Definitions containing à deux

We've found 38 definitions:

folies à deux

folies à deux

Plural form of folie à deux.

— Wiktionary

adagio

adagio

a slow section of a pas de deux requiring great skill and strength by the dancers

— Princeton's WordNet

Deux-Sèvres

Deux-Sèvres

Deux-Sèvres is a French department. Deux-Sèvres literally means "two Sèvres": the Sèvre Nantaise and the Sèvre Niortaise are two rivers which have their sources in the department.

— Freebase

Franu00E7ois

Franu00E7ois

commune in the Deux-Su00E8vres department in the Poitou-Charentes region in western France.

— Wiktionary

Massais

Massais

Massais is a commune in the Deux-Sèvres department in western France.

— Freebase

Salles, Deux-Sèvres

Salles, Deux-Sèvres

Salles is a commune in the Deux-Sèvres department in western France.

— Freebase

Pas de deux

Pas de deux

In ballet, a pas de deux is a type of duet. It usually consists of an entrée, adagio, two variations, and a coda.

— Freebase

Deux

Deux

Deux was a South Korean hip hop duo popular in early 1990s. The duo consisted of Lee Hyun Do and Kim Sung Jae. They were not only colleagues when they were the 2nd generation of the hip hop group, Hyeon Jin Young and Wawa but also close friends to each other. Hip-hop music that was once considered an exclusive music for African-Americans until the early 1990, appeared in South Korea as a mixed form of dance music and rap, called "rap dance". In the mid-1990s hip hop gained great popularity in South Korea and Deux has been considered frontiers of Korean hip hop music along with Seo Taiji and Boys, Kim Gun Mo and DJ Doc. Lee composed their music while Kim took care of choreography and styling. Some of Deux's music has appeared in the Pump it Up. The songs are We Are, Come Back To Me, and Out of the Ring.

— Freebase

Poitou-Charentes

Poitou-Charentes

Poitou-Charentes is an administrative region in south-western France comprising four departments: Charente, Charente-Maritime, Deux-Sèvres and Vienne. The regional capital is Poitiers.

— Freebase

Buloz

Buloz

a French littérateur, born near Geneva; originator of the Revue des Deux Mondes (1803-1877).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Boutonne

Boutonne

The Boutonne is a 98.8 km long river in the Deux-Sèvres and Charente-Maritime départements, western France. Its source is in the village of Chef-Boutonne. It flows generally southwest. It is a right tributary of the Charente into which it flows near Cabariot.

— Freebase

Missé

Missé

Missé is a commune in the Deux-Sèvres department in western France. It is situated on the River Thouet some 5 km upstream from the town of Thouars, and is the site of a spectacular loop in the river.

— Freebase

Tumulus of Bougon

Tumulus of Bougon

The Tumulus of Bougon or Necropolis of Bougon is a group of five Neolithic barrows located in Bougon near La-Mothe-Saint-Héray, between Exoudon and Pamproux in Poitou-Charentes, France. Their discovery in 1840 raised great scientific interest. To protect the monuments, the site was acquired by the department of Deux-Sèvres in 1873. Excavations resumed in the late 1960s. The oldest structures of this prehistoric monument date to 4800 BC.

— Freebase

Revue des deux Mondes

Revue des deux Mondes

The Revue des deux Mondes is a French language monthly literary and cultural affairs magazine that has been published in Paris since 1829. According to its website, "it is today the place for debates and dialogues between nations, disciplines and cultures, about the major subjects of our societies". The main shareholder is Marc Ladreit de Lacharrière's FIMALAC Group.

— Freebase

Niort

Niort

Niort is a commune in the Deux-Sèvres department in western France. The Latin name of the city was Novioritum. The population of Niort is 60,486 and more than 137,000 people live in the urban area. Near Niort at Maisonnay there is one of the tallest radio masts in France.

— Freebase

Saint-Germain-des-Prés

Saint-Germain-des-Prés

Saint-Germain-des-Prés is an area of the 6th arrondissement of Paris, France, located around the church of the former Abbey of Saint-Germain-des-Prés. Home to a number of famous cafés, such as Les Deux Magots and Café de Flore, the Saint-Germain-des-Prés area was the center of the existentialist movement.

— Freebase

Palais-Royal

Palais-Royal

The Palais-Royal, originally called the Palais-Cardinal, is a palace and an associated garden located in the 1st arrondissement of Paris. Facing the Place du Palais-Royal, it stands opposite the north wing of the Louvre, and its famous forecourt, screened with columns and, since 1986, containing Daniel Buren's site-specific artpiece, Les Deux Plateaux, known as Les Colonnes de Buren.

— Freebase

Élégie

Élégie

Élégie is a ballet made by New York City Ballet's founding balletmaster George Balanchine to Igor Stravinsky's Élégie for solo viola. The first of three ballets made with this title was a pas de deux which had its première Monday, November 5, 1945, on a program of the National Orchestral Society entitled Adventure in Ballet, together with Circus Polka, danced by School of American Ballet students with Todd Bolender as guest artist, and Symphonie Concertante. The Ballet Society première was Wednesday, April 28, 1948, at City Center of Music and Drama; the violist was Emanuel Vardi. The evening included the première of Orpheus, which lead directly to the founding of New York City Ballet as a resident company at City Center. Stravinsky referred to Élégie as a kind of preview for the Orpheus pas de deux, the music reflecting through the interlaced bodies of the dancers fixed in a central spot on stage. The second version was a solo created for Lukas Foss' A Festival of Stravinsky: His Heritage and His Legacy, which also included the première of Balanchine's Ragtime. Its première took place on Friday, July 15, 1966, in Philharmonic Hall, New York; the violist was Jesse Levine; the first City Ballet performance was Thursday, July 28 at Saratoga Performing Arts Center, again with Jesse Levine.

— Freebase

Grétry

Grétry

a celebrated musical composer, born at Liège, composed 40 operas marked by feeling and expression, the "Deux Avares," "Zemire et Azor," and "Richard Coeur de Lion" among them; he bought Rousseau's hermitage at Montmorency, where he died (1741-1813).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Sandeau, Léonard Jules

Sandeau, Léonard Jules

French novelist, born at Aubusson; gave up law for literature; was George Sands first "friend" in Paris, and wrote with her "Rose et Blanche"; contributed to the Revue des Deux Mondes; wrote many novels and plays, and was elected to the Academy (1858), and during his later life held the librarianship at St. Cloud (1811-1883).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Derib

Derib

Derib is a Swiss francophone comics creator, one of the most famous in Europe, who started his professional career at Peyo's studio. He is probably best known for his Western comics such as the children's comic Yakari, and the more mature works Buddy Longway and Celui-qui-est-né-deux-fois. He draws in both a realistic style, and a cartoon style, with a fondness for drawing majestic landscapes of the American West. Many of his major works feature Sioux Native Americans in leading roles, and he has stated in interviews that he holds great admiration for the tribe.

— Freebase

Romanche

Romanche

The Romanche is a 78 km long mountain river in southeastern France, right tributary of the Drac. Its source is in the northern part of the Massif des Écrins, Dauphiné Alps. It flows into the Drac in Champ-sur-Drac, south of Grenoble. The road from Grenoble to Briançon over the Col du Lautaret runs through the Romanche valley. There are several mountain and ski resorts in the valley, including Alpe d'Huez, La Grave and Les Deux Alpes. The Romanche flows through the following départements and towns: ⁕Hautes-Alpes: La Grave ⁕Isère: Le Bourg-d'Oisans, Vizille

— Freebase

Folie à deux

Folie à deux

Folie à deux, or shared psychosis, is a psychiatric syndrome in which symptoms of a delusional belief are transmitted from one individual to another. The same syndrome shared by more than two people may be called folie à trois, folie à quatre, folie en famille or even folie à plusieurs. Recent psychiatric classifications refer to the syndrome as shared psychotic disorder and induced delusional disorder in the ICD-10, although the research literature largely uses the original name. The disorder was first conceptualized in 19th century French psychiatry by Charles Lasègue and Jean-Pierre Falret and so also known as Lasègue-Falret Syndrome.

— Freebase

Taillandier, Saint-René

Taillandier, Saint-René

French littérateur and professor, born at Paris; filled the chair of Literature at the Sorbonne from 1863; wrote various works of literary, historical, and philosophical interest, and did much by his writings to extend the knowledge of German art and literature in France; was a frequent contributor to the Revue des Deux Mondes, and in 1873 was elected a member of the Academy (1817-1879).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Brunetière

Brunetière

French critic, connected with the Revue des Deux Mondes and now editor; a very sound and sensible critic; his chief work, begun in the form of lectures in 1890, entitled "L'Évolution des Genres de l'Histoire de la Littérature Française"; according to Prof. Saintsbury, promises to be one of the chief monuments that the really "higher" criticism has yet furnished; b. 1849.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Cherubini

Cherubini

a celebrated musical composer, born at Florence; naturalised in France; settled in Paris, the scene of his greatest triumphs; composed operas, of which the chief were "Iphigenia in Aulis," and "Les deux Journeés; or, The Water-Carrier," his masterpiece; also a number of sacred pieces and requiems, all of the highest merit; there is a portrait of him by Ingres (1842) in the Louvre, representing the Muse of his art extending her protecting hand over his head (1760-1842).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Theuriet, André

Theuriet, André

modern French poet and novelist, born at Marly le Roi, near Paris; studied law, and in 1857 received a post in the office of the Minister of Finance; has published several volumes of poems, dealing chiefly with rustic life, but is more widely known by his novels, such as "Mademoiselle Guignon," "Le Mariage de Gérard," "Deux Soeurs," &c., all of them more or less tinged with melancholy, but also inspired by true poetic feeling; b. 1833.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Zakouski

Zakouski

Zakouski is a ballet made by New York City Ballet balletmaster in chief Peter Martins to: ⁕Vocalise, Op. 34, No. 14 by Sergei Rachmaninoff ⁕"Parasha's Song" from the opera Mavra by Igor Stravinsky ⁕The fourth of Cinq Melodies by Sergei Prokofiev ⁕Valse-Scherzo, Op. 34 by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky. The premiere took place on Tuesday, November 17, 1992, at the New York State Theater, Lincoln Center. It was the first role made on Nikolaj Hübbe at City Ballet; he chose to dance it as well at his farewell performance Sunday, February 10, 2008, at which time he and Yvonne Borree divided the pas de deux with Megan Fairchild and Andrew Veyette, who were dancing it for the first time.

— Freebase

Féuillet, Octave

Féuillet, Octave

a celebrated French novelist, born at Saint-Lò, in La Manche; started his literary career as one of Dumas' assistants, but made his first independent success in the Revue des Deux Mondes by a series of tales, romances, &c., begun in 1848; in 1862 he was elected a member of the Academy, and later became librarian to Louis Napoleon; his novels, of which "Le Roman d'un Jeune Homme Pauvre" and "Sibylle" are the most noted, are graceful in style, and reveal considerable dramatic force, but often lapse into sentimentality, and too often treat of indelicate subjects, although in no spirit of coarseness (1812-1890).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Speech Assessment Methods Phonetic Alphabet

Speech Assessment Methods Phonetic Alphabet

The Speech Assessment Methods Phonetic Alphabet is a computer-readable phonetic script using 7-bit printable ASCII characters, based on the International Phonetic Alphabet. It was originally developed in the late 1980s for six European languages by the EEC ESPRIT information technology research and development program. As many symbols as possible have been taken over from the IPA; where this is not possible, other signs that are available are used, e.g. [@] for schwa, [2] for the vowel sound found in French deux, and [9] for the vowel sound found in French neuf. Today, officially, SAMPA has been developed for all the sounds of the following languages: The characters ["s{mp@] represent the pronunciation of the name SAMPA in English, with the initial symbol ["] indicating primary stress. Like IPA, SAMPA is usually enclosed in square brackets or slashes, which are not part of the alphabet proper and merely signify that it is phonetic as opposed to regular text.

— Freebase

IDC

IDC

IDC is David McCarthy, a DJ/recording artist from London, UK. A major interview feature in leading international dance music publication DJ Mag recently declared "Electro iconoclast IDC isn't your typical DJ/producer - he's more like a multi-instrumentalist mix between Brian Wilson and DFA's James Murphy" IDC's releases have consistently received 5 star press reviews, starting with his debut single 'Scratch', through to the release of his debut album 'Overthrow The Boss Class' in 2008 and continuing to 2013 with subsequent album and single releases. Second album 'The Sun Is Always Shining Above The Clouds' saw the world's biggest selling dance magazine Mixmag write "IDC is back with a rich and diverse album made across five studios over 18 months" and make lead single "Eins Deux Tres" 'Tune Of The Month', describing it as "a beautifully compelling collage of Beach Boys-like vocal harmonies and electronic voices." An extensive programme of DJ dates at major music Festivals and 'Top 100' club venues have established IDC as a headline act throughout Europe and SE Asia. The third album from IDC is due for release in summer 2014.

— Freebase

Coffee culture

Coffee culture

Coffee culture describes a social atmosphere or series of associated social behaviors that depends heavily upon coffee, particularly as a social lubricant. The term also refers to the diffusion and adoption of coffee as a widely consumed stimulant by a culture. In the late 20th century, particularly in the Western world and urbanized centers around the globe, espresso has been an increasingly dominant form. People that participate in cafe culture are sometimes referred to as "cafe au laiters" and "espressonites". The formation of culture around coffee and coffeehouses dates back to 14th century Turkey. Coffeehouses in Western Europe and the Eastern Mediterranean were traditionally social hubs, as well as artistic and intellectual centers. For example, Les Deux Magots in Paris, now a popular tourist attraction, was once associated with the intellectuals Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir. In the late 17th and 18th centuries, coffeehouses in London became popular meeting places for artists, writers, and socialites and were also the center for much political and commercial activity. Elements of today's coffeehouses have their origins in early coffeehouses, and continue to form part of the concept of coffee culture.

— Freebase

Arbuthnot

Arbuthnot

At least three British privateers bore the name Arbuthnot during the American Revolutionary War. ⁕One Arbuthnot was a British privateer schooner named after Admiral Mariot Arbuthnot. In 1778 she was in company with His Majesty's armed brig Cabot, Edmund Dod, commander, when they captured the brigantine Deux Amis, and recaptured the ship York. At that time Arbuthnot was the property of the officers of HMS Rainbow. Arbuthnot became the prize of the American ships Argo and Fair American in April 1780, during the American Revolutionary War. Argo was a Pennsylvanian privateer brig, commissioned on 18 March 1780 under Commander John Ridge of Philadelphia. She was listed as being armed with fourteen guns and having a crew of sixty men. Fair American too was a Philadelphian privateer, under the command of Stephen Decatur, Sr.. She was listed as having a battery of sixteen guns and a crew of 130. Arbuthnot was armed with 14 guns. ⁕A second Arbuthnot sailed from New York on 16 October 1780 as part of a squadron attacking the James River. She was armed with 16 guns and was under the command of James Goodrich. ⁕A third Arbuthnot was the British privateer schooner of 10 guns, under the command of Captain John Riddle. She was sailing from New York to Newfoundland when the Connecticut brigantine Minerva captured her on 24 June 1781.

— Freebase

Home! Sweet Home!

Home! Sweet Home!

"Home! Sweet Home!" is a song that has remained well known for over 150 years. Adapted from American actor and dramatist John Howard Payne's 1823 opera Clari, Maid of Milan, the song's melody was composed by Englishman Sir Henry Bishop with lyrics by Payne. The opening lines have become famous. As soon as 1827 this song was quoted by Swedish composer Franz Berwald in his Konzertstück for Bassoon and Orchestra. Gaetano Donizetti used the theme in his Opera Anna Bolena Act 2, Scene 3 as part of Anna’s Mad Scene to underscore her longing for her childhood home. It is also used with Sir Henry Wood's Fantasia on British Sea Songs and in Alexandre Guilmant's Fantasy for organ Op. 43, the Fantaisie sur deux mélodies anglaises, both of which also use "Rule, Britannia!". In 1857 composer/pianist Sigismond Thalberg wrote a series of variations for piano on the theme of Home! Sweet Home!. In 1909, it was featured in the silent film The House of Cards, an Edison Studios film. In the particular scene, a frontier bar was hurriedly closed due to a fracas. A card reading "Play Home Sweet Home" was displayed, upon which an on-screen fiddler promptly supplied a pantomime of the song. This may imply a popular association of this song with the closing hour of drinking establishments.

— Freebase

Yorktown

Yorktown

Yorktown is a census-designated place in York County, Virginia, United States. It is the county seat of York County, one of the eight original shires formed in colonial Virginia in 1682. The CDP's population was 195 as of the 2010 census, while the county's population was 66,134 in the 2011 census estimate. The town is most famous as the site of the siege and subsequent surrender of General Cornwallis to General George Washington, and the French Fleet during the American Revolutionary War on October 19, 1781. Although the war would last for another year, this British defeat at Yorktown effectively ended the war. Yorktown also figured prominently in the American Civil War, serving as a major port to supply both northern and southern towns, depending upon who held Yorktown at the time. Today, Yorktown is part of an important national resource known as the Historic Triangle of Yorktown, Jamestown and Williamsburg, and is the eastern terminus of the Colonial Parkway. Yorktown is also the eastern terminus of the TransAmerica Trail, a bicycle touring route created by the Adventure Cycling Association. One of Yorktowns historic sister cities is Zweibrücken in Germany. In the time of the American War of Independence, a German Regt called the Royal Deux-Ponts Regiment was commanded by Comte Christian de Forbach and was one of the four regiments that arrived at Newport with Rochambeau in 1780 and went on to participate in the Battle of Yorktown on the side of the Americans in 1781. Since that time Yorktown is in very close friendship to the German city of Zweibrücken.

— Freebase

Sully, Maximilien de Béthune, Duke of

Sully, Maximilien de Béthune, Duke of

celebrated minister of Henry IV. of France, born at the Château of Rosny, near Mantes, whence he was known at first as the Baron de Rosny; at first a ward of Henry IV. of Navarre, he joined the Huguenot ranks along with him, and distinguished himself at Coutras and Ivry, and approved of Henry's policy in changing his colours on his accession to the throne, remaining ever after by his side as most trusted adviser, directing the finances of the country with economy, and encouraging the peasantry in the cultivation of the soil; used to say, "Labourage et pasteurage, voilà les deux mamelles dont La France est alimentée, les vraies mines et trésors de Pérou," "Tillage and cattle-tending are the two paps whence France sucks nourishment; these are the true mines and treasures of Peru;" on the death of the king he retired from court, and occupied his leisure in writing his celebrated "Memoirs," which, while they show the author to be a great statesman, give no very pleasant idea of his character (1560-1611).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Sainte-Beuve, Charles Augustin

Sainte-Beuve, Charles Augustin

the greatest of French literary critics, born at Boulogne-sur-Mer; adopted medicine as a profession in deference to the wishes of his widowed mother, and for some years studied at Paris, but even as a student had begun his career as a literary critic by contributions to the Globe newspaper; in 1827 became acquainted with Victor Hugo, whose commanding influence drew him into the Romantic movement, and determined for him a literary career; a critical work on French poetry in the 16th century (1828), two volumes of mediocre poetry (1829-1830), and a psychological novel, "Volupté" (1834), the fruit of spiritual and mental unrest, preceded his lectures at Lausanne on Port-Royal (1837), which, afterwards elaborated and published, contain some of his finest writings; an appointment in the Mazarin Library, Paris (1840), brought him a modest competence, and allowed him during the next 8 years to contribute without strain or stress to the Revue des Deux Mondes; was elected in 1845 to the Academy; three years later lectured for a session at Liège University; during 1849-1869 he contributed a weekly literary article to the Constitutionnel; these form his famous "Causeries du Lundi" and "Nouveaux Lundis," which, for variety of human interest, critical insight, and breadth of sympathy, remain unsurpassed; was appointed professor of Latin in the Collège de France (1854), but his unpopularity with the students, owing to his support of Napoleon III., led to his resignation; as a senator in 1865 his popularity revived by his eloquent advocacy of freedom of thought, and on his decease some 10,000 people attended his funeral (1804-1869).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Quinet, Edgar

Quinet, Edgar

a French man of letters, born at Bourg, in the department of Ain; was educated at Bourg and Lyons, went to Paris in 1820, and in 1823 produced a satire called "Les Tablettes du Juif-Errant," at which time he came under the influence of Herder (q. v.) and executed in French a translation of his "Philosophy of Humanity," prefaced with an introduction which procured him the friendship of Michelet, a friendship which lasted with life; appointed to a post in Greece, he collected materials for a work on Modern Greece, and this, the first fruit of his own view of things as a speculative Radical, he published in 1830; he now entered the service of the Revue des Deux Mondes, and in the pages of it his prose poem "Ahasuérus" appeared, which was afterwards published in a book form and soon found a place in the "Index Expurgatorius" of the Church; this was followed by other democratic poems, "Napoleon" in 1835 and "Prometheus" in 1838; from 1838 to 1842 he occupied the chair of Foreign Literature in Lyons, and passed from it to that of the Literature of Southern Europe in the College of France; here, along with Michelet, he commenced a vehement crusade against the clerical party, which was brought to a head by his attack on the Jesuits, and which led to his suspension from the duties of the chair in 1846; he distrusted Louis Napoleon, and was exiled in 1852, taking up his abode at Brussels, to return to Paris again only after the Emperor's fall; through all these troubles he was busy with his pen, in 1838 published his "Examen de la Vie de Jésus," his "Du Genie des Religions," "La Révolution Religieuse au xixe Siècle," and other works; he was a disciple of Herder to the last; he believed in humanity, and religion as the soul of it (1803-1875).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia


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