Definitions containing à'becket, gilbert

We've found 175 definitions:

Becket

Becket

Becket or The Honor of God is a play written in French by Jean Anouilh. It is a depiction of the conflict between Thomas Becket and King Henry II of England leading to Becket's assassination in 1170. It contains many historical inaccuracies, which the author acknowledged.

— Freebase

hanger

hanger

(England): A steep, wooded declivity. Gilbert White

— Wiktionary

Gibbs

Gibbs

An English patronymic surname from Gibb ( Gilbert).

— Wiktionary

Gibb

Gibb

derived from a diminutive of the name Gilbert.

— Wiktionary

EUPHORIA

EUPHORIA

Euphoria was a short-lived band from 1968 to 1969, consisting of Roger Penney,on electric autoharp, Wendy Penney,on Bass guitar, Tom Pacheco,on Acoustic Guitar, and Sharon Alexander. Roger and Wendy were a folk duo performing in Greenwich Village, using the names Roger Becket and Wendy Becket. Euphoria is generally regarded as a sunshine pop group.

— Freebase

Canonize

Canonize

to declare (a deceased person) a saint; to put in the catalogue of saints; as, Thomas a Becket was canonized

— Webster Dictionary

Gilbertian

Gilbertian

Pertaining to, or in the style of the dramatist and librettist W. S. Gilbert; ludicrously comic

— Wiktionary

gilbert and sullivan

Gilbert and Sullivan

the music of Gilbert and Sullivan

— Princeton's WordNet

savoyard

Savoyard

a person who performs in the operettas of Gilbert and Sullivan

— Princeton's WordNet

henry ii

Henry II

first Plantagenet King of England; instituted judicial and financial reforms; quarreled with archbishop Becket concerning the authority of the Crown over the church (1133-1189)

— Princeton's WordNet

Micronesian

Micronesian

of or pertaining to Micronesia, a collective designation of the islands in the western part of the Pacific Ocean, embracing the Marshall and Gilbert groups, the Ladrones, the Carolines, etc

— Webster Dictionary

Himself

Himself

Himself is Irish-English singer-songwriter Gilbert O'Sullivan's debut album, originally released in August 1971. Union Square Music re-released it 2011 on Salvo label in part of the Gilbert O'Sullivan - A Singer & His Songs collection.

— Freebase

sullivan

Sullivan, Arthur Sullivan, Arthur Seymour Sullivan, Sir Arthur Sullivan

English composer of operettas who collaborated with the librettist William Gilbert (1842-1900)

— Princeton's WordNet

sir arthur sullivan

Sullivan, Arthur Sullivan, Arthur Seymour Sullivan, Sir Arthur Sullivan

English composer of operettas who collaborated with the librettist William Gilbert (1842-1900)

— Princeton's WordNet

arthur seymour sullivan

Sullivan, Arthur Sullivan, Arthur Seymour Sullivan, Sir Arthur Sullivan

English composer of operettas who collaborated with the librettist William Gilbert (1842-1900)

— Princeton's WordNet

arthur sullivan

Sullivan, Arthur Sullivan, Arthur Seymour Sullivan, Sir Arthur Sullivan

English composer of operettas who collaborated with the librettist William Gilbert (1842-1900)

— Princeton's WordNet

canterbury

Canterbury

a town in Kent in southeastern England; site of the cathedral where Thomas a Becket was martyred in 1170; seat of the archbishop and primate of the Anglican Church

— Princeton's WordNet

gilbertian

Gilbertian

wildly comic and improbable as in Gilbert and Sullivan operas

— Princeton's WordNet

prospection

prospection

"The problem with this error of retrospection is that it can keep us from discovering our errors of prospection" Daniel Gilbert "Stumbling on Happiness" Knopf New York 2006 ISBN 1-4000-4266-6}}

— Wiktionary

Canterbury

Canterbury

a city in England, giving its name various articles. It is the seat of the Archbishop of Canterbury (primate of all England), and contains the shrine of Thomas a Becket, to which pilgrimages were formerly made

— Webster Dictionary

d'oyly carte

D'Oyly Carte, Richard D'Oyly Carte

English impresario who brought Gilbert and Sullivan together and produced many of their operettas in London (1844-1901)

— Princeton's WordNet

richard d'oyly carte

D'Oyly Carte, Richard D'Oyly Carte

English impresario who brought Gilbert and Sullivan together and produced many of their operettas in London (1844-1901)

— Princeton's WordNet

Gilbert

Gilbert

Gilbert is a town in Maricopa County, Arizona, United States, located southeast of Phoenix, within the Phoenix metropolitan area. Once known as the "Hay Shipping Capital of the World", Gilbert is currently the most populous incorporated town in the United States. Gilbert encompasses 76 square miles and has made a rapid transformation from an agriculture-based community to an economically diverse suburban center located in the southeast valley of the Phoenix metropolitan area. In the last two decades, Gilbert has grown at an extremely high rate, increasing in population from 5,717 in 1980 to 208,453 as of a 2010 Census Bureau estimate.

— Freebase

Lafayette

Lafayette

Gilbert du Motier, marquis de La Fayette (1757 u2013 1834), a French aristocrat who is considered a national hero in both France and the United States for his participation in the French and American revolutions.

— Wiktionary

gilbertian

Gilbertian

of or pertaining to or characteristic of the style of William S. Gilbert

— Princeton's WordNet

Gilbert and Ellice Islands

Gilbert and Ellice Islands

The Gilbert and Ellice Islands were a British protectorate from 1892 and colony from 1916 until 1 January 1976, when the islands were divided into two colonies which became independent nations shortly after. The Gilbert Islands have been the major part of the nation of Kiribati since 1979, and the Ellice Islands became Tuvalu in 1978.

— Freebase

Delays

Delays

Delays are an English indie band formed in Southampton, consisting of brothers Greg and Aaron Gilbert, Colin Fox and Rowly. The band's sound combines guitar and synths and features Greg Gilbert's distinctive falsetto lead vocals. They have released four critically acclaimed albums to date, the first three of which made the Top 30 in the UK Albums Chart.

— Freebase

pleasant island

Nauru, Nauru Island, Pleasant Island

a small island in the central Pacific Ocean 2,800 miles to the southwest of Hawaii; in Micronesia to the west of the Gilbert Islands

— Princeton's WordNet

nauru island

Nauru, Nauru Island, Pleasant Island

a small island in the central Pacific Ocean 2,800 miles to the southwest of Hawaii; in Micronesia to the west of the Gilbert Islands

— Princeton's WordNet

nauru

Nauru, Nauru Island, Pleasant Island

a small island in the central Pacific Ocean 2,800 miles to the southwest of Hawaii; in Micronesia to the west of the Gilbert Islands

— Princeton's WordNet

Iolanthe

Iolanthe

Iolanthe; or, The Peer and the Peri is a comic opera with music by Arthur Sullivan and libretto by W. S. Gilbert. It is one of the Savoy operas and is the seventh collaboration of the fourteen between Gilbert and Sullivan. Iolanthe was first produced in London at the Savoy Theatre, on 25 November 1882, three days after Patience closed, and ran for 398 performances. It was the first of Gilbert and Sullivan's operas to premiere at the Savoy Theatre. The story concerns a band of immortal fairies who find themselves at odds with the House of Peers. The opera satirises many aspects of British government and law.

— Freebase

William Gilbert

William Gilbert

William Gilbert, also known as Gilberd, was an English physician, physicist and natural philosopher. He passionately rejected both the prevailing Aristotelian philosophy and the Scholastic method of university teaching. He is remembered today largely for his book De Magnete, and is credited as one of the originators of the term "electricity". He is regarded by some as the father of electrical engineering or electricity and magnetism. While today he is generally referred to as William Gilbert, he also went under the name of William Gilberd. The latter was used in his and his father's epitaph, the records of the town of Colchester, and in the Biographical Memoir in De Magnete, as well as in the name of The Gilberd School in Colchester, named after Gilbert. A unit of magnetomotive force, also known as magnetic potential, was named the gilbert in his honour.

— Freebase

Gilbert and Sullivan

Gilbert and Sullivan

Gilbert and Sullivan refers to the Victorian-era theatrical partnership of the librettist W. S. Gilbert and the composer Arthur Sullivan. The two men collaborated on fourteen comic operas between 1871 and 1896, of which H.M.S. Pinafore, The Pirates of Penzance and The Mikado are among the best known. Gilbert, who wrote the words, created fanciful "topsy-turvy" worlds for these operas where each absurdity is taken to its logical conclusion—fairies rub elbows with British lords, flirting is a capital offence, gondoliers ascend to the monarchy, and pirates turn out to be noblemen who have gone wrong. Sullivan, six years Gilbert's junior, composed the music, contributing memorable melodies that could convey both humour and pathos. Their operas have enjoyed broad and enduring international success and are still performed frequently throughout the English-speaking world. Gilbert and Sullivan introduced innovations in content and form that directly influenced the development of musical theatre through the 20th century. The operas have also influenced political discourse, literature, film and television and have been widely parodied and pastiched by humorists. Producer Richard D'Oyly Carte brought Gilbert and Sullivan together and nurtured their collaboration. He built the Savoy Theatre in 1881 to present their joint works and founded the D'Oyly Carte Opera Company, which performed and promoted Gilbert and Sullivan's works for over a century.

— Freebase

Potoroo

Potoroo

The potoroo is a kangaroo/rat-like marsupial about the size of a rabbit. All three extant species are threatened, especially the long-footed Potoroo and Gilbert's potoroo. The main threats are predation by introduced species and habitat loss. Potoroos were formerly very common, and early settlers reported them as being a significant pest to their crops. Gilbert's Potoroo is Australia's most endangered animal. There are only 30–40 known left in the wild. It was discovered in 1840 by a naturalist called John Gilbert. It was then thought to have become extinct until being rediscovered in 1994 at the Two Peoples Bay Nature Reserve in Western Australia.

— Freebase

New Order

New Order

New Order are an English rock band comprising Bernard Sumner, Stephen Morris, Gillian Gilbert, Phil Cunningham and Tom Chapman. The band was formed in 1980 by Sumner, Peter Hook and Morris – the remaining members of Joy Division, following the suicide of vocalist Ian Curtis – with the addition of Gilbert. In 1993 the band broke-up amidst tension between bandmembers, but reformed in 1998. In 2001, Cunningham replaced Gilbert, who left the group due to family commitments. In 2007, Peter Hook left the band and the band broke-up again, with Sumner stating in 2009 that he no longer wishes to make music as New Order. The band reunited in 2011 without Hook, with Gilbert returning to the fold and Chapman replacing Hook on bass. During the band's career and in between lengthy breaks, band members have been involved in several solo projects, such as Sumner's Electronic and Bad Lieutenant; Hook's Monaco and Revenge and Gilbert and Morris' The Other Two. Cunningham was previously a member of Marion and with Sumner and Chapman was a member of Bad Lieutenant.

— Freebase

tuvalu

Tuvalu

a small island republic on the Tuvalu islands; formerly part of the British colony of Gilbert and Ellice Islands until it withdrew in 1975 and became independent of the United Kingdom in 1978

— Princeton's WordNet

gilbert islands

Gilbert Islands

a group of islands in Micronesia to the southwest of Hawaii; formerly part of the British colony of Gilbert and Ellice Islands until it became part of the Republic of Kiribati in 1979

— Princeton's WordNet

Anelectrics

Anelectrics

(a) Bodies which do not become electrified by friction; a term introduced by Gilbert, now little used, as all bodies develop electricity under proper conditions by contact action; the reverse of idioelectrtics.

(b) Also a conductor of electricity, the reverse of a dielectric, q. v. (See Conductor.)

It will be seen that Gilbert's anelectrics were, after all, the same as the modern anelectrics, i.e., conductors.

— The Standard Electrical Dictionary

Engaged

Engaged

Engaged is a three-act farcical comic play by W. S. Gilbert. It premiered at the Haymarket Theatre on 3 October 1877, the same year as The Sorcerer, one of Gilbert's comic operas written with Arthur Sullivan, which was soon followed by the collaborators' great success in H.M.S. Pinafore. Engaged was well received on the London stage and then in New York City, where the first production of the play opened in February 1879. The work then enjoyed many revivals on both sides of the Atlantic and continues to be produced today. Engaged has been W. S. Gilbert's most popular stage work aside from the Gilbert and Sullivan comic operas. A New York Times review of an 1886 production of Engaged noted that "the laughter was almost incessant." Makers wrote: "Engaged [is] unquestionably the finest and funniest English comedy between Bulwer-Lytton's Money and Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest, which it directly inspired". Engaged may also have inspired George Bernard Shaw's Arms and the Man and Alan Ayckbourn's The Norman Conquests.

— Freebase

Trial by Jury

Trial by Jury

Trial by Jury is a comic opera in one act, with music by Arthur Sullivan and libretto by W. S. Gilbert. It was first produced on 25 March 1875, at London's Royalty Theatre, where it initially ran for 131 performances and was considered a hit, receiving critical praise and outrunning its popular companion piece, Jacques Offenbach's La Périchole. The story concerns a "breach of promise of marriage" lawsuit in which the judge and legal system are the objects of lighthearted satire. Gilbert based the libretto of Trial by Jury on an operetta parody that he had written in 1868. The opera premiered more than three years after Gilbert and Sullivan's only previous collaboration, Thespis, an 1871–72 Christmas season entertainment. In the intervening years, both the author and composer were busy with separate projects. Beginning in 1873, Gilbert tried several times to get the opera produced before the impresario Richard D'Oyly Carte suggested that he collaborate on it with Sullivan. Sullivan was pleased with the piece and promptly wrote the music. As with most Gilbert and Sullivan operas, the plot of Trial by Jury is ludicrous, but the characters behave as if the events were perfectly reasonable. This narrative technique blunts some of the pointed barbs aimed at hypocrisy, especially of those in authority, and the sometimes base motives of supposedly respectable people and institutions. These themes became favourites of Gilbert through the rest of his collaborations with Sullivan. Critics and audiences praised how well Sullivan's witty and good-humoured music complemented Gilbert's satire. The success of Trial by Jury launched the famous series of 13 collaborative works between Gilbert and Sullivan that came to be known as the Savoy Operas.

— Freebase

lord high fixer

lord high fixer

[primarily British, from Gilbert & Sullivan's ‘lord high executioner’] The person in an organization who knows the most about some aspect of a system. See wizard.

— The New Hacker's Dictionary

Cass Gilbert

Cass Gilbert

Cass Gilbert was a prominent American architect. An early proponent of skyscrapers in works like the Woolworth Building, Gilbert was also responsible for numerous museums and libraries, state capitol buildings as well as public architectural icons like the United States Supreme Court building. His public buildings in the Beaux Arts style reflect the optimistic American sense that the nation was heir to Greek democracy, Roman law and Renaissance humanism. Gilbert's achievements were recognized in his lifetime; he served as president of the American Institute of Architects in 1908-09. Gilbert was a conservative who believed architecture should reflect historic traditions and the established social order. His design of the new Supreme Court building, with its classical lines and small size contrasted sharply with the very large modernist Federal buildings going up along the National Mall in Washington, D.C., which he disliked. Heilbrun says "Gilbert's pioneering buildings injected vitality into skyscraper design, and his 'Gothic skyscraper,' epitomized by the Woolworth Building, profoundly influenced architects during the first decades of the twentieth century." Christen and Flanders note that his reputation among architectural critics went into eclipse during the age of modernism, but has since rebounded because of "respect for the integrity and classic beauty of his masterworks."

— Freebase

Sheldonian Theatre

Sheldonian Theatre

"Senate House" of Oxford; so called from Gilbert Sheldon, archbishop of Canterbury, who built it.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Best evidence rule

Best evidence rule

The best evidence rule is a common law rule of evidence which can be traced back at least as far as the 18th century. In Omychund v Barker 1 Atk, 21, 49; 26 ER 15, 33, Lord Harwicke stated that no evidence was admissible unless it was "the best that the nature of the case will allow". The publication ten years later of Gilbert's enormously influential Law of Evidence, a posthumous work by Sir Jeffrey Gilbert, Lord Chief Baron of the Exchequer, established the primacy of the best evidence rule, which Gilbert regarded as central to the concept of evidence. The general rule is that secondary evidence, such as a copy or facsimile, will be not admissible if an original document exists, and is not unavailable due to destruction or other circumstances indicating unavailability. The best evidence rule is also thought to be the basis for the rule precluding the admissibility of hearsay evidence, although the two rules are now quite distinct.

— Freebase

Street, George Edmund

Street, George Edmund

architect, born in Essex; was the architect of the New Law Courts in London; had been trained under Gilbert Scott (1824-1881).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Crigler–Najjar syndrome

Crigler–Najjar syndrome

Crigler–Najjar syndrome or CNS is a rare disorder affecting the metabolism of bilirubin, a chemical formed from the breakdown of red blood cells. The disorder results in an inherited form of non-hemolytic jaundice, which results in high levels of unconjugated bilirubin and often leads to brain damage in infants. This syndrome is divided into type I and type II, with the latter sometimes called Arias syndrome. These two types, along with Gilbert's syndrome, Dubin–Johnson syndrome, and Rotor syndrome, make up the five known hereditary defects in bilirubin metabolism. Unlike Gilbert's syndrome, only a few hundred cases of CNS are known.

— Freebase

À'Becket, Gilbert

À'Becket, Gilbert

an English humourist, who contributed to Punch and other organs; wrote the "Comic Blackstone" and comic histories of England and Rome (1811-1856).

À'Becket, A. W.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

CopperKey

CopperKey

CopperKey, Inc. provides Web-based predictive marketing software and solutions. The company offers Bizfusion, a point-and-click Web-based portal interface that analyzes customer lists, performs market analysis, and identifies new prospects. It serves telecommunications, information, and retail industries. The company was founded in 1997 and is based in Gilbert, Arizona.

— CrunchBase

Grossmith, George

Grossmith, George

actor, famous for leading parts in Gilbert and Sullivan's operas, and since as giving single-handed dramatic sketches and songs, written by himself and set to music by himself; b. 1847.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Gilbert Stuart

Gilbert Stuart

Gilbert Charles Stuart was an American painter from Rhode Island. Gilbert Stuart is widely considered to be one of America's foremost portraitists. His best known work, the unfinished portrait of George Washington that is sometimes referred to as The Athenaeum, was begun in 1796 and never finished; Stuart retained the portrait and used it to paint 130 copies which he sold for $100 each. The image of George Washington featured in the painting has appeared on the United States one-dollar bill for over a century, and on various U.S. Postage stamps of the 19th century and early 20th century. Throughout his career, Gilbert Stuart produced portraits of over 1,000 people, including the first six Presidents of the United States. His work can be found today at art museums across the United States and the United Kingdom, most notably the Metropolitan Museum of Art and Frick Collection in New York City, the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., the National Portrait Gallery in London, Worcester Art Museum in Massachusetts, and the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston.

— Freebase

Avranches`

Avranches`

a town in dep. of Manche, Normandy; the place, the spot marked by a stone, where Henry II. received absolution for the murder of Thomas à Becket; lace-making the staple industry, and trade in agricultural products.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

William Schwenck Gilbert

William Schwenck Gilbert

Sir William Schwenck Gilbert was an English dramatist, librettist, poet and illustrator best known for the fourteen comic operas produced in collaboration with the composer Sir Arthur Sullivan. The most famous of these include H.M.S. Pinafore, The Pirates of Penzance and one of the most frequently performed works in the history of musical theatre, The Mikado. These, as well as several of the other Savoy operas, continue to be frequently performed in the English-speaking world and beyond by opera companies, repertory companies, schools and community theatre groups. Lines from these works have become part of the English language, such as "short, sharp shock", "What, never? Well, hardly ever!", and "Let the punishment fit the crime". Gilbert also wrote the Bab Ballads, an extensive collection of light verse accompanied by his own comical drawings. His creative output included over 75 plays and libretti, numerous stories, poems, lyrics and various other comic and serious pieces. His plays and realistic style of stage direction inspired other dramatists, including Oscar Wilde and George Bernard Shaw. According to The Cambridge History of English and American Literature, Gilbert's "lyrical facility and his mastery of metre raised the poetical quality of comic opera to a position that it had never reached before and has not reached since".

— Freebase

Cuzco

Cuzco

Cuzco is an unincorporated town in Columbia Township, Dubois County, Indiana. The American Civil War historian Gilbert R. Tredway was reared in Cuzco during the 1920s and 1930s.

— Freebase

Alexander III.

Alexander III.

pope, successor to Adrian IV., an able man, whose election Barbarossa at first opposed, but finally assented to; took the part of Thomas à Becket against Henry II. and canonised him, as also St. Bernard. Pope from 1159 to 1181.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Nobili

Nobili

Nobili is a lunar crater that lies near the eastern limb of the Moon, giving it a foreshortened appearance when viewed from the Earth. The crater overlies the western rim of the slightly larger crater Schubert X, and the eastern rim of this satellite crater is overlain in turn by Jenkins, resulting in a triple crater formation. To the south lies Gilbert. Nobili is a circular crater formation with a worn, circular rim. The rim wall is smaller along the eastern side where it overlaps Schubert X. A small crater, Gilbert P, is attached to the southwestern rim, and there is a small break in the northeastern rim. The interior floor is nearly featureless, with a small double-peak formation at the center. This crater was previously designated Schubert Y, before being given its current name by the IAU.

— Freebase

His Excellency

His Excellency

His Excellency is a two-act comic opera with a libretto by W. S. Gilbert and music by F. Osmond Carr. The piece concerns a practical-joking governor whose pranks threaten to make everyone miserable, until the Prince Regent kindly foils the governor's plans. Towards the end of the Gilbert and Sullivan partnership, Arthur Sullivan declined to write the music for this piece after Gilbert insisted on casting his protege, Nancy McIntosh, in the lead role; Sullivan and producer Richard D'Oyly Carte, proprietor of the Savoy Theatre, did not feel that McIntosh was adequate. The opera premiered instead under the management of George Edwardes at the Lyric Theatre in London on 27 October 1894, closing on 6 April 1895 after a run of 162 performances. It starred many of the Savoy Theatre regulars, such as George Grossmith, Rutland Barrington and Jessie Bond, as well as Ellaline Terriss, who was to become a major West End star. It was also produced in New York at the Broadway Theatre on 14 October 1895 for a run of 88 performances, and in German translation at the Carltheater, Vienna, in both 1895 and 1897. The opera also enjoyed a British provincial tour.

— Freebase

Kiribati

Kiribati

Kiribati, officially the Republic of Kiribati, is an island nation in the central tropical Pacific Ocean. The permanent population is just over 100,000, and the nation is composed of 32 atolls and one raised coral island, dispersed over 3.5 million square kilometres, straddling the equator, and bordering the International Date Line at its easternmost point. The name Kiribati is the local pronunciation of "Gilberts", derived from the main island chain, the Gilbert Islands, which in turn were named after the British explorer Thomas Gilbert, who discovered them. The capital, South Tarawa, consists of a number of islets connected through a series of causeways, located in the Tarawa archipelago. Kiribati became independent from the United Kingdom in 1979. It is a member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the IMF and the World Bank, and became a full member of the United Nations in 1999.

— Freebase

As Luck Would Have It

As Luck Would Have It

As Luck Would Have It is a 2002 Swiss film. It was directed by Lorenzo Gabriele and stars Jean-Claude Brialy and Julien Bravo. It was based on an original script by Julie Gilbert.

— Freebase

Willy Gilbert

Willy Gilbert

Willy C. M. Gilbert was a Norwegian sailor who competed in the 1920 Summer Olympics. He was a crew member of the Norwegian boat Mosk II which won the gold medal in the 10 metre class.

— Freebase

Heliae

Heliae

Heliae is a platform technology company that uses sunlight and low-cost carbon feedstocks to produce high-value products from algae. Based in Gilbert, Ariz., Heliae is leveraging its core production technology into four target markets: nutrition, therapeutics, health & beauty and agrosciences. With a seasoned management team and world-class science, Heliae is advancing the future of the algae industry by delivering novel algae-based products to dynamic markets around the world.

— CrunchBase

Sir William Schwenck Gilbert

Sir William Schwenck Gilbert

Sir William Schwenck Gilbert was an English dramatist, librettist, poet and illustrator best known for the fourteen comic operas produced in collaboration with the composer Sir Arthur Sullivan. The most famous of these include H.M.S. Pinafore, The Pirates of Penzance and one of the most frequently performed works in the history of musical theatre, The Mikado. These, as well as several of the other Savoy operas, continue to be frequently performed in the English-speaking world and beyond by opera companies, repertory companies, schools and community theatre groups. Lines from these works have become part of the English language, such as "short, sharp shock", "What, never? Well, hardly ever!", and "Let the punishment fit the crime". Gilbert also wrote the Bab Ballads, an extensive collection of light verse accompanied by his own comical drawings. His creative output included over 75 plays and libretti, numerous stories, poems, lyrics and various other comic and serious pieces. His plays and realistic style of stage direction inspired other dramatists, including Oscar Wilde and George Bernard Shaw. According to The Cambridge History of English and American Literature, Gilbert's "lyrical facility and his mastery of metre raised the poetical quality of comic opera to a position that it had never reached before and has not reached since".

— Freebase

Henry II.

Henry II.

king of England from 1154 to 1189, first of the Plantagenet line; was the son of Matilda, daughter of Henry I., and her second husband Geoffrey Plantagenet, Count of Anjou, born at Le Mans; when he came to the throne as Stephen's successor he was already in possession, mainly through his marriage with Eleanor, the divorced wife of Louis VII., of more than half of France; he set himself with all the vigour of his energetic nature to reform the abuses which had become rampant under Stephen, and Thomas à Becket was his zealous Chancellor; the Great Council was frequently summoned to deliberate on national affairs; the Curia Regis was strengthened, the itinerant judgeships revived, while the oppression and immorality of the nobles was sternly suppressed by the demolition of the "adulterine castles"; a blow was aimed at the privileges and licentiousness of the clergy by the Constitutions of Clarendon, but their enactment brought about a rupture between the king and Becket, now Archbishop of Canterbury, which subsequently ended in the murder of Becket; in 1171 Ireland was invaded and annexed, and three years later William the Lion of Scotland was forced to declare his kingdom a fief to the English throne; some time previously the Welsh princes had done him homage; the last years of his reign were embittered by quarrels and strife with his ungrateful sons; he was a man of many kingly qualities, perhaps the best, taken all in all, that England ever had, and his reign marks an epoch in the development of constitutional law and liberty (1133-1189).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Wilde

Wilde

Wilde is a 1997 British biographical film directed by Brian Gilbert with Stephen Fry in the titular role. The screenplay by Julian Mitchell is based on the Pulitzer Prize-winning 1987 biography of Oscar Wilde by Richard Ellmann.

— Freebase

Newstead Abbey

Newstead Abbey

an abbey near Nottingham, founded by Henry II. by way of atonement for the murder of Thomas à Becket, which was given at the dissolution of the monasteries to an ancestor of Lord Byron, who lived in it and sold it, since which it has been restored.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Makin

Makin

Makin is the name of a chain of islands located in the Pacific Ocean island nation of Kiribati. Makin is the northernmost of the Gilbert Islands, with a population of 1,798.

— Freebase

Problem Child

Problem Child

Problem Child is a 1990 American comedy film. It stars John Ritter, Amy Yasbeck, Gilbert Gottfried, Jack Warden, Michael Richards and Michael Oliver. The film was directed by Dennis Dugan. The film was the first of many produced by Robert Simonds.

— Freebase

Richard D'Oyly Carte

Richard D'Oyly Carte

Richard D'Oyly Carte was an English talent agent, theatrical impresario, composer and hotelier during the latter half of the Victorian era. Rising from humble beginnings, Carte built two of London's theatres and a hotel empire, while also establishing an opera company that ran continuously for over a hundred years and a management agency representing some of the most important artists of the day. Carte started his career in his father's music publishing and musical instrument manufacturing business. As a young man, he conducted and composed music, but he soon turned to promoting the entertainment careers of others through his management agency. Carte believed that a school of wholesome, well-crafted, family-friendly, English comic opera could be as popular as the risqué French works dominating the London musical stage in the 1870s. To that end, he brought together the dramatist W. S. Gilbert and composer Arthur Sullivan and, together with his wife Helen Carte, he nurtured their collaboration on a series of thirteen Savoy operas. He founded the D'Oyly Carte Opera Company and built the state-of-the-art Savoy Theatre to host the Gilbert and Sullivan operas.

— Freebase

Peter O'Toole

Peter O'Toole

Peter James O'Toole was a English-Irish stage and film actor. He attended the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, and began working in the theatre, gaining recognition as a Shakespearean actor at the Bristol Old Vic and with the English Stage Company, before making his film debut in 1959. He achieved international recognition playing T. E. Lawrence in Lawrence of Arabia for which he received his first Academy Award nomination. He received seven further Oscar nominations – for Becket, The Lion in Winter, Goodbye, Mr. Chips, The Ruling Class, The Stunt Man, My Favorite Year and Venus – and holds the record for the most Academy Award acting nominations without a win. He won four Golden Globes, a BAFTA and an Emmy, and was the recipient of an Honorary Academy Award in 2003.

— Freebase

Topsy Turvy

Topsy Turvy

Topsy-Turvy is a 1999 musical drama film written and directed by Mike Leigh and stars Allan Corduner as Arthur Sullivan and Jim Broadbent as W. S. Gilbert, along with Timothy Spall and Lesley Manville. The story concerns the 15-month period in 1884 and 1885 leading up to the premiere of Gilbert and Sullivan's The Mikado. The film focuses on the creative conflict between playwright and composer, and the decision by the two men to continue their partnership, which led to the creation of several more famous Savoy Operas between them. The film was not released widely, but it received very favourable reviews, including a number of film festival awards and two design Academy Awards. While considered an artistic success, illustrating Victorian era British life in the theatre in depth, the film did not recover its production costs. Leigh cast actors who did their own singing in the film, and the singing performances were faulted by some critics, while others lauded Leigh's strategy.

— Freebase

Richard Burton

Richard Burton

Richard Burton, CBE was a Welsh actor. He was nominated seven times for an Academy Award – for My Cousin Rachel, The Robe, Becket, The Spy Who Came in from the Cold, Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, Anne of the Thousand Days and Equus – six of which were for Best Actor in a Leading Role, without ever winning. He was a recipient of BAFTA, Golden Globe and Tony Awards for Best Actor. Although never trained as an actor, Burton was, at one time, the highest-paid actor in Hollywood. He remains closely associated in the public consciousness with his second wife, actress Elizabeth Taylor. The couple's turbulent relationship was rarely out of the news.

— Freebase

Aldie

Aldie

Aldie is an unincorporated community village located on the John Mosby Highway between Gilbert's Corner and Middleburg in Loudoun County, Virginia. It is located in a gap between the Catoctin Mountain and Bull Run Mountain, through which the Little River flows. The zip code for Aldie, Virginia, is 20105.

— Freebase

Gilbert Islands

Gilbert Islands

The Gilbert Islands are a chain of sixteen atolls and coral islands in the Pacific Ocean. They are the main part of Republic of Kiribati and include Tarawa, the site of the country's capital and residence of almost half of the population.

— Freebase

Humphrey Gilbert

Humphrey Gilbert

Sir Humphrey Gilbert of Devon in England was a half-brother of Sir Walter Raleigh. Adventurer, explorer, member of parliament, and soldier, he served during the reign of Queen Elizabeth and was a pioneer of English colonization in North America and the Plantations of Ireland.

— Freebase

Ghost in the machine

Ghost in the machine

The "ghost in the machine" is British philosopher Gilbert Ryle's description of René Descartes' mind-body dualism. The phrase was introduced in Ryle's book The Concept of Mind to highlight the perceived absurdity of dualist systems like Descartes' where mental activity carries on in parallel to physical action, but where their means of interaction are unknown or, at best, speculative.

— Freebase

Electrics

Electrics

Substances developing electrification by rubbing or friction; as Gilbert, the originator of the term, applied it, it would indicate dielectrics. He did not know that, if insulated, any substance was one of his "electrics." A piece of copper held by a glass handle becomes electrified by friction.

— The Standard Electrical Dictionary

Willard

Willard

Willard is a 2003 horror film loosely based on the novel Ratman's Notebooks by Stephen Gilbert and a remake of the 1971 film Willard. It was not billed as a remake by the producers, but as a re-working of the themes from the original, with a stronger focus on suspense.

— Freebase

Emergency Call

Emergency Call

Emergency Call is a British film released in 1952 by Nettlefold Films. The film was directed by Lewis Gilbert and stars Jack Warner in a familiar role playing a policeman, Anthony Steel, Joy Shelton and Sid James as a dubious boxing promoter. The film was remade in 1962 as Emergency starring Glyn Houston.

— Freebase

Short, sharp shock

Short, sharp shock

The phrase "short, sharp shock" means "a quick, severe punishment." It was originally used in Gilbert and Sullivan's 1885 comic opera The Mikado, where it appears in the song near the end of Act I, "I Am So Proud". It has since been used in popular songs, song titles, literature, as well as in general speech.

— Freebase

Buckles

Buckles

Buckles is a comic strip by David Gilbert about the misadventures of an anthropomorphic naïve dog. Buckles debuted on March 25, 1996. King Feature's Syndicate: "More of an only child with canine instincts than he is the family pet. Buckles can display all the charm...of a small child discovering how to find his way through life."

— Freebase

Canterbury Tales

Canterbury Tales

a body of tales by Chaucer, conceived of as related by a small company of pilgrims from London to the shrine of Thomas à Becket at Canterbury. They started from the Tabard Inn at Southwark, and agreed to tell each a tale going and each another coming back, the author of the best tale to be treated with a supper. None of the tales on the homeward journey are given.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

John of Salisbusy

John of Salisbusy

bishop of Chartres, born at Salisbury, of Saxon lineage; was a pupil of Abelard; was secretary first to Theobald and then to Thomas á Becket, archbishop of Canterbury; was present at the assassination of the latter; afterwards he retired to France and was made bishop; wrote the Lives of St. Thomas and St. Anselm, and other works of importance in connection with the scholasticism of the time (1120-1180).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

GAG line

GAG line

The GAG line, which as an acronym for Goal-A-Game, was a famous ice hockey line for the New York Rangers in the late 1960s and early 1970s, as these linemates averaged over 1 goal a game while playing together. It consisted of Jean Ratelle at center, Rod Gilbert on right wing and Vic Hadfield on the left side.

— Freebase

Davie

Davie

Davie is a town in Broward County, Florida, United States. The town's population was 91,992 at the 2010 census. It is the most populous municipality labelled as a "town" in Florida, and the third most populous such community in the United States, trailing only Gilbert, Arizona and Cary, North Carolina.

— Freebase

Sheldonian Theatre

Sheldonian Theatre

The Sheldonian Theatre, located in Oxford, England, was built from 1664 to 1668 after a design by Christopher Wren for the University of Oxford. The building is named after Gilbert Sheldon, chancellor of the university at the time and the project's main financial backer. It is used for music concerts, lectures and university ceremonies, but not for drama.

— Freebase

Opera Comique, London

Opera Comique, London

The Opera Comique was a 19th-century theatre constructed in Westminster, London, between Wych Street and Holywell Street with entrances on the East Strand. It opened in 1870 and was demolished in 1902, to make way for the construction of the Aldwych and Kingsway. It is perhaps best remembered for hosting several of the early Gilbert and Sullivan operas.

— Freebase

Heathfield, George Augustus Eliott, Lord

Heathfield, George Augustus Eliott, Lord

a gallant general, the defender of Gibraltar, son of Sir Gilbert Eliott, born at Stobs, in Roxburghshire; saw service first in the war of the Austrian Succession, fighting at Dettingen and Fontenoy; as a colonel he fought with English troops in alliance with Frederick the Great against Austria; for his heroic defence of Gibraltar (1779-1783) against the combined forces of France and Spain he was raised to the peerage as Baron of Gibraltar (1717-1790).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Foster, Birket

Foster, Birket

a celebrated artist, born at North Shields; his earliest work was done in wood-engraving under the direction of Landells, and many of his sketches appeared in the Illustrated London News; following this he executed, in collaboration with John Gilbert, a series of illustrations for the works of Goldsmith, Cowper, Scott, and other poets, in which he exhibited a rare skill in rural scenes; subsequent work has been in water-colours, and in 1861 he was elected a member of the Water-Colour Society (1825-1899).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Johnny Gilbert

Johnny Gilbert

John L. "Johnny" Gilbert III is an American show business personality who has worked mainly on television game shows. Originally a nightclub singer and entertainer, he has hosted and announced a number of game shows from various eras, dating as far back as the 1950s. He has become known primarily for his work as the announcer and audience host for the syndicated version of the quiz show Jeopardy!.

— Freebase

Ideoelectrics or Idioelectrics

Ideoelectrics or Idioelectrics

Bodies which become electric by friction. This was the old definition, the term originating with Gilbert. It was based on a misconception, as insulation is all that is requisite for frictional electrification, metals being thus electrified if held by insulating handles. The term is virtually obsolete; as far as it means anything it means insulating substances such as scaling wax, sulphur, or glass.

— The Standard Electrical Dictionary

Canterbury

Canterbury

Canterbury is an historic English cathedral city, which lies at the heart of the City of Canterbury, a district of Kent in South East England. It lies on the River Stour. Originally a Brythonic settlement called *Durou̯ernon, it was renamed Durovernum Cantiacorum by the Roman conquerors in the 1st century AD. After it became the chief Jutish settlement, it gained its English name Canterbury, itself derived from the Old English Cantwareburh. After the Kingdom of Kent's conversion to Christianity in 597, St Augustine founded an episcopal see in the city and became the first Archbishop of Canterbury, a position that now heads the Church of England and the worldwide Anglican Communion. Thomas Becket's murder at Canterbury Cathedral in 1170 led to the cathedral becoming a place of pilgrimage for Christians worldwide. This pilgrimage provided the theme for Geoffrey Chaucer's 14th-century literary classic The Canterbury Tales. The literary heritage continued with the birth of the playwright Christopher Marlowe in the city in the 16th century.

— Freebase

Kuria

Kuria

Kuria is the name of a pair of islets in the Central Gilbert Islands in Kiribati, northwest of Aranuka. The two islets, Buariki and Oneeke, are separated by a 20 metre wide channel on a shallow water platform, which is crossed by a bridge of the connecting road. The islands are surrounded by fringing reef which is broadest on the eastern side of Kuria. The population of Kuria is 980 as of 2010.

— Freebase

Clair

Clair

"Clair" is a popular song by Irish singer Gilbert O'Sullivan and is one of his biggest-selling singles. Written by O'Sullivan and produced by Gordon Mills, it was the number one single in the UK for two weeks in November 1972, number one in Canada on the RPM 100 national singles chart the following January, and peaked at number two on the Billboard Hot 100 in the US. It was also O'Sullivan's second and last number one hit on the U.S. Easy Listening chart, after "Alone Again". The song is the love song of an uncle for his young niece, though for the first part of the song, the ambiguous text leads one to think that it is from one adult to another. The brief instrumental introduction is the sound of Gilbert whistling, before he comes in. The real Clair was the young daughter of O'Sullivan's producer-manager, Gordon Mills, and his wife, the model Jo Waring. The little girl's giggling is heard at the end of this song. The "Uncle Ray" mentioned in the song is O'Sullivan himself, a reference to his real name of Raymond O'Sullivan. The instrumental break in the middle section is done half a step up from A to B-Flat, before going back to A. "Clair" was included in Sullivan's album Back to Front. An Italian version was performed in 1973 by the crooner Johnny Dorelli. A cover by Singers Unlimited was sampled by producer J Dilla for the Slum Village song "Players."

— Freebase

A Closed Book

A Closed Book

A Closed Book is a short novel by Gilbert Adair, published in 2000. The book starts with a slightly awkward meeting between a crotchety blind author and a sighted interviewee he seeks to employ as his assistant. The narrative is presented almost entirely through dialogue between the two men, puctuated by fragments of the writer's diary. As the two men's relationship develops it becomes clear that both have something to hide. A film based on the novel was released in 2010.

— Freebase

Gilbert Murray

Gilbert Murray

George Gilbert Aimé Murray, OM was an Australian-born British classical scholar and public intellectual, with connections in many spheres. He was an outstanding scholar of the language and culture of Ancient Greece, perhaps the leading authority in the first half of the twentieth century. He is the basis for the character of Adolphus Cusins in his friend George Bernard Shaw's play Major Barbara, and also appears as the chorus figure in Tony Harrison's play Fram.

— Freebase

Assassins

Assassins

Assassins is a musical with music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and book by John Weidman, based on an idea by Charles Gilbert, Jr. It uses the premise of a murderous carnival game to produce a revue-style portrayal of men and women who attempted to assassinate Presidents of the United States. The music varies to reflect the popular music of the eras depicted. The musical first opened Off-Broadway in 1990, and the 2004 Broadway production won five Tony Awards.

— Freebase

Butaritari

Butaritari

Butaritari is an atoll located in the Pacific Ocean island nation of Kiribati. It is the most fertile of the Gilbert Islands, with relatively good soils and high rainfall. Butaritari atoll has a land area of 13.49 km² and a population of 4,346 as of 2010. During World War II, Butaritari was known by American forces as "Makin Atoll", and was the site of the Battle of Makin. Locally, Makin is the name of a separate atoll to the Northeast of Butaritari.

— Freebase

Sweethearts

Sweethearts

Sweethearts is a comic play billed as a "dramatic contrast" in two acts by W. S. Gilbert. The play tells a sentimental and ironic story of the differing recollections of a man and a woman about their last meeting together before being separated and reunited after 30 years. It was first produced on 7 November 1874 at the Prince of Wales's Theatre in London, running for 132 performances until 13 April 1875. It enjoyed many revivals, thereafter, into the 1920s. The first professional production of Sweethearts in Britain in recent memory was given in the spring of 2007 at the Finborough Theatre in London, along with Arthur Sullivan's The Zoo.

— Freebase

Palomar

Palomar

Palomar is the title of a graphic novel written and drawn by Gilbert Hernandez and published in 2003 by Fantagraphics Books. It collects work previously published within the pages of Love and Rockets. Palomar is the fictional town in Latin America where all the stories presented are set. Palomar is included in Time magazine's Best Comics of 2003 list, and in 2005 was one of Time's 100 best graphic novels of all time.

— Freebase

Quokka

Quokka

The quokka, the only member of the genus Setonix, is a small macropod about the size of a domestic cat. Like other marsupials in the macropod family, the quokka is herbivorous and mainly nocturnal. It can be found on some smaller islands off the coast of Western Australia, in particular on Rottnest Island just off Perth and Bald Island near Albany. A small mainland colony exists in the protected area of Two Peoples Bay Nature Reserve, where they co-exist with Gilbert's potoroo.

— Freebase

LINPACK

LINPACK

LINPACK is a software library for performing numerical linear algebra on digital computers. It was written in Fortran by Jack Dongarra, Jim Bunch, Cleve Moler, and Gilbert Stewart, and was intended for use on supercomputers in the 1970s and early 1980s. It has been largely superseded by LAPACK, which runs more efficiently on modern architectures. LINPACK makes use of the BLAS libraries for performing basic vector and matrix operations. The LINPACK benchmarks appeared initially as part of the LINPACK user's manual. Parallel LINPACK benchmark implementation called HPL is used to benchmark and rank supercomputers for the TOP500 list.

— Freebase

Canterbury

Canterbury

in E. Kent, on the Stour, by rail 62 m. SE. of London; is the ecclesiastical capital of England; the cathedral was founded A.D. 597 by St. Augustin; the present building belongs to various epochs, dating as far back as the 11th century; it contains many interesting monuments, statues, and tombs, among the latter that of Thomas à Becket, murdered in the north transept, 1170; the cloisters, chapter-house, and other buildings occupy the site of the old monastic houses; the city is rich in old churches and ecclesiastical monuments; there is an art gallery; trade is chiefly in hops and grain. Kit Marlowe was a native.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Mayhew, Henry

Mayhew, Henry

littérateur and first editor of Punch, born in London, and articled to his father, a solicitor; chose journalism as a profession, and in conjunction with Gilbert à Beckett started The Thief in 1832, the first of the "Bits" type of papers; he joined the first Punch staff in 1841, in which year his farce "The Wandering Minstrel" was produced; collaborating with his brother Augustus, he wrote "Whom to Marry" and many other novels between 1847 and 1855, thereafter works on various subjects; his principal book, "London Labour and the London Poor," appeared in 1851 (1812-1887).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

His Majesty

His Majesty

His Majesty, or, The Court of Vingolia is an English comic opera in two acts with dialogue by F. C. Burnand, lyrics by R. C. Lehmann, additional lyrics by Adrian Ross and music by Alexander Mackenzie. The work premiered at the Savoy Theatre in London on 20 February 1897, running for only 61 performances until 24 April 1897, despite a strong cast including George Grossmith, Ilka Pálmay, Scott Russell, Fred Billington, Florence Perry and Walter Passmore. The D'Oyly Carte Opera Company then toured the opera throughout 1897 alongside more familiar Gilbert and Sullivan works.

— Freebase

Technoscience

Technoscience

Technoscience is a concept widely used in the interdisciplinary community of science and technology studies to designate the technological and social context of science. The notion indicates a common recognition that scientific knowledge is not only socially coded and historically situated but sustained and made durable by material networks. "Technoscience" is a term coined by French philosopher Gaston Bachelard in 1953. It was popularized in the French-speaking world by Belgian philosopher Gilbert Hottois in the late 1970s/early 1980s, and entered common usage in English in the early 2000s.

— Freebase

Double Talk

Double Talk

Double Talk is an American game show that aired on the ABC network in 1986. Henry Polic II hosted this word game created by Bob Stewart, which contained elements of the previous Stewart-produced game show Shoot for the Stars. Bob Hilton was the announcer for the show's first two weeks and was replaced starting on the third week by Johnny Gilbert. Near the end of its run, the show was retitled Celebrity Double Talk. However, no format changes took place with the change in the show's title.

— Freebase

A&P

A&P

"A&P" is a comic short story written by John Updike in 1961. M. Gilbert Porter called the titular A & P in Updike's story "the common denominator of middle-class suburbia, an appropriate symbol for [the] mass ethic of a consumer-conditioned society." According to Porter, when the main character chooses to rebel against the A & P he also rebels against this consumer-conditioned society, and in so doing he "has chosen to live honestly and meaningfully." William Peden, on the other hand, called the story "deftly narrated nonsense...which contains nothing more significant than a checking clerk's interest in three girls in bathing suits." "A & P", first introduced in The New Yorker on July 22, 1961, also later appeared in the collection Pigeon Feathers.

— Freebase

Lola Montez

Lola Montez

Eliza Rosanna Gilbert, Countess of Landsfeld, better known by the stage name Lola Montez, was an Irish dancer and actress who became famous as a "Spanish dancer", courtesan and mistress of King Ludwig I of Bavaria, who made her Countess of Landsfeld. She used her influence to institute liberal reforms. At the start of the Revolutions of 1848 in the German states, she was forced to flee. She proceeded to the United States via Switzerland, France and London, returning to her work as an entertainer and lecturer. For a time she visited Australia.

— Freebase

Broken Hearts

Broken Hearts

Broken Hearts is a blank verse play by W. S. Gilbert in three acts styled "An entirely original fairy play". It opened at the Royal Court Theatre in London on 9 December 1875, running for three months, and toured the provinces in 1876. It was revived at the Savoy Theatre in 1882. Julia Gwynne played Melthusine. It was revived again in 1883, and yet again in 1888 starring Marion Terry in February and Julia Neilson in May, and also at Crystal Palace that year. There was also a New York City production at the Madison Square Theatre].

— Freebase

Ratak Chain

Ratak Chain

The Ratak Chain is a chain of islands within the island nation of the Marshall Islands. Ratak means "sunrise". It lies just to the east of the country's other main island chain, the Ralik Chain. As of 1999, the total population of the Ratak islands is 30,925. The atolls and isolated islands in the chain are: ⁕Bokak Atoll ⁕Bikar Atoll ⁕Utirik Atoll ⁕Taka Atoll ⁕Mejit Island ⁕Ailuk Atoll ⁕Jemo Island ⁕Likiep Atoll ⁕Wotje Atoll ⁕Erikub Atoll ⁕Maloelap Atoll ⁕Aur Atoll ⁕Majuro Atoll ⁕Arno Atoll ⁕Mili Atoll ⁕Knox Atoll The Ratak Chain forms a continuous chain of seamounts with the Gilbert Islands to the south, which are part of Kiribati.

— Freebase

Fathead

Fathead

Fathead is a brand name of life-sized, precision-cut vinyl wall graphics manufactured by Fathead LLC. Fathead LLC is a privately held company based in Detroit, Michigan. The ownership group is led by Dan Gilbert, who is chairman and founder of Quicken Loans, and also Majority Owner of the Cleveland Cavaliers. Fathead categories include Real.Big, Fathead Jr., Fathead Customs, Fathead Tradeables, Fathead Teammate, Fathead Skins, and SM/ART across 500 officially licensed brands. The products are high-definition wall graphics of professional athletes, animated heroes, entertainment characters, team helmets and logos. The graphics are constructed of vinyl and a low-tack adhesive.

— Freebase

Cahoots

Cahoots

Cahoots is the fourth studio album by Canadian/American rock group The Band released in 1971 and was their last all-original studio album for four years. It received only mixed reviews when it first appeared. Robbie Robertson wrote or co-wrote all but one of the album tracks, Bob Dylan's "When I Paint My Masterpiece". Robertson's occasional co-writers include Danko and Helm on "Life is a Carnival", and Van Morrison on "4% Pantomime". The album's front cover was painted by New York artist/illustrator Gilbert Stone, while the back cover features a photograph portrait of the group by Richard Avedon.

— Freebase

Chandler

Chandler

Chandler is a city in Maricopa County, Arizona, United States, and is a prominent suburb of the Phoenix, Arizona, Metropolitan Statistical Area. It is bordered to the north and west by Tempe, to the north by Mesa, to the west by Phoenix, to the south by the Gila River Indian Community, and to the east by Gilbert. As of July 2011, the population was 240,101 according to the United States Census Bureau, however, according to the city's official website, Chandler's Planning Division estimated the population as of September 2012 being 239,610. It also has satellite locations for many technology companies, including Intel and Orbital Sciences Corporation.

— Freebase

Grand Poobah

Grand Poobah

Grand Poobah is a term derived from the name of the haughty character Pooh-Bah in Gilbert and Sullivan's The Mikado. In this comic opera, Pooh-Bah holds numerous exalted offices, including "First Lord of the Treasury, Lord Chief Justice, Commander-in-Chief, Lord High Admiral... Archbishop of Titipu, and Lord Mayor" and Lord High Everything Else. The name has come to be used as a mocking title for someone self-important or high-ranking and who either exhibits an inflated self-regard or who has limited authority while taking impressive titles. The formal term for the practice of holding multiple offices is "dual mandate".

— Freebase

Let It Be Me

Let It Be Me

"Let It Be Me" is a popular song originally published in 1955 as "Je t'appartiens". The score was written and first recorded by Gilbert Bécaud. The lyrics were penned in French by Pierre Delanoë. The English language version used lyrics by Mann Curtis and was performed in 1957 by Jill Corey in the television series Climax!. Corey's version, with orchestration by Jimmy Carroll, was released as a single and was moderately successful. The most popular version of "Let It Be Me" was released in 1960 by The Everly Brothers. It reached 7th position on the Billboard Hot 100. The harmony arrangement of this version was often emulated in subsequent remakes.

— Freebase

Red-billed Chough

Red-billed Chough

The Red-billed Chough or simply Chough, Pyrrhocorax pyrrhocorax, is a bird in the crow family, one of only two species in the genus Pyrrhocorax. Its eight subspecies breed on mountains and coastal cliffs from the western coasts of Ireland and Britain east through southern Europe and North Africa to Central Asia, India and China. This bird has glossy black plumage, a long curved red bill, red legs, and a loud, ringing call. It has a buoyant acrobatic flight with widely spread primaries. The Red-billed Chough pairs for life and displays fidelity to its breeding site, which is usually a cave or crevice in a cliff face. It builds a wool-lined stick nest and lays three eggs. It feeds, often in flocks, on short grazed grassland, taking mainly invertebrate prey. Although it is subject to predation and parasitism, the main threat to this species is changes in agricultural practices, which have led to population decline, some local extirpation, and range fragmentation in Europe; however, it is not threatened globally. The Red-billed Chough, which derived its common name from the Jackdaw, was formerly associated with fire-raising, and has links with Saint Thomas Becket and the county of Cornwall. The Red-billed Chough has been depicted on postage stamps of a few countries, including the Isle of Man, with four different stamps, and The Gambia, where the bird does not occur.

— Freebase

Glycogen storage disease type III

Glycogen storage disease type III

Glycogen storage disease type III is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder and inborn error of metabolism characterized by a deficiency in glycogen debranching enzymes. It is also known as Cori's disease in honor of the 1947 Nobel laureates Carl Cori and Gerty Cori. Other names include Forbes disease in honor of clinician Gilbert Burnett Forbes, an American Physician who further described the features of the disorder, or limit dextrinosis. Glycogen is a molecule the body uses to store carbohydrate energy. Symptoms of GSD-III are caused by a deficiency of the enzyme amylo-1,6 glucosidase, or debrancher enzyme. This causes excess amounts of an abnormal glycogen to be deposited in the liver, muscles and, in some cases, the heart.

— Freebase

The First Letter

The First Letter

The First Letter is the ninth studio album and the last album released by Wire before their second extended hiatus. It was one of only three releases credited to "Wir", the others being the "So And Slow It Grows" single, and a limited edition two song EP entitledVien. The band changed their name to "Wir" after drummer Robert Gotobed's departure, who quit the band because the musical direction increasingly relied on drum machines and loops. Other than an Erasure remix, the band would not reform until 1999, and not release any new material until 2002's Read and Burn 01 and Read and Burn 02 EPs and 2003's subsequent Send. The album produced the single "So and Slow It Grows." All songs were composed by Bruce Gilbert, Colin Newman, and Graham Lewis, except "Naked, Whooping and Such-Like", with words by Lewis, and reading by Claude Bessey.

— Freebase

Frederick Sanger

Frederick Sanger

Frederick Sanger, OM, CH, CBE, FRS, FAA is a British biochemist who was twice the recipient of the Nobel Prize for Chemistry, the only person to have been so. In 1958 he was awarded a Nobel prize in chemistry "for his work on the structure of proteins, especially that of insulin". In 1980, Walter Gilbert and Sanger shared half of the chemistry prize "for their contributions concerning the determination of base sequences in nucleic acids". The other half was awarded to Paul Berg "for his fundamental studies of the biochemistry of nucleic acids, with particular regard to recombinant-DNA". He is the fourth person to have been awarded two Nobel Prizes, either individually or in tandem with others.

— Freebase

Patter song

Patter song

The patter song is characterized by a moderately fast to very fast tempo with a rapid succession of rhythmic patterns in which each syllable of text corresponds to one note. It is a staple of comic opera, especially Gilbert and Sullivan, but it has also been used in musicals and other situations. The lyric of a patter song generally features tongue-twisting rhyming text, with alliterative words and other consonant or vowel sounds that are intended to be entertaining to listen to at rapid speed, and the musical accompaniment is lightly orchestrated and fairly simple, to emphasize the text. The song is often intended as a showpiece for a comic character, usually a bass or baritone. The singer should be capable of excellent enunciation in order to show the song to maximum effect.

— Freebase

Conductus

Conductus

In medieval music, conductus is a type of sacred, but non-liturgical vocal composition for one or more voices. The word derives from Latin conducere, and the conductus was most likely sung while the lectionary was carried from its place of safekeeping to the place from which it was to be read. The conductus was one of the principal types of vocal composition of the ars antiqua period of medieval music history. The form most likely originated in the south of France around 1150, and reached its peak development during the activity of the Notre Dame School in the early 13th century. Most of the conductus compositions of the large mid-13th century manuscript collection from Notre Dame are for two or three voices. Much of the surviving repertoire is contained in the Florence Manuscript and also the manuscript Wolfenbüttel 1099. Conductus are also unique in the Notre Dame repertory in admitting secular melodies as source material, though sacred melodies were also commonly used. Common subjects for the songs were lives of the saints, feasts of the Lord, the Nativity, as well as more current subjects such as exemplary behavior of contemporary witnesses to the faith, such as Thomas Becket. A significant and interesting repertory of conductus from late in the period consists of songs which criticize abuses by the clergy, including some which are quite outraged. While it might be difficult to imagine them being sung in church, it is possible that the repertory may have had an existence beyond its documented liturgical use.

— Freebase

Sullivan, Sir Arthur Seymour

Sullivan, Sir Arthur Seymour

English composer, born in London; won the Mendelssohn scholarship at the Royal Academy of Music, and by means of it completed his musical education at Leipzig; in 1862 composed incidental music for "The Tempest," well received at the Crystal Palace; since then has been a prolific writer of all kinds of music, ranging from hymns and oratorios to popular songs and comic operas; his oratorios include "The Prodigal Son" (1868), "The Light of the World," "The Golden Legend," &c., but it is as a writer of light and tuneful operas (librettos by W. S. Gilbert, q. v.) that he is best known; these began with "Cox and Box" (1866), and include "Trial by Jury," "The Sorcerer" (1877), "Pinafore," "Patience" (1881), "Mikado" (1885), &c., in all of which he displays great gifts as a melodist, and wonderful resource in clever piquant orchestration; received the Legion of Honour in 1878, and was knighted in 1883; b. 1842.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Clear Vascular

Clear Vascular

Clear Vascular, Inc. (CVI) is a clinical stage company that was formed in 2005 by Drs. Gilbert Gonzales (CEO) and has been supported by equity and equity-sparing funding . The Company’s aims are to image and treat vulnerable plaque and other vascular inflammatory diseases. The tin-117m based products have been developed under the Initiative for Proliferation Prevention (IPP) program in collaboration with the US Department of Energy and Brookhaven National Laboratory initially using reactors in Russia. This early work validated the imaging and therapeutic effects predicted for tin-117m.Under this IPP program a proton accelerator method of producing the tin-117m at higher specific activities was then developed in collaboration with the Institute for Nuclear Research near to Moscow. This production method has been demonstrated to be transferable to a number of institutions in the USA and elsewhere where the product could be made at will.Innovative work by Dr. Nigel Stevenson led to a new tin-117m production method using alpha particles and a cadmium-116 target. This is now the primary method that is routinely used to manufacture the tin for the clinical trial product. In conjunction with this, the development of our primary product, Tin-Annexin, has led to numerous pre-clinical and clinical trials that have demonstrated the viability of not only imaging the vulnerable plaque but, more importantly, therapeutically treating the condition.

— CrunchBase

Dunnart

Dunnart

Dunnarts are furry narrow-footed marsupials the size of a mouse, members of the genus Sminthopsis. They are mainly insectivorous. A male dunnart's Y chromosome has only 4 genes, making it the smallest known mammalian Y chromosome. There are 21 species, all in Australia and some in New Guinea: ⁕Genus Sminthopsis ⁕S. crassicaudata species-group ⁕Fat-tailed Dunnart, Sminthopsis crassicaudata ⁕S. macroura species-group ⁕Kakadu Dunnart, Sminthopsis bindi ⁕Carpentarian Dunnart, Sminthopsis butleri ⁕Julia Creek Dunnart, Sminthopsis douglasi ⁕Stripe-faced Dunnart, Sminthopsis macroura ⁕Red-cheeked Dunnart, Sminthopsis virginiae ⁕S. granulipes species-group ⁕White-tailed Dunnart, Sminthopsis granulipes ⁕S. griseoventer species-group ⁕Kangaroo Island Dunnart, Sminthopsis aitkeni ⁕Boullanger Island Dunnart, Sminthopsis boullangerensis ⁕Grey-bellied Dunnart, Sminthopsis griseoventer ⁕S. longicaudata species-group ⁕Long-tailed Dunnart, Sminthopsis longicaudata ⁕S. murina species-group ⁕Chestnut Dunnart, Sminthopsis archeri ⁕Little Long-tailed Dunnart, Sminthopsis dolichura ⁕Sooty Dunnart, Sminthopsis fulginosus ⁕Gilbert's Dunnart, Sminthopsis gilberti ⁕White-footed Dunnart, Sminthopsis leucopusSlender-tailed Dunnart, Sminthopsis murinaS. psammophila species-groupHairy-footed Dunnart, Sminthopsis hirtipesOoldea Dunnart, Sminthopsis ooldeaSandhill Dunnart, Sminthopsis psammophilaLesser Hairy-footed Dunnart, Sminthopsis youngsoni

— Freebase

Cruelty

Cruelty

Cruelty is indifference to suffering, and even pleasure in inflicting it. Sadism can also be related to this form of action or concept. Cruel ways of inflicting suffering may involve violence, but affirmative violence is not necessary for an act to be cruel. For example, if a person is drowning and begging for help, and another person is able to help, but merely watches with disinterest or perhaps mischievous amusement, that person is being cruel — rather than violent. George Eliot stated that "cruelty, like every other vice, requires no motive outside of itself; it only requires opportunity." Bertrand Russell stated that "the infliction of cruelty with a good conscience is a delight to moralists. That is why they invented Hell." Gilbert K. Chesterton stated that "cruelty is, perhaps, the worst kind of sin. Intellectual cruelty is certainly the worst kind of cruelty."

— Freebase

Mesa

Mesa

Mesa is a city in Maricopa County, in the U.S. state of Arizona and is a suburb located about 20 miles east of Phoenix. Mesa is in the East Valley section of the Phoenix Metropolitan Area. It is bordered by Tempe on the west, the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community on the north, Chandler and Gilbert on the south, and Apache Junction on the east. As of the 2010 Census Mesa became Arizona's center of population. Mesa is the third-largest city in Arizona, after Phoenix and Tucson, the 38th-largest city in the US. The city is home to 439,041 as of 2010, reported by the Census Bureau, making its population larger than more recognizable cities such as Atlanta, Miami, Minneapolis, Cincinnati, Greensboro, Pittsburgh, Ft. Wayne, St. Louis, Tulsa, Wichita, and Cleveland. Mesa is home to numerous higher education facilities including Polytechnic campus of Arizona State University.

— Freebase

Mr. Big

Mr. Big

Mr. Big is an American rock group, formed in Los Angeles, California in 1988. The band is a quartet composed of Eric Martin, Paul Gilbert, Billy Sheehan, and Pat Torpey; The band is noted especially for their musicianship, and scored a number of hits. Their songs were often marked by strong vocals and vocal harmonies. Their hits include "To Be with You" and "Green-Tinted Sixties Mind". Mr. Big have remained active and popular for over two decades, despite internal conflicts and changing music trends. They broke up in 2002, but after requests from fans, they reunited in 2009; their first tour was in Japan, in June 2009. The band released What If..., their first album in 10 years, in January 2011. The band takes its name from the song by Free, which was eventually covered by the band on their 1993 album, Bump Ahead.

— Freebase

Irving Langmuir

Irving Langmuir

Irving Langmuir was an American chemist and physicist. His most noted publication was the famous 1919 article "The Arrangement of Electrons in Atoms and Molecules" in which, building on Gilbert N. Lewis's cubical atom theory and Walther Kossel's chemical bonding theory, he outlined his "concentric theory of atomic structure". Langmuir became embroiled in a priority dispute with Lewis over this work; Langmuir's presentation skills were largely responsible for the popularization of the theory, although the credit for the theory itself belongs mostly to Lewis. While at General Electric, from 1909–1950, Langmuir advanced several basic fields of physics and chemistry, invented the gas-filled incandescent lamp, the hydrogen welding technique, and was awarded the 1932 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his work in surface chemistry. The Langmuir Laboratory for Atmospheric Research near Socorro, New Mexico, was named in his honor as was the American Chemical Society journal for Surface Science, called Langmuir.

— Freebase

Bayonne Bridge

Bayonne Bridge

The Bayonne Bridge is the fifth-longest steel arch bridge in the world, and was the longest in the world at the time of its completion. Spanning the Kill Van Kull, it connects Bayonne, New Jersey with Staten Island, New York carrying NY 440 and NJ 440. The bridge was designed by master bridge-builder Othmar Ammann and the architect Cass Gilbert. It was built by the Port of New York Authority and opened on November 15, 1931, after dedication ceremonies were held the previous day. The bridge became a National Historic Civil Engineering Landmark in 1985. The Port Authority has launched a $743.3 million rebuilding project to raise the roadbed within the existing arch to allow larger container ships to pass underneath. The bridge is one of three connecting New Jersey with Staten Island. The Goethals Bridge in Elizabeth and Outerbridge Crossing in Perth Amboy traverse the Arthur Kill.

— Freebase

Alfie

Alfie

Alfie is a 1966 British film directed by Lewis Gilbert, starring Michael Caine. It is an adaptation by Bill Naughton of his own novel and play of the same name. The film was released by Paramount Pictures. Alfie tells the story of a young man who leads a self-centered life, purely for his own enjoyment, until events force him to question his uncaring behaviour and his aloneness. Alfie frequently breaks the fourth wall by speaking directly to the camera narrating and justifying his actions. His words often contrast with or totally contradict his actions. Alfie was the first film to receive the "suggested for mature audiences" classification by the Motion Picture Association of America in the United States which evolved into today's PG rating. The film was followed by Alfie Darling in 1975, with Alan Price replacing Caine in the title role; in 2004 a remake was released, starring Jude Law in the title role.

— Freebase

Down Down

Down Down

"Down Down" is a popular song by the English rock band, Status Quo. Written by Francis Rossi and Bob Young and produced by Status Quo, "Down Down" was Status Quo's only number one single in the UK Singles Chart to date. "Down Down" spent a week at the top of the chart in January 1975. The single was first released on 29 November 1974 on the Vertigo label, paired with the B-side song "Nightride". Both songs came from the album On The Level which had yet to be released. The album version lasts 5 minutes and 24 seconds and the single version 3 minutes and 49 seconds. Originally it was entitled "Get Down", but this was changed before release, possibly to avoid confusion with the Gilbert O'Sullivan song of the same name. Towards the end of his life, DJ John Peel was known for playing "Down Down" as part of his eclectic DJ sets. In 1986 co-writer Bob Young released a country music style version of "Down Down" on his solo album In Quo Country. In July 2012 Status Quo reworked the lyrics to create a 3-minute promotional song for the Australian supermarket chain Coles. The chorus chants, "down, down, prices are down". This was released on television and YouTube.

— Freebase

Kristallnacht

Kristallnacht

Kristallnacht, also referred to as the Night of Broken Glass, or Reichskristallnacht, Pogromnacht, and November pogrome, was a pogrom against Jews throughout Nazi Germany and parts of Austria on 9–10 November 1938, carried out by SA paramilitary forces and non-Jewish civilians. German authorities looked on without intervening. The name Kristallnacht comes from the shards of broken glass that littered the streets after Jewish-owned stores, buildings, and synagogues had their windows smashed. At least 91 Jews were killed in the attacks, and 30,000 were arrested and incarcerated in concentration camps. Jewish homes, hospitals, and schools were ransacked, as the attackers demolished buildings with sledgehammers. Over 1,000 synagogues were burned and over 7,000 Jewish businesses destroyed or damaged. Martin Gilbert writes that no event in the history of German Jews between 1933 and 1945 was so widely reported as it was happening, and the accounts from the foreign journalists working in Germany sent shock waves around the world. The Times wrote at the time: "No foreign propagandist bent upon blackening Germany before the world could outdo the tale of burnings and beatings, of blackguardly assaults on defenseless and innocent people, which disgraced that country yesterday."

— Freebase

Pygmalion

Pygmalion

Pygmalion is a 1912 play by George Bernard Shaw, named after a Greek mythological character. Professor of phonetics Henry Higgins makes a bet that he can train a bedraggled Cockney flower girl, Eliza Doolittle, to pass for a duchess at an ambassador's garden party by teaching her to assume a veneer of gentility, the most important element of which, he believes, is impeccable speech. The play is a sharp lampoon of the rigid British class system of the day and a commentary on women's independence. In ancient Greek mythology, Pygmalion fell in love with one of his sculptures that came to life and was a popular subject for Victorian era English playwrights, including one of Shaw's influences, W. S. Gilbert, who wrote a successful play based on the story in 1871, called Pygmalion and Galatea. Shaw also would have been familiar with the burlesque version, Galatea, or Pygmalion Reversed. Shaw's play has been adapted numerous times, most notably as the musical My Fair Lady and the film of that name.

— Freebase

Errantry

Errantry

Errantry is a three-page long poem by J.R.R. Tolkien, first published in 1933. It was included in Tolkien's short poetry collection The Adventures of Tom Bombadil. Tolkien invented the meter, which consists of trisyllabic assonances, three in each set of four lines. The second and fourth line in every quartet rhyme, as do the end of the first line and beginning of the second line in every pair. This was so difficult that he never wrote another poem again in this style, though he later did develop another style from this, and the result, through long evolution from Errantry, was Eärendil the Mariner as published in The Fellowship of the Ring. This poem was set to music by Donald Swann. The sheet music and an audio recording are part of the song-cycle The Road Goes Ever On. Errantry later came to be categorised as a Hobbit poem from Middle-earth. Errantry perfectly fits the tune of Gilbert and Sullivan's I Am the Very Model of a Modern Major-General.

— Freebase

Adiantum bellum

Adiantum bellum

Adiantum bellum is a species of fern in the genus Adiantum, and is native to Bermuda. It is 1 of 19 ferns native to Bermuda, the only native maidenhair, and the most prolific fern on the island. It is found only on Bermuda; however the IPNI reports it also found in Guiana. A. bellum is deciduous. In the wild it grows in crevices, on cliffs and under rock ledges, in roadside verge, and terrestrially on hillsides. It does require moisture and shade, and is often prolific near streams if in well-drained sites. The delicate fronds grow to 5-30 cm long, and are fan-shaped, light to medium green with black stems. Benjamin D. Gilbert described a variety of A. bellum which he called walsingense; however, it is believed that this is just a variety produced by better soil and moisture conditions. The other maidenhair fern that now grows wild on Bermuda, Adiantum capillus-veneris, was introduced by Governor Lefroy. Bermuda Maidenhair Fern is sometimes grown in gardens; however, it is not hardy and does better indoors.

— Freebase

Gordy

Gordy

Gordy is a 1995 American family comedy-drama film about a piglet named Gordy who searches for his missing family. Gordy experiences the lives of others who are part of the film's side plots, including travelling country music singers Luke McAllister and his daughter Jinnie Sue; and lonely boy Hanky Royce whose mother is engaged to a sinister businessman, Gilbert Sipes. Gordy changes lives for the people he encounters due to their ability to understand him. The film was released to theaters on May 12, 1995. It was distributed by Miramax Family Films. Gordy was originally conceived in the early 1970s by Green Acres creator Jay Sommers and writer Dick Chevillat as a vehicle for the Arnold Ziffel character from the television series. Both are given writing credit for the film, although Sommers had died some ten years before the release of Gordy. It was shot in Atlanta, Georgia. The film features the song "Pig Power" by Tag Team. A music video was produced for the song, featuring clips from the film.

— Freebase

Phoenix Islands

Phoenix Islands

The Phoenix Islands are a group of eight atolls and two submerged coral reefs, lying in the central Pacific Ocean east of the Gilbert Islands and west of the Line Islands. They are a part of the Republic of Kiribati. During the late 1930s they became the site of the last attempted colonial expansion of the British Empire through the Phoenix Islands Settlement Scheme. The islands and surrounding areas are home to some 120 species of coral and more than 500 species of fish. On January 28, 2008, the government of Kiribati formally declared the entire Phoenix group and surrounding waters a protected area, making its 410,500 square kilometres the world's largest marine protected area. The group is uninhabited except for a few families on Kanton. The United States unincorporated territories of Baker Island and Howland Island are often considered northerly outliers of the group, in the geographical sense. Howland and Baker are statistically grouped with the United States Minor Outlying Islands, however. The United States previously claimed all the Phoenix Islands under the Guano Islands Act. The Treaty of Tarawa released all American claims to Kiribati, excluding Baker and Howland.

— Freebase

Chemistry set

Chemistry set

A chemistry set is an educational toy allowing the user to perform simple chemistry experiments. The best known such sets were produced by the A. C. Gilbert Company, an early and middle 20th-century American manufacturer of educational toys. Porter Chemical Company, with the Chemcraft sets, and the Skilcraft corporation were other manufacturers. Well known chemistry sets from the United Kingdom include the 1960s and 1970s sets by Thomas Salter Science and later Salters Science, then the "MERIT" sets through the 1970s and 1980s. Dekkertoys created a range of sets which were similar, complete with glass test tubes of dry chemicals. The modern offerings, with a few exceptions, tend to have less in the way of chemicals and very simplified instructions. A GCSE equipment set was produced offering students better quality equipment, and there is also a more up market range of sets available from Thames & Kosmos such as the C3000 Kit. Several authors have noted that from the 1980s on, concerns about illegal drug production, terrorism and legal liability have led to chemistry sets becoming increasing bland and unexciting.

— Freebase

Mary Wollstonecraft

Mary Wollstonecraft

Mary Wollstonecraft was an eighteenth-century British writer, philosopher, and advocate of women's rights. During her brief career, she wrote novels, treatises, a travel narrative, a history of the French Revolution, a conduct book, and a children's book. Wollstonecraft is best known for A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, in which she argues that women are not naturally inferior to men, but appear to be only because they lack education. She suggests that both men and women should be treated as rational beings and imagines a social order founded on reason. Until the late 20th century, Wollstonecraft's life, which encompassed several unconventional personal relationships, received more attention than her writing. After two ill-fated affairs, with Henry Fuseli and Gilbert Imlay, Wollstonecraft married the philosopher William Godwin, one of the forefathers of the anarchist movement. Wollstonecraft died at the age of thirty-eight, ten days after giving birth to her second daughter, leaving behind several unfinished manuscripts. Her daughter Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin, later Mary Shelley, the author of Frankenstein, would become an accomplished writer herself.

— Freebase

Choiseul

Choiseul

Choiseul is an illustrious family from Champagne, France, descendents of the comtes of Langres. The family's head was Renaud III de Choiseul, comte de Langres and sire de Choiseul, who in 1182 married Alix de Dreux, daughter of Louis VI of France. It has formed into the Langres, Clémont, Aigremont, Beaugré, Allecourt, Frontières, Praslin, Plessis branches, among others. It also took the name Choiseul-Gouffier from the 18th century onwards. It has produced several marshals: ⁕Jean de Baudricourt, seigneur of Baudricourt and of Choiseul ⁕Charles de Choiseul, comte of the Plessis-Praslin, who served under Henri IV and Louis XIII ⁕César de Choiseul du Plessis-Praslin, duc de Choiseul, who defied Turenne at Rethel, when he commanded the Spanish army ⁕Caesar, duc de Choiseul, French marshal and diplomat, generally known for the best part of his life as marshal du Plessis-Praslin ⁕Claude de Choiseul, comte de Choiseul-Francières, who distinguished himself in the battle of Seneffe against the Dutch Republic and made a marshal in 1693 Two bishops and an archbishop: ⁕Gilbert de Choiseul du Plessis Praslin, brother of marshal César de Choiseul du Plessis-Praslin, Bishop of Comminges from 1644 to 1670.

— Freebase

Competence

Competence

Competence is the ability of an individual to do a job properly. A competency is a set of defined behaviors that provide a structured guide enabling the identification, evaluation and development of the behaviors in individual employees. The term "competence" first appeared in an article authored by R.W. White in 1959 as a concept for performance motivation. Later, in 1970, Craig C. Lundberg defined the concept in "Planning the Executive Development Program". The term gained traction when in 1973, David McClelland, Ph.D. wrote a seminal paper entitled, "Testing for Competence Rather Than for Intelligence". It has since been popularized by one-time fellow McBer & Company colleague Richard Boyatzis and many others, such as T.F. Gilbert who used the concept in relationship to performance improvement. Its use varies widely, which leads to considerable misunderstanding. Some scholars see "competence" as a combination of knowledge, skills and behavior used to improve performance; or as the state or quality of being adequately or well qualified, having the ability to perform a specific role. For instance, management competency might include systems thinking and emotional intelligence, and skills in influence and negotiation.

— Freebase

Roger Bannister

Roger Bannister

Sir Roger Gilbert Bannister, CBE is an English former athlete best known for running the first mile in less than 4 minutes. In the 1952 Olympics in Helsinki, Bannister set a British record in the 1500 metres, but did not win the medal he expected. This humiliation strengthened his resolve to be the first 4-minute miler. This was finally achieved on May 6th 1954 at Iffley Road Track in Oxford, with Chris Chataway and Chris Brasher providing the pacing. When the announcer declared "The time was three...", the cheers of the crowd drowned-out the details of the result, which was 3 min 59.4 sec. Bannister's record only lasted 46 days. More notable was that he had reached this goal with so little training, while practising as a junior doctor. Bannister went on to become a distinguished neurologist and Master of Pembroke College, Oxford, before retiring in 1993. When asked whether the 4-minute mile was his proudest achievement, he said he felt prouder of his contribution to academic medicine through research into the responses of the nervous system. Bannister is patron of the The MSA Trust.

— Freebase

Blocking

Blocking

Blocking is a theatre term that refers to the precise movement and positioning of actors on a stage in order to facilitate the performance of a play, ballet, film or opera. The term derives from the practice of 19th-century theatre directors such as Sir W. S. Gilbert who worked out the staging of a scene on a miniature stage using blocks to represent each of the actors. In contemporary theatre, the director usually determines blocking during rehearsal, telling actors where they should move for the proper dramatic effect, ensure sight lines for the audience and work with the lighting design of the scene. Each scene in a play is usually "blocked" as a unit, after which the director will move on to the next scene. The positioning of actors on stage in one scene will usually affect the possibilities for subsequent positioning unless the stage is cleared between scenes. Once all the blocking is completed a play is said to be "fully blocked" and then the process of "polishing" or refinement begins. During the blocking rehearsal usually the assistant director or the stage manager take notes about where actors are positioned and their movement patterns on stage.

— Freebase

Tetraoxygen

Tetraoxygen

The tetraoxygen molecule, also called oxozone, was first predicted in 1924 by Gilbert N. Lewis, who proposed it as an explanation for the failure of liquid oxygen to obey Curie's law. Today it seems Lewis was off, but not by much: computer simulations indicate that although there are no stable O4 molecules in liquid oxygen, O2 molecules do tend to associate in pairs with antiparallel spins, forming transient O4 units. In 1999, researchers thought that solid oxygen existed in its ε-phase as O4. However, in 2006, it was shown by X-ray crystallography that this stable phase known as ε oxygen or red oxygen is in fact O8. Nevertheless, tetraoxygen has been detected as a short-lived chemical species in mass spectrometry experiments. Absorption bands of the O4 molecule e.g. at 360, 477 and 577 nm are frequently used to do aerosol inversions in atmospheric optical absorption spectroscopy. Due to the known distribution of O2 and therefore also O4, O4 slant column densities can be used to retrieve aerosol profiles which can then be used again in radiative transfer models to model light paths.

— Freebase

Lewis acids and bases

Lewis acids and bases

The term Lewis acid refers to a definition of acid published by Gilbert N. Lewis in 1923, specifically: An acid substance is one which can employ an electron lone pair from another molecule in completing the stable group of one of its own atoms. Thus, H3O+ is a Lewis acid, since it can accept a lone pair, completing its stable form, which requires two electrons. The modern-day definition of Lewis acid, as given by IUPAC is a molecular entity that is an electron-pair acceptor and therefore able to react with a Lewis base to form a Lewis adduct, by sharing the electron pair furnished by the Lewis base. This definition is both more general and more specific—the electron pair need not be a lone pair, but the reaction should give an adduct. A Lewis base, then, is any species that donates a pair of electrons to a Lewis acid to form a Lewis adduct. For example, OH− and NH3 are Lewis bases, because they can donate a lone pair of electrons. Some compounds, such as H2O, are both Lewis acids and Lewis bases, because they can either accept a pair of electrons or donate a pair of electrons, depending upon the reaction.+2+3+

— Freebase

Lake Bonneville

Lake Bonneville

Lake Bonneville was a prehistoric pluvial lake that covered much of North America's Great Basin region. Most of the territory it covered was in present-day Utah, though parts of the lake extended into present-day Idaho and Nevada. Formed about 32,000 years ago, it existed until about 14,500 years ago, when a large portion of the lake was released through the Red Rock Pass in Idaho. Following the Bonneville Flood, as the release is now known, the lake receded to a level called the Provo Level. Many of the unique geological characteristics of the Great Basin are due to the effects of the lake. At more than 1,000 ft deep and more than 19,691 square miles in area, the lake was nearly as large as Lake Michigan and significantly deeper. With the change in climate, the lake began drying up, leaving Great Salt Lake, Utah Lake, Sevier Lake, Rush Lake, and Little Salt Lake as remnants. Lake Bonneville was named by the geologist G. K. Gilbert after Benjamin Louis Eulalie de Bonneville, a French-born officer in the United States Army, who was also a fur trapper, and explorer in the American West. Bonneville was noted for his expeditions to the Oregon Country and the Great Basin.

— Freebase

Raleigh, Sir Walter

Raleigh, Sir Walter

courtier, soldier, and man of letters, born near Budleigh, in E. Devon, of ancient family; entered as student at Oxford, but at 17 joined a small volunteer force in aid of the Protestants in France; in 1580 distinguished himself in suppressing a rebellion in Ireland; was in 1582 introduced at court, fascinated the heart of the Queen by his handsome presence and his gallant bearing, and received no end of favours at her hand; joined his half-brother, Sir Humphrey Gilbert, in an expedition to North America, founded a colony, which he called Virginia in honour of the queen, and brought home with him the potato and the tobacco plants, till then unknown in this country; rendered distinguished services in the destruction of the Armada; visited and explored Guiana, and brought back tidings of its wealth in gold and precious things; fell into disfavour with the queen, but regained her esteem; under King James he became suspected of disloyalty, and was committed to the Tower, where he remained 12 years, and wrote his "History of the World"; on his release, but without a pardon, he set out to the Orinoco in quest of gold-mines there, but returned heart-broken and to be sentenced to die; he met his fate with calm courage, and was beheaded in the Old Palace Yard; of the executioner's axe he smilingly remarked, "A sharp medicine, but an infallible cure" (1552-1618).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Rushlight

Rushlight

A rushlight is a type of candle or miniature torch formed by soaking the dried pith of the rush plant in fat or grease. For several centuries rushlights were a common source of artificial light for poor people throughout the British Isles. They were extremely inexpensive to make. English essayist William Cobbett wrote, "This rushlight cost almost nothing to produce and was believed to give a better light than some poorly dipped candles." One of the earliest printed descriptions of rushlights was written by English antiquary John Aubrey in 1673. Rev. Gilbert White gave a detailed description of rushlight making in The Natural History and Antiquities of Selborne, Letter XXVI. Rushlights were still used in rural England to the end of the 19th century, and they had a temporary revival during World War II. In parts of Wales the use of rushlights continued into the middle of the 20th century. It is not clear whether rushlights were ever popular in the United States and Canada. Antique rushlight holders are occasionally found in North America, but most were probably imported from England; "none are known to bear the mark of an American smith." In New England, "rushlights were used little if at all in colonial days."

— Freebase

Pacific Ocean

Pacific Ocean

The Pacific Ocean is the largest of the Earth's oceanic divisions. It extends from the Arctic in the north to the Southern Ocean in the south, bounded by Asia and Australia in the west, and the Americas in the east. At 165.25 million square kilometres in area, this largest division of the World Ocean – and, in turn, the hydrosphere – covers about 46% of the Earth's water surface and about one-third of its total surface area, making it larger than all of the Earth's land area combined. The equator subdivides it into the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean, with two exceptions: the Galápagos and Gilbert Islands, while straddling the equator, are deemed wholly within the South Pacific. The Mariana Trench in the western North Pacific is the deepest point in the world, reaching a depth of 10,911 metres. The eastern Pacific Ocean was first sighted by Europeans in the early 16th century when Spanish explorer Vasco Núñez de Balboa crossed the Isthmus of Panama in 1513 and discovered the great "southern sea" which he named Mar del Sur. The ocean's current name was coined by Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan during the Spanish expedition of the world in 1521, as he encountered favourable winds on reaching the ocean. He therefore called it Mar Pacifico in Portuguese, meaning "peaceful sea".

— Freebase

Electron pair

Electron pair

In chemistry, an electron pair consists of two electrons that occupy the same orbital but have opposite spins. The electron pair concept was introduced in a 1916 paper of Gilbert N. Lewis. Because electrons are fermions, the Pauli exclusion principle forbids these particles from having exactly the same quantum numbers. Therefore the only way to occupy the same orbital, i.e. have the same orbital quantum numbers, is to differ in the spin quantum number. This limits the number of electrons in the same orbital to exactly two. The pairing of spins is often energetically favorable and electron pairs therefore play a very large role in chemistry. They can form ⁕a chemical bond between two atoms ⁕as a lone pair. ⁕fill the core levels of an atom. Because the spins are paired, the magnetic moment of the electrons cancels and the contribution of the pair to the magnetic properties will in general be a diamagnetic one. Although a strong tendency to pair off electrons can be observed in chemistry, it is also possible that electrons occur as unpaired electrons. In the case of metallic bonding the magnetic moments also compensate to a large extent, but the bonding is more communal so that individual pairs of electrons cannot be distinguished and it is better to consider the electrons as a collective 'ocean'.

— Freebase

Individuation

Individuation

The principle of individuation, or principium individuationis describes the manner in which a thing is identified as distinguished from other things. The term is used to describe two different concepts. The first, the philosophical, is the general idea of how a single thing is identified as being an individual thing, able to be identified as not being something else. This includes how the individual person is thought distinct from the elements of the world, and also how one individual is thought to be distinct from other individuals. The second concept, coming out of C.G. Jung's analytical psychology, describes the process in which the individual Self develops out of an undifferentiated unconscious. It is a developmental, psychical process, the process whereby the innate elements of personality, the different experiences of a person's life and the different aspects and components of the immature psyche become integrated over time into a well-functioning whole. There is a region where the two could be said to blur into each other, but it is important to recognize that they are in fact speaking of two different things. This concept appears in numerous fields and may be encountered in works of Arthur Schopenhauer, Friedrich Nietzsche, Carl Jung, Gilbert Simondon, Bernard Stiegler, Gilles Deleuze, Henri Bergson, David Bohm, and Manuel De Landa.

— Freebase

Hills Hoist

Hills Hoist

A Hills Hoist is a height-adjustable rotary clothes line, manufactured in Adelaide, South Australia by Lance Hill since 1945. The Hills Hoist and similar rotary clothes hoists remain a common fixture in many backyards in Australia and New Zealand. They are considered one of Australia's most recognisable icons, and are used frequently by artists as a metaphor for Australian suburbia in the 1950s and 1960s. Although originally a product name, the term "Hills Hoist" became synonymous with rotary clothes hoists in general, throughout Australia. As early as 1895 Colin Stewart and Allan Harley of Sun Foundry in Adelaide applied for a patent for an 'Improved Rotary and Tilting Clothes Drying Rack'. In their design the upper clothes line frame tilted to allow access to the hanging lines. Gilbert Toyne of Geelong patented four rotary clothes hoists designs between 1911 and 1946. Toyne's first patented clothes hoist was sold though the Aeroplane Clothes Hoist Company established in 1911. It was Toyne's 1925 all-metal model with its enclosed crown wheel-and-pinion winding mechanism that defined clothes hoist designs for decades to follow. Lance Hill began to manufacture the Hills rotary clothes hoist in his backyard in 1945. His wife apparently wanted an inexpensive replacement to the line and prop she had for drying clothes.

— Freebase

Ockham

Ockham

Ockham is a small village near East Horsley, in Surrey, England. The village lies to the east of the A3 between Cobham and Guildford. Other neighbouring villages include Ripley, Wisley and Effingham. Ockham appears in Domesday Book of 1086 as Bocheham. It was held by Richard Fitz Gilbert. Its domesday assets were: 1½ hides, 1 church, 2 fisheries worth 10d, 3 ploughs, 2 acres of meadow, woodland worth 60 hogs. It rendered £10. Most notably, Ockham is believed to be the birthplace of William of Ockham—famous Mediaeval philosopher and the proponent of Occam's razor—and, more recently, Ada Lovelace lived at Ockham Park. Ockham Common, to the north east of the village, is the site of the disused Wisley Airfield, which has a paved 2 km runway. As late as 1972, this airfield was in service as a satellite fit-out and flight test centre for Vickers and latterly the British Aircraft Corporation, linked to their main factory and airfield at nearby Brooklands, Weybridge, capable of taking aircraft as large as the VC10. Although the airfield is disused, the aviation connection remains: it is the location of OCK, a VOR navigational beacon which anchors the South West Arrival Stack for London Heathrow Airport, which along with Biggin Hill, Kent, Bovingdon, Hertfordshire and Lambourne, Essex are London's main holds.

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Arizona

Arizona

Arizona is a state in the southwestern region of the United States. It is also part of the Western United States and of the Mountain West states. It is the sixth most extensive and the 15th most populous of the 50 states. Its capital and largest city is Phoenix. The second largest city is Tucson, followed in population by eight cities of the Phoenix metropolitan area: Mesa, Chandler, Glendale, Scottsdale, Gilbert, Tempe, Peoria, and Surprise. Arizona is the 48th state and last of the contiguous states to be admitted to the Union, achieving statehood on February 14, 1912. It is noted for its desert climate in its southern half, with very hot summers and quite mild winters. The northern half of the state features forests of pine, Douglas fir, and spruce trees, a very large, high plateau and some mountain ranges—such as the San Francisco Mountains—as well as large, deep canyons, with much more moderate weather for three seasons of the year, plus significant snowfalls. There are ski resorts in the areas of Flagstaff and Alpine. Arizona is one of the Four Corners states. It has borders with New Mexico, Utah, Nevada, California, and Mexico, and one point in common with the southwestern corner of Colorado. Arizona has a 389-mile-long international border with the Mexican states of Sonora and Baja California.

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Latimer

Latimer

Latimer is a village and civil parish that sits on the border between Buckinghamshire and Hertfordshire, in England. The parish forms part of the Buckinghamshire district of Chiltern. Latimer parish includes the villages of Latimer, Ley Hill and Tyler's Hill. Latimer was originally joined with the adjacent village of Chenies. Both were anciently called Isenhampstead, at a time when there was a royal palace in the vicinity. However in the reign of King Edward III of England the lands were split between two manorial barons: Thomas Cheyne in the village that later became called 'Chenies', and William Latimer in this village. Latimer came into possession of the manor in 1326. At the time of the English Civil War Latimer belonged to the Earl of Devonshire. When Charles I was captured by the Parliamentarian forces he was brought to Latimer on his way to London. The small village includes 17th and 18th century cottages around a triangular village green with a pump on it. The church of St Mary Magdelane was rebuilt by Sir George Gilbert Scott in 1867. The rectory was built in the 18th century in grey and red brick. Ley Hill is part of Latimer parish and includes a Common, the Crown pub, the Swan pub and a Methodist Chapel. Tyler's Hill is also in Latimer parish and includes St George's Anglican Church. The graveyard at Tyler's Hill which serves Ley Hill and Tyler's Hill is run by Latimer parish council.

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Lillian Russell

Lillian Russell

Lillian Russell was an American actress and singer. She became one of the most famous actresses and singers of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, known for her beauty and style, as well as for her voice and stage presence. Russell was born in Iowa but raised in Chicago. Her parents separated when she was eighteen, and she moved to New York with her mother. She quickly began to perform professionally, singing for Tony Pastor and playing roles in comic opera, including Gilbert and Sullivan works. She married composer Edward Solomon in 1884 and created roles in several of his operas in London, but in 1886 he was arrested for bigamy. Russell was married four times, but her longest relationship was with Diamond Jim Brady, who supported her extravagant lifestyle for four decades. In 1885, Russell returned to New York and continued to star in operetta and musical theatre. For many years, she was the foremost singer of operettas in America, performing continuously through the end of the 19th century. In 1899, she joined the Weber and Fields's Music Hall, where she starred for five years. After 1904, she began to have vocal difficulties and switched to dramatic roles. She later returned to musical roles in vaudeville, however, finally retiring from performing around 1919. In later years, Russell wrote a newspaper column, advocated women's suffrage and was a popular lecturer.

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Ely, Cambridgeshire

Ely, Cambridgeshire

Ely is a cathedral city in Cambridgeshire, England, 14 miles north-north-east of Cambridge and about 80 miles by road from London. Æthelthryth founded an abbey at Ely in AD 673; the abbey was destroyed in 870 by Danish invaders and was rebuilt by Ethelwold, Bishop of Winchester, in 970. Construction of the cathedral was started in 1083 by the first Norman bishop, Simeon. Sacrist, Alan of Walsingham's octagon, built over Ely's nave crossing between 1322 and 1328, is the "greatest individual achievement of architectural genius at Ely Cathedral" according to architectural historian Nikolaus Pevsner. Building continued until the dissolution of the abbey in 1539 during the Reformation. The cathedral was sympathetically restored between 1845 and 1870 by the architect George Gilbert Scott. As the seat of a diocese, Ely has long been considered a city; in 1974, city status was granted by royal charter. Ely is built on a 23-square-mile Kimmeridge Clay island which, at 85 feet, is the highest land in the fens. Major rivers including the Witham, Welland, Nene and Great Ouse, feed into the fens and, until draining commenced in the seventeenth century, formed freshwater marshes and meres within which peat was laid down. There are two sites of special scientific interest in the city: a former Kimmeridge Clay quarry, and one of the United Kingdom's best remaining examples of medieval ridge and furrow agriculture.

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One-time pad

One-time pad

In cryptography, the one-time pad is a type of encryption which has been proven to be impossible to crack if used correctly. Each bit or character from the plaintext is encrypted by a modular addition with a bit or character from a secret random key of the same length as the plaintext, resulting in a ciphertext. If the key is truly random, as large as or greater than the plaintext, never reused in whole or part, and kept secret, the ciphertext will be impossible to decrypt or break without knowing the key. It has also been proven that any cipher with the perfect secrecy property must use keys with effectively the same requirements as OTP keys. However, practical problems have prevented one-time pads from being widely used. First described by Frank Miller in 1882, the one-time pad was re-invented in 1917 and patented a couple of years later. It is derived from the Vernam cipher, named after Gilbert Vernam, one of its inventors. Vernam's system was a cipher that combined a message with a key read from a punched tape. In its original form, Vernam's system was vulnerable because the key tape was a loop, which was reused whenever the loop made a full cycle. One-time use came a little later when Joseph Mauborgne recognized that if the key tape were totally random, cryptanalysis would be impossible.

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FEAL

FEAL

In cryptography, FEAL is a block cipher proposed as an alternative to the Data Encryption Standard, and designed to be much faster in software. The Feistel based algorithm was first published in 1987 by Akihiro Shimizu and Shoji Miyaguchi from NTT. The cipher is susceptible to various forms of cryptanalysis, and has acted as a catalyst in the discovery of differential and linear cryptanalysis. There have been several different revisions of FEAL, though all are Feistel ciphers, and make use of the same basic round function and operate on a 64-bit block. One of the earliest designs is now termed FEAL-4, which has four rounds and a 64-bit key. Unfortunately, problems were found with FEAL-4 from the start: Bert den Boer related a weakness in an unpublished rump session at the same conference where the cipher was first presented. A later paper describes an attack requiring 100–10000 chosen plaintexts, and Sean Murphy found an improvement that needs only 20 chosen plaintexts. Murphy and den Boer's methods contain elements similar to those used in differential cryptanalysis. The designers countered by doubling the number of rounds, FEAL-8. However, eight rounds also proved to be insufficient — in 1989, at the Securicom conference, Eli Biham and Adi Shamir described a differential attack on the cipher, mentioned in. Gilbert and Chassé subsequently published a statistical attack similar to differential cryptanalysis which requires 10000 pairs of chosen plaintexts.15¹²

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Harpsichordist

Harpsichordist

A harpsichordist is a person who plays the harpsichord. Many baroque composers played the harpsichord, including Johann Sebastian Bach, Domenico Scarlatti, George Frideric Handel, François Couperin and Jean-Philippe Rameau. At this time, it was common for such musicians also to play the organ, and all keyboard instruments, and to direct orchestral music while playing continuo on the instrument. Modern harpsichord playing can be roughly divided into three eras, beginning with the career of the influential reviver of the instrument, Wanda Landowska. At this stage of the 'harpsichord revival', players generally used harpsichords of a heavy, piano-influenced type made by makers such as Pleyel; the revival of the instrument also led some composers to write specifically for the instrument, often on the request of Landowska. An influential later group of English players using post-Pleyel instruments by Thomas Goff and the Goble family included George Malcolm and Thurston Dart. The next generation of harpsichordists were pioneers of modern performance on instruments built according to the authentic practices of the earlier period, following the research of such scholar-builders as Frank Hubbard and William Dowd. This generation of performers included such players as Ralph Kirkpatrick, Igor Kipnis, and Gustav Leonhardt. More recently, many outstanding harpsichordists have appeared, such as Trevor Pinnock, Kenneth Gilbert, Christopher Hogwood, Jos van Immerseel, Ton Koopman, David Schrader and Alexander Frey, with many of them also directing a baroque orchestra from the instrument.

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Jeopardy!

Jeopardy!

Jeopardy! is an American television quiz show created by Merv Griffin. Like most programs of its genre, it features trivia in a wide variety of topics, including history, language, literature, the arts, the sciences, popular culture, geography, and wordplay; however, it has a unique answer-and-question format in which contestants are presented with clues in the form of answers, and must phrase their responses in question form. The show's broadcast history in the United States spans nearly five decades. The original version debuted on NBC on March 30, 1964, and was part of the network's daytime lineup until January 3, 1975. A weekly nighttime syndicated edition of the show aired from September 9, 1974 to September 5, 1975. A revival, The All-New Jeopardy!, ran as a daytime series from October 2, 1978 until March 2, 1979. These three versions were hosted by Art Fleming, with Don Pardo serving as announcer for the first two, and John Harlan announcing the 1978–79 version. On September 10, 1984, Jeopardy! returned to television as a daily syndicated series with Alex Trebek as host and Johnny Gilbert as announcer. Since its debut, this version of the program has gone on to win a record 30 Daytime Emmy Awards and a Peabody Award, and both TV Guide and GSN have ranked it #2 on their respective "50 Greatest Game Shows" lists. In addition, the program has gained a worldwide following with a multitude of international adaptations.

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Sir Arthur Sullivan

Sir Arthur Sullivan

Sir Arthur Seymour Sullivan MVO was an English composer. He is best known for his series of 14 operatic collaborations with the dramatist W. S. Gilbert, including such enduring works as H.M.S. Pinafore, The Pirates of Penzance and The Mikado. Sullivan composed 23 operas, 13 major orchestral works, eight choral works and oratorios, two ballets, incidental music to several plays, and numerous hymns and other church pieces, songs, and piano and chamber pieces. The best known of his hymns and songs include "Onward Christian Soldiers" and "The Lost Chord". The son of a military bandmaster, Sullivan composed his first anthem at age eight. He was selected as soloist in the boys' choir of the Chapel Royal. The Reverend Thomas Helmore, the choirmaster, encouraged Sullivan and arranged for the publication and performance of his early compositions. In 1856, the Royal Academy of Music awarded the first Mendelssohn Scholarship to the 14-year-old Sullivan, allowing him to study first at the Academy and then in Germany, at the Leipzig Conservatoire. His graduation piece was a suite of incidental music to Shakespeare's The Tempest. When it was performed in London in 1862, it was an immediate sensation. Sullivan began his composing career with a series of ambitious works, interspersed with hymns, parlour ballads and other light pieces. Among his best received early pieces were a ballet, L'Île Enchantée, and his Irish Symphony, Cello Concerto and Overture in C. From 1861 to 1872, he supplemented his income by working as a church organist and as a music teacher.

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Tuvalu

Tuvalu

Tuvalu, formerly known as the Ellice Islands, is a Polynesian island nation located in the Pacific Ocean, midway between Hawaii and Australia. It comprises three reef islands and six true atolls spread out from 6° to 10° south. Its nearest neighbours are Kiribati, Nauru, Samoa and Fiji. Its population of 10,544 makes it the third-least populous sovereign state in the world, with only Vatican City and Nauru having fewer inhabitants. In terms of physical land size, at just 26 square kilometres Tuvalu is the fourth smallest country in the world, larger only than the Vatican City at 0.44 km², Monaco at 1.98 km² and Nauru at 21 km². The first inhabitants of Tuvalu were Polynesian people. In 1568 Spanish navigator Álvaro de Mendaña sailed through the islands and is understood to have sighted Nui during his expedition in search of Terra Australis. In 1819 the island of Funafuti was named Ellice's Island; the name Ellice was applied to all nine islands after the work of English hydrographer Alexander George Findlay. The islands came under Britain's sphere of influence in the late 19th century, when the Ellice Islands were declared a British protectorate by Captain Gibson R.N., of HMS Curacao, between 9 and 16 October 1892. The Ellice Islands were administered as British protectorate by a Resident Commissioner from 1892 to 1916 as part of the British Western Pacific Territories, and later as part of the Gilbert and Ellice Islands colony from 1916 to 1974.

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Burlesque

Burlesque

Burlesque is a literary, dramatic or musical work intended to cause laughter by caricaturing the manner or spirit of serious works, or by ludicrous treatment of their subjects. The word derives from the Italian burlesco, which, in turn, is derived from the Italian burla – a joke, ridicule or mockery. Burlesque overlaps in meaning with caricature, parody and travesty, and, in its theatrical sense, with extravaganza, as presented during the Victorian era. "Burlesque" has been used in English in this literary and theatrical sense since the late 17th century. It has been applied retrospectively to works of Chaucer and Shakespeare and to the Graeco-Roman classics. Contrasting examples of literary burlesque are Alexander Pope's sly The Rape of the Lock and Samuel Butler's irreverent Hudibras. An example of musical burlesque is Richard Strauss's 1890 Burleske for piano and orchestra. Examples of theatrical burlesques include W. S. Gilbert's Robert the Devil and the A. C. Torr – Meyer Lutz shows, including Ruy Blas and the Blasé Roué. A later use of the term, particularly in the United States, refers to performances in a variety show format. These were popular from the 1860s to the 1940s, often in cabarets and clubs, as well as theatres, and featured bawdy comedy and female striptease. Some Hollywood films attempted to recreate the spirit of these performances from the 1930s to the 1960s, or included burlesque-style scenes within dramatic films, such as 1972's Cabaret and 1979's All That Jazz, among others. There has been a resurgence of interest in this format since the 1990s.

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Newfoundland

Newfoundland

Newfoundland, is a large Canadian island off the east coast of the North American mainland, and the most populous part of the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. The province's official name was also "Newfoundland" until 2001, when its name was changed to "Newfoundland and Labrador". The island of Newfoundland was visited by the Icelandic Viking Leif Eriksson in the 11th century, who called the new land "Vinland". The next European visitors to Newfoundland were Portuguese, Spanish, French and English migratory fishermen. The island was visited by the Italian John Cabot, working under contract to King Henry VII of England on his expedition from Bristol in 1497. In 1501, Portuguese explorers Gaspar Corte-Real and his brother Miguel Corte-Real charted part of the coast of Newfoundland in a failed attempt to find the Northwest Passage. Cabot's landing is considered the initial foundation of the British Empire – a fact solidified on August 5, 1583, when Sir Humphrey Gilbert claimed Newfoundland as England's first overseas colony under Royal Charter of Queen Elizabeth I of England, thus officially establishing a fore-runner to the much later British Empire. Newfoundland is considered Britain's longest serving colony. According to 2006 official Census Canada statistics, 57% of responding Newfoundland and Labradorians claim British Isles ancestry, with 43.2% claiming at least one English parent, 21.5% at least one Irish parent, and 7% at least one parent of Scottish origin. Additionally 6.1% claimed at least one parent of French ancestry. The island's total population as of the 2006 census was 479,105.

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Tinkertoy

Tinkertoy

The Tinkertoy Construction Set is a toy construction set for children. It was created in 1914—one year after the A. C. Gilbert Company's Erector Set—by Charles H. Pajeau and Robert Pettit in Evanston, Illinois. Pajeau, a stonemason, designed the toy after seeing children play with sticks and empty spools of thread. He and Pettit set out to market a toy that would allow and inspire children to use their imaginations. At first, this did not go well, but after a year or two over a million were sold. The cornerstone of the set is a wooden spool roughly two inches in diameter with holes drilled every 45 degrees around the perimeter and one through the center. Unlike the center, the perimeter holes do not go all the way through. With the differing-length sticks, the set was intended to be based on the Pythagorean progressive right triangle. Tinkertoy sticks before 1992 were made with a diameter of 0.25 inch. The earlier sets had natural wood sticks, but changed to colored sticks in the late 1950s. From measurement, the orange sticks are 1.25 inches long; yellow, 2.15; blue, 3.35; red, 5.05; green, 7.40; and, purple, 10.85. Spools are 1.35 inches in diameter with holes of 0.30 inch depth. The ratio of succeeding stick sizes when including adjustments for spool diameter and hole depth work out to be the square root of 2, enabling the construction of 45-45-90 right triangles. The theory is discussed in Pajeau's patent, no. 1113371, of 1914.

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Move It

Move It

"Move It" is a song recorded by Cliff Richard and the Drifters. Originally intended as the B-side to "Schoolboy Crush", it was released as Richard's debut single on 29 August 1958 and became his first hit record. It is credited with being one of the first authentic rock and roll songs produced outside the United States. The song was written by Ian Samwell. "Schoolboy Crush", written by Aaron Schroeder and Sharon Gilbert, had already been recorded in America by Bobby Helms. Cliff Richard and the Drifters recorded their own version, which was intended to be the A-side of their debut single. However "Move It" was heard by producer Jack Good, who insisted that if Richard was to appear on his TV show Oh Boy!, he would have to sing "Move It". The planned single was flipped, and climbed to number 2 in the charts, starting Cliff Richard on a career which included British hits through six decades. Described by Allmusic as "Presley-esque" and by Richard himself as "my one outstanding rock 'n' roll classic", "Move It" was written atop a London double-decker bus on the way to a rehearsal at Richard's house by the Drifters guitarist Ian "Sammy" Samwell. A second verse was written by Samwell for the Hank Marvin album Hank plays Cliff in 1995, with Cliff Richard once more providing the vocals. The new version was debuted live at a Royal Variety Performance in front of Queen Elizabeth II that year. Since then, Richard has continued to perform the song with the additional verse.

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Marshall Islands

Marshall Islands

The Marshall Islands, officially the Republic of the Marshall Islands, is an island country located in the northern Pacific Ocean. Geographically, the country is part of the larger island group of Micronesia, with the population of 68,480 people spread out over 34 low-lying coral atolls, comprising 1,156 individual islands and islets. The islands share maritime boundaries with the Federated States of Micronesia to the west, Wake Island to the north, Kiribati to the south-east, and Nauru to the south. The most populous atoll is Majuro, which also acts as the capital. Micronesian colonists gradually settled the Marshall Islands during the 2nd millennium BC, with inter-island navigation made possible using traditional stick charts. Islands in the archipelago were first explored by Europeans in the 1520s, with Spanish explorer Alonso de Salazar sighting an atoll in August 1526. Other expeditions by Spanish and English ships followed, with the islands' current name stemming from British explorer John Marshall. Recognised as part of the Spanish East Indies in 1874, the islands were sold to Germany in 1884, and became part of German New Guinea in 1885. The Empire of Japan occupied the Marshall Islands in World War I, which were later joined with other former German territories in 1919 by the League of Nations to form the South Pacific Mandate. In World War II, the islands were conquered by the United States in the Gilbert and Marshall Islands campaign. Along with other Pacific Islands, the Marshall Islands were then consolidated into the United-States-governed Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands. Self-government was achieved in 1979, and full sovereignty in 1986, under a Compact of Free Association with the United States.

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Adrenalin

Adrenalin

Adrenalin is an American rock band from East Detroit Michigan, that is perhaps best known for their song "Road of the Gypsy," featured in the 1986 film Iron Eagle. Adrenalin is made up of six friends from elementary school to high school. Brian and Mark Pastoria, Jimmy and Mike Romeo, Bruce Schafer and Mike "Flash" Haggerty started the band in the mid-seventies with the help of lead singer David Larson. Adrenalin created a huge buzz among fans and the music industry alike, as well as quickly earning the respect of musicians such as Bob Seger and Aerosmith. They continually won awards throughout the late '70s and well into the '80s when Marc Gilbert joined the band and were getting radio airplay across the country. Their albums boasted heartland rockers like "Don't Be Lookin Back," "Faraway Eyes," and "Road Of The Gypsy," a song featured in the film, Iron Eagle. Adrenalin was even in rotation when MTV was still a fledgling station that actually played music videos. They produced an EP, Don't Be Looking Back in 1983, and two albums, Road of the Gypsy and American Heart both produced by Vini Poncia. By the end of Adrenalin's run as a band, the members had coped with the suicide of their original lead singer, David Larson. They were dropped by Polygram during the mid-'80s collapse of MCA records. "Through all of this," remembers Brian Pastoria, "we never considered packing it in. We believed in what we were doing...Giving up was not an option."

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Al Jolson

Al Jolson

Al Jolson was an American singer and comedian. At the peak of his career, he was dubbed "The World's Greatest Entertainer". His performing style was brash and extroverted, and he popularized a large number of songs that benefited from his "shamelessly sentimental, melodramatic approach". Numerous well-known singers were influenced by his music, including Bing Crosby David Bowie, Bob Dylan and others, Dylan once referred to him as "somebody whose life I can feel". Broadway critic Gilbert Seldes compared him to the Greek god Pan, claiming that Jolson represented "the concentration of our national health and gaiety." In the 1930s, he was America's most famous and highest-paid entertainer. Between 1911 and 1928, Jolson had nine sell-out Winter Garden shows in a row, more than 80 hit records, and 16 national and international tours. Although he's best remembered today as the star of the first 'talking picture', The Jazz Singer, he later starred in a series of successful musical films throughout the 1930s. After the attack on Pearl Harbor, Jolson became the first star to entertain troops overseas during World War II. After a period of inactivity, his stardom returned with The Jolson Story. Larry Parks played Jolson, with the singer dubbing for Parks. The formula was repeated in the sequel, Jolson Sings Again. In 1950 he again became the first star to entertain GIs on active service in the Korean War, performing 42 shows in 16 days. He died just weeks after returning to the U.S., partly owing to the physical exertion of performing. Defense Secretary George Marshall afterward awarded the Medal of Merit to Jolson's family.

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JOB

JOB

JOB rolling papers are a popular brand of cigarette paper produced by Republic Tobacco in Perpignan, France. In 1838, a French craftsman named Jean Bardou came up with the idea for a booklet of rolling papers made of thin, pure rice paper. The booklets were a success and Bardou's trademark, the initials "JB" separated by a diamond, became such a common sight that people began referring to them as JOB, thus the brand-name was born. By 1849 he filed for a patent for "Papier JOB". In the late 1890s, the company hired art nouveau artist Alphonse Mucha, as well as many other artists, to design advertising posters for the brand. Mucha drew a sinuous long-haired goddess holding a rolled cigarette. The image was inspired by Michelangelo's Sibyls from the Sistine Chapel. The poster image was so popular that it was sold as a lithograph. In 2008, the company commissioned Stuckist artist, Paul Harvey to create a campaign series of posters with a stylistic reference to Alphonse Mucha. Harvey made works featuring famous double acts to emphasise the sales message of "The Original Double", a reference to the twin-size packets of papers made by Job. Harvey's enthusiasm for the project came about because "Mucha is one of his heroes", said Mark Ross, the director of Glorious Creative agency managing the campaign. The work created some controversy: Gilbert and George gave their endorsement to the images, but The Mighty Boosh and The White Stripes were not pleased to be featured. Famous Doubles, a show of the original paintings used for the posters, was promoted at the Wanted Gallery in Notting Hill by Fraser Kee Scott, director of the A Gallery.

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Carolines on Broadway

Carolines on Broadway

Carolines on Broadway is a venue for stand-up comedy located in Times Square in New York City on Broadway between 49th and 50th Street. It is one of the most established, famous, and recognized stand-up comedy clubs in the United States. Its marketing slogan is "America's Premiere Comedy Nightclub." Many of the top headliners in the U.S. have performed at Carolines, including Paul Reubens, Jerry Seinfeld, Jay Leno, Bill Hicks, Andrew Dice Clay, Gilbert Gottfried, Andy Borowitz, Joy Behar, Jon Stewart, Robin Williams, Colin Quinn, Chris Rock, Norm Macdonald, Elayne Boosler, Michael Richards, Richard Belzer, Chris Rush and Mitch Hedberg. Other popular stand-ups that have headlined at Caroline's include Patrice O'Neal, Jim Norton, Greg Giraldo, Adam Ferrara, Dave Attell, Rich Vos, Bill Burr, Bob Kelly, Lee Camp, Harrison Greenbaum, Modi Rosenfeld and Stephen Lynch. Caroline Hirsch opened her eponymous cabaret in Chelsea, New York, in 1981. She started booking comedians, and these were so popular that soon she was booking nothing else. Needing a larger venue, Caroline's moved to South Street Seaport where it gained national recognition as the venue for A&E Network's Caroline's Comedy Hour television series, which won a CableACE award for Best Stand-Up Comedy Series. In 1992, the club moved to a 300-seat space in Times Square. The new club received the American Institute of Architecture Award for Best Interior Club Design and was featured on the cover of Interior Design magazine. In December of 2009, Caroline's played host to the first public reunion of Dave Chappelle, Paul Mooney, and Charlie Murphy since the cancellation of Chappelle's Show.

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Jellyfish Tree

Jellyfish Tree

Medusagyne oppositifolia, the jellyfish tree, is a critically endangered and unusual tree endemic to the island of Mahé, of the Seychelles. It is the only member of the Medusagyne genus of the Ochnaceae family of tropical trees and shrubs. The plant, thought to be extinct until a few individuals were found in the 1970s, is named for the unique Jellyfish-like shape of its flowers. They are small trees which can reach up to 10 metres tall and have a dense rounded crown of foliage. The bark is dark and has many distinctive, deep fissures. The leaves are shiny and leathery in appearance with a slightly scalloped edge; they turn bright red with age. Leaves are up to 8 cm in length. The small white flowers are difficult to see amongst the dense foliage; male and bisexual flowers are carried on the drooping inflorescence. The generic name Medusagyne was given to the plant by John Gilbert Baker who thought that the gynoecium of the flower resembles the head of Medusa from Greek mythology. Baker did not have the dehisced fruit, which resembles a larval hydrozoan or jellyfish, so he did not base the generic name on this resemblance; the vernacular name, jellyfish tree, was applied later possibly based on the appearance of the dehisced fruit and the coincidence that the word medusa is also used to describe the free-floating umbrella-shaped form of jellyfish. This plant exhibits many adaptations to dry climate, strange on a moist archipelago. It can withstand drought, and its seeds disperse by the wind. This suggests it has Gondwanan origins. The fruits are green and rounded; the outer coat becomes reddish-brown with maturity and then dries, exposing the seeds within, which are then distributed by the wind.

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Photon

Photon

A photon is an elementary particle, the quantum of light and all other forms of electromagnetic radiation, and the force carrier for the electromagnetic force, even when static via virtual photons. The effects of this force are easily observable at both the microscopic and macroscopic level, because the photon has zero rest mass; this allows long distance interactions. Like all elementary particles, photons are currently best explained by quantum mechanics and exhibit wave–particle duality, exhibiting properties of both waves and particles. For example, a single photon may be refracted by a lens or exhibit wave interference with itself, but also act as a particle giving a definite result when its position is measured. The modern photon concept was developed gradually by Albert Einstein to explain experimental observations that did not fit the classical wave model of light. In particular, the photon model accounted for the frequency dependence of light's energy, and explained the ability of matter and radiation to be in thermal equilibrium. It also accounted for anomalous observations, including the properties of black body radiation, that other physicists, most notably Max Planck, had sought to explain using semiclassical models, in which light is still described by Maxwell's equations, but the material objects that emit and absorb light, do so in amounts of energy that are quantized. Although these semiclassical models contributed to the development of quantum mechanics, many further experiments starting with Compton scattering of single photons by electrons, first observed in 1923, validated Einstein's hypothesis that light itself is quantized. In 1926 the chemist Gilbert N. Lewis coined the name photon for these particles, and after 1927, when Arthur H. Compton won the Nobel Prize for his scattering studies, most scientists accepted the validity that quanta of light have an independent existence, and Lewis' term photon for light quanta was accepted.

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Laccolith

Laccolith

A laccolith is a sheet intrusion that has been injected between two layers of sedimentary rock. The pressure of the magma is high enough that the overlying strata are forced upward, giving the laccolith a dome or mushroom-like form with a generally planar base. Laccoliths tend to form at relatively shallow depths and are typically formed by relatively viscous magmas, such as those that crystallize to diorite, granodiorite, and granite. Cooling underground takes place slowly, giving time for larger crystals to form in the cooling magma. The surface rock above laccoliths often erodes away completely, leaving the core mound of igneous rock. The term was first applied as laccolite by Grove Karl Gilbert after his study of intrusions of diorite in the Henry Mountains of Utah in about 1875. It is often difficult to reconstruct shapes of intrusions. For instance, Devils Tower in Wyoming was thought to be a volcanic neck, but study has revealed it to be an eroded laccolith. The rock would have had to cool very slowly so as to form the slender pencil-shaped columns of phonolite porphyry seen today. However, erosion has stripped away the overlying and surrounding rock, and so it is impossible to reconstruct the original shape of the igneous intrusion; that rock may not be the remnant of a laccolith. At other localities, such as in the Henry Mountains and other isolated mountain ranges of the Colorado Plateau, some intrusions demonstrably have shapes of laccoliths. The small Barber Hill syenite-stock laccolith in Charlotte, Vermont, has several volcanic trachyte dikes associated with it. Molybdenite is also visible in outcrops on this exposed laccolith. In Big Bend Ranch State Park, at the southwesternmost visible extent of the Ouachita orogeny, lies the Solitario. It consists of the eroded remains of a laccolith, presumably named for the sense of solitude that observers within the structure might have, due to the partial illusion of endless expanse in all directions.

— Freebase

En plein air

En plein air

En plein air is a French expression which means "in the open air," and is particularly used to describe the act of painting outdoors, which is also called peinture sur le motif in French. Artists have long painted outdoors, but in the mid-19th century working in natural light became particularly important to the Barbizon school and Impressionism. The popularity of painting en plein air increased in the 1870s with the introduction of paints in tubes. Previously, each painter made their own paints by grinding and mixing dry pigment powders with linseed oil. The Newlyn School in England is considered another major proponent of the technique in the latter 19th century. It was during this period that the "Box Easel", typically known as the French Box Easel or field easel, was invented. It is uncertain who developed it first, but these highly portable easels, with telescopic legs and built-in paint box and palette, made treks into the forest and up the hillsides less onerous. Still made today, they remain a popular choice even for home use since they fold up to the size of a brief case and thus are easy to store. French Impressionist painters such as Claude Monet, Camille Pissarro, and Pierre-Auguste Renoir advocated en plein air painting, and much of their work was done outdoors, in the diffuse light provided by a large white umbrella. In the second half of the nineteenth century and beginning of the twentieth century in Russia, painters such as Vasily Polenov, Isaac Levitan, Valentin Serov, Konstantin Korovin and I. E. Grabar were known for painting en plein air. American Impressionists, too, such as those of the Old Lyme school, were avid painters en plein air. American Impressionist painters noted for this style during this era included, Guy Rose, Robert William Wood, Mary Denil Morgan, John Gamble, and Arthur Hill Gilbert. The Canadian Group of Seven and Tom Thomson are examples of en plein air advocates.

— Freebase


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