Definitions containing à l'anglaise

We've found 31 definitions:

Robe

Robe

A robe is a loose-fitting outer garment. A robe is distinguished from a cape or cloak by the fact that it usually has sleeves. The English word robe derives from Middle English robe, borrowed from Old French robe, itself taken from the Frankish word *rouba, and is related to the word rob. There are various types of robes, including: ⁕A gown worn as part of the academic regalia of faculty or students, especially for ceremonial occasions, such as a convocations, congregations or graduations. ⁕A gown worn as part of the attire of a judge or barrister. ⁕A wide variety of long, flowing religious dress including pulpit robes and the robes worn by various types of monks. ⁕A gown worn as part of the official dress of a peer or royalty. ⁕Any of several women's fashions, as robe d'anglaise, "robe de style". ⁕A gown worn in fantasy literature and role-playing games by wizards and other magical characters. ⁕An absorbent "bath robe" worn mostly after washing or swimming. ⁕One such example is a bathrobe, a garment made of terrycloth or another towel-like material and is typically worn at home after a bath or other activities where the wearer is nude to keep warm and/or preserve modesty in times of no immediate need to fully dress. See, for example, that worn by the fictional character Arthur Dent.

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French leave

French leave

French leave is "Leave of absence without permission or without announcing one's departure", including leaving a party without bidding farewell to the host. The intent behind this behaviour is to leave without disturbing the host. The phrase is first recorded in 1771 and was born at a time when the English and French cultures were heavily interlinked. In French, the equivalent phrase is "filer à l'anglaise" and seems to date from the turn of the 19th and 20th centuries.

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Commode

Commode

A commode, commode with legs, or commode on legs is any of several pieces of furniture. The word commode comes from the French word for "convenient" or "suitable", which in turn comes from the Latin adjective commodus, with similar meanings. Originally, in French furniture, a commode introduced about 1700 meant a low cabinet, or chest of drawers at the height of the dado rail. A commode, made by an ébéniste and applied with gilt-bronze mounts, was a piece of veneered case furniture much wider than it was high, raised on high or low legs and with or without enclosing drawers. The piece of furniture would be provided with a marble slab top selected to match the marble of the chimneypiece. A commode occupied a prominent position in the room for which it was intended: it stood against the pier between the windows, in which case it would often be surmounted by a mirror glass, or a pair of identical commodes would flank the chimneypiece or occupy the center of each end wall. Bombé commodes, with surfaces shaped in three dimensions were a feature of the rococo style called "Louis Quinze". Rectilinear neoclassical, or "Louis Seize" commodes might have such deep drawers or doors that the feet were en toupie— in the tapering turned shape of a child's spinning top. Both rococo and neoclasical commodes might have cabinets flanking the main section, in which case such a piece was a commode à encoignures; pairs of encoignures or corner-cabinets might also be designed to complement a commode and stand in the flanking corners of a room. If a commode had open shelves flanking the main section it was a commode à l'anglaise

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Bavarian cream

Bavarian cream

Bavarian cream or Crème bavaroise or simply Bavarois is a classic dessert that was included in the repertoire of chef Marie-Antoine Carême, who is sometimes credited with it. It was named in the early 19th century for Bavaria or, perhaps more likely in the history of haute cuisine, for a particularly distinguished visiting Bavarian, such as a Wittelsbach. Escoffier declared that Bavarois would be more properly Moscovite, owing to its preparation, in the days before mechanical refrigeration, by being made in a "hermetically sealed" mold that was plunged into salted, crushed ice to set—hence "Muscovite". Bavarian cream is similar to pastry cream but thickened with gelatin or isinglass instead of flour or cornstarch, and flavoured with liqueur. It is not to be confused with Crème anglaise, which is a custard sauce thickened with egg. Bavarian cream is lightened with whipped cream when on the edge of setting up, before being molded, for a true Bavarian cream is usually filled into a fluted mold, chilled until firm, then turned out onto a serving plate. By coating a chilled mold first with a fruit gelatin, a glazed effect can be produced. Imperfections in the unmolding are disguised with strategically placed fluted piping of crème Chantilly. In the United States, it is not uncommon to serve Bavarian cream directly from the bowl it has been chilled in, similar to a French mousse. In this informal presentation, Escoffier recommended the Bavarian cream be made in a "timbale or deep silver dish which is then surrounded with crushed ice".

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Pantalettes

Pantalettes

Pantalettes are undergarments covering the legs worn by women, girls, and very young boys in the early- to mid-19th century. Pantalettes originated in France in the early 19th century, and quickly spread to Britain and America. Pantalettes were a form of leggings or long drawers. They could be one-piece or two separate garments, one for each leg, attached at the waist with buttons or laces. The crotch was left open for hygiene reasons. They were most often of white linen fabric and could be decorated with tucks, lace, cutwork or broderie anglaise. Ankle-length pantalettes for women were worn under the crinoline and hoop skirt to ensure that the legs were modestly covered should they become exposed. Pantalettes for children and young girls were mid-calf to ankle-length and were intended to show under their shorter skirts. Until the mid-19th century, very young boys were commonly dressed in dresses, gowns and pantalettes, though there were commonly associated with girls' clothing, until the boys were breeched at any age between 2 and 8 years of age, and sometimes older. Young boys would be dressed in this fashion until at least they were toilet-trained.

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Spadroon

Spadroon

The Spadroon is a light sword with a straight blade of the cut and thrust type. The style became popular among military and naval officers in the 1790s, spreading from England to the United States and to France, where it was known as the épée anglaise. Hilts were often of the beaded or "five-ball" type with a stirrup guard. A spadroon blade usually had a broad, central fuller and a single edge, often with a false edge near the tip. Spadroons can also be double-edged as well.

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Cutwork

Cutwork

Cutwork or cut work is a needlework technique in which portions of a textile are cut away and the resulting "hole" is reinforced and filled with embroidery or needle lace. Cutwork is related to drawn thread work. In drawn thread work, typically only the warp or weft threads are withdrawn, and the remaining threads in the resulting hole are bound in various ways. In other types of cutwork, both warp and weft threads may be drawn. Needlework styles that incorporate cutwork include broderie anglaise, Carrickmacross lace, whitework, and early reticella.

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organ transplantation

organ transplantation

The moving of an organ from one body to another; or from a donor site to another location on the patient's own body, for the purpose of replacing the recipient's damaged or absent organ.

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Carbon dioxide

Carbon dioxide

Carbon dioxide is a naturally occurring chemical compound composed of two oxygen atoms covalently bonded to a single carbon atom. It is a gas at standard temperature and pressure and exists in Earth's atmosphere in this state, as a trace gas at a concentration of 0.039 per cent by volume. As part of the carbon cycle, plants, algae, and cyanobacteria use light energy to photosynthesize carbohydrate from carbon dioxide and water, with oxygen produced as a waste product. However, photosynthesis cannot occur in darkness and at night some carbon dioxide is produced by plants during respiration. Carbon dioxide is produced by combustion of coal or hydrocarbons, the fermentation of sugars in beer and winemaking and by respiration of all living organisms. It is exhaled in the breath of humans and land animals. It is emitted from volcanoes, hot springs, geysers and other places where the earth's crust is thin and is freed from carbonate rocks by dissolution. CO2 is also found in lakes at depth under the sea, and commingled with oil and gas deposits. The environmental effects of carbon dioxide are of significant interest. Carbon dioxide is an important greenhouse gas, warming the Earth's surface to a higher temperature by reducing outward radiation. Atmospheric carbon dioxide is the primary source of carbon in life on Earth and its concentration in Earth's pre-industrial atmosphere since late in the Precambrian eon has been regulated by photosynthetic organisms. Burning of carbon-based fuels since the industrial revolution has rapidly increased concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide, increasing the rate of global warming and causing anthropogenic climate change. It is also a major source of ocean acidification since it dissolves in water to form carbonic acid, which is a weak acid as its ionization in water is incomplete.

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Mountain Ash

Mountain Ash

Mountain Ash is a town and community in the Cwm Cynon, Rhondda Cynon Taf, Wales. Mountain Ash has a population of around 7,039. Mountain Ash lies near the villages of Penrhiwceiber, Cefnpennar, Cwmpennar, Darranlas, Fernhill, Glenboi and Newtown and Miskin. Mountain Ash lies within the historic county boundaries of Glamorgan.

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Livermore

Livermore

Livermore is a city in Alameda County. The estimated population as of 2011 was 82,039. Livermore is located on the eastern edge of California's San Francisco Bay Area. Livermore was founded by William Mendenhall and named after Robert Livermore, his friend and a local rancher who settled in the area in the 1840s. Livermore is the home of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, for which the chemical element livermorium is named. Its south side, home to local vineyards, has developed several executive subdivisions near Ruby Hill. The city has also redeveloped its downtown district. The city is considered part of the Tri-Valley area, including Amador, Livermore and San Ramon Valleys.

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Wenzhou

Wenzhou

Wenzhou is a prefecture-level city in southeastern Zhejiang province, People's Republic of China. As of the 2010 census, about 3,039,500 live in the Wenzhou city proper; the area under its jurisdiction, which includes two satellite cities and six counties, had a population of 9,122,100. The prefectural area borders Lishui to the west, Taizhou to the north, and looks out to the East China Sea on its eastern coast. Wenzhou was a prosperous foreign treaty port, which remains well-preserved today. It is situated in a mountainous region and, as a result, has been isolated for most of its history from the rest of the country, making the local culture and language very distinct not only from the rest of China but from neighbouring areas as well. It is also known for its emigrants who leave their native land for Europe and the United States, with a reputation for being entrepreneurs who start restaurants, retail and wholesale businesses in their adopted countries. People of Wenzhou origin make up a large number of ethnic Chinese residents of Italy, the Netherlands, France, and Africa.

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Recife

Recife

Recife is the fifth-largest metropolitan area in Brazil with 3,743,854 inhabitants, the largest metropolitan area of the North/Northeast Regions, the 5th-largest metropolitan influence area in Brazil, and the capital and largest city of the state of Pernambuco. The population of the city proper was 1,555,039 in 2012. Recife is located where the Beberibe River meets the Capibaribe River to flow into the Atlantic Ocean. It is a major port on the Atlantic Ocean. Its name is an allusion to the coral reefs that are present by the city's shores. The many rivers, small islands and over 50 bridges found in Recife city center characterize its geography and gives it the moniker of the "Brazilian Venice." The Metropolitan Region of Recife is the main industrial zone of the State of Pernambuco; most relevant products are those derived from cane, electronics, food, and others; thanks to the fiscal incentives of government, many industrial enterprises were started in the 1970s and 1980s. Recife has a tradition of being the most important commercial center of the North/Northeastern region of Brazil with more than 52,500 business enterprises in Recife itself plus 32,500 in the Metro Area which totals more than 85,000.

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Chantilly

Chantilly

Chantilly is an unincorporated community located in western Fairfax County of Northern Virginia. Recognized by the U.S. Census Bureau as a census designated place, the community population was 23,039 as of the 2010 census -- down from 41,041 in 2000, due to the splitting off of parts of it to form new CDP's including Greenbriar and Fair Lakes. It is named after an early 19th-century mansion and farm. Chantilly is part of the Washington metropolitan area and is approximately 24 miles from Washington, D.C. Chantilly is home to Washington Dulles International Airport, which serves Washington, D.C. It is also the location of the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center annex of the National Air and Space Museum and the headquarters of the National Reconnaissance Office. Chantilly was also home to the annual Bilderberg summit in 2008 and 2012.

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Bangor

Bangor

Bangor is a city in and the county seat of Penobscot County, Maine, United States, and the major commercial and cultural center for eastern and northern Maine. It is the principal city of the Bangor, Maine Metropolitan Statistical Area, which encompasses all of Penobscot County. As of 2008, Bangor is the third most-populous city in Maine, as it has been for more than a century. The population of the city was 33,039 at the 2010 census; the Bangor Metropolitan Statistical Area, 153,923. Bangor is the largest market town, distribution center, transportation hub, and media center in a five-county area whose population tops 330,000 and which includes Penobscot, Piscataquis, Hancock, Aroostook, and Washington counties. Bangor is about 30 miles from Penobscot Bay up the Penobscot River at its confluence with the Kenduskeag Stream. It is connected by bridge to the neighboring city of Brewer. Nearby towns include Orono, Hampden, Hermon, Old Town, Glenburn, and Veazie.

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Decathlon

Decathlon

The decathlon is a combined event in athletics consisting of ten track and field events. The word decathlon is of Greek origin, from δέκα and ἄθλος. Events are held over two consecutive days and the winners are determined by the combined performance in all. Performance is judged on a points system in each event, not by the position achieved. The decathlon is contested mainly by male athletes, while female athletes typically compete in the heptathlon. Traditionally, the title of "World's Greatest Athlete" has been given to the man who wins the Olympic decathlon. This began when King Gustav V of Sweden told Jim Thorpe, "You, sir, are the world's greatest athlete" after Thorpe won the decathlon at the Stockholm Olympics in 1912. The current decathlon world record holder is American Ashton Eaton, who scored 9,039 points at the 2012 United States Olympic Trials. The event developed from the ancient pentathlon. Pentathlon competitions were held at the ancient Greek Olympics. Pentathlons involved five disciplines – long jump, discus throw, javelin throw, sprint and a wrestling match. Introduced in Olympia during 708 BC, the competition was extremely popular for many centuries. By the 6th century BC, pentathlons had become part of religious games. The Amateur Athletic Union held "all around events" from the 1880s and a decathlon first appeared on the Olympic athletics program at the 1904 Games.

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Patmos

Patmos

Patmos is a small Greek island in the Aegean Sea. One of the northernmost islands of the Dodecanese complex, it has a population of 2,998 and an area of 34.05 km². The highest point is Profitis Ilias, 269 metres above sea level. The Municipality of Patmos, which includes the offshore islands of Arkoi, Marathos, and several uninhabited islets, has a total population of 3,047 and a combined land area of 45.039 square kilometres. It is part of the Kalymnos regional unit. Patmos' main communities are Chora, and Skala, the only commercial port. Other settlements are Grikou and Kampos. The churches and communities on Patmos are of the Eastern Orthodox tradition. In 1999, the island's historic center Chora, along with the Monastery of Saint John the Theologian and the Cave of the Apocalypse, were declared World Heritage Sites by UNESCO. The monastery was founded by Saint Christodulos. Patmos is also home to the Patmian School, a notable Greek seminary. Patmos is mentioned in the Christian scriptural Book of Revelation. The book's introduction states that its author, John, was on Patmos when he was given a vision from Jesus. Early Christian tradition identified this writer John of Patmos as John the Apostle, though some modern scholars are uncertain. As such, Patmos is a destination for Christian pilgrimage. Visitors can see the cave where John is said to have received his Revelation, and several monasteries on the island are dedicated to Saint John.

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Parage

Parage

Parage is a village located in the Bačka Palanka municipality, in the South Bačka District of Serbia. It is situated in the Autonomous Province of Vojvodina. The village has a Serb ethnic majority and its population numbering 1,039 people.

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Murmansk

Murmansk

Murmansk is a port city and the administrative center of Murmansk Oblast, Russia, located in the extreme northwest part of Russia, on the Kola Bay, 12 kilometers from the Barents Sea on the northern shore of the Kola Peninsula, not far from Russia's borders with Norway and Finland. Population: 307,257; 336,137; 468,039. Despite its rapidly declining population, Murmansk remains the largest city north of the Arctic Circle.

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Diadema

Diadema

Diadema is a municipality in São Paulo state, Brazil. Belonging to the ABC Region of Greater São Paulo, it is 17 km distant from São Paulo's central point. Initially part of São Bernardo do Campo, Diadema became a city of its own in 1959. The city has an area of 30.65 square kilometres and a population of 386,039, the 14th largest in the state. Entirely urbanised, the annual mean temperature in the city is 19,6°C. Its HDI is 0.790. Although located in the heart of a traditionally industrial region, its main source of income is the service sector, featuring 77 healthcare installations. Diadema is still home to a butterfly zoo, a botanical garden, an art museum and an observatory.

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Ayan

Ayan

Ayan is a rural locality and the administrative center of Ayano-Maysky District of Khabarovsk Krai, Russia, located on the shore of a well-protected bay of the Sea of Okhotsk, 1,447 kilometers from Khabarovsk and 631 kilometers by sea from Nikolayevsk-on-Amur. Population: 967; 1,325; 2,039.

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Karaman

Karaman

Karaman is a town in south central Turkey, located in Central Anatolia, north of the Taurus Mountains, about 100 km south of Konya. It is the capital district of the Karaman Province. According to 2000 census, the population of the province is 231,872 of which 132,064 live in the town of Karaman. The district covers an area of 3,686 km², and the town lies at an average elevation of 1,039 m. The Karaman Museum is one of the major sights.

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Changwon

Changwon

Changwon is the capital city of Gyeongsangnam-do, South Korea. Changwon is the 8th most populated city in South Korea, with an established population of 1,089,039 people in 2010. It encompasses a land area of 743 square kilometres on the southeastern coast of South Korea. The population of southeastern Korea, including the city of Busan, is more than 6,478,000. Changwon is known as a heavy industrial city. The city only covers 7% of Gyeongsangnam-do province, also known as Gyeongnam, but holds 33.6% of its population; it also accounted for 38.5% of the total 2.1821 trillion won budget of the Gyeongnam province. In 209 AD, during the Three Kingdoms period, Changwon was named Gulja-gun, a province of the Silla kingdom. In 757 Changwon was renamed Uian-gun during the reorganization of all Silla provinces. In 1408 during the Joseon period, King Taejong established Changwon-bu. In 1415, King Taejong renamed Changwon-bu to Changwon-dohobu and it became the capital of the Gyeongnam province. On April 1, 1974 Changwon was designated 'Industrial Base Development Area No. 92.' As a result, the city was developed and significantly expanded.

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Newnan

Newnan

Newnan is a city in Metro Atlanta, and the county seat of Coweta County, Georgia, about 40 miles southwest of Atlanta. The population was 33,039 at the 2010 census, up from 16,242 at the 2000 census, for a growth rate of 103.4% over that decade.

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Bauru

Bauru

Bauru is a Brazilian municipality in midwestern region of the state of São Paulo. It is also the capital of the micro-region of Bauru. The population in 2010 is 344 039, the area of the municipality is 675.2 km² and the population density is 464.56/km². Established in 1896, its boundaries are Reginópolis to the north, Arealva to the northeast, Pederneiras to the east, Agudos and Piratininga to the south and Avaí to the west. The presence of a strong service sector, many college campuses - including the University of São Paulo and Universidade Estadual Paulista - and the city's location at the junction of three railroads and three highways make Bauru a major urban center of the State of São Paulo. It is the hometown of Marcos César Pontes, the first Brazilian in space. It is also the town where Pelé grew up and learned his football skills. The city is served by two airports: the older Bauru Airport, and the newer Bauru-Arealva Airport, officially known as Moussa Nakhl Tobias Airport, located in the adjoining municipality of Arealva.

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Takagi

Takagi

Takagi is a village located in Shimoina District, Nagano Prefecture, Japan. As of 2003, the village has an estimated population of 7,039 and a density of 105.66 persons per km². The total area is 66.62 km².

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Pindorama

Pindorama

Pindorama is the Tupi word for Land of the Palms, the natives' name for Brazil. Pindorama is also a municipality in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. The population of the city is 15,039 and the area is 184.8 km². Pindorama belongs to the Mesoregion of São José do Rio Preto.

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Atmosphere of Earth

Atmosphere of Earth

The atmosphere of Earth is the layer of gases surrounding the planet Earth that is retained by Earth's gravity. The atmosphere protects life on Earth by absorbing ultraviolet solar radiation, warming the surface through heat retention, and reducing temperature extremes between day and night. The common name air is given to the atmospheric gases used in breathing and photosynthesis. By volume, dry air contains 78.09% nitrogen, 20.95% oxygen, 0.93% argon, 0.039% carbon dioxide, and small amounts of other gases. Air also contains a variable amount of water vapor, on average around 1% at sea level, and 0.4% over the entire atmosphere. Air content and atmospheric pressure vary at different layers, and air suitable for the survival of terrestrial plants and terrestrial animals is found only in Earth's troposphere and artificial atmospheres. The atmosphere has a mass of about 5.15×10^ kg, three quarters of which is within about 11 km of the surface. The atmosphere becomes thinner and thinner with increasing altitude, with no definite boundary between the atmosphere and outer space.

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jehovah's witness

jehovah's witness

A member of the jehovah's witnesses belief and faith.

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kingdom hall

kingdom hall

A building or place where members of the jehovah's witnesses gather for fellowship and worship.

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fundamentalism

fundamentalism

Fundamentalism, this word's semantic meaning can only be relevant to the degree of understanding of a current social intellectual domain. This innate didactic sense has been proven by the ability of newer generation capacity to resolve ancient metaphysical problems. Therefore, what was fundamental to old generations may not be fundamental to modern current intellectuals.

— Editors Contribution