of his occupation.

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Serjeant-at-law

Serjeant-at-law

The Serjeants-at-Law was an order of barristers at the English bar. The position of Serjeant-at-Law, or Sergeant-Counter, was centuries old; there are writs dating to 1300 which identify them as descended from figures in France prior to the Norman Conquest. The Serjeants were the oldest formally created order in England, having been brought into existence as a body by Henry II. The order rose during the 16th century as a small, elite group of lawyers who took much of the work in the central common law courts. With the creation of Queen's Counsel during the reign of Elizabeth I, the order gradually began to decline, with each monarch opting to create more King's or Queen's Counsel. The Serjeants' exclusive jurisdictions were ended during the 19th century, and with the Judicature Act 1873 coming into force in 1875, it was felt that there was no need to have such figures, and no more were created. The last Serjeant-at-Law was Lord Lindley. The Serjeants had for many centuries exclusive jurisdiction over the Court of Common Pleas, being the only lawyers allowed to argue a case there. At the same time they had rights of audience in the other central common law courts and precedence over all other lawyers. Only Serjeants-at-Law could become judges of these courts right up into the 19th century, and socially the Serjeants ranked above Knights Bachelor and Companions of the Bath. Within the Serjeants-at-Law were more distinct orders; the King's Serjeants, particularly favoured Serjeants-at-Law, and within that the King's Premier Serjeant, the Monarch's most favoured Serjeant, and the King's Ancient Serjeant, the oldest. Serjeants were created by Writ of Summons under the Great Seal of the Realm and wore a special and distinctive dress, the chief feature of which was the coif, a white lawn or silk skullcap, afterwards represented by a round piece of white lace at the top of the wig.

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Lanka

Lanka

Lanka is the name given in Hindu mythology to the island fortress capital of the legendary king Ravana in the great Hindu epics, the Ramayana and the Mahabharata. The fortress was situated on a plateau between three mountain peaks known as the Trikuta Mountains. The ancient City of Lankapura is thought to have been burnt down by Lord Hanuman. After the King Ravana was killed by Lord Rama with the help of the former's brother Vibhishana, Vibhishana was crowned King of Lankapura by Lord Rama after which he ruled the kingdom. The mythological Lankapuri is identified today as Sri Lanka. His descendants ruled the kingdom even during the period of the Pandavas. According to the epic, the Mahabharata, the Pandava Sahadeva had visited this kingdom during his southern military campaign for the Rajasuya sacrifice of Pandava king Yudhisthira.

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Beadsman

Beadsman

Bedesman, or beadsman was generally a pensioner or almsman whose duty it was to pray for his benefactor. In Scotland there were public almsmen supported by the king and expected in return to pray for his welfare and that of the state. These men wore long blue gowns with a pewter badge on the right arm, and were nicknamed Blue Gowns. Their number corresponded to the king's years, an extra one being added each royal birthday. They were privileged to ask alms throughout Scotland. On the king's birthday each bedesman received a new blue gown, a loaf, a bottle of ale, and a leathern purse containing a penny for every year of the king's life. On the pewter badge which they wore were their name and the words "pass and repass," which authorized them to ask alms. The last beadsman died in Aberdeen in 1988. In consequence of its use in this general sense of pensioner, "bedesman" was long used in English as equivalent to "servant." The word had a special sense as the name for those almsmen attached to cathedrals and other churches, whose duty it was to pray for the souls of deceased benefactors. A relic of pre-Reformation times, these old men still figure in the accounts of English cathedrals.

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Battle of Brunanburh

Battle of Brunanburh

The Battle of Brunanburh was an English victory in 937 by the army of Æthelstan, King of England, and his brother Edmund over the combined armies of Olaf III Guthfrithson, the Norse–Gael King of Dublin; Constantine II, King of Scots; and Owen I, King of Strathclyde. Though relatively little known today, it was called "the greatest single battle in Anglo-Saxon history before the Battle of Hastings." Michael Livingston claimed that Brunanburh marks "the moment when Englishness came of age." The site of the battle is not known, though modern scholarship suggests that somewhere in the Wirral Peninsula is likely. Mention of the battle is made in dozens of sources, in Old English, Latin, Irish, Welsh, Icelandic, and Middle English, and there are many later accounts or responses to the battle, including those by Alfred, Lord Tennyson and Jorge Luis Borges. A contemporary record of the battle is found in the Old English poem Battle of Brunanburh, preserved in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle.

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Field of the Cloth of Gold

Field of the Cloth of Gold

The Field of the Cloth of Gold or Camp du Drap d'Or is the name given to a place in Balinghem, between Guînes and Ardres, in France, near Calais, that was the site of a meeting that took place from 7 June to 24 June 1520, between King Henry VIII of England and King Francis I of France. The meeting was arranged to increase the bond of friendship between the two kings following the Anglo-French treaty of 1514. The form "Field of Cloth of Gold" has been in general use in the English language since at least the 18th century. The hereditary monarchs of the two countries would not meet again until 1843 when Queen Victoria met King Louis Philippe I, the last king to rule France. There was an intervening meeting in 1536 between James V of Scotland and Francis I of France, but James V ruled Scotland. Under the guidance of England's Cardinal Thomas Wolsey, the chief nations of Europe sought to outlaw war forever among Christian nations. Mattingly studied the causes of wars in that era, finding that such nonaggression treaties could never be stronger than the armies of their sponsors. When those forces were about equal, these treaties typically widened the conflict. That is, diplomacy could sometimes postpone war, but could not prevent wars based on irreconcilable interests and ambitions. What was lacking, Mattingly concludes, was a neutral power whose judgements were generally accepted by either impartial justice or by overwhelming force.

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House of Gadi

House of Gadi

The House of Gadi was a dynasty of kings of the Northern Kingdom of Israel. The dynasty is also called the House of Menahem, after its founder. The dynasty lasted for only twelve years and ruled from the then capital of Israel, Samaria. The dynasty is so named because Menahem was the son of Gadi. Some have speculated that Gadi was a scion of the tribe of Gad. Two kings of Israel came from the dynasty - Menahem and Pekahiah. Menahem became king of Israel in the thirty-ninth year of the reign of Azariah, king of Judah. He reigned in Israel for ten years. He was succeeded by his son Pekahiah. Pekahiah became king in the fiftieth year of the reign of Azariah. After a reign of two years, Pekahiah was assassinated by Pekah, son of Remaliah, one of his chief officers with the help of fifty men of Gilead. Pekah succeeded Pekahiah as king. Petah's dynasty is known as the House of Remaliah.

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Gawain

Gawain

Gawain is King Arthur's nephew and a Knight of the Round Table in the Arthurian legend. Under the name Gwalchmei, he appears very early in the legend's development, being mentioned in some of the earliest Welsh Arthurian sources. He is one of a select number of Round Table members to be referred to as one of the greatest knights, most notably in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. He is almost always portrayed as the son of Arthur's sister Morgause and King Lot of Orkney and Lothian, and his brothers are Agravain, Gaheris, Gareth, and Mordred. He was well known to be the most trustworthy friend of Sir Lancelot. In some works he has sisters as well. According to some legends, he would have been the true and rightful heir to the throne of Camelot, after the reign of King Arthur. Gawain is often portrayed as a formidable, courteous, and also a compassionate warrior, fiercely loyal to his king and family. He is a friend to young knights, a defender of the poor, and as "the Maidens' Knight", a defender of women as well. In some works, his strength waxes and wanes with the sun; in the most common form of this motif, his might triples by noon, but fades as the sun sets. His knowledge of herbs makes him a great healer, and he is credited with at least three children: Florence, Lovell, and Gingalain, the last of which is also called Libeaus Desconus or Le Bel Inconnu, the Fair Unknown. Gawain appears in English, French and Celtic literature as well as in Italy where he appears in the architecture of the north portal in the cathedral of Modena, constructed in 1184.

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Luft

Luft

Luft, the German word for "air", is used by some chess writers and commentators to denote a space left by a pawn move into which a castled king may move, especially such a space made with the intention of avoiding a back rank checkmate. A move leaving such a space is often said to "give the king some luft". In German itself, however, such a space would be called a Luftloch. A simplified example is seen to the right. Black is threatening checkmate with the simple 1...Re1# and White must deal with this threat. The right thing to do is to give the king some luft by moving a pawn on the g or h file: 1.g3, 1.g4, 1.h3, and 1.h4 will all avoid immediate checkmate. After each, 1...Re1+ can be simply met with 2.Kg2 or 2.Kh2. It is usually better to move the h-pawn because moving the f-pawn can weaken the king's position and moving the g-pawn creates holes at f3 and h3. In the diagram, Black has a weak luft because of the holes on a6 and c6; White has a strong luft, without holes.

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Naaman

Naaman

Naaman was a commander of the armies of Ben-Hadad II in the time of Joram, king of Israel. He is mentioned in 2 Kings 5 of the Tanakh as "וְ֠נַעֲמָן שַׂר־ צְבָ֨א מֶֽלֶךְ־ אֲרָ֜ם" or "Naaman captain of the army of the King of Aram". According to the narrative, he was afflicted with tzaraath. When the Hebrew slave-girl who waits on his wife tells her of a prophet in Samaria who can cure her master, he obtains a letter from Ben-Hadad II to Joram in which the former asks Joram to arrange for the healing of his subject Naaman. Naaman proceeds with the letter to Joram. The king of Israel suspects in this — to him — impossible request a pretext of Syria for later starting a war against him, and tears his clothes. When the prophet Elisha hears about this, he sends for Naaman. But rather than personally receiving Naaman when the latter arrives at Elisha's house, Elisha merely sends a messenger to the door who tells Naaman to cure his affliction by dipping himself seven times in the Jordan River. Naaman, who had expected the prophet himself to come out to him and perform some kind of impressive ritual magic, angrily refuses, and prepares to go home unhealed. Only after Naaman's slaves suggest to their master that he has nothing to lose by at least giving it a try, he does as told and finds himself healed. Naaman returns to Elisha with lavish gifts, which Elisha flatly refuses to accept. Naaman also renounces his former god Rimmon after being cured by Elisha and accepts the God of Israel. He does, however, ask that the God of Israel pardon him when he enters the temple of Rimmon as part of his obligations to the king of Syria.

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Latitat

Latitat

A latitat is a legal device, namely a writ, that is "based upon the presumption that the person summoned was hiding", see Blackstone. The word "latitat" is Latin for "he lurks." In England, the writ is essentially a summons out of the civil, and in those days common law only court King's Bench. It is now defunct but examples still exist from 1579 and 1791. One example from the 16th Century was a writ presented to the Star Chamber, a powerful court operating outside the normal system of law. In that example, the Court of King's Bench had issued a writ of latitat directing the King's Sheriff to arrest the named person and present him before the court at a specified time and place. The matter had come before the Star Chamber because the arrest had been resisted and the Under-Sheriff assaulted and a writ of subpoena was now requested. The writ may have arisen in 1566 because at that time there was a 'Bill for Latitat for Vexation out of the King's Bench' before Parliament and there was another in 1802. The current practice would be for the issue of a subpoena. If the person concerned failed to appear, the High Court of England and Wales has the power to issue a Bench Warrant i.e. a warrant for the arrest of the person concerned, who may then be subject to arrest under that aegis of The Tipstaff and presentation before the court for contempt of court.

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Nine Years' War

Nine Years' War

The Nine Years' War – often called the War of the Grand Alliance, the War of the Palatine Succession, or the War of the League of Augsburg – was a major war of the late 17th century fought between King Louis XIV of France, and a European-wide coalition, the Grand Alliance, led by the Anglo-Dutch Stadtholder-King William III, Holy Roman Emperor Leopold I, King Charles II of Spain, Victor Amadeus II of Savoy, and the major and minor princes of the Holy Roman Empire. The Nine Years' War was fought primarily on mainland Europe and its surrounding waters, but it also encompassed a theatre in Ireland and in Scotland, where William III and James II struggled for control of the British Isles, and a campaign between French and English settlers and their respective Indian allies in colonial North America. The War was the second of Louis XIV's three major wars. Louis XIV had emerged from the Franco-Dutch War in 1678 as the most powerful monarch in Europe; but, although he had expanded his realm, the 'Sun King' remained unsatisfied. Using a combination of aggression, annexation, and quasi-legal maneuvers, Louis XIV immediately set about extending his gains in order to stabilize and strengthen France's frontiers, culminating in the brief War of the Reunions. The resulting Truce of Ratisbon guaranteed the extended borders of France for twenty years, but Louis XIV's subsequent actions – notably his revocation of the Edict of Nantes in 1685, and his attempt to extend his influence in the German Rhineland – led to the deterioration of his military and political dominance. Louis XIV's decision to cross the Rhine and besiege Philippsburg in September 1688 was intended to pre-empt a strike against France by Emperor Leopold I and to force the Holy Roman Empire into accepting his territorial and dynastic claims. But, when the Emperor and the German princes resolved to resist, and when the States-General and William III brought the Dutch and the English into the war against France, Louis XIV at last faced a powerful coalition aimed at curtailing his ambitions.

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King Lear

King Lear

King Lear is a tragedy by William Shakespeare. The title character descends into madness after disposing of his estate between two of his three daughters based on their flattery, bringing tragic consequences for all. The play is based on the legend of Leir of Britain, a mythological pre-Roman Celtic king. It has been widely adapted for the stage and motion pictures, and the role of Lear has been coveted and played by many of the world's most accomplished actors. The play was written between 1603 and 1606 and later revised. Shakespeare's earlier version, The True Chronicle of the History of the Life and Death of King Lear and His Three Daughters, was published in quarto in 1608. The Tragedy of King Lear, a more theatrical version, was included in the 1623 First Folio. Modern editors usually conflate the two, though some insist that each version has its individual integrity that should be preserved. After the Restoration, the play was often revised with a happy ending for audiences who disliked its dark and depressing tone, but since the 19th century Shakespeare's original version has been regarded as one of his supreme achievements. The tragedy is particularly noted for its probing observations on the nature of human suffering and kinship. George Bernard Shaw wrote, "No man will ever write a better tragedy than Lear".

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Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is a small spaniel classed as a toy dog by The Kennel Club. It is one of the most popular breeds in the United Kingdom. Since 2000, it has grown in popularity in the United States. It is a smaller breed of spaniel, and Cavalier adults are often the same size as adolescent dogs of other spaniel breeds. It has a silky, smooth coat and commonly a smooth undocked tail. The breed standard recognizes four colours: Blenheim, Tricolour, Black and Tan, and Ruby. The breed is generally friendly, affectionate and good with both children and other animals; however, they require a lot of human interaction. The King Charles changed drastically in the late 17th century, when it was interbred with flat-nosed breeds. Until the 1920s, the Cavalier shared the same history as the smaller King Charles Spaniel. Breeders attempted to recreate what they considered to be the original configuration of the breed, a dog resembling Charles II's King Charles Spaniel of the Restoration. Various health issues affect this particular breed, most notably mitral valve disease, which leads to heart failure. This appears in most Cavaliers at some point in their lives and is the most common cause of death. The breed may also suffer from syringomyelia, in which cavities are formed in the spinal cord, possibly associated with malformation of the skull that reduces the space available for the brain. Cavaliers are also affected by ear problems, a common health problem among spaniels of various types, and they can suffer from such other general maladies as hip dysplasia, which are common across many types of dog breeds.

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Amphitryon

Amphitryon

Amphitryon, in Greek mythology, was a son of Alcaeus, king of Tiryns in Argolis. Amphitryon was a Theban general, who was originally from Tiryns in the eastern part of the Peloponnese. He was friends with Panopeus. Having accidentally killed his father-in-law Electryon, king of Mycenae, Amphitryon was driven out by Electryon's brother, Sthenelus. He fled with Alcmene, Electryon's daughter, to Thebes, where he was cleansed from the guilt of blood by Creon, his maternal uncle, king of Thebes. Alcmene, who was pregnant and had been betrothed to Amphitryon by her father, refused to marry him until he had avenged the death of her brothers, all but one of whom had fallen in battle against the Taphians. It was on his return from this expedition that Electryon had been killed. Amphitryon accordingly took the field against the Taphians, accompanied by Creon, who had agreed to assist him on condition that he slew the Teumessian fox which had been sent by Dionysus to ravage the country. The Taphians, however, remained invincible until Comaetho, the king's daughter, out of love for Amphitryon cut off her father's golden hair, the possession of which rendered him immortal. Having defeated the enemy, Amphitryon put Comaetho to death and handed over the kingdom of the Taphians to Cephalus. On his return to Thebes, he married Alcmene, who gave birth to twin sons, Iphicles and Heracles. Only the former was the son of Amphitryon because Heracles was the son of Zeus, who had visited Alcmene during Amphitryon's absence.

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Catherine Parr

Catherine Parr

Catherine Parr was queen of England as the last of the six wives of King Henry VIII of England, whom she married on 12 July 1543. She was the first queen consort of Ireland and the fourth commoner Henry had taken as his consort, and outlived him. She was also the most-married English queen, having had four husbands. Catherine enjoyed a close relationship with Henry's three children and was personally involved in the education of Elizabeth and Edward, both of whom became English monarchs. She was influential in Henry's passing of the Third Succession Act in 1543 that restored both his bastardised daughters, Mary and Elizabeth, to the line of succession to the throne. Catherine was appointed Regent from July to September 1544 while Henry was on a military campaign in France and in case he lost his life, she was to rule as Regent until Edward came of age. However he did not give her any function in government in his will. On account of Catherine's Protestant sympathies, she provoked the enmity of powerful Catholic officials who sought to turn the King against her—a warrant for her arrest was drawn up in 1546. However, she and the King soon reconciled. Her book Prayers or Meditations became the first book published by an English queen under her own name. She assumed the role of Elizabeth's guardian following the King's death, and published a second book, The Lamentations of a Sinner.

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Protea cynaroides

Protea cynaroides

The king protea is a flowering plant. It is a distinctive member of Protea, having the largest flower head in the genus. The species is also known as giant protea, honeypot or king sugar bush. It is widely distributed in the southwestern and southern parts of South Africa in the fynbos region. The king protea is the national flower of South Africa. It also is the flagship of the The Protea Atlas Project, run by the South African National Botanical Institute. The king protea has several colour forms and horticulturists have recognized 81 garden varieties, some of which have injudiciously been planted in its natural range. In some varieties the pink of the flower and red borders of leaves are replaced by a creamy yellow. This unusual flower has a long vase life in flower arrangements, and makes for an excellent dried flower. Protea cynaroides is adapted to survive the fires by its thick underground stem, which contains many dormant buds; these will produce the new growth after the fire.

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Ermanaric

Ermanaric

Ermanaric was a Greuthungian Gothic King who before the Hunnic invasion evidently ruled a sizable portion of Oium, the part of Scythia inhabited by the Goths at the time. He is mentioned in two Roman sources; the contemporary writings of Ammianus Marcellinus and in Getica by the 6th-century historian Jordanes. According to Ammianus, Ermanaric was "a most warlike king" who eventually committed suicide, faced with the aggression of the Alani and of the Huns, who invaded his territories in the 370s. Ammianus says he "ruled over extensively wide and fertile regions". Ammianus also says that after Ermanaric´s death, a certain Vithimiris was elected as a new king. According to Jordanes' Getica, Ermanaric ruled the realm of Oium. He describes him as a "Gothic Alexander" who "ruled all the nations of Scythia and Germania as they were his own". Jordanes also states that the king put to death a young woman named Sunilda with the use of horses, because of her infidelity. Thereupon her two brothers, Sarus and Ammius, severely wounded Ermanaric leaving him unfit to defend his kingdom from Hunnic incursions. Variations of this legend had a profound effect on medieval Germanic literature, including that of England and Scandinavia. Jordanes claims that he successfully ruled the Goths until his death at the age of 110.

— Freebase

Act a Fool

Act a Fool

Act a Fool is the debut album by West Coast hip hop artist King Tee. It is considered to be one of his better albums. Its success can be attributed to its production which is handled by DJ Pooh and King Tee himself, or the lack of guest appearances. King Tee is the only vocalist on the entire album—aside from Breeze and Mixmaster Spade on "Just Clowning--and his rhymes are described as "[d]efiant, angry, confrontational, and bemused" by Ron Wynn of Allmusic. Act a Fool reached Billboard 200 chart position. Its title track reached #29 on the Hot Rap Singles chart, and "Bass", which is remixed on this album, reached #19 on the same chart. Five of the eleven tracks on King Tee's debut album were later included on his greatest hits album, Ruff Rhymes: Greatest Hits Collection, in 1998.

— Freebase

Ear Candy

Ear Candy

Ear Candy is the sixth album by heavy metal/hard rock trio King's X, released in 1996. The album has two songs which are rewritten versions of earlier songs: "Picture" is also known as "The Door", a song with different lyrics, released on their pre-King's X release Sneak Preview. The song "Mississippi Moon" is mainly inspired on the song "If I Could Fly", which King's X played in shows after they had changed their name to its definite version, King's X. The bonus track "Freedom" can also be found as a b-side of the single "A Box". It was later given a proper release on the album Ogre Tones.

— Freebase

Satto

Satto

Satto, also known as Chadu, was a king of Chūzan, one of three kingdoms formerly on the island of Okinawa. His reign was marked by expansion and development of Chūzan's trade relations with other states, and the beginning of Okinawa's tributary relations with Ming Dynasty China, a relationship that continued for roughly five hundred years, almost until the fall of the Qing Dynasty. Satto was Governor of the Urasoe district, which surrounded and included Chūzan's capital. On the death of King Seii in 1350, Satto seized the throne for himself. His own line, or dynasty, however, did not last past his son, Bunei, who was ousted in 1405. Chinese envoys arrived in Chūzan in 1372, requesting admission of Chinese cultural supremacy and that Okinawa send representatives to Nanjing. Satto complied with these requests without hesitation, as this granted him formal license to trade with the most powerful nation in the region. He sent his younger brother Taiki to Nanjing in 1374, as the leader of a mission to formally submit to China, entering into tributary and trade relations. The Hongwu Emperor entertained the Ryukyuan mission, accepted their gifts, and sent them back with various gifts from China, including a royal seal, which served as a symbol of investiture. A Chinese official accompanied the returning mission, and represented the Imperial Court in officially confirming Satto as king of Okinawa. Though Okinawa was never conquered or annexed by China, this custom of investiture, of formally confirming the king in the eyes of the Chinese court, continued as part of tributary relations until the dismantling of the Ryūkyū Kingdom five centuries later. There were at least nine tributary missions to China over the next twenty years, three of them led by Taiki.

— Freebase

Totila

Totila

Totila, original name Baduila was the penultimate King of the Ostrogoths, reigning from 541 to 552 AD. A skilled military and political leader, Totila reversed the tide of Gothic War, recovering by 543 almost all the territories in Italy that the Eastern Roman Empire had captured from his Kingdom in 540. A relative of Theudis, sword-bearer of Theodoric the Great and king of the Visigoths, Totila was elected king by Ostrogothic nobles in the autumn of 541 after King Witigis had been carried off prisoner to Constantinople. Totila proved himself both as a military and political leader, winning the support of the lower classes by liberating slaves and distributing land to the peasants. After a successful defence at Verona, Totila pursued and defeated a numerically superior army at the Battle of Faventia in 542 AD. Building on his victories, Totila followed these victories by defeating the Romans outside Florence and capturing Naples. By 543, fighting on land and sea, he had reconqured the bulk of the lost territory. Rome held out, and Totila appealed unsuccessfully to the Senate in a letter reminding them of the loyalty of the Romans to his predecessor Theodoric the Great. In the spring of 544 the Eastern Roman emperor Justinian I sent his general Belisarius to Italy to counterattack, but Totila, captured Rome in 546 from Belisarius and depopulated the city after a yearlong siege. When Totila left to fight the Byzantines in Lucania, south of Naples, Belisarius retook Rome and rebuilt its fortifications.

— Freebase

Avener

Avener

An avener, or avenor, was the chief officer of the stables of a king, and the officer in charge of obtaining positions for horses belonging to the king. The Latin version of the word was avenarius, from the Latin avena, meaning "oats" or "straw". The avenar was under the watch of the Master of the Horse, and in his duties administered the oaths of office to all other stable officials. He was also in charge of stable expense accounts and payroll. An avenary, related to an avener, was the largest department in the household of the king. There was generally a staff of 100 to 200 valets and grooms which, under the watch of the avenar, tended to the horses of the king, his household, officials and attendants, as well as the horses of royal visitors.

— Freebase

Catherine of Braganza

Catherine of Braganza

Catherine of Braganza was queen of England, Scotland and Ireland from 1662 to 1685, as the wife of King Charles II. Queen Catherine was a member of the House of Braganza, the most senior noble house in Portugal which became Portugal's royal house after Catherine's father was acclaimed King John IV. Owing to her devotion to the Roman Catholic beliefs in which she had been raised, Catherine was an unpopular consort for Charles II. She was the special object of attack by the inventors of the Popish Plot. In 1678 the murder of Sir Edmund Berry Godfrey was ascribed to her servants, and Titus Oates accused her of a design to poison the king. These charges, of which the absurdity was soon shown by cross-examination, nevertheless placed the queen for some time in great danger. On 28 November, Oates accused her of high treason, and the Commons passed an address for her removal and that of all the Roman Catholics from Whitehall. A series of fresh depositions were sent in against her, and in June 1679 it was decided that she must stand her trial; but she was protected by the king, who in this instance showed unusual chivalry and earned her gratitude.

— Freebase

Achall

Achall

Achall, daughter of Cairbre Nia Fer, king of Tara, and his wife Fedelm Noíchrothach, is a minor character from the Ulster Cycle of Irish mythology. After her brother Erc was killed by Conall Cernach, she died of grief on a hill near Tara, which was named Achall after her. The legendary High King of Ireland Túathal Techtmar is said to have taken power after defeating the previous High King, Elim mac Conrach, in battle on the hill of Achall. According to The Expulsion of the Déisi, another legendary High King, Cormac mac Airt, lived on the hill of Achall after he lost an eye, his physical imperfection meaning he could no longer rule at Tara. The hill is now known as Skryne.

— Freebase

Bebryces

Bebryces

The Bebryces were a tribe of people who lived in Bithynia. According to Strabo they were one of the many Thracian tribes that had crossed from Europe into Asia. According to legend they were defeated by Heracles or the Dioscuri, who killed their king, Mygdon or Amycus. Their land was then given to King Lycus of the Mariandynians, who built the city Heraclea there. Some say Amycus was a brother of Mygdon and another Bebrycian king; both were sons of Poseidon and Melia. Greek mythology offers two different accounts for the origin of the name 'Bebryces': either from a woman named Bebryce, or from a hero named Bebryx. Bebryce is possibly the same as Bryce, a daughter of Danaus, a mythical King of Libya and Arabia. Bebryx was also the father of Pyrene.

— Freebase

Dagobert I

Dagobert I

Dagobert I was the king of Austrasia, king of all the Franks, and king of Neustria and Burgundy. He was the last king of the Merovingian dynasty to wield any real royal power. Dagobert was the first of the Frankish kings to be buried in the royal tombs at Saint Denis Basilica.

— Freebase

Aun

Aun

Ane, On, One, Auchun or Aun the Old, English: Edwin, is the name of a mythical Swedish king of the House of Yngling, the ancestors of Norway's first king, Harald Fairhair. Edwin was the son of Jorund, and had ten sons, nine of which he was said to have sacrificed in order to prolong his own life. Ruling from his seat in Uppsala, Aun was reputedly a wise king who made sacrifices to the gods. However, as he was not of a warlike disposition and preferred to live in peace. He was attacked and defeated by the Danish prince Halfdan. Aun fled to the Geats in Västergötland, where he stayed for 25 years until Halfdan died in his bed in Uppsala. Upon Halfdan's death Aun returned to Uppsala. Aun was now 60 years old, and in an attempt to live longer he sacrificed his son to Odin, who had promised that this would mean he would live for another 60 years. After 25 years, Aun was attacked by Halfdan's cousin Ale the Strong. Aun lost several battles and had to flee a second time to Västergötland. Ale the Strong ruled in Uppsala for 25 years until he was killed by Starkad the old. After Ale the Strong's death, Aun once again returned to Uppsala and once again sacrificed a son to Odin; this time Odin told the king that he would remain living as long as he sacrificed a son every ten years and that he had to name one of the Swedish provinces after the number of sons he sacrificed.

— Freebase

Wilton House

Wilton House

Wilton House is an English country house situated at Wilton near Salisbury in Wiltshire. It has been the country seat of the Earls of Pembroke for over 400 years. The first recorded building on the site of Wilton House was a priory founded by King Egbert circa 871. Later, this priory, due to the munificence of King Alfred, was granted lands and manors until it became wealthy and powerful. However, by the time Wilton Abbey was dissolved during the Dissolution of the Monasteries by King Henry VIII of England, its prosperity was already on the wane — following the seizure of the abbey, King Henry presented it and the estates to William Herbert, 1st Earl of Pembroke in c.1544.

— Freebase

Coretta Scott King

Coretta Scott King

Coretta Scott King was an American author, activist, and civil rights leader. The widow of Martin Luther King, Jr., Coretta Scott King helped lead the African-American Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s. Mrs. King played a prominent role in the years after her husband's 1968 assassination when she took on the leadership of the struggle for racial equality herself and became active in the Women's Movement and the LGBT rights movement.

— Freebase

Archchancellor

Archchancellor

An archchancellor or chief chancellor was a title given to the highest dignitary of the Holy Roman Empire, and also used occasionally during the Middle Ages to denote an official who supervised the work of chancellors or notaries. The Carolingian successors of Pepin the Short appointed chancellors over the whole Frankish realm in the ninth century. Hincmar refers to this official as a summus cancellarius in De ordine palatii et regni and an 864 charter of King Lothair I refers to Agilmar, Archbishop of Vienne, as archchancellor, a word which also begins appearing in chronicles about that time. The last Carolingian archchancellor in West Francia was Archbishop Adalberon of Reims, with the accession of Hugh Capet the office was replaced by a Chancelier de France. At the court of Otto I, then King of Germany, the title seems to have been an appanage of the Archbishop of Mainz. After Otto had finally deposed King Berengar II of Italy and was crowned Holy Roman Emperor in 962, a similar office was created for the Imperial Kingdom of Italy. By the early eleventh century, this office was perennially held by the Archbishop of Cologne. Theoretically, the archbishop of Mainz took care of Imperial affairs for Germany and the Archbishop of Cologne for Italy, though the latter often used deputies, his see being outside of his kingdom. A third office was created about 1032, when Emperor Conrad II acquired the Kingdom of Burgundy upon the death of King Rudolph III, but it only appears in the hands of the Archbishop of Trier in the twelfth century as the chancellory of Arles. It is not known if the office was ever more than a prestigious title for the archbishop.

— Freebase

Joseph Taylor

Joseph Taylor

Joseph Taylor was a 17th-century actor. As the successor of Richard Burbage with the King's Men, he was arguably the most important actor in the later Jacobean and the Caroline eras. Taylor started as a child actor with the Children of the Chapel in the first decade of the century. As he matured he remained in the profession, with the Lady Elizabeth's Men and Prince Charles's Men. With those companies, he developed into an important leading man. Richard Burbage died in March 1619; Taylor joined the King's Men the next month, and over the coming years he acted all the major roles of the Shakespearean canon. According to James Wright's Historia Histrionica, Taylor "acted Hamlet incomparably well" and was noted for his Iago. He was also famous for the parts of Paris in The Roman Actor, Ferdinand in The Duchess of Malfi, and Mosca in Volpone, Face in The Alchemist, and Truewit in Epicene. Taylor starred in many King's men plays; he played the protagonists in Massinger's The Picture and Arthur Wilson's The Swisser; he was the Duke in Lodowick Carlell's The Deserving Favourite. Taylor and John Lowin became leaders of the King's Men after the deaths of Henry Condell and John Heminges. At the same time, Taylor gained a share in the Blackfriars Theatre, and two shares in the Globe. Together with Cuthbert Burbage, Richard Robinson and Winifred, his wife, William Heminges, and John Lowin, Taylor filed a Bill of Complaint on 28 January 1632 in the Court of Requests against the owner of the Globe, Sir Matthew Brend, in order to obtain confirmation of an extension of the 31-year lease originally granted by Sir Matthew Brend's father, Nicholas Brend.

— Freebase

Ehud

Ehud

Ehud ben‑Gera is described in the biblical Book of Judges as a judge who was sent by God to deliver the Israelites from Moabite domination. Biblical narrative: - Ehud was sent to the Moabite King Eglon on the pretext of delivering the Israelites' annual tribute. He had blacksmiths make a double-edged shortsword about eighteen inches long, useful for a stabbing thrust. Being left-handed, he could conceal the sword on his right thigh, where it was not expected. Once they met, Ehud told Eglon he had a secret message for him. Eglon dismissed his attendants and allowed Ehud to meet him in private. Ehud said, "I have a message from God for you", drew his sword, and stabbed the king in his abdomen. Eglon was eviscerated by the blow, which caused him to leak excrement; he was so overweight that the sword disappeared into the wound and Ehud left it there. He locked the doors to the king's chamber and left. Eglon's assistants returned when too much time had elapsed and found the doors locked. Assuming that he was relieving himself, they waited "to the point of embarrassment" before unlocking the door and finding their king dead.

— Freebase

Limited government

Limited government

In a limited government, the power of government to intervene in the exercise of civil liberties is restricted by law, usually in a written constitution. It is a principle of classical liberalism, free market libertarianism, and some tendencies of liberalism and conservatism in the United States. The theory of limited government contrasts, for example, with the ideal that government should intervene to promote equality and opportunity through regulation of property and wealth redistribution. As discussed in the Federalist Papers, the idea of limited government originally implied the notion of a separation of powers and the system of checks and balances promoted by the U.S. Constitution. This understanding of limited government maintains that government is internally limited by the system of checks and balances as well as the Constitution itself, which can be amended, and externally through the republican principle of electoral accountability. Such an understanding of limited government, as explained by James Madison, does not place arbitrary and ideologically biased parameters on the actions of a government thus allowing government to change as time demands. "Limited government" stands in contrast to the doctrine of the Divine Right of Kings. Under that doctrine, the king, and by extension his entire government, held unlimited sovereignty over its subjects. Limited government exists where some effective limits restrict governmental power. In Western civilization, the Magna Carta stands as the early exemplar of a document limiting the reach of the king's sovereignty. While its limits protected only a small portion of the English population, it did state that the king's barons possessed rights which they could assert against the king. The English Bill of Rights associated with the Glorious Revolution of 1688 established limits of royal sovereignty. In contrast, and as stated in the above paragraph, The United States Constitution of 1787 created a government limited by the terms of the written document itself, by the election by the people of the legislators and the executive, and by the checks and balances through which the three branches of government limited each other's power.

— Freebase

Leil

Leil

Leil was a legendary king of the Britons as accounted by Geoffrey of Monmouth. He was the son of King Brutus Greenshield. Leil was a peaceful and just king and took advantage of the prosperity afforded him by his ancestors. He founded Carlisle, Cumbria in the north as a tribute to this prosperity. He reigned for twenty-five years until he grew old and feeble. His inactivity sparked a civil war, during which he died. He was succeeded by his son Rud Hud Hudibras. Geoffrey asserts that Leil reigned at the time when Solomon built the Temple in Jerusalem and Silvus Epitus was king of Alba Longa.

— Freebase

MLK

MLK

"MLK" is the tenth and final song from U2's 1984 album, The Unforgettable Fire. A lullaby to honor Martin Luther King, Jr., it is a short, pensive piece with simple lyrics. It was because of this song, along with "Pride", another tribute to King, that earned Bono the highest honor of the King Center, an organization founded by Coretta Scott King.

— Freebase

King Philip's War

King Philip's War

King Philip's War, sometimes called the First Indian War, Metacom's War, Metacomet's War, or Metacom's Rebellion, was an armed conflict between Native American inhabitants of present-day New England and English colonists and their Native American allies in 1675–78. The war is named after the main leader of the Native American side, Metacomet, known to the English as "King Philip". Major Benjamin Church emerged as the Puritan hero of the war; it was his company of Puritan rangers and Native American allies that finally hunted down and killed King Philip on August 12, 1676. The war continued in northern New England until a treaty was signed at Casco Bay in April 1678. The war was the single greatest calamity to occur in seventeenth-century Puritan New England. In the space of little more than a year, twelve of the region's towns were destroyed and many more damaged, the colony's economy was all but ruined, and much of its population was killed, including one-tenth of all men available for military service. More than half of New England's towns were attacked by Native American warriors. Nearly all the English colonies in America were settled without any significant English government support, as they were used chiefly as a safety valve to minimize religious and other conflicts in England. King Philip's War was the beginning of the development of a greater American identity, for the colonists' trials, without significant English government support, gave them a group identity separate and distinct from subjects of the Parliament of England and the Crown in England.

— Freebase

ROYCROFTER

ROYCROFTER

A successful book-maker on the East Aurora turf. From Fr. _roi_, king, and old Saxon _crofter_, or grafter. King of Grafters.

— The Foolish Dictionary, by Gideon Wurdz

crown

crown

a head decoration worn by a king or queen

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

crown

crown

to make sb king or queen in a ceremony

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

king

king

a playing card with a picture of a king

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

kingdom

kingdom

the territory ruled over by a king or queen

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

monarch

monarch

a king or queen

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

monarchy

monarchy

a system in which a country is ruled by a king or queen

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

monarchy

monarchy

a country that is ruled by a king or queen

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

republic

republic

a democratic government or country, usually with a president, not a king or queen

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

throne

throne

a chair for a king or queen

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

throne

throne

the position of being king or queen

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

Henry III.

Henry III.

king of England from 1216 to 1272, eldest son of King John; succeeded to the throne at the age of nine; during his minority the kingdom was wisely and faithfully served by the Earl of Pembroke and Hubert de Burgh; when he came to years he proved himself a weak ruler, and, according to Stubbs, his administration was "one long series of impolitic and unprincipled acts"; with the elevation of Peter des Roches, a native of Anjou, to the post of chief adviser, French interlopers soon became predominant at the Court, and the recipients of large estates and pensions, an injustice further stimulated by the king's marriage with Eleanor of Provence; justice was prostituted, England humiliated under a feeble foreign policy, and the country finally roused by infamous exactions; Simon de Montfort, the king's own brother-in-law, became the leader of the people and the champion of constitutional rights; by the Provisions of Oxford, forced upon the king by Parliament assembled at Oxford (1258), a wider and more frequent Parliamentary representation was given to the people, and the king's power limited by a permanent council of 15; as an issue of the Barons' War, which resulted in the defeat and capture of the king at Lewes (1264), these provisions were still further strengthened by the Mise of Lewes, and from this time may be dated the birth of representative government in England as it now exists; in 1265 was summoned the first Parliament as at present constituted, of peers temporal and spiritual, and representatives from counties, cities, and boroughs; internal dissensions ceased with the victory of Prince Edward over the barons at Eastham (1265), the popular leader De Montfort perished on the field (1206-1272).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

EyeView

EyeView

Eyeview is the leading provider of personalized digital video advertising solutions for brand marketers. Eyeview is the only company that offers broadcast quality personalized videos for each consumer, with proprietary creative technology that integrates the brand's relevant messages. As the consumer progresses along the path to purchase, Eyeview dynamically changes the brand's message in-stream to ensure the consumer continues to receive the most relevant informative and effective ad. As a result, our brands consistently experience lift in key performance indicators and increase in brand equity and sales. Eyeview partners with Fortune 500 leaders in automotive, retail, telecommunications, quick service restaurants, entertainment and travel including Target, Comcast, Lowe's, Officemax, Expedia, Toyota, Burger King and more. The company is headquartered in New York City with offices in Los Angeles, Chicago, Detroit, and Tel Aviv. For more information, please visit www.eyeviewdigital.com.

— CrunchBase

Lottay

Lottay

The Lottay online gift-giving and wish-list service helps individuals and groups give and receive gifts of cash. Lottay gifts are money, “wrapped” in the look-and-feel of the occasion via e-greeting cards, personalized messages, images and pictures. The gift of cash is sent via the PayPal. “Cash may be king, but its reputation as a gift stinks. It’s usually seen as cold and impersonal, so Lottay wants to change that. We want to remove the stigma and embarrassment of giving money as a gift, so we created a way to make giving and receiving money fun, thoughtful and personal.”

— CrunchBase

Prism Pharmaceuticals

Prism Pharmaceuticals

Prism Pharmaceuticals, Inc., an acute care pharmaceutical company, engages in developing and commercializing cardiovascular injectable products in the United States. Its products include NEXTERONE, an anti arrhythmic agent in the form of injectable amiodarone; and PM103, an intravenous formulation of clopidogrel bisulfate. The company was founded in 2004 and is based in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania.

— CrunchBase

Rexante Systems

Rexante Systems

Rexante Systems was founded in 2010 by electrical engineers who are also successful traders, and is backed by Alumni of Paypal, YouTube and Palantir Technologies. We are based in Palo Alto, in the heart of Silicon Valley.The name Rexante is a play on the Latin words Rex ("king") and Ex-Ante ("before the event"). "Ante" is also American poker slang from the mid-1800's for placing a bet.

— CrunchBase

Second & Fourth

Second & Fourth

We make companies more attractive to investors. Second & Fourth is an angel/seed stage group located in the greater Boston area founded by seasoned start up & former Facebook executives Steve King & PJ Solomon. Second & Fourth provides investing, advising and consulting services to pre-seed/early stage companies focused on the internet market.We're an angel/seed stage group helping talented entrepreneurs build extraordinary companies. The value we bring founders is helping them become more attractive to investors by working specifically on product, monetization and growth strategies. Our approach is to work alongside them to rapidly develop, launch & monetize their business. Ultimately we deliver hands-on, actionable direction developing the product, crafting monetization strategies, and raising capital.

— CrunchBase

SilverStorm Technologies

SilverStorm Technologies

SilverStorm Technologies provides networking and clustered interconnect solutions for high performance business computing markets. It designs and manufactures an InfiniBand based set of solutions for the performance and I/O requirements of data center environments that utilize clustered topologies. The company markets its products through direct sales, and channel and technology partners globally. SilverStorm Technologies, Inc. was founded as InfiniCon Systems, Inc. in 2000 and changed its name to SilverStorm Technologies, Inc. in 2005. The company is headquartered in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania. As of November 01, 2006, SilverStorm Technologies, Inc. operates as a subsidiary of QLogic Corp.

— CrunchBase

StuffBuff

StuffBuff

StuffBuff is a new king of ad platform allows people to buy and see relevant advertisements based on the text that they highlight.When a user highlight a particular keyword they are in essence “informing” advertisers of what they are interested in. StuffBuff displays a small ad unit that allows them to learn more about a product or offer and even purchase that item without ever having to leave the publishers site.

— CrunchBase

The Motley Fool

The Motley Fool

Founded in 1993 in Alexandria, Va., by brothers David and Tom Gardner, The Motley Fool is a multimedia financial-services company dedicated to building the world’s greatest investment community. Reaching millions of people each month through its website, books, newspaper column, television appearances, and subscription newsletter services, The Motley Fool champions shareholder values and advocates tirelessly for the individual investor. The company’s name was taken from Shakespeare, whose wise fools both instructed and amused, and could speak the truth to the king – without getting their heads lopped off.

— CrunchBase

YCD Multimedia

YCD Multimedia

YCD Multimedia is an industry leader providing corporations and organizations worldwide with advanced digital media solutions and applications within the retail environment, as well as other industries. YCD's flexible platforms help businesses attract clients, reinforce branding and ensure a measurable impact on their business. YCD's end-to-end offering combines strategy, professional services and technology to increase profits, optimize product mix and enhance the customer experience. To date, the company has partnered with over 2,000 customers, including Fortune 500 corporations and some of the world's most recognized brands, such as Burger King, Coca-Cola, Toyota, Estee Lauder, Ferrari, Cartier, and Diesel. Founded in 1999, YCD Multimedia is headquartered in the United States with offices in the United Kingdom and Israel, and has an international network of resellers serving clients around the globe. In October 2011 YCD acquired C-nario, a global provider of digital signage software solutions. For more information, visit www.ycdmultimedia.com

— CrunchBase

James III.

James III.

king of Scotland from 1460 to 1488, son of James II.; was during his minority under the care of his mother and Bishop Kennedy of St. Andrews, the Earl of Angus being lieutenant-general of the kingdom; but the bishop and the earl died before he was 14, and the nobility fell into faction and disorder again; the first to gain power was Lord Boyd (whose son married the king's sister), but a charge of treason brought about his downfall and exile; the king married Princess Margaret of Denmark in 1469, and gave himself up to a life of quiet ease surrounded by men of art and culture, while his brothers Albany and Mar, by their military tastes and achievements, won the affections of the nobles; James, becoming jealous, imprisoned them; Albany, who had intrigued with Edward IV., fled to France, Mar died in Craigmillar Castle; while the king and his army were marching to meet expected English action in 1482 the nobles, instigated by Archibald, Bell-the-Cat, seized and hanged the royal favourites at Lauder, and committed the king to Edinburgh Castle; a short reconciliation was effected, but was soon broken, and civil war ensued; the defeat of the royalist forces at Sauchieburn took place in 1488; the king escaped from the field, but was thrown from his horse, and taking refuge in a house at Beaton's Mill, was there slain (1462-1488).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

absey-book

absey-book

An ABC book; a primer. - Shakespeare, King John, I,i

— Wiktionary

accession

accession

A coming to; the act of acceding and becoming joined; as, a king's accession to a confederacy.

— Wiktionary

Jupiter

Jupiter

The King of the Gods, also called Jove. Equivalent to the Greek Zeus, Jupiter was one of the children of Saturn.

— Wiktionary

purple

purple

The colour worn by an emperor or king; by extension, imperial power.

— Wiktionary

throne

throne

The ornate seat a king or queen sits on for formal occasions, usually placed on a raised dais in the throne room.

— Wiktionary

queen

queen

The wife or widow of a king. Example: Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother

— Wiktionary

king

king

A king skin.

— Wiktionary

king

king

To rule over as king.

— Wiktionary

king

king

To perform the duties of a king.

— Wiktionary

king

king

To dress and perform as a drag king.

— Wiktionary

kingdom

kingdom

A nation having as supreme ruler a king and/or queen.

— Wiktionary

Adelaide

Adelaide

State capital of South Australia, named in honor of Queen Adelaide, wife of King William IV.

— Wiktionary

paint

paint

A face card (king, queen, or jack).

— Wiktionary

sovereignty

sovereignty

Supreme authority over all things. (as in an emperor, king, dictator, or God, ref. u2018King of kings, and Lord of lordsu2019)

— Wiktionary

castle

castle

A large building that is fortified and contains many defences; in previous ages often inhabited by a nobleman or king.

— Wiktionary

checkmate

checkmate

The conclusive victory in a game of chess that occurs when an opponent's king is threatened with unavoidable capture.

— Wiktionary

checkmate

checkmate

To put the king of an opponent into checkmate.

— Wiktionary

crown

crown

To formally declare (someone) a king or emperor.

— Wiktionary

crown

crown

In checkers, to stack two checkers to indicate that the piece has become a king.

— Wiktionary

prince

prince

A (male) ruler, a sovereign; a king, monarch.

— Wiktionary

princess

princess

The daughter (or granddaughter) of a king, queen, emperor, empress, prince, or another princess.

— Wiktionary

nobleman

nobleman

A peer; an aristocrat; ranks range from baron to king to emperor.

— Wiktionary

laurel

laurel

An English gold coin made in 1619, and so called because the king's head on it was crowned with laurel

— Wiktionary

acephali

acephali

A class of levelers in the time of King Henry I.

— Wiktionary

Georgian

Georgian

Of the reign of a King George, or in the style of that reign. (mostly British).

— Wiktionary

Epirus

Epirus

A larger historical kingdom based there, widely extended by the proverbial king Pyrrhus

— Wiktionary

marriage

marriage

A king and a queen, when held as a hand in Texas hold 'em and some other card games.

— Wiktionary

carrier

carrier

An Old English carrier pigeon or Old English carrier (the "King of the Doos").

— Wiktionary

regicide

regicide

The killing of a king.

— Wiktionary

regicide

regicide

One who kills a king.

— Wiktionary

pharaoh

pharaoh

The supreme ruler of ancient Egypt; a formal address for the sovereign seat of power as personified by the 'king' in an institutional role of Horus son of Osiris; often used by metonymy for Ancient Egyptian sovereignty

— Wiktionary

move

move

To transfer (a piece or man) from one space or position to another, according to the rules of the game; as, to move a king.

— Wiktionary

oath

oath

A solemn pledge or promise to a god, king, or another person, to attest to the truth of a statement or contract

— Wiktionary

oath

oath

A light or insulting use of a solemn pledge or promise to a god, king or another person, to attest to the truth of a statement or contract the name of a deity in a profanity, as in swearing oaths

— Wiktionary

George

George

, A coin with King Georgeu2019s profile.

— Wiktionary

shah

shah

A king of Persia.

— Wiktionary

crown prince

crown prince

A person designated and raised to become the next king.

— Wiktionary

cowboy

cowboy

A playing card of king rank.

— Wiktionary

Your Majesty

Your Majesty

A title of respect used when addressing a monarch of higher rank than a prince; that is, a king, queen, emperor, or empress.

— Wiktionary

His Majesty

His Majesty

A title of respect used when referring to a king.

— Wiktionary

agist

agist

To take to graze or pasture, at a certain sum; used originally of the feeding of cattle in the king's forests, and collecting the money for the same.

— Wiktionary

agistor

agistor

Formerly, an officer of the king's forest, who had the care of cattle agisted, and collected the money for the same; hence called gisttaker, which in England is corrupted into guest-taker.

— Wiktionary

agistment

agistment

Formerly, the taking and feeding of other men's cattle in the king's forests; the price paid for such a feeding.

— Wiktionary

avener

avener

An officer of the king's stables whose duty it was to provide oats for the horses.

— Wiktionary

purveyor

purveyor

An officer who provided provisions for the king's household.

— Wiktionary

Aegyptus

Aegyptus

King of Egypt in Greek mythology whose name means supine goat.

— Wiktionary

David

David

The second king of Judah and Israel, the successor of Saul.

— Wiktionary

Saul

Saul

The first king of Israel.

— Wiktionary

Ravana

Ravana

The king of the asuras, ruler of Lanka and killed by Rama in Ramayana.

— Wiktionary

silk

silk

The gown worn by a Senior (i.e. Queen's/King's) Counsel

— Wiktionary

silk

silk

a Senior (i.e. Queen's/King's) Counsel

— Wiktionary

realm

realm

A territory or state, as ruled by a specific power, and particularly those territories ruled by a king.

— Wiktionary

tierce

tierce

A sequence of three playing cards of the same suit. Tierce of ace, king, queen, is called tierce-major.

— Wiktionary

cavalier

cavalier

One of the court party in the time of King Charles I, as contrasted with a Roundhead or an adherent of Parliament.

— Wiktionary

cavalier

cavalier

Of or pertaining to the party of King Charles I.

— Wiktionary

tutelage

tutelage

The act of guarding or protecting; guardianship; protection; as, the king's right of seigniory and tutelage.

— Wiktionary

waif

waif

Goods found of which the owner is not known; originally, such goods as a pursued thief threw away to prevent being apprehended, which belonged to the king unless the owner made pursuit of the felon, took him, and brought him to justice.

— Wiktionary

honor

honor

An ace, king, queen, jack, or ten especially of the trump suit in bridge.

— Wiktionary

Sheol

Sheol

(Old Testament) the realm of dead, the common grave of mankind, Hell. In older English translations of the Bible, notably the Authorized or King James Bible, this word is translated as grave or pit.

— Wiktionary

Jason

Jason

The leader of the Argonauts, who retrieved the Golden Fleece from king Aeetes of Colchis, for his uncle Pelias.

— Wiktionary

Katie

Katie

A king and a ten as a starting hand in Texas hold 'em due to phonetic similarity with "K-T"

— Wiktionary

Perseus

Perseus

The last Antigonid king of Macedonia, Perseus of Macedon.

— Wiktionary

Nebuchadnezzar

Nebuchadnezzar

A very large wine bottle (named after the King) with the capacity of about 15 liters, equivalent to 20 standard bottles.

— Wiktionary


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