Definitions containing "box and cox,"

We've found 250 definitions:

Box

Box

boks, n. a tree remarkable for the hardness and smoothness of its wood—also Box-tree (Shak.): a case or receptacle for holding anything: the contents of a box: a small house or lodge, as a shooting-box, &c.: in a theatre, a small enclosure with several seats—the boxes = their occupants, the ladies: an old square pew or similar enclosure, as a sentry-box, signal-box, &c.: the driver's seat on a carriage: the case in which the ship's compass is kept.—v.t. to put into or furnish with boxes: (slang) to overturn a watchman in his box.—ns. Box′-bed, a kind of bed once common in Scotch cottages, having its ends, sides, and roof of wood, and capable of being closed in front by two sliding panels; Box′-day, one of the Court of Session vacation days when papers ordered to be deposited in court must be lodged.—adj. Box′en, made of or like boxwood.—ns. Box′ing-day, in England, the day after Christmas, when boxes or presents are given; Box′-ī′ron, a hollow smoothing-iron which is heated by a heater put into it; Box′-keep′er, an attendant who opens the doors of boxes at theatres or other places of public amusement; Box′-lobb′y, the lobby leading to the boxes in a theatre; Box′wood, wood of the box-tree.—In the wrong box, in a false position, in a scrape.—To be in a box, to be in a fix; To box Harry, to take a beefsteak, mutton-chop, or bacon and eggs with tea or ale, instead of the regulation dinner of the commercial traveller; To box the compass, to name the 32 points in their order and backwards, hence to make a complete roundabout in any opinion. [A.S. box—L. buxus—Gr. pyxos, the tree, pyxis, a box.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Cox's Orange Pippin

Cox's Orange Pippin

Cox's Orange Pippin is an apple cultivar first grown in 1825, at Colnbrook in Buckinghamshire, England, by the retired brewer and horticulturist Richard Cox. Though the parentage of the cultivar is unknown, Ribston Pippin seems a likely candidate. The variety was introduced for sale by the 1850s by Mr. Charles Turner, and grown commercially from the 1860s, particularly in the Vale of Evesham in Worcestershire, and later in Kent. Cox's Orange Pippin is highly regarded due to its excellent flavour and attractive appearance. The apples are of medium size, orange-red in colour deepening to bright red and mottled with carmine over a deep yellow background. The flesh is very aromatic, yellow-white, fine-grained, crisp and very juicy. Cox's flavour is sprightly subacid, with hints of cherry and anise, becoming softer and milder with age. When ripe apples are shaken, the seeds make a rattling sound as they are only loosely held in the apple flesh. One of the best in quality of the English dessert apples; Cox's Orange Pippin may be eaten out of hand or sliced. Not recommended for cooking, it cooks to a fine froth. Cox's Orange Pippin is often blended with other varieties in the production of cider.

— Freebase

Jim Cox

Jim Cox

James Glennister "Jim" Cox is a former Tasmanian Labor politician and member of the Tasmanian House of Assembly in the electorate of Bass. He was first elected in the 1989 election. He was defeated in the 1992 election and re-elected in the 1996 election, holding the seat until his retirement in 2010. In 1989, Tasmanian media magnate Edmund Rouse, Chairman of Gunns, attempted to bribe Cox with $110,000 to cross the floor of parliament in an attempt to prevent Labor forming government in alliance with the five Green Independents, and attempting to secure the return of the pro-logging Liberal Party government of Robin Gray. Cox reported the bribery attempt to police, and ultimately Rouse served 18 months in jail. Cox was re-elected in the 2006 election, receiving 15.3% of first preferences, a decrease compared to his previous result of 17.5% in the 2002 election. Before entering Parliament, Cox co-hosted the The Saturday Night Show on TNT-9 with Graeme Goodings and was a radio announcer in northern Tasmania. Cox won Logie Awards for most popular male on Tasmanian television in 1979 and 1981.

— Freebase

Box-spring

Box-spring

A box-spring is a type of bed base typically consisting of a sturdy wooden frame covered in cloth, and containing springs. Usually the box-spring is placed on top of a wooden or metal bedframe which sits on the floor and acts as a brace. The box-spring is usually the same size as the much softer mattress which is placed above the box-spring. Working together, the frame, box-spring, and mattress make up a bed. It is common to find a box-spring and mattress being used together without the support of a frame underneath, the box spring being mounted directly on casters standing on the floor. The purpose of the box-spring is threefold: ⁕to raise the mattress' height, making it easier to get in and out of bed; ⁕to absorb shock and reduce wear to the mattress; and ⁕to create a flat and firm structure for the mattress to lie upon. The first rectangular spring-cushioned wire frames to support mattresses did not have wood rims or cloth covers. These were called bedsprings. More and more box-springs are being made out of wood, then covered in fabrics. Wood makes a better support system for the newer memory foam and latex mattresses. The newest design in box-springs is the folding box spring made of wood and springs, then covered in fabric which can fold in half and can be sent by shipping and courier companies.

— Freebase

COX-2 inhibitor

COX-2 inhibitor

COX-2 selective inhibitor is a form of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug that directly targets COX-2, an enzyme responsible for inflammation and pain. Targeting selectivity for COX-2 reduces the risk of peptic ulceration, and is the main feature of celecoxib, rofecoxib and other members of this drug class. After several COX-2 inhibiting drugs were approved for marketing, data from clinical trials revealed that COX-2 inhibitors caused a significant increase in heart attacks and strokes, with some drugs in the class having worse risks that others. Rofecoxib was taken off the market in 2004 because of these concerns and celecoxib and traditional NSAIDS received black box warnings on their labels.

— Freebase

naproxen

naproxen

A certain non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug that inhibits the COX-1 and COX-2 enzymes and thereby reduces pain, fever, inflammation, and stiffness.

— Wiktionary

Mitre box

Mitre box

A mitre box is a wood working tool used to guide a hand saw to make precise mitre cuts in a board. The most common form of a mitre box is a 3-sided box which is open at the top and the ends. The box is made wide enough to accommodate the width of the boards to be cut. Slots are cut in the walls of the box at the precise angle at which the cut is to be made. These slots provide the guide for the saw to follow. Most commonly, the slots in the mitre box are cut at 45 degrees and 90 degrees. The mitre saw combines the features of a mitre box with a backsaw. In the past, mitre boxes were constructed mostly of wood. Some have had metal guides fitted to help prevent wear on the slots. Today, mitre boxes are also available in other materials such as moulded plastic and cast aluminium. When carpenters used to make their own mitre boxes, it was common to use a mitre box until its guide slots became worn and then make a new one out of scrap timber. There is still a case to be made for making one today; for example, if an odd size cornice is to be fixed, then a custom mitre box with a bottom board that is 175mm wide would ensure that the cornice sits true while the cuts are being made to it. The three pieces of timber that form the mitre box are nailed together, and the top steadying pieces are fixed with smaller panel pins. The angles are marked and the guide slots are cut with the same saw that will be used for the rest of the cutting.

— Freebase

Lumiracoxib

Lumiracoxib

Lumiracoxib is a COX-2 selective inhibitor non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, manufactured by Novartis and still sold in few countries, including Mexico, Ecuador and the Dominican Republic, under the trade name Prexige. Lumiracoxib has several distinctive features. Its structure is different from that of other COX-2 inhibitors, such as celecoxib: lumiracoxib is an analogue of diclofenac, making it a member of the arylalkanoic acid class of NSAIDs; it binds to a different site on the COX-2 receptor than do other COX-2 inhibitors; it is the only acidic coxib; and has the highest COX-2 selectivity of any NSAID. Since its original approval, lumiracoxib has been withdrawn from the market in several countries, mostly due to hepatotoxicity concerns. It has never been approved for use in the United States.

— Freebase

Cox's Bazar District

Cox's Bazar District

Cox's Bazar is a district in the Chittagong Division of Bangladesh. It is named after Cox's Bazar, which is one of the world's longest natural sea beaches. It is located 150 kilometres south of Chittagong. Cox's Bazar is also known by the name Panowa. Another old name was Palongkee. The modern Cox's Bazar derives its name from Captain Cox, an army officer who served in British India. It is one of the fishing ports of Bangladesh.

— Freebase

cox-2 inhibitor

Cox-2 inhibitor

an anti-inflammatory drug that fights pain and blocks Cox-2 activity without impeding the activity of Cox-1; increases the risk of heart attacks

— Princeton's WordNet

Press box

Press box

The press box is a special section of a sports stadium or arena that is set up for the media to report about a given event. It is typically located in the section of the stadium holding the luxury box. In general, newspaper writers sit in this box and write about the on-field event as it unfolds. Television and radio announcers broadcast from the press box as well. The press box is considered to be a working area, and writers, broadcasters, and other visitors to press boxes are constantly reminded of this fact at sporting events. Cheering is strictly forbidden in press boxes, and anyone violating rules against showing favoritism for either team is subject to ejection from the press box by security personnel. The rule against cheering is generally enforced only in the writers' area of the press box, as broadcasters are often employed by one of the teams involved. A "scratched" or injured player can be said to be "watching from the press box".

— Freebase

Post-office box

Post-office box

A post-office box or Post Office box is a uniquely addressable lockable box located on the premises of a post office station. In many countries, particularly in Africa, and the Middle East there is no 'door to door' delivery of mail. For example, should one post mail to a street address in Namibia, it will be returned to sender as undeliverable. Consequently renting a PO box has traditionally been the only way to receive mail in such countries, although some, like Jordan, are now introducing home delivery. Generally, post office boxes are rented from the post office either by individuals or by businesses on a basis ranging from monthly to annual, and the cost of rent varies depending on the box size. Central business district PO boxes are usually more expensive than rural PO boxes. In the United States, the rental rate used to be uniform across the country. Now, however, a postal facility can be in any of seven fee groups by location; in addition, certain customers qualify for free box rental. In the United Kingdom, Royal Mail PO boxes are often little more than pigeon-holes in the secure section of a Sorting Office, and are only accessible by staff. In such cases, the renter of the PO box will be issued with a card showing the PO box number and delivery office name, and must produce this to the desk staff when collecting mail. For an additional fee, the Royal Mail will deliver received items to the renter's geographical address.

— Freebase

Box kite

Box kite

A box kite is a high performance kite, noted for developing relatively high lift; it is a type within the family of cellular kites. The typical design has four parallel struts. The box is made rigid with diagonal crossed struts. There are two sails, or ribbons, whose width is about a quarter of the length of the box. The ribbons wrap around the ends of the box, leaving the ends and middle of the kite open. In flight, one strut is the bottom, and the bridle is tied between the top and bottom of this strut. The dihedrals of the sails help stability. The box kite was invented in 1893 by Lawrence Hargrave, an Englishman who emigrated to Australia, as part of his attempt to develop a manned flying machine. Hargrave linked several of his box kites together, creating sufficient lift for him to fly some 16 ft off the ground. A winged variant of this kite is known as the Cody kite following its development by Samuel Cody as a platform for military observation during the Second Boer War. Military uses also involved a kite/radio transmitter combination issued to pilots during World War II for use in liferafts. Large box kites are constructed as cellular kites. Rather than one box, there are many, each with its own set of sails.

— Freebase

Text box

Text box

A text box, text field or text entry box is a kind of widget used when building a graphical user interface. A text box's purpose is to allow the user to input text information to be used by the program. User-interface guidelines recommend a single-line text box when only one line of input is required, and a multi-line text box only if more than one line of input may be required. Non-editable text boxes can serve the purpose of simply displaying text. A typical text box is a rectangle of any size, possibly with a border that separates the text box from the rest of the interface. Text boxes may contain zero, one, or two scrollbars. Text boxes usually display a text cursor, indicating the current region of text being edited. It is common for the mouse cursor to change its shape when it hovers over a text box.

— Freebase

Elbert Frank Cox

Elbert Frank Cox

Elbert Frank Cox was an American mathematician who became the first black person in the world to receive a Ph.D. in mathematics. He spent most of his life as a professor at Howard University in Washington, D.C., where he was known as an excellent teacher. During his life, he overcame various difficulties which arose because of his race. In his honor, the National Association of Mathematicians established the Cox-Talbot Address, which is annually delivered at the NAM's national meetings. The Elbert F. Cox Scholarship Fund, which is used to help black students pursue studies, is named in his honor as well. In 1917 after graduating, Cox joined the U.S Army in World War I. After he discharged from the Army, he began his career as a high school math tutor.

— Freebase

Pandora

Pandora

a beautiful woman (all-gifted), whom Jupiter caused Vulcan to make out of clay in order to punish the human race, because Prometheus had stolen the fire from heaven. Jupiter gave Pandora a box containing all human ills, which, when the box was opened, escaped and spread over the earth. Hope alone remained in the box. Another version makes the box contain all the blessings of the gods, which were lost to men when Pandora opened it

— Webster Dictionary

quine

quine

[from the name of the logician Willard van Orman Quine, via Douglas Hofstadter] A program that generates a copy of its own source text as its complete output. Devising the shortest possible quine in some given programming language is a common hackish amusement. (We ignore some variants of BASIC in which a program consisting of a single empty string literal reproduces itself trivially.) Here is one classic quine: ((lambda (x) (list x (list (quote quote) x))) (quote (lambda (x) (list x (list (quote quote) x))))) This one works in LISP or Scheme. It's relatively easy to write quines in other languages such as Postscript which readily handle programs as data; much harder (and thus more challenging!) in languages like C which do not. Here is a classic C quine for ASCII machines: char*f="char*f=%c%s%c;main() {printf(f,34,f,34,10);}%c"; main(){printf(f,34,f,34,10);} For excruciatingly exact quinishness, remove the interior line breaks. Here is another elegant quine in ANSI C: #define q(k)main(){return!puts(#k" q("#k")");} q(#define q(k)main(){return!puts(#k" q("#k")");}) Some infamous Obfuscated C Contest entries have been quines that reproduced in exotic ways. There is an amusing Quine Home Page.

— The New Hacker's Dictionary

Adify

Adify

Adify provides the technology and back office services necessary for companies to run their own online ad networks. Adify is a self-service ad network for companies interested in developing their own ad networks. The service allows a publisher to negotiate ad rates, and to reject an advertiser if not interested. Adify about 20 percent of the revenues. Clients include Guardian, Forbes.com, NBC WeatherPlus, Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia and others.Adify was acquired by Cox Communications Enterprises on April 29, 2008 for $300 million.

— CrunchBase

Police box

Police box

A police box is a British telephone kiosk or callbox located in a public place for the use of members of the police, or for members of the public to contact the police. Unlike an ordinary callbox, its telephone is located behind a hinged door so it can be used from the outside, and the interior of the box is, in effect, a miniature police station for use by police officers. Police boxes predate the era of mobile telecommunications; now British police officers carry two-way radios and/or mobile phones rather than relying on fixed kiosks. Most boxes are now disused or have been withdrawn from service. The typical police box contained a telephone linked directly to the local police station, allowing patrolling officers to keep in contact with the station, reporting anything unusual or requesting help if necessary. A light on top of the box would flash to alert an officer that he/she was requested to contact the station. Members of the public could also use the phone to contact a police station in an emergency. British police boxes were usually blue, except in Glasgow, where they were red until the late 1960s. In addition to a telephone, they contained equipment such as an incident book and a first aid kit. Today the image of the blue police box is widely associated with the science fiction television programme Doctor Who, in which the protagonist's time machine, a TARDIS, is in the shape of a 1960s British police box. In the context of a TARDIS, the image of the blue police box is a trademark of the BBC.

— Freebase

Sullivan, Sir Arthur Seymour

Sullivan, Sir Arthur Seymour

English composer, born in London; won the Mendelssohn scholarship at the Royal Academy of Music, and by means of it completed his musical education at Leipzig; in 1862 composed incidental music for "The Tempest," well received at the Crystal Palace; since then has been a prolific writer of all kinds of music, ranging from hymns and oratorios to popular songs and comic operas; his oratorios include "The Prodigal Son" (1868), "The Light of the World," "The Golden Legend," &c., but it is as a writer of light and tuneful operas (librettos by W. S. Gilbert, q. v.) that he is best known; these began with "Cox and Box" (1866), and include "Trial by Jury," "The Sorcerer" (1877), "Pinafore," "Patience" (1881), "Mikado" (1885), &c., in all of which he displays great gifts as a melodist, and wonderful resource in clever piquant orchestration; received the Legion of Honour in 1878, and was knighted in 1883; b. 1842.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

glove box

glove box

A plastic box or similar enclosure containing a controlled environment, with rubber gloves fastened around holes in the front of the box through which a person can manipulate things in the box without introducing outside contamination; an isolator.

— Wiktionary

Box plot

Box plot

In descriptive statistics, a box plot or boxplot is a convenient way of graphically depicting groups of numerical data through their quartiles. Box plots may also have lines extending vertically from the boxes indicating variability outside the upper and lower quartiles, hence the terms box-and-whisker plot and box-and-whisker diagram. Outliers may be plotted as individual points. Box plots display differences between populations without making any assumptions of the underlying statistical distribution: they are non-parametric. The spacings between the different parts of the box help indicate the degree of dispersion and skewness in the data, and identify outliers. In addition to the points themselves, they allow one to visually estimate various L-estimators, notably the interquartile range, midhinge, range, mid-range, and trimean. Boxplots can be drawn either horizontally or vertically.

— Freebase

Sound box

Sound box

A sound box or sounding box is an open chamber in the body of a musical instrument which modifies the sound of the instrument, and helps transfer that sound to the surrounding air. Objects respond more strongly to vibrations at certain frequencies, known as resonances. The frequency and strength of the resonances of the body of a musical instrument have a significant impact on the tone quality it produces. The air inside the chamber has its own resonances, and these interact with the resonances of the body, altering the resonances of the instrument as a whole. The sound box typically adds resonances at lower frequencies, enhancing the lower-frequency response of the instrument. The distinctive sound of an instrument with a sound box owes a lot to the alteration made to the tone. A sound box is found in most string instruments. The most notable exceptions are some electrically amplified instruments like the solid body electric guitar or the electric violin, and the piano which uses only a sound board instead. Drumhead lutes such as the banjo or erhu have at least one open end of the sound box covered with animal skin. Open back banjos are normally used for clawhammer and frailing, while those used for bluegrass have the back covered with a resonator.

— Freebase

Black box

Black box

In science and engineering, a black box is a device, system or object which can be viewed in terms of its input, output and transfer characteristics without any knowledge of its internal workings. Its implementation is "opaque". Almost anything might be referred to as a black box: a transistor, an algorithm, or the human mind. The opposite of a black box is a system where the inner components or logic are available for inspection, which is sometimes known as a clear box, a glass box, or a white box.

— Freebase

Box girder

Box girder

A box or tubular girder is a girder that forms an enclosed tube with multiple walls, rather than an I or H-beam. Originally constructed of riveted wrought iron, they are now found in rolled or welded steel, aluminium extrusions or pre-stressed concrete. Compared to an I-beam, the advantage of a box girder is that it better resists torsion. Having multiple vertical webs, it can also carry more load than an I beam of equal height. The distinction in naming between a box girder and a tubular girder is imprecise. Generally the term box girder is used, especially if it is rectangular in section. Where the girder carries its "content" inside the box, such as the Britannia Bridge, it is termed a tubular girder. Tubular girder is also used if the girder is round or oval in cross-section, such as the Royal Albert Bridge. Where a large box girder contains more than two walls, i.e. with multiple boxes, it is referred to as a cellular girder.

— Freebase

Cyclooxygenase

Cyclooxygenase

Cyclooxygenase, officially known as prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase, is an enzyme that is responsible for formation of important biological mediators called prostanoids, including prostaglandins, prostacyclin and thromboxane. Pharmacological inhibition of COX can provide relief from the symptoms of inflammation and pain. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as aspirin and ibuprofen, exert their effects through inhibition of COX. The names "prostaglandin synthase" and "prostaglandin endoperoxide synthetase" are still used to refer to COX.

— Freebase

Cryptograms

Cryptograms

Cryptograms is the second album from Atlanta, Georgia-based indie rock group Deerhunter, released through Kranky Records on January 29, 2007 on CD and vinyl. Following the 2005 release of its first full-length album Turn It Up Faggot, Deerhunter began recording material for its next record at Rare Book Room studio in New York. This initial recording session failed, due to the physical and mental state of lead singer Bradford Cox, as well as malfunctioning equipment in the studio. The band returned to Atlanta, only giving recording a second try after encouragement from members of the band Liars. The final version of Cryptograms was recorded in two separate day-long sessions, months apart, resulting in two musically distinct parts—the first includes more ambient music while the second contains more pop music elements. Cox sang most of the record's lyrics in a stream-of-consciousness manner; they include themes of death, companionship, and Cox's experiences with his genetic disorder Marfan syndrome. Cryptograms was generally well received by critics, and several publications placed the album on their lists of the top albums of 2007.

— Freebase

Tobin Bronze

Tobin Bronze

Tobin Bronze was an Australian Thoroughbred Hall of Fame racehorse who competed with great success during the 1960s. A chestnut son of Arctic Explorer from the Masthead mare Amarco he proved to be a crowd favourite due to his stunning good looks and winning 24 of his 44 Australian race starts. His record in weight for age races was impeccable starting 16 times for 12 wins, 3 seconds and 1 third. This did not preclude him from also winning many races under handicap conditions with quality races such as the 1967 VATC Caulfield Cup carrying 9 st 10 lb as well as the AJC Doncaster Handicap with 9 st 5 lb amongst his great wins. He also won the 1967 VATC Toorak Handicap with 9 st 12 lb, a weight carrying record for this event, which still stands today. An 20 October 2009 Sydney Morning Herald article ranked Tobin Bronze's win in the 1966 Cox Plate as one of the "Top 5 Cox Plate moments." Only the champion stayer Redcraze has ever carried more weight to victory in a Caulfield Cup. After three seasons in Australia he was sold to American interests but not before winning his final race start in Australia the 1967 W.S. Cox Plate, much to the delight of the huge crowd that attended to bid him farewell.

— Freebase

KRAV-FM

KRAV-FM

KRAV-FM, known as "Mix 96 - Today's Best Music", is a radio station in Tulsa, Oklahoma, owned by Cox Radio. The station plays a mix of pop music from the 1980s, 1990s, and today. The station's call letters are taken from the name of long-time owner George Kravis. Kravis sold the station to Cox in 1996. The station began as an easy listening station in the 1960s and flipped to a Hot AC format in 1976 as "FM 96". Owned by Cox Media Group.

— Freebase

Nikki

Nikki

Nikki is an American sitcom that aired on The WB from 2000 to 2002. Nikki was a starring vehicle for Nikki Cox, who had previously starred in another WB sitcom, Unhappily Ever After, which ran for five seasons. Looking to capitalize on Cox's popularity, Bruce Helford created a sitcom that featured Cox as the title character.

— Freebase

quots.

quots.

Plural form of quot..

— Wiktionary

Dredger

Dredger

a box with holes in its lid; -- used for sprinkling flour, as on meat or a breadboard; -- called also dredging box, drudger, and drudging box

— Webster Dictionary

Quote

Quote

kwōt, v.t. to repeat the words of any one: to adduce for authority or illustration: to give the current price of: to enclose within quotation marks: (Shak.) to set down in writing.—v.i. to make a quotation.—adj. Quō′table, that may be quoted.—ns. Quō′tableness, Quōtabil′ity.—adv. Quō′tably.—ns. Quōtā′tion, act of quoting: that which is quoted: the current price of anything; Quōtā′tion-mark, one of the marks used to note the beginning and the end of a quotation—generally consisting of two inverted commas at the beginning, and two apostrophes at the end of a quotation; but a single comma and a single apostrophe are frequently used; Quō′ter. [O. Fr. quoter, to number—Low L. quotāre, to divide into chapters and verses—L. quotus, of what number?—quot, how many?]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Quota

Quota

kwō′ta, n. the part or share assigned to each.—n. Quot′ity (Carlyle), the number of individuals in a collection. [It.,—L. quotus, of what number?—quot, how many?]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Sand

Sand

sand, n. fine particles of crushed or worn rocks, used in founding: force of character: (pl.) lands covered with sand: a sandy beach: moments of time, from the use of sand in the hour-glass.—v.t. to sprinkle with sand.—ns. Sand′-bag (fort.), a canvas bag filled with sand or earth, forming a ready means of giving cover against an enemy's fire, or of tamping the charge in a mine: an engraver's leather cushion, &c.; Sand′-bag′ger, a robber who uses a sand-bag to stun his victims; Sand′-ball, a ball of soap mixed with fine sand for the toilet; Sand′-band, a guard-ring to keep sand from working into the axle-box; Sand′-bank, a bank of sand formed by tides and currents; Sand′-bath, a vessel of hot sand for heating vessels without direct exposure to the fire: a bath in which the body is covered with warm sea-sand: saburration; Sand′-bear, the Indian badger; Sand′-bed, the bed into which the iron from the blast-furnace is run; Sand′-bird, a sandpiper: a shore bird; Sand′-blast, sand driven by a blast of air or steam for cutting and engraving figures on glass or metal.—adj. Sand′-blind, afflicted with partial blindness, in which particles of sand seem to float before the eyes.—ns. Sand′-blind′ness; Sand′-blow′er, a sand bellows; Sand′-box, a box with a perforated top for sprinkling sand on writing, a contrivance formerly used by way of blotting-paper: a box with sand to prevent the wheels of a rail from slipping; Sand′-brake, a device for stopping trains automatically; Sand′-bug, a burrowing crustacean: a digger-wasp; Sand′-bur, a weed found in the plains of the western United States; Sand′-canal′, the stone canal of an echinoderm; Sand′-cherr′y, the dwarf cherry; Sand′-cock, the redshank; Sand′-crab, the lady-crab; Sand′-crack, a crack in a horse's hoof: a crack in a moulded brick before burning; Sand′-crick′et, a name applied to certain large crickets in the western United States; Sand′-dab, a kind of plaice; Sand′-dart, a British noctuid moth; Sand′-dart′er, -div′er, a small etheostomine fish of the Ohio valley; Sand′-doll′ar, a flat sea-urchin; Sand′-drift, a mound of drifted sand; Sand′-dune, a ridge of loose sand drifted by the wind.—adj. Sand′ed (Shak.), marked with yellow spots: sprinkled with sand: short-sighted.—ns. Sand′-eel, a small eel-like fish, which buries itself in the sand when the tide retires; Sand′erling, a genus of birds of the snipe family, characterised by the absence of a hind-toe, common on the coast, eating marine worms, small crustaceans, and bivalve molluscs; Sand′-fence, a barrier in a stream of stakes and iron wire;

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Pyx

Pyx

piks, n. (R.C.) the sacred box in which the host is kept after consecration: the box at the British Mint containing sample coins.—v.t. to test the weight and fineness of, as the coin deposited in the pyx.—Trial of the pyx, final trial by weight and assay of the gold and silver coins of the United Kingdom, prior to their issue from the Mint. [L. pyxis, a box—Gr. pyxispyxos (L. buxus), the box-tree.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Snuff

Snuff

snuf, v.i. to draw in air violently and noisily through the nose: to sniff: to smell at anything doubtfully: to take snuff into the nose.—v.t. to draw into the nose: to smell, to examine by smelling.—n. a powdered preparation of tobacco or other substance for snuffing, a pinch of such: a sniff: resentment, huff.—ns. Snuff′-box, a box for snuff; Snuff′-dip′ping, the habit of dipping a wetted stick into snuff and rubbing it on the gums; Snuff′er, one who snuffs; Snuff′iness, state of being snuffy.—v.i. Snuf′fle, to breathe hard through the nose.—n. the sound made by such: a nasal twang: cant.—n. Snuf′fler, one who snuffles or speaks through his nose when obstructed.—n.pl. Snuf′fles, nasal catarrh and consequent stoppage of the nose.—ns. Snuff′ling; Snuff′-mill, a machine for grinding tobacco into snuff; Snuff′-mull, a snuff-box; Snuff′-spoon, a spoon for taking snuff from a snuff-box; Snuff′-tāk′er, one who snuffs habitually; Snuff′-tāking.—adj. Snuff′y, soiled with, or smelling of, snuff.—Take a thing in snuff (Shak.), to take offence; Up to snuff, knowing, not likely to be taken in. [Dut. snuffen, snuf; Ger. schnaufen, to snuff.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

eight

eight

A light, narrow rowing boat, especially one used in competitive rowing, steered by a cox, in which a eight rowers each have two oars

— Wiktionary

coxed

coxed

Having a cox

— Wiktionary

coxless

coxless

Not having a cox.

— Wiktionary

coxes

coxes

Plural form of cox.

— Wiktionary

Telephone booth

Telephone booth

A telephone booth, telephone kiosk, telephone call box, telephone box or public call box is a small structure furnished with a payphone and designed for a telephone user's convenience. In the USA and Canada, "telephone booth" is used, while in the Commonwealth of Nations it is a "telephone box" or "phone box". Such a booth usually has lighting, a door to provide privacy, and windows to let others know if the booth is in use. The booth may be furnished with a printed directory of local telephone numbers, and a booth in a formal setting, such as a hotel, may be furnished with paper and pen and even a seat. An outdoor booth may be made of metal and plastic to withstand the elements and heavy use, while an indoor booth may have more elaborate architecture and furnishings. Most outdoor booths feature the name and logo of the telephone service provider.

— Freebase

Box lacrosse

Box lacrosse

Box lacrosse, also known as indoor lacrosse and sometimes shortened to boxla or simply box, is an indoor version of lacrosse played mostly in North America. The game originated in Canada, where it is the most popular version of the game played in contrast to the traditional field lacrosse game. It is played between two teams of six players each, and is traditionally played on an ice hockey rink once the ice has been removed or covered. The playing area is called a box, in contrast to the open playing field of field lacrosse. The object of the game is to use a long handled racket, known as a lacrosse stick, to catch, carry, and pass the ball in an effort to score by ultimately hurling a solid rubber lacrosse ball into an opponent's goal. At the highest level box lacrosse is represented by the Senior A divisions of the Canadian Lacrosse Association, and the National Lacrosse League. While there are thirty-one total members of the Federation of International Lacrosse, only eight nations have competed in international box lacrosse competition. Only Canada, Iroquois Nationals and the United States have finished in the top three places at the ILF World Indoor Lacrosse Championships.

— Freebase

Box camera

Box camera

The box camera is mechanically simple, the most common form is a cardboard or plastic box with a lens in one end and film at the other. The lenses are often single element designs meniscus fixed focus lens, or in better quality box cameras a doublet lens with minimal possible adjustments to the aperture or shutter speeds. Because of the inability to adjust focus, the small lens aperture and the low sensitivity of the sensitive materials available, these cameras work best in brightly lit daylit scenes when the subject is within the hyperfocal distance for the lens and of subjects that move little during the exposure -- snapshots. During the box cameras heyday, box cameras with photographic flash, shutter and aperture adjustment were introduced, allowing indoor photos.

— Freebase

Litter box

Litter box

A litter box, sometimes called a sandbox, litter tray, litter pan, or catbox, is an indoor feces and urine disposal box for cats that are permitted free roam of a home but who cannot or do not always go outside to relieve themselves. Many owners of these animals prefer not to let them roam outside for fear that they might succumb to the elements or get hit by a car. A litter box makes it possible to shelter pets from these risks. In the wild, cats naturally excrete in soft or sandy soil for easy burial. They use their paws to cover up in a back sweeping motion to cover their feces. To stimulate this instinctive desire, a litter box's bottom is filled typically with an inch or more of cat litter. Litter box filler is a loose, granular material that absorbs moisture and odors such as ammonia. Some litter brands contain baking soda to absorb such odors. The litter material also satisfies a cat's instinctive desire to use an easily-dug material. The most common material is clay, although recycled paper "pellets" and silica-based "crystal" variants are also used. Sometimes, when an owner wishes to stimulate the cat's natural instincts, natural dirt is used.

— Freebase

Box Spring

Box Spring

Box Spring is a geyser in the Lower Geyser Basin of Yellowstone National Park in the United States. Box Spring is part of the Pink Cone Group. Other geysers in this groups are Bead Geyser, Dilemma Geyser, Labial Geyser, Narcissus Geyser, Pink Geyser, and Pink Cone Geyser. Eruptions of Box Spring last about 2 minutes and are 10 to 15 feet high. The interval between eruptions is 10 to 90 minutes. As its name indicates, Box Spring was a hot spring until the 1983 Borah Peak earthquake triggered activity in the spring and it began erupting. It was later discovered that Box Spring was recorded as being active in the 1870s.

— Freebase

Safe deposit box

Safe deposit box

A safe deposit box, otherwise known as safety deposit box is an individually secured container, usually held within a larger safe or bank vault. Safe deposit boxes are generally located in banks, post offices or other institutions. Safe deposit boxes are used to store valuable possessions, such as gemstones, precious metals, currency, marketable securities, important documents such as wills, property deeds, and birth certificates, or computer data storage that need protection from theft, fire, flood, tampering, or other perils. When renting out a safe deposit box in a bank in the United States does not mean that the property is automatically insured. An individual should still purchase insurance for the safe deposit box in order to cover theft and other natural disasters. In the typical arrangement, a renter pays the bank a fee for the use of the box, which can be opened only with presentation of an assigned key, the bank's own guard key, the proper signature, and perhaps a code of some sort. Some banks additionally use biometric dual-control security to complement the conventional security procedures.

— Freebase

Box

Box

Box describes a variety of containers and receptacles for permanent use as storage, or for temporary use often for transporting contents. Boxes may be made of durable materials such as wood or metal, or of corrugated fiberboard, paperboard, or other non-durable materials. The size may vary from very small to the size of a large appliance. A corrugated box is a very common shipping container. When no specific shape is described, a box of rectangular cross-section with all sides flat may be expected, but a box may have a horizontal cross section that is square, elongated, round or oval; sloped or domed top surfaces, or non-vertical sides. A decorative or storage box may be opened by raising, pulling, sliding or removing the lid, which may be hinged and/or fastened by a catch, clasp, or lock.

— Freebase

Blue box

Blue box

A blue box is an unauthorized electronic device that generates the same tones employed by a telephone operator's dialing console to switch long-distance calls. A blue box is a tool that emerged in the 1960s and 70s; it allowed users to route their own calls by emulating the in-band signaling mechanism that then controlled switching in long distance dialing systems. The most typical use of a blue box was to place free telephone calls. A related device, the black box enabled one to receive calls which were free to the caller. The blue box no longer works in most Western nations, as modern switching systems are now digital and do not use in-band signaling. Instead, signaling occurs on an out-of-band channel which cannot be accessed from the line the caller is using, a system called Common Channel Interoffice Signaling or CCIS.

— Freebase

TATA Box Binding Protein-Like Proteins

TATA Box Binding Protein-Like Proteins

A class of proteins related in structure and function to TATA-BOX BINDING PROTEIN that can take the place of TATA-BOX BINDING PROTEIN in the transcription initiation complex. They are found in most multicellular organisms and may be involved in tissue-specific promoter regulation. They bind to DNA and interact with TATA-BINDING PROTEIN ASSOCIATED FACTORS, however they may lack specificity for the TATA-BOX.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Transcription Factor TFIID

Transcription Factor TFIID

The major sequence-specific DNA-binding component involved in the activation of transcription of RNA POLYMERASE II. It was originally described as a complex of TATA-BOX BINDING PROTEIN and TATA-BINDING PROTEIN ASSOCIATED FACTORS. It is now know that TATA BOX BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE PROTEINS may take the place of TATA-box binding protein in the complex.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

S-Phase Kinase-Associated Proteins

S-Phase Kinase-Associated Proteins

A family of structurally-related proteins that were originally identified by their ability to complex with cyclin proteins (CYCLINS). They share a common domain that binds specifically to F-BOX MOTIFS. They take part in SKP CULLIN F-BOX PROTEIN LIGASES, where they can bind to a variety of F-BOX PROTEINS.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

box and whiskers plot

box and whiskers plot

A graphical summary of a numerical data sample through five statistics u2014 median, upper quartile, lower quartile and upper extreme and lower extreme values u2014 by depiction as a box with its edges at the quartile marks and an internal line at the median and with lines protruding from the box as far as the extremal values.

— Wiktionary

Me!Box Media

Me!Box Media

Me!Box licenses a platform to media producers/distributors that makes it possible for them to accomplish unparalleled viewer engagement with their videos - on ANY online video player. Producers are able to open the door for advertisers to connect with consumers in distinctive ways right from the content and thereby encouraging viewers to delve deeper into the brand and the message. The company monetizes from incremental user activity and commerce driven by a viewer™s contextual interest in a section of a video property.The Me!Box platform comes with a Me!Box Skin Creator and a Me!Box Experience Console with built-in search capability. While the creator embeds meta-data on the video, the Experience Console non-intrusively renders all meta-information during playback while allowing the viewer to search, interact, and share interests with friends from anywhere in the video. Me!Box provides integration of the Experience Console with any playback infrastructure. Rich usage data and reporting are sold as separate add-on services.

— CrunchBase

boxwood

boxwood, Turkish boxwood

very hard tough close-grained light yellow wood of the box (particularly the common box); used in delicate woodwork: musical instruments and inlays and engraving blocks

— Princeton's WordNet

turkish boxwood

boxwood, Turkish boxwood

very hard tough close-grained light yellow wood of the box (particularly the common box); used in delicate woodwork: musical instruments and inlays and engraving blocks

— Princeton's WordNet

Naija

Naija

An Arabic/Islamic name for a girl meaning "prosperous" and "successful"

— Editors Contribution

may not

may not

May not means "should not" or "must not", depending on the sentence.

— Editors Contribution

Pyx

Pyx

the name of a cup-shaped, gold-lined vessel, with lid, used in the Roman Catholic churches for containing the eucharistic elements after their consecration either for adoration in the churches or for conveying to sick-rooms. Pyx means "box." Hence Trial of the Pyx is the annual test of the British coinage, for which purpose one coin in every 15 lbs. of gold and one in every 60 lbs. of silver coined is set aside in a pyx or box.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Watch

Watch

woch, n. act of looking out: close observation: guard: one who watches or those who watch: a sentry: a pocket timepiece: the place where a guard is kept: a division of the night: time of watching, esp. in a ship, a division of a ship's crew into two or three sections, so that one set of men may have charge of the vessel while the others rest. (The day and night are divided into watches of four hours each, except the period from 4 to 8 P.M., which is divided into two dog-watches of two hours' duration each).—v.i. to look with attention: to keep guard: to look out: to attend the sick by night: to inspect, keep guard over (with over).—v.t. to keep in view: to give heed to: to have in keeping: to guard: to wait for, detect by lying in wait: (Shak.) to keep from sleep.—ns. Watch′-bill, a list of the officers and crew of a ship, as divided into watches, with their several stations; Watch′-box, a sentry-box; Watch′case, the outer case of a watch: (Shak.) a sentry-box; Watch′-clock, a watchman's clock; Watch′-dog, a dog kept to guard premises and property; Watch′er, one who watches; Watch′-fire, a night-fire acting as a signal: a fire for the use of a watching-party, sentinels, scouts, &c.—adj. Watch′ful, careful to watch or observe: attentive: circumspect: cautious.—adv. Watch′fully.—ns. Watch′fulness; Watch′-glass, a sand-glass: the glass covering of the face of a watch; Watch′-guard, a watch-chain of any material; Watch′-gun, a gun fired at the changing of the watch, as on a ship; Watch′-house, a house in which a guard is placed: a lock-up, detaining office; Watch′-jew′el, a jewel used in the works of a watch for lessening friction; Watch′-key, a key for winding a watch; Watch′-light, a light used for watching or sitting up in the night; Watch′-māk′er, one who makes and repairs watches; Watch′-māk′ing; Watch′man, a man who watches or guards, esp. the streets of a city at night; Watch′-meet′ing, a religious meeting to welcome in the New Year, held on the night before, called the Watch′-night; Watch′-off′icer, the officer in charge of the ship during a watch, also called Officer of the watch; Watch′-pā′per, a round piece of paper, often decorated, put inside the outer case of a watch to prevent rubbing; Watch′-pock′et, a small pocket for holding a watch; Watch′-spring, the mainspring of a watch; Watch′-tow′er, a tower on which a sentinel is placed to watch or keep guard against the approach of an enemy; Watch′word, the password to be given to a watch or sentry: any signal: a maxim, rallying-cry.—Watch and ward, the old custom of watching by night and by day in towns and cities: uninterrupted vigilance.—The Black Watch, the 42d and 73d Regiments, now the 1st and 2d Battalions of the Black Watch or Royal Hig

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

celebrex

celecoxib, Celebrex

a Cox-2 inhibitor (trade name Celebrex) that relieves pain and inflammation without harming the digestive tract

— Princeton's WordNet

celecoxib

celecoxib, Celebrex

a Cox-2 inhibitor (trade name Celebrex) that relieves pain and inflammation without harming the digestive tract

— Princeton's WordNet

rofecoxib

rofecoxib, Vioxx

a Cox-2 inhibitor (trade name Vioxx) that relieves pain and inflammation without harming the digestive tract; voluntarily withdrawn from the market in 2004

— Princeton's WordNet

vioxx

rofecoxib, Vioxx

a Cox-2 inhibitor (trade name Vioxx) that relieves pain and inflammation without harming the digestive tract; voluntarily withdrawn from the market in 2004

— Princeton's WordNet

acid halide

acyl halide, acid halide

organic compounds containing the group -COX where X is a halogen atom

— Princeton's WordNet

acyl halide

acyl halide, acid halide

organic compounds containing the group -COX where X is a halogen atom

— Princeton's WordNet

Boce

Boce

a European fish (Box vulgaris), having a compressed body and bright colors; -- called also box, and bogue

— Webster Dictionary

Sonometer

Sonometer

an instrument for exhibiting the transverse vibrations of cords, and ascertaining the relations between musical notes. It consists of a cord stretched by weight along a box, and divided into different lengths at pleasure by a bridge, the place of which is determined by a scale on the face of the box

— Webster Dictionary

chest

chest

A box, now usually a large strong box with a secure convex lid.

— Wiktionary

PO box

PO box

A post office box; a lockable box hired from the postal authorities or a private company as a collection point for mail.

— Wiktionary

boxy

boxy

Box-like or box-shaped.

— Wiktionary

noisemaker

noisemaker

A device comprised of a handle with a ratchet at one end, with the ratchet end contained within a box that serves as an echo chamber, so that swinging or moving the device causes the ratchet to rotate within the box, creating a series of loud clicking sounds

— Wiktionary

box turtle

box turtle

A turtle of the genus Terrapene (the North American box turtles), or of Cuora or Pyxidea (the Asian box turtles), characterised by having a domed shell that is hinged at the bottom, allowing the animal to close its shell tightly to escape predators.

— Wiktionary

solander

solander

A box, in the form of a book, used for keeping botanical specimens etc; drop-spine or clamshell box

— Wiktionary

winebox

winebox

A box containing box wine.

— Wiktionary

Will Smith

Will Smith

Willard Christopher "Will" Smith, Jr. is an American actor, producer, and rapper. He has enjoyed success in television, film and music. In April 2007, Newsweek called him the most powerful actor in Hollywood. Smith has been nominated for four Golden Globe Awards, two Academy Awards, and has won four Grammy Awards. In the late 1980s, Smith achieved modest fame as a rapper under the name The Fresh Prince. In 1990, his popularity increased dramatically when he starred in the popular television series The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air. The show ran for nearly six years on NBC and has been syndicated consistently on various networks since then. In the mid-1990s, Smith moved from television to film, and ultimately starred in numerous blockbuster films. He is the only actor to have eight consecutive films gross over $100 million in the domestic box office, and ten consecutive films gross over $150 million internationally and the only one to have eight consecutive films in which he starred open at #1 spot in the domestic box office tally. Sixteen of the twenty fiction films he has acted in have accumulated worldwide gross earnings of over $100 million, and four took in over $500 million in global box office receipts. As of 2012, his films have grossed $6.36 billion in global box office. He received Best Actor Oscar nominations for Ali and The Pursuit of Happyness.

— Freebase

Boom Box

Boom Box

Boom Box is a limited-edition box set album by the American rock band No Doubt, released on November 25, 2003 through Interscope Records. It compiled The Singles 1992–2003, The Videos 1992–2003, Everything in Time, and Live in the Tragic Kingdom. The Singles 1992–2003 was also released on a separate CD on the same date. Everything in Time was released as a separate CD later on October 12, 2004. The Videos 1992–2003 was released as a separate DVD on May 4, 2004. At the time of Boom Box's release, Live in the Tragic Kingdom had already been released on VHS and it was re-released on DVD on June 13, 2006. The Singles 1992–2003 and The Videos 1992–2003 are compiled from the singles released from four of the band's five studio albums, No Doubt, Tragic Kingdom, Return of Saturn and Rock Steady, with tracks from the last three heavily represented. Everything in Time is an album of B-sides, rare songs and remixes, taken mainly from the recording sessions of Return of Saturn. Live in the Tragic Kingdom is a recording of a concert filmed during the band's tour for Tragic Kingdom. The release of Boom Box received very little coverage from music critics because it was not a studio album. The few reviews it received were positive. The album charted at number 206 on the Top Internet Albums. However, in its separate release, The Singles 1992–2003 was reviewed widely and positively, and it charted highly across North America and Europe, peaking at number 2 in the U.S. and number 5 in the UK. Everything in Time, in its separate release, charted on the U.S. Billboard 200 at number 182.

— Freebase

Suggestion box

Suggestion box

A suggestion box is a device for obtaining additional comments, questions, and requests. In its most basic and traditional form, it is a receptacle with an opening, not unlike an offering box or voting box. The box is used for collecting slips of paper with input from customers and patrons of a particular organization. Suggestion boxes may also exist internally, within an organization, such as means for garnering employee input. Variations on this method include paper feedback forms which can be sent via postal mail, such as the "We value your input" or "How was the service today?" cards found in some restaurants; solicitations to provide comments over the telephone, such as a voluntary survey at the end of a transaction with a call center, or even an invitation on a printed store receipt to call and complete a customer satisfaction survey; or the placement of feedback forms on an institution's website. Including mechanisms for customer comments beyond an ordinary point of service has several benefits. Suggestion boxes provide some degree of detachment from the person or service that a customer may be critiquing, and may therefore yield more frank and open feedback, thereby providing greater opportunities for obtaining accurate market research data and improving customer relations.

— Freebase

Gaylussacia brachycera

Gaylussacia brachycera

Gaylussacia brachycera, commonly known as box huckleberry or box-leaved whortleberry, is a low North American shrub related to the blueberry and the other huckleberries. It is easily distinguished from other members of its genus by its leaves: they resemble those of boxwood and lack the resin glands typical of huckleberries. Like its relatives, it bears white urn-shaped flowers in the early summer, which develop to blue, edible berries in late summer. It is mostly found in Appalachia; many of its stations there were known to natives, who picked and ate the berries, before botanists became aware of them in the 1920s. A relict species nearly exterminated by the last ice age, box huckleberry is self-sterile, and is found in isolated colonies which reproduce clonally by extending roots. One colony in Pennsylvania was once estimated to be as many as 13,000 years old; more recent estimates have an upper bound of about 8,000 years, which would make it the oldest woody plant east of the Rocky Mountains. Another colony in Pennsylvania, about 1,300 years old, has been protected by the Hoverter and Sholl Box Huckleberry Natural Area.

— Freebase

Lunch box

Lunch box

The lunch box, also referred to as a lunch pail or lunch kit, is used to store food to be taken anywhere. The concept of a food container has existed for a long time, but it was not until people began using tobacco tins to haul meals in the early 20th century, followed by the use of lithographed images on metal, that the containers became a staple of youth, and a marketable product. The lunch box has most often been used by schoolchildren to take packed lunches, or a snack, from home to school. The most common modern form is a small case with a clasp and handle, often printed with a colorful image that can either be generic or based on children's television shows or films. Use of lithographed metal to produce lunch boxes in the 1950s, 1960s, 1970s and 1980s gave way in the 1990s to use of injection-molded plastic. A lunch kit comprises the actual "box" and a matching vacuum bottle. However, pop culture has more often embraced the singular term lunch box, which is now most commonly used.

— Freebase

Dialog box

Dialog box

In a graphical user interface of computers, a dialog box is a type of window used to enable reciprocal communication or "dialog" between a computer and its user. It may communicate information to the user, prompt the user for a response, or both. A dialog box is most often used to provide the user with the means for specifying how to implement a command, or to respond to a question or an "alert". Dialog boxes are classified as "modal" or "modeless", depending on whether or not they block interaction with the software that initiated the dialog. The type of dialog box displayed is dependent upon the desired user interaction. The simplest type of dialog box is the alert, which displays a message and may require an acknowledgment that the message has been read, usually by clicking "OK", or a decision as to whether or not an action should proceed, by clicking "OK" or "Cancel". Alerts are also used to display a "termination notice"—sometimes requesting confirmation that the notice has been read—in the event of either an intentional closing or unintentional closing of an application or the operating system. Although this is a frequent interaction pattern for modal dialogs, it is also criticized by usability experts as being ineffective for its intended use, which is to protect against errors caused by destructive actions, and for which better alternatives exist.

— Freebase

Notchback

Notchback

Notchback is a styling term describing a car body style, a variation of three-box styling where the third distinct volume or "box" is less pronounced — especially where the rear deck is short or where the rear window is upright. Generally, the notchback refers to the distinct angle of the rear window in relation to the vehicle's more horizontal roofline and its rear decklid. The term is derives from the noun, notch meaning v-cut or indentation — though as a styling term it eludes precise definition and can overlap other styling designations. The term can apply to a sedan, coupé, liftback or hatchback configuration — especially where the third box of the three-box styling remains articulated, though perhaps barely — as with the third generation European Ford Escort. Notchback may highlight a design's sharp or abrupt roof/rear-window angle. Examples include the European Ford Anglia and U.S. Mercury Montclair that also included a rear window that could be lowered for "breezeway" ventilation. The styling term also may overlap the marketing use of the term notchback, for example where the term differentiates models within a range, for example the Chevrolet Vega Notchback from the Vega Hatchback. The compact Ford Mustang although labeled a hardtop coupe, exhibited "long hood - short deck" notchback styling that was common on 1960s compact coupes.

— Freebase

Box Step

Box Step

Box Step is a basic dance step named after the pattern it creates on the floor, which is that of a square or box. It is used in a number of American Style ballroom dances: Rumba, Waltz, bronze-level Foxtrot. While it can be performed individually, it is usually done with a partner. This is the most common dance step in the Waltz. In International Standard there is a similar step called Closed Change. In a typical example, the leader begins with the left foot and proceeds as follows. Every step is with full weight transfer. During the second and fourth step the foot is supposed to travel along two sides of the box, rather than along its diagonal. Rhythm varies. For example, it is "1-2-3, 4-5-6" in Waltz and "Sqq, Sqq" in Rumba. In other dances the box may start from the left or right foot, either back or forward, or even sidewise. For example, in the Quadrado figure of Samba de Gafieira the leader steps "left-together-back, right-together-forward".

— Freebase

Junction box

Junction box

An electrical junction box is a container for electrical connections, usually intended to conceal them from sight and deter tampering. A small metal or plastic junction box may form part of an electrical conduit wiring system in a building, or may be buried in the plaster of a wall, concealed behind an access panel or cast into concrete with only the lid showing. It sometimes includes terminals for joining wires. A similar container used for joining wires to electrical switches or sockets is called a pattress. The term may also be used for a larger item such as a piece of street furniture. In the UK, this is sometimes called a cabinet. See Enclosure. Junction boxes form an integral part of a circuit protection system where circuit integrity has to be provided, as for emergency lighting or emergency power lines, or the wiring between a nuclear reactor and a control room. In such an installation, the fireproofing around the incoming or outgoing cables must also be extended to cover the junction box to prevent short circuits inside the box during an accidental fire.

— Freebase

Box turtle

Box turtle

The box turtle or is a genus of turtle native to North America. It is also known as the box tortoise, although box turtles are terrestrial members of the American pond turtle family, and not members of the tortoise family. The 12 taxa which are distinguished in the genus are distributed over four species. It is largely characterized by having a domed shell, which is hinged at the bottom, allowing the animal to close its shell tightly to escape predators. Box turtles have become popular pets, although their needs in captivity are complex. The females usually have yellowish, brown eyes and the males usually have red or orange eyes, but the most reliable way to discern males from females is to examine the plastron; on males there is a concave area centered beneath the hinge.

— Freebase

Box Canyon, Colorado

Box Canyon, Colorado

Box Canyon is a Box canyon in Ouray County, Colorado, United States. It was originally founded as a mining camp and helped the city of Ouray establish itself as a permanent community. Box Canyon is home to Box Canyon Falls, a 285-foot waterfall, with quartzite walls that extend almost one hundred feet past the falls.

— Freebase

Letter box

Letter box

A letter box, letterbox, letter plate, letter hole, deed, mail slot, or mailbox is a receptacle for receiving incoming mail at a private residence or business. For the opposite purpose of collating outgoing mail, a post box is generally used instead. Letterboxes or mailboxes consist of four primary designs: ⁕A slot in a wall or door through which mail is delivered ⁕A box attached directly to the house ⁕A box mounted at or near the street ⁕A centralised mail delivery station consisting of individual mailboxes for an entire building ⁕A centralised mail delivery station consisting of individual mailboxes for multiple recipients at multiple addresses in a particular neighborhood or community

— Freebase

List box

List box

A list box is a GUI widget that allows the user to select one or more items from a list contained within a static, multiple line text box. The user clicks inside the box on an item to select it, sometimes in combination with the Shift key or Control key in order to make multiple selections. "Control-clicking" an item that has already be selected, unselects it. A list box is called select or select1 in the XForms standard. Select is used for allowing the user to select many items from a list whereas select1 only allows the user to select a single item from a list.

— Freebase

Post box

Post box

A post box is a physical box into which members of the public can deposit outgoing mail intended for collection by the agents of a country's postal service. The term post box can also refer to a private letter box for incoming mail.

— Freebase

Efficient

Efficient

Efficient is a grey Thoroughbred racehorse gelding, bred in New Zealand, who won the 2007 Melbourne Cup, ridden by Michael Rodd, and the 2006 Victoria Derby. Efficient was by the outstanding sire Zabeel from the mare Refused The Dance by Defensive Play. He is a half brother to Guillotine, winner of the 2008 MVRC Dato Tan Chin Nam Stakes. In his first campaign in the spring of 2006 he put together five consecutive wins including the Group 2 Aami Vase at Moonee Valley and ending with a win in the VRC Derby by 2½ lengths. Following his Derby win Efficient was entered into the Melbourne Cup field, run three days later. However, he did not pull up well enough and so was scratched from the race and spelled instead. Returning in the autumn Efficient had a very light campaign of just two starts. In the 1,400 metre Group 3 Schweppervescence Cup he finished fourth behind Haradasun and fifth behind Miss Finland in the Group One Australian Guineas over 1,600 metres. As a four year old in the Spring of 2007 Efficient resumed in the Memsie Stakes at Caulfield and ran 10th beaten 7 lengths. At his next start he ran fourth in the Group 2 Dato Tan Chin Nam Stakes behind El Segundo and Haradasun. He then ran unplaced in the 2,000 metre Group 1 Turnbull Stakes. Three weeks later Efficient lined up in the Weight for Age Group 1 Cox Plate over 2,040 metres at Moonee Valley where he finished 9th beaten 6½ lengths by the winner El Segundo. Efficient's next start was the Melbourne Cup, his first start in a handicap race since his first campaign. He dropped 3 kg from the Cox Plate run to carry 54.5 kg. Due to his poor recent form he was sent out a 16-1 chance. Reunited with jockey Michael Rodd for the first time since their 2006 Victoria Derby win, Efficient settled back in the field and travelled well. He was pulled to the outside to make a run and in the closing stages Efficient went on to defeat Purple Moon by half a length.

— Freebase

Brothel creeper

Brothel creeper

Creepers or brothel creepers are a type of shoe usually with suede uppers and thick crepe soles. They found their beginnings in the years following World War II, as soldiers based in the deserts in North Africa wore suede boots with hard-wearing crepe rubber soles because of the climate and environment. Having left the army, many of these ex-soldiers found their way to the nightspots of London wearing the same crepe-soled shoes and these became known as "brothel creepers". In the late 1950s, these shoes were taken up by the Teddy Boys along with drainpipe trousers, draped jackets, bolo ties, quiff and pompadour haircuts, and velvet or electric blue clothes. This style of shoe was developed in 1949 by George Cox and marketed under the "Hamilton" name, based on George Cox Jr.'s middle name. The brothel creeper regained popularity in the early 1970s when Malcolm McLaren sold them from his "Let it Rock" shop in London's Kings Road. Teddy Boys were the obvious customers, but the brothel creeper still proved to be popular among regular customers when McLaren and his partner Vivienne Westwood changed the shop to more rocker-oriented fashion. The shoe has since been adopted by subcultures such as indie, ska, punk, new wavers, psychobilly, greasers and goth, Japanese Visual Kei, and was noted as the footwear of choice of Bananarama.

— Freebase

Deliverance

Deliverance

Deliverance is a 1972 American thriller film produced and directed by John Boorman and starring Jon Voight, Burt Reynolds, Ronny Cox, and Ned Beatty, with both Cox and Beatty making their feature film debuts. The film is based on a 1970 novel of the same name by American author James Dickey, who has a small role in the film as the Sheriff. The screenplay was written by Dickey and an uncredited Boorman. Widely acclaimed as a landmark picture, the film is noted both for the memorable music scene near the beginning that sets the tone for what lies ahead—a trip into unknown and potentially dangerous territory—and for its notorious "squeal like a pig" male rape scene. In 2008, Deliverance was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant".

— Freebase

Coxless four

Coxless four

A coxless four is a rowing boat used in the sport of competitive rowing. It is designed for four persons who propel the boat with sweep oars. The crew consists of four rowers, each having one oar. There are two rowers on the stroke side and two on the bow side. There is no cox, but the rudder is controlled by one of the crew, normally with the rudder cable attached to the toe of one of their shoes which can pivot about the ball of the foot, moving the cable left or right. The steersman may row at bow, who has the best vision when looking over their shoulder, or on straighter courses stroke may steer, since they can point the stern of the boat at some landmark at the start of the course. The equivalent boat when it is steered by a cox is referred to as a "coxed four". Racing boats are long, narrow, and broadly semi-circular in cross-section in order to reduce drag to a minimum. Originally made from wood, shells are now almost always made from a composite material for strength and weight advantages. Fours have a fin towards the rear, to help prevent roll and yaw and to help the rudder. The riggers are staggered alternately along the boat so that the forces apply asymmetrically to each side of the boat. If the boat is sculled by rowers each with two oars the combination is referred to as a quad scull. In a quad scull the riggers apply forces symmetrically. A sweep oared boat has to be stiffer to handle the unmatched forces, and so requires more bracing, which means it has to be heavier than an equivalent sculling boat. However most rowing clubs cannot afford to have a dedicated large hull with four seats which might be rarely used and instead generally opt for versatility in their fleet by using stronger shells which can be rigged for either as fours or quads.

— Freebase

Kodagu district

Kodagu district

Kodagu [[[ಕನ್ನಡ]]: ಕೊಡಗು], also known by its anglicised former name of Coorg, is an administrative district in Karnataka, India. It occupies an area of 4,102 square kilometres in the Western Ghats of southwestern Karnataka. As of 2001, the population was 548,561, 13.74% of which resided in the district's urban centres, making it the least populous of the 30 districts in Karnataka. Kodagu is well known in the world for coffee and its "brave warriors". Madikeri is the headquarters of Kodagu. The district is bordered by Dakshina Kannada district to the northwest, Hassan district to the north, Mysore district to the east, Kannur district of Kerala to the southwest, and the Wayanad district of Kerala to the south. Kodagu is home to the native speakers of Kodava language. According to Karnataka Kodava Sahitya Academy, apart from Kodavas and Kodava Heggade, 18 other ethnic groups speak Kodava Takk in and outside the district including Iri, Koyava, Banna, Madivala, Hajama, Kembatti, and Meda. Though the language has no script, recently German linguist Gregg M. Cox developed a new writing system for the language known as the Coorgi-Cox alphabet, used by a number of individuals within Kodagu. Lately, some organizations including the Codava National Council and Kodava Rashtriya Samiti are demanding Kodava homeland status and autonomy to Kodagu district.

— Freebase

Burn

Burn

"Burn" is a song by American R&B singer Usher, which he wrote with American songwriters Jermaine Dupri, Bryan-Michael Cox. The song was produced by Dupri and Cox for Usher's fourth studio album, Confessions. "Burn" is about breakup in a relationship, and the public referred to it as an allusion to Usher's personal struggles. Originally planned as the album's lead single, "Burn" was pushed back after favorable responses for the song "Yeah!". "Burn" was released as the second single from the album in July 2004. "Burn" topped various charts around the world, including the Billboard Hot 100 for eight non-consecutive weeks; it succeeded "Yeah!" at number one. Both singles gave Usher nineteen consecutive weeks at the top spot, longer than any solo artist of the Hot 100 era. "Burn" was certified platinum in Australia and United States, and gold in New Zealand. The song was well received by critics and garnered award nominations. In 2009 it was named the 21st most successful song of the 2000s, on the Billboard Hot 100 Songs of the Decade. This song won the 2005 Kids' Choice Award for Favorite Song.

— Freebase

Carprofen

Carprofen

Carprofen is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug that veterinarians prescribe as a supportive treatment for various conditions. It provides day-to-day treatment for pain and inflammation from arthritic in geriatric dogs, joint pain, osteoarthritis, hip dysplasia, and other forms of joint deterioration. It is also used to relieve short-term post-operative pain, inflammation, and swelling after spaying, neutering, and other procedures. Carprofen reduces inflammation by inhibition of COX-2 and other sources of inflammatory prostaglandins. This is targeted protection, in that it does not interfere with COX-1 activity.

— Freebase

My Bad

My Bad

Dr. Cox is still facing the threat of suspension, and coincidentally, J.D. is assigned to a special patient: Jordan Sullivan, an important board member. She is very demanding and J.D. ends up sleeping with her after he confronts her. Only he didn't know that she is Dr. Cox's ex-wife, and now the only one who can save J.D.'s mentor from being fired by the evil Dr. Kelso. Meanwhile, Elliot is assigned to take care of a shrink whose jaw has been wired shut, and for whom she ends up becoming a patient. Carla's mom makes a scandal after Turk spends the night at Carla's, and when she breaks her leg, Carla blames Turk for it.

— Freebase

Kenyon Cox

Kenyon Cox

Kenyon Cox was an American painter, illustrator, muralist, writer, and teacher. Cox was an influential and important early instructor at the Art Students League of New York. He was the designer of the League's logo, whose motto is Nulla Dies Sine Linea or No Day Without a Line.

— Freebase

Adaptive enzyme

Adaptive enzyme

An adaptive enzyme or inducible enzyme is an enzyme that is expressed only under conditions in which it is clear of adaptive value, as opposed to a constitutive enzyme which is produced all the time. The Inducible enzyme is used for the breaking-down of things in the cell. It is also a part of the Operon Model, which illustrates a way for genes to turn "on" and "off". The Inducer causes the gene to turn on. Then there's the repressor protein that turns genes off. The inducer can remove this repressor, turning genes back on. The operator is a section of DNA where the repressor binds to shut off certain genes; the promoter is the section of DNA where the RNA polymerase binds. Lastly, the regulatory gene is the gene for the repressor protein. An example of inducible enzyme is COX-2 which is synthesized in macrophages to produce Prostaglandin E2 while the constitutive enzyme COX-1 is always produced in variety of organisms in body.

— Freebase

Foodarama

Foodarama

Foodarama, also known as Cox's Foodarama, is a supermarket chain in Texas, with its headquarters in Foodarama Store #1 in Brays Oaks, Houston. In Greater Houston, as of 2004 Foodarama operates nine stores. Carrol Cox is the founder and president of Foodarama. As of 2011, 1,000 people work for Foodarama.

— Freebase

Absolutely Not

Absolutely Not

"Absolutely Not" is the title of a song by the Canadian R&B / dance music singer Deborah Cox. The song first appeared on the soundtrack to the 2001 Eddie Murphy film Dr. Dolittle 2. Hex Hector's "Chanel Mix" of the song is included on Cox's 2002 studio album The Morning After. Released as a single in mid-2001, "Absolutely Not" was most successful on the Billboard Hot Dance Club Play chart, where remixes by DJ Hex Hector spent two weeks at #1 in September of that year. It remained on the survey for 12 weeks. The song was nominated for a Juno Award in the category Best Dance Recording in 2002. The song has been featured on various compilation albums, including the second season soundtrack to the North American version of Queer As Folk TV series. The song was covered by Dutch singer Glennis Grace.

— Freebase

Box

Box

a tree or shrub, flourishing in different parts of the world. The common box (Buxus sempervirens) has two varieties, one of which, the dwarf box (B. suffruticosa), is much used for borders in gardens. The wood of the tree varieties, being very hard and smooth, is extensively used in the arts, as by turners, engravers, mathematical instrument makers, etc

— Webster Dictionary

Brass

Brass

a journal bearing, so called because frequently made of brass. A brass is often lined with a softer metal, when the latter is generally called a white metal lining. See Axle box, Journal Box, and Bearing

— Webster Dictionary

Case

Case

a box and its contents; the quantity contained in a box; as, a case of goods; a case of instruments

— Webster Dictionary

Cock

Cock

kok, n. the male of birds, particularly of the domestic fowl: the time of cock-crowing: a weathercock: a plucky chap, a term of familiarity, as 'Old cock:' a strutting chief or leader: anything set erect: a tap for liquor: part of the lock of a gun, held back by a spring, which, when released by the trigger, produces the discharge.—v.t. to set erect or upright: to set up, as the hat: to draw back the cock of a gun: to turn up to one side: to tilt up knowingly, inquiringly, or scornfully.—v.i. to strut: to swagger.—ns. Cockāde′, a knot of ribbons or something similar worn on the hat as a badge; Cockalō′rum, a bumptious little person: a boy's game; Cock′-broth, the broth made from a boiled cock; Cock′chafer, the May-bug, an insect of a pitchy-black colour, most destructive to vegetation; Cock′-crow, -ing, early morning, the time at which cocks crow.—adj. Cocked, set erect: turned up at one side.—ns. Cock′er, one who follows cock-fighting: a small dog of the spaniel kind employed by sportsmen in pheasant and woodcock shooting; Cock′erel, a young cock: a young man—also Cock′le, whence Cock′le-brained, foolish; Cock′-eye, a squinting eye: the loop by which a trace is attached to the whipple-tree.—adj. Cock′-eyed.—ns. Cock′-fight, -ing, a fight or contest between game-cocks: a fight; Cock′-horse, a child's rocking-horse.—adj. prancing, proud.—adv. properly a-cock-horse = on cock-horse, on horseback: exultingly.—ns. Cock′laird (Scot.), a yeoman; Cock′loft, the room in a house next the roof; Cock′-match, a cock-fight; Cock′pit, a pit or enclosed space where game-cocks fought: a room in a ship-of-war for the wounded during an action; Cock′roach, the common black beetle; Cocks′comb, the comb or crest on a cock's head: a fop: the name of various plants; Cock′shut (Shak.), twilight, probably referring to the time when poultry are shut up; Cock′-shy, a free throw at a thing, as for amusement.—adj. Cock′-sure, quite sure, often without cause.—n. Cock′swain (see Coxswain).—adjs. Cock′sy, Cox′y, bumptious.—n. Cock′tail, a racing horse that is not thoroughbred: one who apes the gentleman: (U.S.) a drink of spirits flavoured with various ingredients.—adjs. Cock′tailed, having the tail cocked or tilted up; Cock′y, impudent.—ns. Cock′y-leek′y, soup made of a fowl boiled with leeks; Cock′yolly, a nursery or pet name for a bird.—Cock-a-doodle-doo, the cry of the cock; Cock-a-hoop, a phrase expressing reckless exultation; Cock and pie, used as an exclamation (see Pie, 2); Cocked ha

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Box

Box

a chest or any receptacle for the deposit of money; as, a poor box; a contribution box

— Webster Dictionary

Box

Box

an axle box, journal box, journal bearing, or bushing

— Webster Dictionary

Box

Box

a present in a box; a present; esp. a Christmas box or gift

— Webster Dictionary

Gland

Gland

the movable part of a stuffing box by which the packing is compressed; -- sometimes called a follower. See Illust. of Stuffing box, under Stuffing

— Webster Dictionary

Hopper

Hopper

a chute, box, or receptacle, usually funnel-shaped with an opening at the lower part, for delivering or feeding any material, as to a machine; as, the wooden box with its trough through which grain passes into a mill by joining or shaking, or a funnel through which fuel passes into a furnace, or coal, etc., into a car

— Webster Dictionary

Journal

Journal

that portion of a rotating piece, as a shaft, axle, spindle, etc., which turns in a bearing or box. See Illust. of Axle box

— Webster Dictionary

Pomander

Pomander

a box to contain such perfume, formerly carried by ladies, as at the end of a chain; -- more properly pomander box

— Webster Dictionary

Tray

Tray

a shallow box, generally without a top, often used within a chest, trunk, box, etc., as a removable receptacle for small or light articles

— Webster Dictionary

Whereret

Whereret

to box (one) on the ear; to strike or box. (the ear); as, to wherret a child

— Webster Dictionary

Coxcomb

Coxcomb

koks′kōm, n. a strip of red cloth notched like a cock's comb, which professional fools used to wear: a fool: a fop.—adjs. Coxcom′bical, Coxcom′ical, foppish: vain.—n. Coxcombical′ity.—adv. Coxcom′bically.—n. Cox′combry, the manner of a coxcomb. [Cockscomb.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Princock

Princock

prin′kok, n. (Shak.) a conceited fellow: a coxcomb.—Also Prin′cox.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Ballot

Ballot

bal′ut, n. a little ball or ticket used in voting: a method of secret voting by putting a ball or ticket into an urn or box.—v.i. to vote by ballot: to select by secret voting (with for): draw lots for:—pr.p. bal′loting; pa.p. bal′loted.—ns. Bal′lotage, in France, the second ballot to decide which of two candidates has come nearest to the legal majority; Bal′lot-box, a box to receive balls or tickets when voting by ballot. [It. ballotta, dim. of balla, ball. See Ball.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Box

Box

boks, n. a blow on the head or ear with the hand.—v.t. to strike with the hand or fist.—v.i. to fight with the fists.—ns. Box′er; Box′ing, the act of fighting with the fists: a combat with the fists; Box′ing-glove, a padded glove worn in boxing.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Pounce

Pounce

powns, n. a fine powder for preparing a surface for writing on: coloured powder sprinkled over holes pricked in paper to form a pattern on paper underneath.—v.t. to sprinkle with pounce, as paper or a pattern.—ns. Pounce′-box, Poun′cet-box, a box with a perforated lid for sprinkling pounce. [Fr. ponce, pumice—L. pumex, pumicis, pumice-stone.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Over Packaging

Over Packaging

Over packaging describes products that are wrapped in more material than is needed or is wanted. For example, putting a really small thing which is wrapped in plastic into a box, then put that box into a bigger box, then put that into another bigger box; that’s over packaging.

— Editors Contribution

RNA, Small Nucleolar

RNA, Small Nucleolar

Small nuclear RNAs that are involved in the processing of pre-ribosomal RNA in the nucleolus. Box C/D containing snoRNAs (U14, U15, U16, U20, U21 and U24-U63) direct site-specific methylation of various ribose moieties. Box H/ACA containing snoRNAs (E2, E3, U19, U23, and U64-U72) direct the conversion of specific uridines to pseudouridine. Site-specific cleavages resulting in the mature ribosomal RNAs are directed by snoRNAs U3, U8, U14, U22 and the snoRNA components of RNase MRP and RNase P.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Promoter Regions, Genetic

Promoter Regions, Genetic

DNA sequences which are recognized (directly or indirectly) and bound by a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase during the initiation of transcription. Highly conserved sequences within the promoter include the Pribnow box in bacteria and the TATA BOX in eukaryotes.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

CLOCK Proteins

CLOCK Proteins

Basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) domain-containing proteins that contain intrinsic HISTONE ACETYLTRANSFERASE activity and play important roles in CIRCADIAN RHYTHM regulation. Clock proteins combine with Arntl proteins to form heterodimeric transcription factors that are specific for E-BOX ELEMENTS and stimulate the transcription of several E-box genes that are involved in cyclical regulation. This transcriptional activation also sets into motion a time-dependent feedback loop which in turn down-regulates the expression of clock proteins.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

HMGB3 Protein

HMGB3 Protein

An HMG-box domain (HMG-BOX DOMAINS) found highly expressed in embryonic tissue and in placenta.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

beta-Transducin Repeat-Containing Proteins

beta-Transducin Repeat-Containing Proteins

A family of F-box domain proteins that contain sequences that are homologous to the beta subunit of transducin (BETA-TRANSDUCIN). They play an important role in the protein degradation pathway by becoming components of SKP CULLIN F-BOX PROTEIN LIGASES, which selectively act on a subset of proteins including beta-catenin and IkappaBbeta.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

ARNTL Transcription Factors

ARNTL Transcription Factors

Basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) domain-containing proteins that play important roles in CIRCADIAN RHYTHM regulation. They combine with CLOCK PROTEINS to form heterodimeric transcription factors that are specific for E-BOX ELEMENTS and stimulate the transcription of several E-box genes that are involved in cyclical regulation.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Y-Box-Binding Protein 1

Y-Box-Binding Protein 1

Y-box-binding protein 1 was originally identified as a DNA-binding protein that interacts with Y-box PROMOTER REGIONS of MHC CLASS II GENES. It is a highly conserved transcription factor that regulates expression of a wide variety of GENES.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Pepper

Pepper

pep′ėr, n. a pungent aromatic condiment consisting of the dried berries of the pepper-plant, entire or powdered: any plant of genus Piper: a plant of genus Capsicum, or one of its pods, whence Cayenne pepper.—v.t. to sprinkle with pepper: to hit or pelt with shot, &c.: to pelt thoroughly: to do for.—adj. Pepp′er-and-salt′, of a colour composed of a light ground dotted with fine spots of a dark colour, or of a dark ground with light spots.—ns. Pepp′er-box, a box with a perforated top for sprinkling pepper on food; Pepp′er-cake, a kind of spiced cake or gingerbread; Pepp′er-cast′er, the vessel, on a cruet-stand, from which pepper is sprinkled; Pepp′ercorn, the berry of the pepper plant: something of little value—Peppercorn rent, a nominal rent; Pepp′erer, one who sells pepper, a grocer; Pepp′er-gin′gerbread, hot-spiced gingerbread; Pepp′er-grass, any plant of genus Lepidium; Pepp′eriness; Pepp′ermint, a species of mint, aromatic and pungent like pepper: a liquor distilled from the plant: a lozenge flavoured with peppermint—Peppermint-drop, a confection so flavoured; Pepp′er-pot, a West Indian dish, of cassareep, together with flesh or dried fish and vegetables, esp. green okra and chillies: tripe shredded and stewed, with balls of dough and plenty of pepper; Pepp′er-tree, a shrub of the cashew family, native to South America, &c.—also Pepper shrub and Chili pepper; Pepp′erwort, the dittander.—adj. Pepp′ery, possessing the qualities of pepper: hot, choleric.—Æthiopian pepper, the produce of Xylopia Æthiopica; Benin pepper, of Cubeba Clusii; Guinea pepper, or Maleguetta pepper, of Amomum; Jamaica pepper, or Pimento, of species of Eugenia (Myrtaceæ); Long pepper, the fruit of Piper Longum; White pepper, the seed freed from the skin and fleshy part of the fruit by soaking in water and rubbing the dried fruit. [A.S. pipor—L. piper—Gr. peperi—Sans. pippala.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

zither

zither

A musical instrument consisting of a flat sounding box with numerous strings, placed on a horizontal surface, and played with a plectrum and fingertips; similar to a dulcimer. In the Norwegian harpeleik and Swedish cittra versions, the instrument is considered a chorded zither and usually has 7 (Norwegian) to 9 (Swedish) chords, some with as many as 11 strings each, which are mostly strummed and damped as chords, although sometimes plucked. The Norwegian harpeleik and Swedish cittra are still in production by a German manufacturer.

— Wiktionary

bit paired keyboard

bit paired keyboard

(alt.: bit-shift keyboard) A non-standard keyboard layout that seems to have originated with the Teletype ASR-33 and remained common for several years on early computer equipment. The ASR-33 was a mechanical device (see EOU), so the only way to generate the character codes from keystrokes was by some physical linkage. The design of the ASR-33 assigned each character key a basic pattern that could be modified by flipping bits if the SHIFT or the CTRL key was pressed. In order to avoid making the thing even more of a kluge than it already was, the design had to group characters that shared the same basic bit pattern on one key.Looking at the ASCII chart, we find: high low bits bits 0000 0001 0010 0011 0100 0101 0110 0111 1000 1001 010 ! " # $ % & ' ( ) 011 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 This is why the characters !"#$%&'() appear where they do on a Teletype (thankfully, they didn't use shift-0 for space). The Teletype Model 33 was actually designed before ASCII existed, and was originally intended to use a code that contained these two rows: low bits high 0000 0010 0100 0110 1000 1010 1100 1110 bits 0001 0011 0101 0111 1001 1011 1101 1111 10 ) ! bel # $ % wru & * ( " : ? _ , . 11 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ' ; / - esc del The result would have been something closer to a normal keyboard. But as it happened, Teletype had to use a lot of persuasion just to keep ASCII, and the Model 33 keyboard, from looking like this instead: ! " ? $ ' & - ( ) ; : * / , . 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 + ~ < > × | Teletype's was not the weirdest variant of the QWERTY layout widely seen, by the way; that prize should probably go to one of several (differing) arrangements on IBM's even clunkier 026 and 029 card punches.When electronic terminals became popular, in the early 1970s, there was no agreement in the industry over how the keyboards should be laid out. Some vendors opted to emulate the Teletype keyboard, while others used the flexibility of electronic circuitry to make their product look like an office typewriter. Either choice was supported by the ANSI computer keyboard standard, X4.14-1971, which referred to the alternatives as “logical bit pairing” and “typewriter pairing”. These alternatives became known as bit-paired and typewriter-paired keyboards. To a hacker, the bit-paired keyboard seemed far more logical — and because most hackers in those days had never learned to touch-type, there was little pressure from the pioneering users to adapt keyboards to the typewriter standard.The doom of the bit-paired keyboard was the large-scale introduction of the computer terminal into the normal office environment, where out-and-out technophobes were expected to use the equipment. The typewriter-paired standard became universal, X4.14 was superseded by X4.23-1982, bit-paired hardware was quickly junked or relegated to dusty corners, and both terms passed into disuse.However, in countries without a long history of touch typing, the argument against the bit-paired keyboard layout was weak or nonexisten

— The New Hacker's Dictionary

Obfuscated C Contest

Obfuscated C Contest

(in full, the ‘International Obfuscated C Code Contest’, or IOCCC) An annual contest run since 1984 over Usenet by Landon Curt Noll and friends. The overall winner is whoever produces the most unreadable, creative, and bizarre (but working) C program; various other prizes are awarded at the judges' whim. C's terse syntax and macro-preprocessor facilities give contestants a lot of maneuvering room. The winning programs often manage to be simultaneously (a) funny, (b) breathtaking works of art, and (c) horrible examples of how not to code in C.This relatively short and sweet entry might help convey the flavor of obfuscated C: /* * HELLO WORLD program * by Jack Applin and Robert Heckendorn, 1985 * (Note: depends on being able to modify elements of argv[], * which is not guaranteed by ANSI and often not possible.) */ main(v,c)char**c;{for(v[c++]="Hello, world! )"; (!!c)[*c]&&(v--||--c&&execlp(*c,*c,c[!!c]+!!c,!c)); **c=!c)write(!!*c,*c,!!**c);} Here's another good one: /* * Program to compute an approximation of pi * by Brian Westley, 1988 * (requires pcc macro concatenation; try gcc -traditional-cpp) */ #define _ -F<00||--F-OO--; int F=00,OO=00; main(){F_OO();printf("%1.3f ",4.*-F/OO/OO);}F_OO() { _-_-_-_ _-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_ _-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_ _-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_ _-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_ _-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_ _-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_ _-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_ _-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_ _-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_ _-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_ _-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_ _-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_ _-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_ _-_-_-_-_-_-_-_ _-_-_-_ } Note that this program works by computing its own area. For more digits, write a bigger program. See also hello world.The IOCCC has an official home page at http://www.ioccc.org/.

— The New Hacker's Dictionary

BNF

BNF

1. [techspeak] Acronym for Backus Normal Form (later retronymed to Backus-Naur Form because BNF was not in fact a normal form), a metasyntactic notation used to specify the syntax of programming languages, command sets, and the like. Widely used for language descriptions but seldom documented anywhere, so that it must usually be learned by osmosis from other hackers. Consider this BNF for a U.S. postal address:  <postal-address> ::= <name-part> <street-address> <zip-part>  <personal-part> ::= <name> | <initial> "."  <name-part> ::= <personal-part> <last-name> [<jr-part>] <EOL>                | <personal-part> <name-part>  <street-address> ::= [<apt>] <house-num> <street-name> <EOL>  <zip-part> ::= <town-name> "," <state-code> <ZIP-code> <EOL> This translates into English as: “A postal-address consists of a name-part, followed by a street-address part, followed by a zip-code part. A personal-part consists of either a first name or an initial followed by a dot. A name-part consists of either: a personal-part followed by a last name followed by an optional jr-part (Jr., Sr., or dynastic number) and end-of-line, or a personal part followed by a name part (this rule illustrates the use of recursion in BNFs, covering the case of people who use multiple first and middle names and/or initials). A street address consists of an optional apartment specifier, followed by a street number, followed by a street name. A zip-part consists of a town-name, followed by a comma, followed by a state code, followed by a ZIP-code followed by an end-of-line.” Note that many things (such as the format of a personal-part, apartment specifier, or ZIP-code) are left unspecified. These are presumed to be obvious from context or detailed somewhere nearby. See also parse. 2. Any of a number of variants and extensions of BNF proper, possibly containing some or all of the regexp wildcards such as * or +. In fact the example above isn't the pure form invented for the Algol-60 report; it uses [], which was introduced a few years later in IBM's PL/I definition but is now universally recognized. 3. In science-fiction fandom, a ‘Big-Name Fan’ (someone famous or notorious). Years ago a fan started handing out black-on-green BNF buttons at SF conventions; this confused the hacker contingent terribly.

— The New Hacker's Dictionary

Wheel

Wheel

hwēl, n. a circular frame turning on an axle: an old instrument of torture: a steering-wheel: (fig.) the course of events, from the wheel, one of the attributes of Fortune, the emblem of mutability: (coll.) a bicycle or tricycle: circular motion: principle of life or motion: (Shak.) a refrain: (pl.) chariot: (slang) a dollar.—v.t. to cause to whirl: to convey on wheels: to turn.—v.i. to turn round or on an axis: to roll forward: to change direction: to move in a circle: to change about: (coll.) to ride a bicycle or tricycle.—ns. Wheel′-an′imal, -animal′cule, a rotifer; Wheel′-barrow, a barrow supported on one wheel and two handles, and driven forward by one man; Wheel′-boat, a boat having wheels, for use on water or on inclined planes; Wheel′-carr′iage, any kind of carriage moved on wheels; Wheel′-chair, a chair moving on wheels.—adj. Wheel′-cut, cut, or ground and polished, on a wheel—of glass.—n. Wheel′-cut′ter, a machine for cutting the teeth on watch and clock wheels.—p.adj. Wheeled, having wheels.—ns. Wheel′er, one who wheels: the horse nearest the wheels of a carriage: a maker of wheels; Wheel′-horse, one of the horses next the wheels in a team; Wheel′-house, a box or small house erected over the steering-wheel in ships: a paddle-box; Wheel′ing, the act of moving or conveying on wheels: a turning or circular movement of troops; Wheel′-lock, a lock for firing a gun by means of a small steel wheel; Wheel′man, a steersman: a cyclist; Wheel′-plough, a plough the depth of whose furrow is regulated by a wheel; Wheel′-race, the part of a race in which the water-wheel is fixed; Wheel′-tax, a tax on carriages; Wheel′-win′dow, a circular window with radiating tracery; Wheel′-work, a combination of wheels and their connection in machinery; Wheel′wright, a wright who makes wheels and wheel-carriages.—adj. Wheel′y, like a wheel.—Wheel and axle, one of the mechanical powers, in its primitive form a cylindrical axle, on which a wheel, concentric with the axle, is firmly fastened, the power being applied to the wheel, and the weight attached to the axis; Wheel of life (see Zoetrope); Wheels within wheels, a complication of circumstances.—Break a butterfly (fly, &c.) upon the wheel, to inflict a punishment out of all proportion to the offence: to employ great exertions for insignificant ends. [A.S. hwéol; Ice. hjól.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Ice yachting

Ice yachting

Ice yachting is the sport of sailing and racing iceboats, also called ice yachts. It is practiced in Austria, Germany, Great Britain, Poland, Norway and Sweden, to some extent, and is very popular in the Netherlands and on the Gulf of Finland, but its highest development is in the United States and Canada. The Dutch ice yacht is a flat-bottomed boat resting crossways upon a planking about three feet wide and sixteen long, to which are affixed four steel runners, one each at bow, stern and each end of the planking. The rudder is a fifth runner fixed to a tiller. Heavy mainsails and jibs are generally used and the boat is built more for safety than for speed. The iceboat of the Gulf of Finland is a V-shaped frame with a heavy plank running from bow to stern, in which the mast is stepped. The stern or steering runner is worked by a tiller or wheel. The sail is a large lug and the boom and gaff are attached to the mast by travelers. The passengers sit upon planks or rope netting. According to some the Russian boats were Faster then the Dutch built ice-yachts. In 1790, ice yachting was in vogue on the Hudson River, its headquarters being at Poughkeepsie, New York. The type was a square box on three runners, the two forward, ones being nailed to the box and the third acting as a rudder operated by a tiller. The sail was a flatheaded sprit. This primitive style was in general use until 1853, when triangular frames with boxes for the crew aft and jib and mainsail rig were introduced. A heavy, hard-riding type soon developed, with short gaffs, low sails, large jibs and booms extending far over the stern. It was over canvassed and the mast was stepped directly over the runner plank, bringing the centre of sail-balance so far aft that the boats were apt to run away, and the over-canvassing frequently caused the windward runner to swing up into the air to a dangerous height. The largest and fastest example of this type, which prevailed until 1879, was Commodore J. A. Roosevelt's first Icicle, which measured 69 ft. over all and carried 1,070 sq ft. of canvas. In 1879 Mr. H. Relyea built the Robert Scott, which had a single backbone and guy wires, and it became the model for all Hudson River ice-yachts. Masts were now stepped farther forward, jibs were shortened, booms cut down, and the center of sail-balance was brought more inboard and higher up, causing the centers of effort and resistance to come more in harmony. The shallow steering-box became elliptical. In 1881 occurred the first race for the American Challenge Pennant, which represents the championship of the Hudson river, the clubs that competed included the Hudson River, North Shrewsbury, Orange Lake, Newburgh and Carthage Ice Yacht Clubs. The races are usually sailed five times round a triangle of which each leg measures one mile, at least two of the legs being to windward. Ice yachts are divided into four classes, carrying respectively 600 sq ft. of canvas or more, between. 450 and 600, between 300 and 450, and less than 300 sq ft. Ice-yachting is very popular on the Great Lakes, both in the United States and Canada, the Kingston, Ontario Club having a fleet of over 25 sail. Other important centers of the sport are the Lake Geneva, Wisconsin area, with an average of twenty five saling days a season for the last five years, Lakes Minnetonka and White Bear in Minnesota, Lakes Winnebago and Pepin in Wisconsin, Bar Harbor Lake in Maine, the St. Lawrence River, Quinte Bay and Lake Champlain.²

— Freebase

Tea caddy

Tea caddy

A tea caddy is a box, jar, canister, or other receptacle used to store tea. The word is believed to be derived from catty, the Chinese pound, equal to about a pound and a third avoirdupois. The earliest examples that came to Europe were of Chinese porcelain, and approximated in shape to the ginger-jar. They had lids or stoppers likewise of china, and were most frequently blue and white. Until about 1800 they were called tea canisters rather than caddies. Earlier tea caddies were made of either porcelain or faience. Later designs had more variety in materials and designs. Wood, pewter, tortoise-shell, brass, copper and even silver were employed, but in the end the material most frequently used was wood, and there still survive vast numbers of Georgian box-shaped caddies in mahogany, rosewood, satin-wood and other timbers. These were often mounted in brass and delicately inlaid, with knobs of ivory, ebony or silver. Many examples were made in Holland, principally of the earthenware of Delft. There were also many English factories producing high quality goods. As the use of the jar waned and the box increased, the provision of different receptacles for green and black tea was abandoned, and the wooden caddy, with a lid and a lock, was made with two and often three divisions, the centre portion being reserved for sugar. In the late 18th and early 19th century, caddies made from mahogany and rosewood were popular.

— Freebase

Matryoshka

Matryoshka

FRANK AND EMMA DELVE INTO THE APPARENT SUICIDE OF A FORMER FBI AGENT WHO HAD INVESTIGATED THE MYSTERIOUS DEATH OF A NUCLEAR PHYSICIST IN1945. Inside a retirement home, Michael Lanyard opens a box filled with memorabilia. Amongst the many items contained within is a small wooden matryoshka doll. In flashback, in the year 1945, a much younger Agent Lanyard meets with Clyde Tolson, then Assistant Director of the FBI. Tolson shows Lanyard a slide of a mangled body. He explains that the victim was Dr. Carew, a physicist who had been hard at work on an experiment critical to the Allied victory in the war. Back in the present day, the elderly Lanyard places a gun to his head and pulls the trigger. Baldwin and Emma are assigned to investigate Lanyard's death. Baldwin dismisses the incident as a simple suicide. But Emma's interest is piqued when she discovers Peter Watts' name listed in the retirement home's guest register. She and Frank access folders containing Lanyard's case files and begin to read the contents within. In flashback, Lanyard drives towards Los Alamos. He is intercepted by General Groves, who attempts to set ground rules for the murder investigation. But Lanyard counters that his authorization goes all the way to President Truman himself. He requests to be driven to Dr. Alexander's residence. When he enters Alexander's home, he finds it vacant. Lanyard searches through some drawers and comes upon a receipt for $10,000 to bail out a man named Warren Kroll. Dr. Alexander interrupts Lanyard's progress. Lanyard demands that he identify Warren Kroll, but the conversation is interrupted when Alexander's young daughter, Natalie, runs into the room. Alexander scoops Natalie (who clutches a matryoshka doll) into his arms, ending the discussion. Later, Lanyard reports back to Tolson by phone. He explains that Warren Kroll was jailed for assault two days before the murder, and was later bailed out of jail by Alexander's nanny, Lily Unser. It turns out that the bail money was withdrawn from Alexander's account. Later, as Lanyard observes the Alexander house from the shadows, he hears a fight break out. Lanyard races inside, where he is attacked by a wild-eyed Kroll. Several M.P.s storm into the house and pin Lanyard to the floor. Back in the present day, Emma and Frank finish reading the file. On the reverse side of the last piece of paper in the file is an ouroboros, doodled in pencil. Later, Emma approaches Watts at Lanyard's funeral. Watts denies that Lanyard was ever a Group member. He tells Emma that Alexander defected to Russia with plutonium. With the case seemingly at a dead end, Emma researches Lily Unser's name on her computer. She discovers that Unser is a patient at a mental hospital. Unser tells Emma and Frank that Kroll is dead. After performing more research, Frank concludes that Kroll is buried at Los Alamos and labeled as a "John Doe." Frank has Kroll's coffin unearthed. He discovers a lead box, covered with cautionary radioactive symbols, inside. The "hot" box is moved to a nuclear containment room. Inside is a well-preserved male body. Frank recognizes the corpse's face as Dr. Alexander's. When Lily learns that Alexander's body has been exhumed, she become more cooperative. She tells Emma that Lanyard was arrested by the M.P.s and ordered to stay off the base. Instead, he returned to Alexander's house and, fearing for Natalie's safety, attempted to take the little girl away. However, Alexander detected his presence. Lanyard handed the little girl to Lily and instructed her to leave at once. Suddenly, Alexander literally transformed into Kroll. Moments later, Lanyard discovered a hidden lab inside Alexander's house. Alexander told Lanyard to bring the matryoshka doll to his daughter, as it contains pages explaining everything. Alexander then reached inside a lead vessel and retrieved some plutonium. He morphed into Kroll and attempted to walk out of the lab. But Lanyard knocked him to the ground. Before...

— Freebase

En plein air

En plein air

En plein air is a French expression which means "in the open air," and is particularly used to describe the act of painting outdoors, which is also called peinture sur le motif in French. Artists have long painted outdoors, but in the mid-19th century working in natural light became particularly important to the Barbizon school and Impressionism. The popularity of painting en plein air increased in the 1870s with the introduction of paints in tubes. Previously, each painter made their own paints by grinding and mixing dry pigment powders with linseed oil. The Newlyn School in England is considered another major proponent of the technique in the latter 19th century. It was during this period that the "Box Easel", typically known as the French Box Easel or field easel, was invented. It is uncertain who developed it first, but these highly portable easels, with telescopic legs and built-in paint box and palette, made treks into the forest and up the hillsides less onerous. Still made today, they remain a popular choice even for home use since they fold up to the size of a brief case and thus are easy to store. French Impressionist painters such as Claude Monet, Camille Pissarro, and Pierre-Auguste Renoir advocated en plein air painting, and much of their work was done outdoors, in the diffuse light provided by a large white umbrella. In the second half of the nineteenth century and beginning of the twentieth century in Russia, painters such as Vasily Polenov, Isaac Levitan, Valentin Serov, Konstantin Korovin and I. E. Grabar were known for painting en plein air. American Impressionists, too, such as those of the Old Lyme school, were avid painters en plein air. American Impressionist painters noted for this style during this era included, Guy Rose, Robert William Wood, Mary Denil Morgan, John Gamble, and Arthur Hill Gilbert. The Canadian Group of Seven and Tom Thomson are examples of en plein air advocates.

— Freebase

Pack

Pack

pak, n. a bundle made to be carried on the back: a collection, stock, or store: a bundle of some particular kind or quantity, as of wool, 480 or 240 lb.: the quantity of fish packed: a complete set of cards: a number of animals herding together or kept together for hunting: a number of persons combined for bad purposes: any great number: a large extent of floating and broken ice: a wet sheet for folding round the body to allay inflammation, fever, &c.—v.t. to press together and fasten up: to place in order: to crowd: to assort, bring together, select, or manipulate persons, cards, &c. for some unjust object: to send away, as from one's presence or employment: to surround a joint, &c., with any substance to prevent leaking, &c.—v.i. to store things away anywhere for safe keeping, &c.: to settle into a firm mass: to admit of being put into compact shape: to depart in haste.—ns. Pack′age, the act of packing, also something packed: a bundle or bale: a charge made for packing; Pack′-an′imal, a beast of burden used to carry goods on its back; Pack′-cinch (-sinsh), a wide girth of canvas, &c., having a hook and ring attached for adjusting the load of a pack-animal; Pack′-cloth, a cloth in which goods are tied up: packsheet; Pack′er, one who packs: one who cures and packs provisions: any device to fill the space between the tubing and the sides of an oil-well, &c.; Pack′et, a small package: a ship or vessel employed in carrying packets of letters, passengers, &c.: a vessel plying regularly between one port and another (also Pack′et-boat, Pack′et-ship, &c.).—v.t. to bind in a packet or parcel: to send in a packet.—ns. Pack′et-day, the day of the departure or arrival of a mail-ship; Pack′et-note (see Note-paper); Pack′-horse, a horse used to carry goods in panniers: a drudge; Pack′-ice, a collection of large pieces of floating ice; Pack′ing, the act of putting into packs or of tying up for carriage: material for packing: anything used to fill an empty space, or to make a joint close, as the elastic ring round a moving rod or piston to make it a tight fit; Pack′ing-box, -case, a box in which goods are packed: a hollow place round the opening of a steam cylinder, filled with some soft substance which, being pressed hard against the piston-rod, makes it a tight fit; Pack′ing-need′le, or Sack-needle, a strong needle for sewing up packages; Pack′ing-pā′per, a strong and thick kind of wrapping-paper; Pack′ing-press, a press for squeezing goods into small compass for packing; Pack′ing-sheet, or Pack′sheet, coarse cloth for packing goods; Pack′-load, the load an animal can carry on its back; Pack′man, a peddler or a man who carries a pack; Pack′-mule, a mule used for carrying burdens; Pack′-sadd′le, a saddle for packs or burdens; Pack′-thread, a coarse thread used to sew up packages; Pack′-train, a train of loaded pack-animals; Pack&prime

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Tea

Tea

tē, n. the dried leaves of a shrub in China, Japan, Assam, and Ceylon: an infusion of the leaves in boiling water: any vegetable infusion.—ns. Tea′-bread, light spongy bread or buns to be eaten with tea; Tea′-cadd′y, a caddy or small box for holding tea; Tea′-cake, a light cake to be eaten with tea; Tea′-can′ister, an air-tight jar or box for holding tea; Tea′-chest, a chest or case in which tea is imported; Tea′-clip′per, a fast-sailing ship in the tea-trade; Tea′-cō′sy (see Cosy); Tea′-cup, a small cup used in drinking tea; Tea′-deal′er, one who buys and sells tea; Tea′-fight (slang), a tea-party; Tea′-gar′den, a public garden where tea and other refreshments are served; Tea′-gown, a loose gown for wearing at afternoon tea at home; Tea′-house, a Chinese or Japanese house for tea, &c.; Tea′-kett′le, a kettle in which to boil water for making tea; Tea′-lead, thin sheet-lead, used in lining tea-chests; Tea′-par′ty, a social gathering at which tea is served, also the persons present; Tea′-plant, the plant or shrub from which tea is obtained; Tea′-pot, a pot or vessel in which the beverage tea is made; Tea′-sau′cer, a saucer in which a tea-cup is set; Tea′-ser′vice, -set, the utensils necessary for a tea-table; Tea′-spoon, a small spoon used with the tea-cup, smaller still than the dessert-spoon; Tea′-stick, a stick cut from the Australian tea-tree; Tea′-tā′ble, a table at which tea is drunk; Tea′-tast′er, one who ascertains the quality of tea by tasting it.—n.pl. Tea′-things, the tea-pot, cups, &c.—ns. Tea′-tree, the common tea-plant or shrub; a name of various Australian myrtaceous and other plants; Tea′-urn, a vessel for boiling water or keeping it hot, used on the tea-table.—Black tea, that which in the process of manufacture is fermented between rolling and firing (heating with charcoal in a sieve), while Green tea is that which is fired immediately after rolling. Among black teas are bohea, congou, souchong, and pekoe; among green, hyson, imperial, and gunpowder. The finest black is Pekoe; the finest green, Gunpowder. [From South Chinese te (pron. ), the common form being ch'a or ts'a.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Mento

Mento

Mento is a style of Jamaican folk music that predates and has greatly influenced ska and reggae music. Mento typically features acoustic instruments, such as acoustic guitar, banjo, hand drums, and the rhumba box — a large mbira in the shape of a box that can be sat on while played. The rhumba box carries the bass part of the music. Mento is often confused with calypso, a musical form from Trinidad and Tobago. Although the two share many similarities, they are separate and distinct musical forms. During the mid-20th century, mento was conflated with calypso, and mento was frequently referred to as calypso, kalypso and mento calypso; mento singers frequently used calypso songs and techniques. As in Calypso, Mento uses topical lyrics with a humorous slant, commenting on poverty and other social issues. Sexual innuendos are also common.

— Freebase

Pillar box

Pillar box

A pillar box is a free-standing post box. They are found in the United Kingdom and in most former nations of the British Empire, members of the Commonwealth of Nations and British overseas territories, such as the Republic of Ireland, Australia, India and Gibraltar. In addition, territories administered by the United Kingdom government, such as the British Mandate for Palestine and territories with Agency postal services provided by the British Post Office such as Morocco, Kuwait, Bahrain and Dubai were also provided with pillar boxes of this nature. Mail is deposited in pillar boxes to be collected by the Royal Mail, An Post or the appropriate postal operator and forwarded to the addressee. The boxes have been in use since 1852, just twelve years after the introduction of the first adhesive postage stamps and uniform penny post. Mail may also be deposited in lamp boxes or wall boxes that serve the same purpose as pillar boxes but are attached to a post or set into a wall. According to the Letter Box Study Group, there are more than 150 recognised designs and varieties of pillar boxes and wall boxes, not all of which have known surviving examples. Royal Mail estimates there are over 100,000 post boxes in the United Kingdom.

— Freebase

Box junction

Box junction

A box junction is a road traffic control measure designed to prevent congestion and gridlock at junctions. The surface of the junction is typically marked with a criss-cross grid of diagonal painted lines, and vehicles may not enter the area so marked unless their exit from the junction is clear. In both Ireland and the United Kingdom, drivers may enter the box and wait when they want to turn right and are stopped from doing so only by oncoming traffic or by other vehicles waiting to turn right. Similar yellow boxes may be painted on other areas of roadway which must be kept free of queuing traffic, such as exits from emergency vehicle depots or level crossings. Box junctions are most widely used in many European countries such as Cyprus, Ireland, Malta, Portugal, Serbia and the United Kingdom; in parts of the United States such as New York and Colorado; and other countries within or outside of the Commonwealth, including Canada, Hong Kong, Singapore, Malaysia, South Africa, Taiwan, and Brazil.

— Freebase

Bed

Bed

A bed is a piece of furniture used as a place to sleep or relax. It has a secondary use as a location to engage in sexual relations. Most modern beds consist of a mattress on a bed frame, with the mattress resting either on a solid base, often wooden slats, or a sprung base. In North America many beds include a box spring inner-sprung base, a large mattress-sized box containing wood and springs that provide additional support and suspension for the mattress. Most beds have a headboard for resting against, with others also having side rails and footboards. "Headboard only" beds often incorporate a "dust ruffle", "bed skirt", or "valance sheet" to hide the bed frame. For greater head support, most people use a pillow, placed on the top of a mattress. Also used is some form of covering blanket to insulate the sleeper, often bed sheets, a quilt, or a duvet, collectively referred to as bedding. Bedding is the removable non-furniture portion of a sleeping environment. A bed can be thought of as a body, and the bedding its clothing. Also, some people prefer to dispense with the box spring and bed frame, and replace it with a platform bed style. This is more common in Europe, Australia and Japan.

— Freebase

Harrison Ford

Harrison Ford

Harrison Ford is an American film actor and producer. He is famous for his performances as Han Solo in the original Star Wars trilogy and the title character of the Indiana Jones film series. Ford is also known for his roles as Rick Deckard in Blade Runner, John Book in Witness and Jack Ryan in Patriot Games and Clear and Present Danger. His career has spanned six decades and includes roles in several Hollywood blockbusters, including Presumed Innocent, The Fugitive, Air Force One, and What Lies Beneath. At one point, four of the top six box-office hits of all time included one of his roles. Five of his films have been inducted into the National Film Registry. In 1997, Ford was ranked No. 1 in Empire's "The Top 100 Movie Stars of All Time" list. As of July 2008, the United States domestic box office grosses of Ford's films total over US$3.5 billion, with worldwide grosses surpassing $6 billion, making Ford the third highest grossing U.S. domestic box-office star. Ford is the husband of actress Calista Flockhart.

— Freebase

Fetishes

Fetishes

Fetishes is a 1996 documentary by Nick Broomfield filmed at Pandora's Box, one of New York City's most luxurious SM/fetish parlours. The film contains interviews with professional dominatrices and their clients including the New York filmmaker Maria Beatty. The documentary opens with black and white footage from an Irving Klaw film depicting models, including Bettie Page, wearing fetish attire. Nick Broomfield and his film crew then arrive at Pandora's Box on Manhattan's Fifth Avenue and are given a tour of the facility by Mistress Raven, including the dungeon and the medical room. The rest of the documentary consists of the following eight chapters: ⁕Slaves ⁕Mistresses ⁕Rubber fetish ⁕Wrestling fetish ⁕Corporal punishment ⁕Masochism ⁕Infantilism ⁕Socio-political fetishes The film was produced in the United Kingdom and was originally made for HBO. It was released in the United States on DVD, and more recently as part of Nick Broomfield's 'Documenting Icons' box set. A full, uncut version with additional archive material is also available in the UK.

— Freebase

Vibraslap

Vibraslap

A vibraslap is a percussion instrument consisting of a piece of stiff wire connecting a wood ball to a hollow box of wood with metal “teeth” inside. The percussionist holds the metal wire in one hand and strikes the ball. The box acts as a resonating body for a metal mechanism placed inside with a number of loosely fastened pins or rivets that vibrate and rattle against the box. The instrument is a modern version of the jawbone. The Vibra-Slap was the first patent granted to the instrument manufacturing company Latin Percussion. The Vibra-Slap's inventor was Martin Cohen. Cohen was told by percussionist Bob Rosengarden, "If you want to make some money, make a jawbone that doesn’t break." About the inventing process Cohen remembers, "I had never seen a jawbone before, but I had heard one on a Cal Tjader album. I found out that it was an animal skull that you would strike, and the sound would come from the teeth rattling in the loose sockets. So I took that concept and invented the Vibraslap, which was my first patent." The Vibra-Slap comes in a variety of sizes and materials and is sometimes marketed under the name "Donkey Call" or "Rattleslap."

— Freebase

Cushioning

Cushioning

Package cushioning is used to help protect fragile items during shipment. It is common for a transport package to be dropped, kicked, and impacted: These events may produce potentially damaging shocks. Transportation vibration from conveyors, trucks, railroads, or aircraft can also damage some items. Shock and vibration are controlled by cushioning so that the chance of product damage is greatly reduced. Cushioning is usually inside a shipping container such as a corrugated box. It is designed to deform or crush to help keep levels of shock and vibration below levels that may damage the product inside the box. Depending on the specific situation, package cushioning can often be between two and three inches thick. Internal packaging materials are also used for functions other than cushioning. Some are used just to immobilize the products in the box and to block them in place. Others are just used to fill a void and do not have a cushioning function.

— Freebase

Kill box

Kill box

In weaponry, a Kill Box is a three-dimensional target area, defined to facilitate the integration of coordinated joint weapons fire. It is a joint forces coordination measure enabling air assets to engage surface targets without needing further coordination with commanders and without terminal attack control. The space is defined by an area reference system, but could follow terrain features, be located by grid coordinates or a radius from a center point. Such a joint coordination measure can help commanders focus the effort of air and indirect fire assets, and also restrict the trajectories and effects of surface-to-surface fires. There may be no-fire areas, restricted operations areas and airspace coordination areas included. No friendly ground forces should go into a kill box unless covered by a no-fire area. A type of Fire Support Coordinating Measure, a Kill Box is often defined by a grid reference system - based on lines of Latitude and Longitude - superimposed upon a map of an area of operation. Each square of the grid may be sub-divided into smaller boxes, each of which may carry its own level of permission - or restriction - on the use of air-to-surface or surface-to-surface weapons.

— Freebase

Teeing ground

Teeing ground

In golf, the teeing ground is the area at the beginning of a hole from which the player's first stroke is taken. When referring to the area, the terms "tee", "tee box", and "teeing ground" are often used interchangeably. The boundaries of the teeing ground are defined by a pair of tee markers. The front, left and right sides of the tee are denoted by the outer edges of the tee markers, assuming the perspective of a player standing in the teeing ground and facing the hole. The teeing ground is two club-lengths in depth. Most courses have at least three sets of tee markers, each a different color and denoting different yardages. Some commonly used tee marker colors are below, along with a general description of who plays from what color. The tee box that a person plays from is not set by rules; in casual play, anyone can use any tee box they wish to. Note that not all courses have all colors, and some may use a completely different color scheme for their tee markers. ⁕Black/Gold tee markers are usually reserved for touring professionals in official tournaments. Most municipal courses aren't equipped with this set of tees as very few public courses will hold professional events. Only the best players in the world play from these tees.

— Freebase

Surrounded

Surrounded

Surrounded is a box set released on June 27, 2006, featuring seven of Björk's albums in DualDisc format. The seven-disc box set contains the original albums on the CD sides, and the DVD sides contain each album remastered in Dolby Digital and DTS 96/24 5.1 surround sound. The corresponding music videos are also featured on the discs and are in PCM 2.0, Dolby Digital 5.1 and DTS 5.1. The original stereo mixes are used for the CD sides and are not remastered. The box set was originally intended to be released in the higher resolution DVD-A format, as evidenced by the disc scans on Björk's official website.

— Freebase

Brigham City

Brigham City

Brigham City is a city in Box Elder County, Utah, United States. The population was 17,899 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Box Elder County. It lies on the western slope of the Wellsville Mountains, a branch of the Wasatch Range at the western terminus of Box Elder Canyon. Brigham City saw most of its growth during the 1950s and 1960s, but has seen a struggling economy and stagnating growth since then. It is near the headquarters of ATK Thiokol, the company that created the solid rocket boosters for the Space Shuttle. Brigham City is known for its peaches and holds an annual celebration called Peach Days on the weekend after Labor Day. Much of Main Street is closed off to cars and the festival is celebrated by a parade, a car show, a carnival, and other activities. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints dedicated its fourteenth temple in Utah in Brigham City on 23 September 2012. The city is the headquarters of the Northwestern Band of the Shoshone Nation, a federally recognized tribe of Shoshone people.

— Freebase

In the Box

In the Box

In the Box was a 30 minute preschoolers' television program which aired in Australia on Network Ten at 8:30 am to 9:00 am, from Monday to Friday. It first aired on 21 December 1998. It was latterly hosted by Brett Annable, Tracey Fleming and Bop, their resident puppet. Previous hosts included Craig McMahon and Dominique McMahon. The show featured varied content. However, there were certain events that would take place during each episode. These included a 'delivery', in which the hosts received a box of items to do an activity with, a visit from two different children each day, and the good-bye song. Some episodes had a particular theme such as baking or time travel. During each episode, Brett, Tracey and Bop sang a variety of songs which appealed to the young target audience. These included Simon Says, Follow the Leader and Washy Washy. Before the show was aired, it replaced the show The Music Shop. In the Box was replaced on 21 December 2006 by Puzzle Play.

— Freebase

Mite box

Mite box

The term mite box refers to a box that is used to save coins for charitable purposes. Contemporary mite boxes are usually made of cardboard and given out to church congregations during the Lenten season. The mite boxes are collected by the church and donations are given to the poor. Mite boxes are popular with children because they can fill them with small change and it teaches them the principle of giving to the poor. The Mite box giving promotes the spirit of contributing based on the intent to help others and not on the monetary amount.

— Freebase

Big Stick

Big Stick

Big Stick are an alternative/independent band that gained much airplay with their debut release, the Drag Racing EP in 1986. It was instantly recognizable for Yanna Trance's voice repeated spoken line "In the summer I wear my tube top, and Eddie takes me to the dragstrip" throughout the track. It was one of the 142 singles in BBC DJ John Peel's Record Box that he'd picked to rescue in case of a fire. Numerous other Big Stick tracks have received substantial airplay and attention over the years. In 1990, Blast First records released a box set of 10 7" singles by various artists on their roster, including Sonic Youth, Dinosaur Jr., Big Black, the Butthole Surfers and Sun Ra. The box set was named after the Big Stick track it contained, Devil's Jukebox. While the band stayed together and more recently have performed with My Life With the Thrill Kill Kult, it is still for Drag Racing that they are best known. They have also collaborated on a film soundtrack, for Besotted.

— Freebase

Tarikat

Tarikat

Tarikat is the reissue on double album CD, digitalized and mastered in Belgium, of the double cassette box Diez años de esplendor, recorded and released to commemorate de tenth anniversary of the band. Vinyl-on-demand label releases the 3LP box 1980-1989 / First decade, including a third LP with bonus tracks, studio and live, and a single record. There also exists a red 'friends edition' box set with golden imprints.

— Freebase

Ludlow wall box

Ludlow wall box

In the UK, a Ludlow wall box is a post box where mail is deposited to be collected by the Royal Mail and forwarded to the addressee. They are built into stone pillars or the walls of buildings and are never found free-standing. This is because they are made largely from wood. They were nearly all made by the now-defunct company of James Ludlow & Son of Birmingham, whose name they take. Similar designs exist as historical artefacts in certain Commonwealth countries. Ludlow style boxes have been in use since 1885 and were in continuous manufacture until 1965. According to the Letter Box Study Group, there are more than 450 locations in the UK and Republic of Ireland where Ludlow post boxes are in use, stored or preserved. As Royal Mail estimates that there are over 100,000 post boxes in the UK, the Ludlow style boxes represent a very small group of nonetheless important designs.

— Freebase

Dreamscapes

Dreamscapes

Dreamscapes is a limited edition eight-CD set of rare Alphaville recordings, released in 1999. It features 124 tracks with a total playing time of around 9.5 hours. 43 of the songs had never been available before, and all of the remainder had been remixed. The four double CDs were packaged in a large box, and accompanied by a large 64-page booklet, containing lyrics, rare photographs and original short fiction. Inside the box were 4 double-CDs, the cover of each was 1/4 of the overall box art. A promotional copy called "Visions of Dreamscapes" was released to accompany the album.

— Freebase

Hinges

Hinges

Hinges is the ninth and final volume in the Fuzzy Warbles series released in September 2006. The album is only available as a Bonus CD in the 9-CD box set The Official Andy Partridge Fuzzy Warbles Collector's Album. The Fuzzy Warbles Series brings together demos, rarities and side projects from XTC founding member Andy Partridge; the box set collects all 8 volumes, plus the Hinges bonus disc. The title "Hinges" is a play on the stamp-collecting theme of the cover design of all 8 previous Fuzzy Warbles volumes, and the packaging of the box set to resemble a stamp-collector's album. Normally, stamp collectors attach their stamps the pages of an album with special sticky fasteners called "hinges".

— Freebase

Hot box

Hot box

Hot box is a non-contact team sport which is similar to ultimate, but played on a smaller field and with fewer players. Like ultimate, the object of the game is to score points by passing the disc into the end zone; however, in Hot Box there is generally only one end zone and it is of much smaller size than an Ultimate end zone. In this way, hot box is a "half-court" variant of ultimate. Because of these reduced requirements, it is often played when not enough players are available to play ultimate.

— Freebase

Coffin

Coffin

A coffin is a funerary box used in the display and containment of dead people, either for burial or cremation. Contemporary North American English makes a distinction between coffin and casket. A coffin is generally understood to denote a funerary box having six sides, while a casket generally denotes a four-sided box.

— Freebase

Box score

Box score

A box score is a structured summary of the results from a sport competition. The box score lists the game score as well as individual and team achievements in the game. Among the sports in which box scores are common are baseball, basketball, cricket, football and hockey.

— Freebase

Cooler

Cooler

A cooler, cool box, portable ice chest, ice box, chilly bin, or 'esky' most commonly is an insulated box used to keep food or drink cool. Ice cubes are most commonly placed in it to help the things inside stay cool. Ice packs are sometimes used, as they either contain the melting water inside, or have a gel sealed inside that stays cold longer than plain ice. The portable ice chest was invented by Richard C. Laramy of Joliet, Illinois. On February 24, 1951, Laramy filed an application with the United States Patent Office for a portable ice chest. The patent was issued December 22, 1953. The Coleman Company popularized the cooler with its initial offering of a galvanized cooler in 1954. Three years later, Coleman developed a process to make a plastic liner for coolers and jugs. Coolers are often taken on picnics, and on vacation or holiday. Where summers are hot, they may also be used just for getting cold groceries home from the store, such as keeping ice cream from melting in a hot automobile. Even without adding ice, this can be helpful, particularly if the trip home will be lengthy.

— Freebase

Combo box

Combo box

A combo box is a commonly used graphical user interface widget. Traditionally, it is a combination of a drop-down list or list box and a single-line editable textbox, allowing the user to either type a value directly into the control or choose from a list of existing options. Today, the original distinction between a combo box and a drop-down list has often disappeared. Combo boxes are typically applied to provide autocomplete or autotype functionality in a convenient way to the user.

— Freebase

Box office

Box office

A box office is a place where tickets are sold to the public for admission to an event. Patrons may perform the transaction at a countertop, through an unblocked hole through a wall or window, or at a wicket. By extension, the term is frequently used, especially in the context of the film industry, as a synonym for the amount of business a particular production, such as a film or theatre show, receives. The term can also mean factors which may influence this amount, as in the phrases "good box office" and "bad box office".

— Freebase

Haybox

Haybox

A hay box, straw box, fireless cooker, insulation cooker, or retained-heat cooker is a cooker that utilizes the heat of the food being cooked to complete the cooking process. Food items to be cooked are heated to boiling point, and then insulated. Over a period of time, the food items cook by the heat captured in the insulated container. Generally, it takes three times the normal cooking time to cook food in a hay box.

— Freebase

Subashi

Subashi

Subashi is a lost city located near Kucha in the Taklamakan Desert, on the ancient Silk Road, in the Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region of China. The city was partly excavated by the Japanese archaeologue Count Otani. A sarira, a Buddhist relic box of the 6th-7th century, discovered in Subashi shows Central Asian men in long tunics, reminiscent of other friezes which have been called Tocharian. The "Witch of Subashi" is another famous archaeological artifact, the mummy of a woman with a huge pointed hat, thought to be a representative of early Caucasian populations who lived in the region around the beginning of our era. ⁕ Central Asian men, detail of Sarira box. ⁕ Central Asian men, detail of Sarira box.

— Freebase

Terrapene ornata

Terrapene ornata

Terrapene ornata is a species of North American box turtle sometimes referred to as the western box turtle or ornate box turtle.

— Freebase

Box wine

Box wine

A box wine is a wine packaged as a bag-in-box. Such packages contain a plastic bladder protected by a box, usually made of corrugated fiberboard.

— Freebase

Relativity Media PL

Relativity Media PL

Relativity Media, LLC is a media and entertainment company that focuses on creating, financing and distributing first class, studio-quality entertainment content and intellectual property across multiple platforms, as well as making strategic partnerships with, and opportunistic investments in, media and entertainment-related companies and assets. Relativity owns and operates Rogue, a company that specializes in the production and distribution of lower-budget genre films, which has had particular success within the horror genre with films including The Unborn and The Strangers. Building upon its foundation of financing and producing films, Relativity has grown to include music, sports and television divisions and the next-generation social network iamrogue.com. Relativity also owns and operates RelativityREAL, Relativity™s television arm, which has become one of the leading suppliers of reality television with more than 20 shows in episodic or pilot. RelativityREAL is run by Tom Forman; his past successes include Extreme Makeover: Home Edition and Kid Nation.To date, Relativity has committed to, produced and/or financed more than 200 studio-quality motion pictures through 2014. Released films have accumulated more than $13.0 billion in worldwide box office revenue. Relativity™s recent films include Dear John, Brothers, The Wolfman, It™s Complicated, Zombieland, Couples Retreat, The Bounty Hunter and, most recently, Get Him to the Greek, Robin Hood and Grown Ups. Upcoming films for Relativity include The Fighter, Despicable Me, Charlie St. Cloud, Salt, Nanny McPhee 2, The Social Network as well as James Cameron’s Sanctum in 3D and Wes Craven™s My Soul To Take in 3D. Twenty-nine of the company™s films have opened at No. 1 at the box office. Relativity films have earned 43 Oscar® nominations, including nods for Nine, A Serious Man, Frost/Nixon, Atonement, American Gangster and 3:10 to Yuma. Forty-eight of Relativity™s films have each generated more than $100 million in worldwide box-office receipts.

— CrunchBase

My Ad Box

My Ad Box

My Ad Box attempts to create a process that would protect the privacy of classified advertisers while offering 24/7 contact for respondents to their ads. In June 2005, Stinnie and co-founder, Joe Hudson, launched My Ad Box - a dedicated, disposable phone number and email address that collects all responses related to an ad - without intruding on the rest of the advertiser’s life. Customers can respond any time, while advertisers can store messages and retrieve them from one handy location - their My Ad Box account. MAB products are currently being sold by newspapers across the country, from the mid-Atlantic to Colorado, and even Canada. MAB’s innovative concept has been covered nationally in television news reports and business publications. The system is easy to use, efficiently designed and an effective way to meet the demands of the modern classified customer while limiting the distractions, dead-ends and potential intrusions that can come from revealing direct personal information in an ad.

— CrunchBase

Bulu Box

Bulu Box

Bulu Box is the discovery ecommerce platform for health, nutrition and weight loss.Launched in March 2012, Bulu Box is the discovery ecommerce platform revolutionizing the vitamin and supplement buying experience by giving consumers a new way to sample, shop, share and learn about the best products available. Members receive samples and educational material each month and discover what products will help them feel their best. Over 5,000 brands like PowerBar and Hydroxycut partner with Bulu Box.

— CrunchBase

Popdust

Popdust

Cofounded by Craig Marks, former top editor of Spin, Blender, and Billboard magazines, Popdust is purpose-built to train a critical, often funny lens on the Popular/Top 40 music genre.Popdust was launched in February of 2011 with the direct participation of top-tier pop, hip-hop and country artists, who appear in original multimedia franchises. Popdust regularly creates and airs episodic original video content including Magic Box, Dear Dr. Popstar, and A Little Bit Obsessed. Popdust spoke to Lady Gaga about her #1 ranking on its Popdust 40, and went on-location at the red carpet of the VMA’s with comedian Tig Notaro.The company secured a $1 million Series A Round of financing led by Lerer Ventures on Feb. 3, 2011.Popdust is a portfolio company of Gramercy Labs, founded by Kevin Fortuna, Philip James, Craig Marks and David Wade in 2010.

— CrunchBase

Jack

Jack

jak, n. used as a familiar name or diminutive of John: a saucy or paltry fellow: a sailor: any instrument serving to supply the place of a boy or helper, as a bootjack for taking off boots, a contrivance for turning a spit (smoke-jack, roasting-jack), a screw for raising heavy weights, a figure which strikes the bell in clocks: the male of some animals: a young pike: a support to saw wood on: a miner's wedge: a flag displayed from the bowsprit of a ship: a leather pitcher or bottle: a coat of mail: (coll.) a knave in cards: the small white ball that forms the aim in bowls.—ns. Jack′-a-dan′dy, a dandy or fop, esp. if diminutive; Jack′-a-Lan′tern, the ignis fatuus or Will-o'-the-Wisp; Jack′-a-Lent′ (Shak.), a boy (for Jack of Lent, a kind of puppet formerly thrown at in sport at Lent); Jack′-block, a block of pulleys used for raising and lowering topgallant-masts.—n.pl. Jack′boots, large boots reaching above the knee, to protect the leg, formerly worn by cavalry, and covered with plates of iron.—ns. Jack′-cross′-tree, the cross-tree at the head of a topgallant-mast; Jack′-flag, a flag which is hoisted at the spritsail topmast-head; Jack′-fool, an absolute ass; Jack′-in-off′ice, a conceited and impertinent official; Jack′-in-the-box′, a box with a figure in it that springs up when the lid is lifted; Jack′-in-the-green′, a May-day chimney-sweep almost covered up with green shrubs; Jack′-knife, a large clasp-knife; Jack′-man, a soldier armed with a jack or coat of mail: a retainer; Jack′-nas′ty, a sneak, a sloven; Jack′-of-all′-trades, one who can turn his hand to anything; Jack′-plane, a large, strong plane used by joiners; Jack′-pudd′ing, a merry-andrew, buffoon; Jack′-rabb′it, one of several species of prairie-hares, with very long ears and legs; Jack′-raft′er, a rafter, shorter than the rest, used in hip-roofs; Jack′-sauce (Shak.), a saucy fellow; Jack′-screw, a screw for raising heavy weights; Jack′-slave (Shak.), a low servant, a vulgar fellow; Jack′-smith, a smith who makes jacks for the kitchen; Jack′-snipe, a small species of snipe; Jack′-staff, the staff on which the jack is hoisted.—n.pl. Jack′-stays, ropes or strips of wood or iron stretched along the yards of a ship to bind the sails to.—ns. Jack′-straw, a straw effigy, a low servile fellow; Jack′-tar, a sailor; Jack′-towel, a long endless towel passing over a roller.—Jack Frost, frost personified as a mischievous fellow; Jack Ketch, a public hangman—from one so named under James II.; Jack Sprat, a diminutive fellow.—Cheap Jack (see Cheap); Every man Jack, one and all; Yellow Jack (slang), yellow feve

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Cash

Cash

kash, n. coin or money: ready money.—v.t. to turn into or exchange for money: to pay money for.—ns. Cash′-account′, an account to which nothing is carried but cash: a form of account with a bank, by which a person is entitled to draw out sums as required by way of loan to a stipulated amount—also called Cash′-cred′it; Cash′-book, a book in which an account is kept of the receipts and disbursements of money; Cashier′, a cash-keeper: one who has charge of the receiving and paying of money; Cash′-pay′ment, payment in ready money; Cash′-rail′way, a mechanical device adopted in large shops and warehouses for the interchange of cash between the counters and the cash-desk.—Hard cash, ready money; Out of cash, or In cash, without or with money: out of, or in, pocket. [A doublet of Case, a box—O. Fr. casse, a box.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Dog

Dog

dog, n. a domestic quadruped of the same genus as the wolf, and akin to the fox, varying in size from small terriers to huge Newfoundlands, mastiffs, and St Bernards: a mean scoundrel: a term of contempt: a fellow (as a jolly dog): one of two constellations of stars: an andiron: an iron hook for holding logs of wood: a dogfish: a cock, as of a gun.—adj. male (opposed to bitch), as in dog-fox, dog-ape.—v.t. to follow as a dog: to follow and watch constantly: to worry with importunity:—pr.p. dog′ging; pa.p. dogged.—ns. Dog′-bane, a plant with an intensely bitter root, valued for its medicinal properties, said to be poisonous to dogs; Dog′-bee, a drone; Dog′-belt, a broad leather belt round the waist for drawing dans or sledges in the low workings of coal-mines; Dog′-bis′cuit, biscuit made for dogs, sometimes containing scraps of meat; Dog′-bolt (obs.), a contemptible fellow; Dog′-box, the part of a railway wagon in which dogs are carried; Dog′-brī′er, the brier dogrose; Dog′cart, a two-wheeled carriage with seats back to back, so called from sporting-dogs being originally carried inside the box.—adj. Dog′-cheap, very cheap.—n. Dog′-coll′ar, a collar for dogs: a kind of stiff collar on a woman's dress: a close-fitting clerical collar.—adj. Dog′-faced.—ns. Dog′-fan′cier, one who has a fancy for, or who deals in dogs; Dog′fish, a popular name for various small species of shark, common on British and American coasts; Dog′-fox, a male fox; Dog′ger.—adj. Dog′gish, like a dog: churlish: brutal.—adv. Dog′gishly.—n. Dog′gishness.—p.adj. Dog′goned (vulg.), confounded.—n. Dog′-grass, a coarse perennial grass common in uncultivated grounds, akin to couch-grass, dog-wheat, &c.—adjs. Dog′-head′ed; Dog′-heart′ed.—ns. Dog′-hole, a hole fit only for dogs: a mean dwelling; Dog′-house, -kenn′el; Dog′-leech, one who treats the diseases of dogs; Dog-lett′er, the letter or sound r—also Canine letter; Dog′-louse; Dog′-pars′ley, fool's parsley; Dog′rose, a wild-rose, a brier; Dog's′-ear, the corner of the leaf of a book turned down like a dog's ear.—v.t. to turn down the corners of leaves.—p.adjs. Dog's′-eared, Dog′-eared.—ns. Dog's′-fenn′el, May-weed; Dog′ship, the quality or personality of a dog.—adj. Dog′-sick.—n. Dog&pri

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Puff

Puff

puf, v.i. to blow in puffs or whiffs: to swell or fill with air: to breathe with vehemence: to blow at, in contempt: to bustle about.—v.t. to drive with a puff: to swell with a wind: to praise in exaggerated terms.—n. a sudden, forcible breath: a sudden blast of wind: a gust or whiff: a fungus ball containing dust: anything light and porous, or swollen and light: a kind of light pastry: a part of a fabric gathered up so as to be left full in the middle: a light ball or pad for dusting powder on the skin, &c.: an exaggerated expression of praise.—ns. Puff′-add′er, a large, venomous African serpent; Puff′-ball, a dried fungus, ball-shaped and full of dust; Puff′-bird, a South American bird resembling the kingfisher in form, but living on insects; Puff′-box, a box for holding powder for the toilet, and a puff for applying it.—adj. Puffed, gathered up into rounded ridges, as a sleeve.—ns. Puff′er, one who puffs: one who raises the prices at an auction in order to excite the eagerness of the bidders to the advantage of the seller; Puff′ery, puffing or extravagant praise.—adv. Puff′ily.—ns. Puff′iness, state of being puffy or turgid: intumescence; Puff′ing, the act of praising extravagantly.—adv. Puff′ingly.—n. Puff′-paste, a short flaky paste for pastry.—adj. Puff′y, puffed out with air or any soft matter: tumid: bombastic: coming in puffs.—Puff up (B.), to inflate. [Imit.; cf. Ger. puffen, &c.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Signal

Signal

sig′nal, n. a sign for giving notice, generally at a distance: token: the notice given: any initial impulse.—v.t. and v.i. to make signals to: to convey by signals:—pr.p. sig′nalling; pa.t. and pa.p. sig′nalled.adj. having a sign: remarkable: notable: eminent.—ns. Sig′nal-book, a book containing a system of signals; Sig′nal-box, -cab′in, &c., a small house in which railway-signals are worked: the alarm-box of a police or fire-alarm system; Sig′nal-code, a code or system of arbitrary signals, esp. at sea, by flags or lights; Sig′nal-fire, a fire used for a signal; Sig′nal-flag, a flag used in signalling, its colour, shape, markings, and combinations indicating various significations; Sig′nal-gun, a gun fired as a signal.—v.t. Sig′nalise, to make signal or eminent: to signal.—ns. Sig′nal-lamp, a lamp by which signals are made by glasses or slides of different colours, &c.; Sig′nalling, the means of transmitting intelligence to a greater or less distance by the agency of sight or hearing.—adv. Sig′nally.—ns. Sig′nalman, one who makes signals and who interprets those made; Sig′nalment, the act of communicating by signals: description by means of marks; Sig′nal-post, a pole on which movable flags, arms, lights, are displayed as signals; Sig′nal-ser′vice, the department in the army occupied with signalling. [Fr.,—L. signalis, signum.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Spring

Spring

spring, v.i. to bound: to leap: to rush hastily: to move suddenly by elastic force: to start up suddenly: to break forth: to appear: to issue: to come into existence: (B.) to rise, as the sun.—v.t. to cause to spring up: to start: to produce quickly, cause to act suddenly: to leap over: to explode, as a mine: to open, as a leak: to crack, as a mast: to bend by force, strain: (archit.) to start from an abutment, &c.: to set together with bevel-joints:—pa.t. sprang, sprung; pa.p. sprung.—n. a leap: a flying back with elastic force: elastic power: an elastic body: any active power: that by which action is produced: cause or origin: a source: an outflow of water from the earth: (B.) the dawn: the time when plants begin to spring up and grow, the vernal season—March, April, May: a starting of a plank in a vessel: a crack in a mast.—ns. Spring′al, Spring′ald, an active springy young man, a youth; Spring′-back, an inner false joint on a bound book, springing upward from the true or outer back when the book is opened flat; Spring′-bal′ance, an instrument for determining the weight of a body by the elasticity of a spiral spring; Spring′-beam, a beam of considerable span, without central support, the tie-beam of a truss; in a steamer, a fore-and-aft beam for connecting the two paddle-beams: an elastic bar at the top of a tilt-hammer, jig-saw, &c.; Spring′-beau′ty, the Claytonia Virginica; Spring′-bed, a mattress formed of spiral springs set in a wooden frame; Spring′-bee′tle, an elater; Spring′-board, a board fastened on elastic supports, used to spring from in performing feats of agility; Spring′bok, a beautiful South African antelope, larger than a roebuck [Dut.]; Spring′-box, a box or barrel in which a spring is coiled: the frame of a sofa, &c., in which the springs are set; Spring′-carr′iage, a wheel-carriage mounted on springs; Spring′-cart, a light cart mounted upon springs; Spring′er, a kind of dog of the spaniel class, useful for springing game in copses: one who springs: the bottom stone of an arch; Spring′-gun, a gun having wires connected with its trigger, and so fixed and planted as to be discharged when trespassers stumble against the wire; Spring′-halt, a jerking lameness in which a horse suddenly twitches up his leg or legs; Spring′-hamm′er, a machine-hammer in which the blow is delivered or augmented by the force of a spring; Spring′-head, a fountain-head, source: a head or end-piece for a carriage-spring.—adj. Spring′-head′ed (Spens.), having heads springing afresh.—ns. Spring′-heeled Jack, one supposed capable of leaping a great height or distance in carrying out mischievous or frolicsome tricks; Spring′-hook, an angler's snap-hook or spear-hook: a latch or door-hook with a spring-catch for keeping it fast in the staple: in a locomotive, a hook fixing the driving-wheel spring to the frame; Spring′-house, a house for keeping meat in, or a dairy, built for coolness over a spring or brook; Spring′iness;

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Work

Work

wurk, n. effort directed to an end: employment: the result of work: that on which one works: anything made or done: embroidery: deed: effect: a literary composition: a book: management: an establishment for any manufacture, a factory (gener. in pl.): (physics) the product of a force by the component displacement of its point and application in the direction of the force: (pl.), (fort.) walls, trenches, &c.: (theol.) acts performed in obedience to the Divine law: a manufactory, workshop, place of work (esp. in pl.): mechanism—e.g. of a watch.—v.i. to make efforts to attain anything: to perform: to be in action: to be occupied in business or labour: to produce effects, to make progress with difficulty, to strain or labour: to ferment: to be agitated, to seethe: to embroider.—v.t. to make by labour: to bring into any state by action: to effect: to carry on operations in: to put in motion: to purge: to influence: to manage: to solve: to achieve: to cause to ferment: to provoke, agitate: to keep employed: to embroider:—pa.t. and pa.p. worked or wrought (rawt).—ns. Workabil′ity, Work′ableness.—adjs. Work′able, that may be worked; Work′aday, work-day, toiling, plodding.—ns. Work′-bag, -bas′ket, a bag, basket, for holding materials for work, esp. needlework; Work′-box, a lady's box for holding materials for work; Work′-day, a day for work: a week-day.—adj. pertaining to a work-day.—ns. Work′er, a toiler, performer: among insects, the neuter or undeveloped female; Work′-fell′ow, one who is engaged in the same work with another.—ns.pl. Work′folk, Work′folks, persons engaged in manual labour.—adj. Work′ful, industrious.—ns. Work′girl, a girl or young woman employed in some manual labour; Work′house, a house where any work or manufacture is carried on: a house of shelter for the poor, who are made to work; Work′ing, action, operation: fermentation: (pl.) the parts of a mine, &c., where actual operations are in hand.—adj. active: labouring: connected with labour.—ns. Work′ing-beam, the oscillating lever of a steam-engine connecting the piston-rod and the crank-shaft, a walking-beam; Work′ing-class, manual labourers (often in pl.); Wor′king-day, a day on which work is done, as distinguished from the Sabbath and holidays: the period of actual work each day.—adj. laborious: plodding.—ns. Work′ing-draw′ing, a drawing of the details of a building by which the builders are guided in their work; Work′ing-house (Shak.), workshop; Work′ing-par′ty, a group of persons who do some work in common, or who meet periodically for such a purpose; Work′man, Work′ing-man, a man who works or labours, esp. manually: a skilful artificer.—adjs. Work′man-like, like a workman: becoming a skilful workman: well performed; Work&pr

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Aliquot

Aliquot

al′i-kwot, adj. such a part of a number as will divide it without a remainder. [L. aliquot, some, several—alius, other, quot, how many.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Quotidian

Quotidian

kwō-tid′i-an, adj. every day: occurring daily.—n. anything returning daily: (med.) a kind of ague that returns daily. [Fr.,—L. quotidianusquot, as many as, dies, a day.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Quotient

Quotient

kwō′shent, n. (math.) the number which shows how often one number is contained in another.—n. Quōtī′ety, the proportionate frequency of an event. [Fr.,—L. quotiens, quoties, how often?—quot, how many?]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Fire

Fire

fīr, n. the heat and light caused by burning: flame: anything burning, as fuel in a grate, &c.: a conflagration: torture or death by burning: severe trial: anything inflaming or provoking: ardour of passion: vigour: brightness of fancy: enthusiasm: sexual passion.—v.t. to set on fire: to inflame: to irritate: to animate: to cause the explosion of: to discharge.—v.i. to take fire: to be or become irritated or inflamed: to discharge firearms.—n. Fire′-alarm′, an alarm of fire, an apparatus for giving such.—n.pl. Fire′arms, arms or weapons which are discharged by fire exploding gunpowder.—ns. Fire′-ar′row, a small iron dart or arrow furnished with a combustible for setting fire to ships; Fire′ball, a ball filled with combustibles to be thrown among enemies: a meteor; Fire′-balloon′, a balloon carrying a fire placed in the lower part for rarefying the air to make itself buoyant: a balloon sent up arranged to ignite at a certain height; Fire′-bas′ket, a portable grate for a bedroom; Fire′-blast, a blast or blight affecting plants, in which they appear as if scorched by the sun; Fire′-boat, a steamboat fitted up to extinguish fires in docks; Fire′box, the box or chamber (usually copper) of a steam-engine, in which the fire is placed; Fire′brand, a brand or piece of wood on fire: one who inflames the passions of others; Fire′brick, a brick so made as to resist the action of fire, used for lining furnaces, &c.; Fire′-brigade′, a brigade or company of men for extinguishing fires or conflagrations; Fire′-buck′et, a bucket for carrying water to extinguish a fire; Fire′clay, a kind of clay, capable of resisting fire, used in making firebricks; Fire′cock, a cock or spout to let out water for extinguishing fires; Fire′damp, a gas, carburetted hydrogen, in coal-mines, apt to take fire and explode when mixed with atmospheric air; Fire′-dog (same as Andiron); Fire′-drake, a fiery meteor, a kind of firework; Fire′-eat′er, a juggler who pretends to eat fire: one given to needless quarrelling, a professed duellist; Fire′-en′gine, an engine or forcing-pump used to extinguish fires with water; Fire′-escape′, a machine used to enable people to escape from fires.—adj. Fire′-eyed (Shak.), having fiery eyes.—ns. Fire′-flag (Coleridge), Fire′flaught (Swinburne), a flash of lightning; Fire′-fly, a name applied to many phosphorescent insects, all included with the Coleoptera or beetles, some giving forth a steady light, others flashing light intermittently (glow-worms, &c.); Fire′-guard, a framework of wire placed in front of a fireplace.—n.pl. Fire′-ī′rons, the irons—poker, tongs, and shovel—used for a fire.—ns. Fire′light′er

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Side

Side

sīd, n. the edge or border of anything: the surface of a solid: a part of a thing as seen by the eye: region, part: the part of an animal between the hip and shoulder: any party, interest, or opinion opposed to another: faction: line of descent: at billiards, a certain bias or kind of spinning motion given to a ball by striking it sidewise: (slang) a pretentious and supercilious manner, swagger.—adj. being on or toward the side: lateral: indirect.—v.i. to embrace the opinion or cause of one party against another.—v.t. (Spens.) to be on the same side with, to support: to cut into sides: to push aside, to set aside.—n.pl. Side′arms, arms or weapons worn on the side, as a sword or bayonet.—ns. Side′-beam, either of the working-beams of a marine engine, placed below the crank-shaft, on each side of the cylinder, instead of a central beam above the crank-shaft; Side′board, a piece of furniture on one side of a dining-room for holding dishes, &c.: (pl.) side-whiskers, stiff standing collars (slang).—n.pl. Side′-bones, enlargements situated above the quarters of a horse's feet, resulting from the conversion into bone of the elastic lateral cartilages.—ns. Side′box, a box or seat at the side of a theatre; Side′-chap′el, a chapel in an aisle or at the side of a church; Side′-comb, a small comb used to keep a lock of hair in place at the side of a woman's head; Side′-cous′in, a distant relative; Side′-cut, a cut from the side, an indirect attack; Side′-cut′ting, an excavation of earth along the side of a railway or canal to obtain material for an embankment.—adj. Sid′ed, having a side: flattened on one or more sides.—ns. Side′-dish, any supplementary dish at a dinner, &c., specially flavoured; Side′-drum, a small double-headed drum in military bands; Side′-glance, a glance to one side; Side′-is′sue, a subordinate issue aside from the main business; Side′light, light coming from the side, any incidental illustration: a window, as opposed to a sky-light, a window above or at the side of a door: one of the red or green lights carried on the side of a vessel under way at night; Side′-line, a line attached to the side of anything: any additional or extra line of goods sold by a commercial traveller: (pl.) the ropes binding the fore and hind feet on the same side of a horse.—adj. Side′ling, inclining to a side, sloping.—adv. sidewise, aslant.—n. Side′lock, a separate lock of hair worn at the side of the head.—adj. Side′long, oblique: not straight.—adv. in the direction of the side: obliquely.—n. the slope of a hill.—ns. Side′-note, a marginal note on a page, as opposed to a foot-note; Side′-part′ner (U.S.), one who shares a duty or employment with another alongside or alternately; Sid′er, a partisan: one living in any particular quarter of a city; Side′-rod, a coupling-rod of

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Spice

Spice

spīs, n. an aromatic and pungent vegetable substance used as a condiment and for seasoning food—pepper, cayenne pepper, pimento, nutmeg, mace, vanilla, ginger, cinnamon, cassia, &c.: a characteristic touch or taste, smack, flavour: anything that adds piquancy or interest: an aromatic odour.—v.t. to season with spice: to tincture, vary, or diversify.—ns. Spice′-box, an ornamental box for keeping spices: (coll.) a hot-tempered person; Spice′-bush, an aromatic American shrub of the laurel family; Spice′-cake, a cake flavoured with spice of some kind.—adjs. Spiced, impregnated with a spicy odour: over-scrupulous; Spice′ful, aromatic.—ns. Spī′cer, one who seasons with spice; Spī′cery, spices in general: a repository of spices: spiciness; Spice′-tree, an evergreen tree of the Pacific United States, yielding a fine hard wood—the Mountain-laurel, California-laurel, Olive- or Bay-tree, and Cajeput; Spice′-wood, the spice-bush. [O. Fr. espice (Fr. épice)—Late L. species, kinds of goods, spices—L. species, a particular kind, &c.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

u03B4-box

u03B4-box

A k-cell which is a Cartesian product of half-closed intervals which are closed at their infima and open at their suprema, and such that the infimum of each interval is the coordinate of a given point (called "the corner" of the u03B4-box), and the length (i.e., measure) of each interval is equal to (the given value) u03B4.

— Wiktionary

Band

Band

band, n. a strip of cloth, or the like, to bind round anything, as a hat-band, waist-band, &c.: a stripe crossing a surface distinguished by its colour or appearance: the neck-band or collar of a shirt, also the collar or ruff worn by both sexes in the 17th century (termed a falling-band later, when turned down over the shoulders): (pl.) the pair of linen strips hanging down in front from the collar, worn by some Protestant clergymen and by English barristers.—n. Band′age, a strip or swathe of cloth used by surgeons to keep a part of the body at rest, to apply pressure, or to retain dressings or apparatus in position—the two chief varieties, the roller and the triangular handkerchief bandage: a piece of cloth used to blindfold the eyes.—v.t. to bind with such.—n. Band′box, a light kind of box for holding bands, caps, millinery, &c.—p.adj. Band′ed, fastened as with a band: striped with bands: leagued, allied.—ns. Band′fish, a name given to various kinds of fish with long, thin, flat bodies; Band′saw, an endless saw, consisting of a toothed steel belt; Band′ster, one who binds the sheaves after the reapers. [M. E. bande—O. Fr. bande, of Teut. origin; cf. A.S. bindan; Ger. binde, a band, Eng. Bind.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Christmas

Christmas

kris′mas, n. an annual festival, originally a mass, in memory of the birth of Christ, held on the 25th of December.—ns. Christ′mas-box, a box containing Christmas presents: a Christmas gift; Christ′mas-card, a card, more or less ornamented, sent from friend to friend at this season; Christ′mas-eve, the evening before Christmas; Christ′mas-rose, or -flow′er, the Helleborus niger, flowering in winter; Christ′mas-tree, a tree, usually fir, set up in a room, and loaded with Christmas presents. [Christ and Mass.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Hat

Hat

hat, n. a covering for the head, generally with crown and brim: the dignity of a cardinal, so named from his red hat.—v.t. to provide with, or cover with, a hat.—ns. Hat′band, the ribbon round a hat, often a mourning-band; Hat′-box, a box in which a hat is carried; Hat′-peg, -rack, -rail, -stand, &c., a contrivance on which hats are hung.—adj. Hat′ted, covered with a hat.—ns. Hat′ter, one who makes or sells hats: a miner who works by himself; Hat′ting, giving a hat; Hat′-trick, any conjurer's trick with a hat: a House of Commons mode of securing a seat by placing one's hat on it: in cricket, the feat of a bowler who takes three wickets by three successive balls—deserving a new hat.—Chimney-pot, Cocked, and Crushed hat (see Chimney, Cock, Crush).—Hang up one's hat (see Hang); Mad as a hatter, completely insane: very angry; Pass round the hat, to beg for contributions, to take up a collection. [A.S. hæt, Dan. hat.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Letter

Letter

let′ėr, n. a conventional mark to express a sound: a written or printed message: literal meaning: a printing-type: (pl.) learning, literary culture.—v.t. to stamp letters upon.—ns. Lett′er-bal′ance, a balance for testing the weight of a letter for post; Lett′er-board (print.), board on which matter in type is placed for keeping or convenience in handling; Lett′er-book, a book in which letters or copies of letters are kept; Lett′er-box, a box in a post-office, at the door of a house, &c., for receiving letters; Lett′er-carr′ier, a postman; Lett′er-case, a portable writing-desk.—adj. Lett′ered, marked with letters: educated: versed in literature: belonging to learning (Lettered proof and Proof before letters; see Proof).—ns. Lett′erer; Lett′er-found′er, one who founds or casts letters or types; Lett′ering, the act of impressing letters: the letters impressed.—adj. Lett′erless, illiterate.—ns. Lett′er-miss′ive, an official letter on matters of common interest, sent to members of a church: a letter from the sovereign addressed to a dean and chapter, naming the person they are to elect bishop—also Royal letter; Lett′ern (same as Lectern); Lett′er-of-cred′it, a letter authorising credit or cash to a certain sum to be paid to the bearer; Lett′er-of-marque (märk), a commission given to a private ship by a government to make reprisals on the vessels of another state.—adj. Lett′er-per′fect, kept in the memory exactly (of an actor's part, &c.).—ns. Lett′erpress, letters impressed or matter printed from type, as distinguished from engraving: a copying-press; Lett′ers-pā′tent, a writing conferring a patent or authorising a person to enjoy some privilege, so called because written on open sheets of parchment; Lett′er-stamp, a post-office implement for defacing a postage-stamp: a stamp for imprinting dates, &c., on letters or papers; Lett′er-wood, the heart-wood of a tree found in British Guiana, dark brown, with darker spots somewhat resembling hieroglyphics; Lett′er-writ′er, one who writes letters, esp. for hire: a book containing forms for imitation in writing letters.—Letter of indication (see Circular); Letters of administration, a document issued by court appointing an administrator of an intestate estate; Letters requisitory, or rogatory, an instrument by which a court of one country asks that of another to take certain evidence on its behalf; Lettre de cachet (see Cachet). [Fr. lettre—L. littera.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

eastman

Eastman, George Eastman

United States inventor of a dry-plate process of developing photographic film and of flexible film (his firm introduced roll film) and of the box camera and of a process for color photography (1854-1932)

— Princeton's WordNet

george eastman

Eastman, George Eastman

United States inventor of a dry-plate process of developing photographic film and of flexible film (his firm introduced roll film) and of the box camera and of a process for color photography (1854-1932)

— Princeton's WordNet

Bathe

Bathe

th, v.t. to wash as in a bath: to wash or moisten with any liquid: to moisten, suffuse, encompass.—v.i. to take a bath.—n. the act of taking a bath.—ns. Bath′ing-box, a box for bathers to undress and dress in; Bath′ing-machine′, a small carriage in which a bather may be carried out into water conveniently deep for bathing. [A.S. bathian; Old High Ger. badôn, bathôn (Ger. baden).]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Bush

Bush

boosh, n. the metal box or lining of any cylinder in which an axle works.—v.t. to furnish with a bush.—n. Bush′-met′al, hard brass, gun-metal, a composition of copper and tin, used for journals, bearings, &c. [Dut. bus—L. buxus, the box-tree.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Couple

Couple

kup′l, n. that which joins two things together: two of a kind joined together, or connected: two: one pair at a dance: a pair: esp. of married or betrothed persons: (statics) a pair of equal forces acting on the same body in opposite and parallel directions.—v.t. to join together.—v.i. to pair sexually.—ns. Coup′lement, union: a couple; Coup′ler, one who or that which couples or unites; Coup′let, two lines of verse that rhyme with each other; Coup′ling, that which connects, an appliance for transmitting motion in machinery; Coup′ling-box, the box or ring of metal connecting the contiguous ends of two lengths of shafts; Coup′ling-pin, a pin or bolt used in coupling machinery.—adj. Well-coupled, of a horse, well formed at the part where the back joins the rump. [O. Fr. cople—L. copula.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Mould

Mould

mōld, n. a hollow form in which anything is cast: a pattern; the form received from a mould, a former or matrix for jellies, &c., also a dish shaped in such: character.—v.t. to form in a mould: to knead, as dough.—adj. Mould′able, that may be moulded.—ns. Mould′-box, a box in which molten steel is hydraulically compressed; Mould′er; Mould′-fac′ing, a fine powder or wash applied to the face of a mould to ensure a smooth casting; Mould′ing, the process of shaping, esp. any soft substance: anything formed by or in a mould: an ornamental edging on a picture-frame, &c., or (archit.) raised above or sunk below the surface of a wall, on cornices, jambs, lintels, &c.—the fillet or list, astragal or bead, ogee, cyma, &c.; Moulding-tā′ble, a table on which a potter moulds his ware; Mould′-loft, a large room in a shipbuilding yard in which the several parts of a ship's hull are laid off to full size from the construction drawings.—Moulding machine, a machine for making wood-mouldings; Moulding plane, a plane used in forming mouldings, a match-plane; Moulding sand, a mixture of sand and loam used by founders in making sand-moulds. [Fr. moule—L. modulus, a measure.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Paint

Paint

pānt, v.t. to cover over with colour: to represent in a coloured picture: to describe in words: to adorn.—v.i. to practise painting: to lay colours on the face, to blush: (slang) to tipple.—n. a colouring substance: anything fixed with caoutchouc to harden it.—adj. Paint′able, that may be painted.—ns. Paint′-box, a box in which different paints are kept in compartments; Paint′-bridge, a platform used by theatrical scene-painters in painting scenery; Paint′-brush, a brush for putting on paint.—adj. Paint′ed, covered with paint: ornamented with coloured figures: marked with bright colours.—ns. Paint′ed-grass, ribbon-grass; Paint′ed-lā′dy, the thistle-butterfly, orange-red spotted with white and black; Paint′er, one whose employment is to paint: one skilled in painting; Paint′er's-col′ic, lead colic; Paint′er-stain′er, one who paints coats of arms, &c.; Paint′iness; Paint′ing, the act or employment of laying on colours: the act of representing objects by colours: a picture: vivid description in words; Paint′ūre (Dryden), the art of painting: a picture.—adj. Paint′y, overloaded with paint, with the colours too glaringly used: smeared with paint.—Paint the town red (U.S.), to break out in a boisterous spree. [O. Fr., pa.p. of Fr. peindre, to paint—L. pingĕre, pictum, to paint.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Patch

Patch

pach, v.t. to mend by putting in a piece: to repair clumsily: to make up of pieces: to make hastily.—n. a piece sewed or put on to mend a defect: anything like a patch: a small piece of ground: a plot: (Shak.) a paltry fellow, a fool—properly a jester: (print.) an overlay to obtain a stronger impression: a small piece of black silk, &c., stuck by ladies on the face, to bring out the complexion by contrast—common in the 17th and 18th centuries.—adj. Patch′able.—ns. Patch′-box, a fancy box for holding the patches worn on the face, generally having a mirror inside the lid; Patch′er, one who patches; Patch′ery (Shak.), bungling work; Patch′work, work formed of patches or pieces sewed together: work patched up or clumsily executed.—adj. Patch′y, covered with patches: inharmonious, incongruous.—Not a patch on, not fit to be compared with. [Low Ger. patschen; prob. conn. with piece.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Poor

Poor

pōōr, adj. having little or nothing: without means: needy: spiritless: depressed: (B.) humble: contrite: wanting in appearance: lean: wanting in strength: weak: wanting in value: inferior: wanting in fertility: sterile: wanting in fitness, beauty, or dignity: trifling: paltry: dear (endearingly).—ns. Poor′house, a house established at the public expense for sheltering the poor: an almshouse; Poor′john (Shak.), a coarse kind of fish, the hake when salted.—n.pl. Poor′-laws, laws providing for the support of the poor.—adv. Poor′ly.—ns. Poor′ness; Poor′-rate, a rate or tax for the support of the poor; Poor′-Rob′in, an almanac; Poor's′-box, a box for receiving contributions to the poor.—adj. Poor′-spir′ited, cowardly: mean.—ns. Poor′-spir′itedness, cowardice; Poor's′-roll (Scots law), the list of poor persons who are litigants, but unable to pay the expenses of litigation, and therefore are allowed to sue in formâ pauperis.—Poor man of mutton (Scot.), cold mutton broiled, esp. the shoulder; Poor man's herb, the hedge-hyssop; Poor Will, a common American bird of the genus Phalænoptilus.—The poor, poor people collectively: those depending on public or private charity. [O. Fr. poure, povre (Fr. pauvre)—L. pauper, poor.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Powder

Powder

pow′dėr, n. dust: any substance in fine particles: gunpowder, a mixture of charcoal, sulphur, and saltpetre: hair-powder.—v.t. to reduce to powder: to sprinkle with powder: to salt by sprinkling.—v.i. to crumble into powder: to use powder for the hair.—n. Pow′der-box, a box for toilet-powder, &c.—adj. Pow′dered, reduced to powder: sprinkled with powder: salted.—ns. Pow′der-flask, Pow′der-horn, a flask or horn for carrying powder, fitted with a means of measuring the amount of each charge; Pow′dering-gown, a loose dressing-gown worn while the hair was being powdered; Pow′dering-tub, a vessel in which meat is salted: a vessel in which venereal disease is treated by sweating; Pow′der-mag′azine, a strongly built place where powder is stored; Pow′der-mill, a mill in which gunpowder is made; Pow′der-mine, an excavation filled with gunpowder for blasting rocks, &c.; Pow′der-monk′ey, a boy formerly employed to carry powder to the gunners on board a ship-of-war; Pow′der-room, the room in a ship where powder is kept.—adj. Pow′dery, resembling or sprinkled with powder: dusty: friable. [O. Fr. poudre—L. pulvis, pulveris, dust.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Touch

Touch

tuch, v.t. to come in contact with: to perceive by feeling: to reach: to relate to: to handle or treat gently or slightly, as in 'to touch the hat,' &c.: to take, taste: to move or soften: to influence: to move to pity: to taint: (slang) to cheat: to lay the hand upon for the purpose of curing scrofula or king's evil—a practice that ceased only with the accession of the House of Brunswick.—v.i. to be in contact with: to make a passing call: to speak of anything slightly: (prov.) to salute by touching the cap.—n. act of touching: a movement on a musical instrument, skill or nicety in such, a musical note or strain: any impression conveyed by contact, a hint, a slight sound: a stroke with a pen, brush, &c.: a tinge, smack, trace, a slight degree of a thing: sense of feeling, contact, close sympathy, harmony: peculiar or characteristic manner: a style of anything at a certain expenditure: a touchstone, test.—adj. Touch′able, capable of being touched.—n. Touch′ableness, the state or quality of being touchable.—adj. Touch′-and-go, of uncertain issue, ticklish, difficult.—ns. Touch′-back, the act of touching the football to the ground behind the player's own goal when it has been kicked by an opponent; Touch′-box, a box containing tinder, which used to be carried by soldiers armed with matchlocks; Touch′-down, the touching to the ground of a football by a player behind the opponents' goal; Touch′er; Touch′-hole, the small hole of a cannon through which the fire is communicated to the charge.—adv. Touch′ily, in a touchy manner: peevishly.—n. Touch′iness, the quality of being touchy: peevishness: irritability.—adj. Touch′ing, affecting: moving: pathetic.—prep. concerning: with regard to.—adv. Touch′ingly.—ns. Touch′ingness; Touch′-me-not, a plant of genus Impatiens: lupus; Touch′-nee′dle, a small bar or needle of gold for testing articles of the same metal by comparing the streaks they make on a touchstone with those made by the needle; Touch′-pā′per, paper steeped in saltpetre for firing a train of powder, &c.; Touch′piece, a coin or medal formerly given by English sovereigns to those whom they touched for the cure of the king's evil; Touch′stone, a kind of compact basalt or stone for testing gold or silver by the streak of the touch-needle: any test; Touch′wood, some soft combustible material, as amadou, used as tinder.—adj. Touch′y, irritable: peevish.—Touch up, to improve by a series of small touches, to elaborate, embellish.—A near touch, a close shave. [Fr. toucher—from Old High Ger. zucchen (Ger. zucken), to move, to draw.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Sticcado

Sticcado

an instrument consisting of small bars of wood, flat at the bottom and rounded at the top, and resting on the edges of a kind of open box. They are unequal in size, gradually increasing from the smallest to the largest, and are tuned to the diatonic scale. The tones are produced by striking the pieces of wood with hard balls attached to flexible sticks

— Webster Dictionary

pandora's box

Pandora's box

(Greek mythology) a box that Zeus gave to Pandora with instructions that she not open it; she gave in to her curiosity and opened it; all the miseries and evils flew out to afflict mankind

— Princeton's WordNet

home plate

home plate

A flat, pentagonal, rubber object placed at the center of the batter's box, which is used as a basis for judging pitched strikes and balls, and the touching of which by a runner advancing from or past third base scores a run.

— Wiktionary

loge

loge

An exclusive box or seating region in older theaters and opera houses, having wider, softer, and more widely spaced seats than in the gallery.

— Wiktionary

blockbuster

blockbuster

Something, such as a film or book, that sustains exceptional and widespread popularity and achieves enormous sales, as opposed to a box office bomb.

— Wiktionary

TARDIS

TARDIS

Time And Relative Dimension In Space; a fictional time machine and spacecraft, disguised in the form of a British police box, used by the Doctor in the British sci-fi television series Doctor Who.

— Wiktionary

pole vault

pole vault

a jumping event contested in track and field which requires an athlete to carry a fiberglass pole down a runway, plant the pole into a vaulting box and vault over a fiberglass bar, landing on a matted pit

— Wiktionary

box camera

box camera

A very simple type of photographic camera, being box shaped, and with a simple lens, and using roll film for taking snapshot pictures.

— Wiktionary

CCITT High Level Language

CCITT High Level Language

a procedural programming language of the CCITT designed for use in telecommunication switches and still in use for legacy systems in some telecommunication companies and for signal box programming.

— Wiktionary

Kextil

Kextil

Kextil will generate a $100 million in revenue with 35% net margins within 5 years by simultaneously attacking the related problems of workforce efficiency and customer satisfaction in the global field service industry. Our business and target market result in a highly capital efficient opportunity in terms of both technology development, go-to-market approach, and scalability. This opportunity will require $6 million of investment capital to reach profitability.Customer problemThe problem is one of information flow. It costs 15-30% of a workforces time to capture and access the information required to create the optimal service outcome. The ability to capture/access data in the field is severly constrained by keyboard/screen interfaces so the quality of data use is poor.The SolutionKextil is an enterprise software company. Our advanced speech recognition technology enables a field service engineer to collect information directly into back end systems and seamlessly access mission critical service related information. This is done without stopping the hands/eyes busy field service work being performend. From the user’s perspective Kextil provides a virtual secretary and virtual supervisor on their shoulders. We drive high ROimprovements in workforce efficiency, knowl. dev., customer sat., and competitive differentiation.The MarketGlobally 9 million field technicians use automation representing a current $18 billion opportunity. There is an additional $12 billion as technology adoption continues. 4 primary sectors utilities, telecom, industrial, technology. Kextil segments by opertational attributes with an initial focus on processes that require large amount of data collection and utilization, medium volume of service events, high cost of error. This is 40% of the market.CustomersCustomers are primarily global enterprises. Prospective customers include: Applied Materials, EMC, Varian Medical, Siemens, Aramark Healthcare, Emerson, First Energy, Dell, British Telecom, Ericcson, Virgin, Cox Communications, Tyco, Pitney Bowes, Toshiba Medical, Abbott Labs, Atos, and Exxon.ManagementThe CEO has 7 years experience evaluating new business opportunities in the speech recognition industry. Co-CTOs are Alex Rudnicky (world renowned thought leader in spoken dialog systems), Jordan Cohen (former CTO Voice Signal which sold for $290 million). Board of Directors includes Jack LeVan (former CEO Vocollect which sold for $190 million) and Leo Colborne former SVP Global Services at EMC. Sales and MarketingKextil's marketing strategy is focused on driving revenue growth along three paths: Selling multiple software modules to customers; Building capabilities by serving our initial target markets that enable Kextil to target larger segments; Leveraging our customer's global field service organizations to establish footholds in markets outside of the US. Kextil will reach its customer base via 1:1 communications centered around industry conferences.BarriersCreating a voice interface for field service is a big technological hurdle and competitive barrier. Our provisional patent filing calls out numerous IP opportunities for spoken dialog systems, multimodal interface, content creation, and workflow tracking. We will augment IP with domain experience and direct interfaces to field service ERP modules.

— CrunchBase

Iptivia

Iptivia

Iptivia, Inc. offers online network and data transferring and management services. The company suites enable online video deployment, carriers monitoring, real time information, and data replication services. It partners with Eirteic Consulting, Mega Hertz Company, OpenAdvice IT Services GmbH, Serima Consulting Group, Network Force, and NVision Group. Iptivia™s clientele include Cox Communications, Comcast, and JP Morgan Chase. The company was founded in 2005 and is headquartered in New York, New York with additional offices in Philadelphia, Texas, and Austria.

— CrunchBase

HiWired

HiWired

HiWired thinks everyone should enjoy the benefits of PC and network-based technologies, without annoying setup and maintenance headaches. The company delivers help remotely via the Internet and secure screen share technology; so you can stay put and avoid the discomfort of sharing your space with an unfamiliar technician. It™s no wonder companies like OfficeMax, Cox Communications and Motorola partner with us to simplify life for their customers with their leading-edge technology and US-based network of expert technicians.

— CrunchBase

Tragara

Tragara

Tragara Pharmaceuticals, Inc. is a pharmaceutical company based in San Diego, California focused on the clinical and commercial development of proprietary drugs for the treatment of various cancers. Tragara launched operations in January 2007 and is focusing its development resources on two proprietary compounds: (1) Capoxigem® (apricoxib; TG01), an oral, potent, and selective inhibitor of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) for the treatment of solid tumors including non-small cell lung cancer, breast cancer, and pancreatic cancer and (2) TG02- multikinase inhibitor for the treatment of hematologic and solid tumors.

— CrunchBase

Moovweb

Moovweb

Moovweb offers products and services that help our customers quickly take advantage of the mobile revolution. Our cloud-based platform uses a patent-pending site virtualization and transformation approach that offers the flexibility and power to deliver incredible mobile customer experiences while at the same time leveraging 100% of existing Web investments. No expensive re-coding. No synchronization headaches. No scaling issues. The Moovweb platform has served billions of mobile page views for an amazing set of customers; we power mobile websites, apps, and tablet solutions for Macy’s, 1-800-FLOWERS.COM, Chico’s, Ross-Simons, The American Cancer Society, Geisinger Health, Accenture, TicketWeb, Cox Communications, Golfsmith, Seagate and dozens of other businesses. Moovweb is headquartered in San Francisco.

— CrunchBase

mPortal

mPortal

mPortal, founded in 2000, offers mobile software and services to telecom, cable and media providers, empowering them to deliver superior mobile user experiences for their content and services across smartphones, tablets, smart TVs and other IP-connected devices.Customers to date include some of the world's leading companies such as AT&T, ABC/Disney, Bright House Networks, Comcast, Cricket Communications, Cox Communications, Disney Mobile, Mobile ESPN, Reliance Infocomm, TELUS, TV Guide, Time Warner Cable, and Verizon Wireless.

— CrunchBase

Baignoire

Baignoire

bān′war, n. a box at the theatre on a level with the stalls. [Orig. = 'bathing-box,' Fr. baigner, to bathe.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Coal

Coal

kōl, n. a solid, black, combustible substance used for fuel, dug out of the earth: cinder.—v.i. to take in coal.—v.t. to supply with coal.—n. Coal′-bed, a stratum of coal.—adj. Coal′-black, black as coal, very black.—ns. Coal′-box, a box for holding coal; Coal′-brass, a name applied to the pyrites in the coal-measures; Coal′field, a field or district containing coal strata; Coal′-fish, a fish of the cod family, so named from the black colour of its back; Coal′-gas, the mixture of gases produced by the destructive distillation of coal, chiefly carburetted hydrogen—giving the gaslight in common use; Coal′-heav′er, one employed in carrying coal; Coal′-house, a covered-in place for keeping coal; Coal′man, one who has to do with coals; Coal′-mas′ter, the owner or lessee of a coalfield; Coal′-meas′ure, a measure by which the quantity of coal is ascertained: (pl.) the group of carboniferous strata in which coal is found (geol.); Coal′-mine, Coal′-pit, a pit or mine from which coal is dug; Coal′-own′er, one who owns a colliery; Coal′-plant, a fossil plant of the carboniferous strata; Coal′-scutt′le, a vessel for holding coal; Coal′-tar, or Gas-tar, a thick, black, opaque liquid which condenses in the pipes when coal or petroleum is distilled; Coal′-trim′mer, one who stores or shifts coal on board vessels; Coal′-whip′per, one employed in unloading coal from vessels at anchor to barges which convey it to the wharves.—adj. Coal′y, of or like coal.—Coaling station, a port at which steamships take in coal; Coal-scuttle bonnet, a woman's bonnet, shaped like a coal-scuttle upside down.—Blind or Anthracite coal, that which does not flame when kindled; Bituminous coal, that which does; Brown coal (see Brown); Caking coal, a bituminous coal which cakes or fuses into one mass in the fire; Cannel or Parrot coal (see Cannel); Cherry or Soft coal, coal breaking off easily into small, irregular cubes, having beautiful shining lustre; Splint, Hard, or Block coal, plentiful in Scotland, hard, breaking into cuboidal blocks.—Blow the coals, to excite passion; Carry coals to Newcastle, to take a thing where it is least needed; Haul over the coals, reprimand—from the discipline applied to heretics; Heap coals of fire on the head, to excite remorse by returning good for evil (Rom. xii. 20). [A.S. col; cog. with Ice. kol, Ger. kohle.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Compass

Compass

kum′pas, n. a circuit or circle: space: limit: range, a limit of tones of a voice or instrument: the circumference: girth: an instrument consisting of a magnetised needle, used to steer ships by, &c., the needle indicating on a card the absolute directions at any given time: (pl.) an instrument consisting of two movable legs, for describing circles, &c.—v.t. to pass or go round: to surround or enclose: to besiege: to bring about or obtain: to contrive or plot: to accomplish.—adj. Com′passable, capable of being compassed.—ns. Com′pass-card, the circular card of a compass; Com′passing, contrivance: design; Com′pass-plane, a plane, convex on the under side, for smoothing curved timber; Com′pass-saw, a saw that cuts in a circular manner; Com′pass-sig′nal, a signal denoting a point in the compass; Com′pass-tim′ber, curved timber, used for shipbuilding, &c.; Com′pass-win′dow, a semicircular bay-window.—Box the compass (see Box); Fetch a compass, to go round in a circuit. [Fr. compas, a circle, prob. from Low L. compassus—L. com, together, passus, a step.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Despatch

Despatch

de-spach′, Dispatch, dis-pach′, v.t. to send away hastily: to send out of the world: to put to death: to dispose of: to perform speedily.—v.i. (Shak.) to make haste.—n. a sending away in haste: dismissal: rapid performance: haste: the sending off of the mails: that which is despatched, as a message, esp. telegraphic.—ns. Despatch′-boat, a government vessel for carrying despatches; Despatch′-box, a box for containing official despatches; Despatch′er.—adv. Despatch′ful (Milt.), swift.—Happy despatch, a playful name given to the Japanese hara-kiri or judicial suicide; Pneumatic despatch (see Pneumatic). [O. Fr. despeecher (mod. Fr. dépêcher); acc. to Littré, from an assumed Low L. despedicāre, to remove obstacles (pedica, a fetter), the opp. of impedicāre. See Impeach.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Die

Die

dī, n. a small cube used in gaming by being thrown from a box: any small cubical body: hazard:—pl. Dice (dīs).—n. Dice′-box.—adj. Diced, ornamented with square or diamond-shaped figures.—ns. Dice′-play; Dice′-play′er, Dī′cer; Dī′cing-house.—The die is cast, the question is decided. [O. Fr. det, pl. dez (Prov. dat, It. dado), from Low L. dadus—L. dātus, given or cast (talus, a piece of bone used in play, being understood). Doublets, dado, date.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Dredge

Dredge

drej, v.t. to sprinkle flour on meat while roasting.—ns. Dredg′er, Dredge′-box, Dredg′ing-box, a utensil for dredging. [O. Fr. dragie, sugar-plum, mixed grain for horses—Gr. tragēmata, spices.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Embox

Embox

em-boks′, v.t. to set in a box. [Em, in, box.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Hutch

Hutch

huch, n. a box, a chest: a coop for rabbits: a baker's kneading-trough: a trough used with some ore-dressing machines: a low wagon in which coal is drawn up out of the pit.—v.i. (Milt.) to hoard up. [Fr. huche, a chest—Low L. hutica, a box; prob. Teut.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Paddle

Paddle

pad′l, v.i. to dabble in water with the hands or the feet: to touch or toy with the fingers: to beat the water as with the feet: to row: to move in the water as a duck does: (slang) to make off.—v.t. to move by means of an oar or paddle: to finger, toy with.—n. a short, broad, spoon-shaped oar, used for moving canoes: the blade of an oar: one of the boards at the circumference of a paddle-wheel.—ns. Padd′le-beam, one of the large timbers at the side of a paddle-wheel; Padd′le-board, one of the floats on the circumference of a paddle-wheel; Padd′le-box, a wooden box covering the upper part of the paddle-wheel of a steamer; Padd′ler, one who paddles; Padd′le-shaft, the axle on which the paddle-wheels of a steamer turn; Padd′le-wheel, the wheel of a steam-vessel, which by turning in the water causes it to move forward; Padd′le-wood, the light, strong wood of a Guiana tree of the dogbane family. [For pattle, freq. of pat.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Pandora

Pandora

pan-dō′ra, n. a beautiful woman to whom Jupiter, in order to punish the theft of heavenly fire by Prometheus, gave a box containing all the ills of human life, which, on the box being opened, spread over all the earth. [Gr., pan, all, dōron, a gift.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Pattern

Pattern

pat′ėrn, n. a person or thing to be copied: a model: an example: style of ornamental work: anything to serve as a guide in forming objects: the distribution of shot in a target at which a gun is fired.—ns. Patt′ern-book, a book containing designs of lace, &c., or in which patterns of cloth, &c., are pasted; Patt′ern-box, in weaving, a box at each side of a loom containing the various shuttles that may be used; Patt′ern-card, a piece of cardboard on which specimens of cloth are fixed; Patt′ern-mak′er, one who makes the patterns for moulders in foundry-work; Patt′ern-shop, the place in which patterns for a factory are prepared; Patt′ern-wheel, the count-wheel in a clock movement. [Fr. patron, a protector, pattern.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Pill

Pill

pil, n. a little ball of medicine: anything nauseous which must be accepted: (slang) a doctor: a disagreeable person.—v.t. (slang) to blackball.—n. Pill′-box, a box for holding pills: a kind of one-horse carriage. [Fr. pilule—L. pilula, dim. of pĭla, a ball.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Resist

Resist

rē-zist′, v.t. to strive against: to oppose.—v.i. to make opposition.—n. a composition applied to a surface to enable it to resist chemical action: a material, as a paste, applied to a fabric to prevent the action of a dye or mordant from affecting the parts not to be coloured.—ns. Resis′tal (obs.); Resis′tance, act of resisting: opposition: (mech.) the power of a body which acts in opposition to the impulse of another: (electr.) that property of a conductor in virtue of which the passage of a current through it is accompanied with a dissipation of energy; Resis′tance-box, a box containing one or more resistance-coils; Resis′tance-coil, a coil of wire which offers a resistance to the passage of a current of electricity; Resis′tant, one who, or that which, resists.—adjs. Resis′tant, Resis′tent, making resistance.—ns. Resis′ter; Resistibil′ity, Resis′tibleness.—adj. Resis′tible.—advs. Resis′tibly; Resis′tingly.—adj. Resis′tive.—adv. Resis′tively.—n. Resistiv′ity.—adj. Resist′less, irresistible: unresisting, unable to resist.—adv. Resist′lessly.—ns. Resist′lessness; Resist′-style, in calico printing, the process of dyeing in a pattern by the use of a resist; Resist′-work, calico printing, in which the pattern is produced by means of resist which preserves parts uncoloured. [Fr.,—L. resistĕrere-, against, sistĕre, to make to stand.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Sentry

Sentry

sen′tri, n. a sentinel: a soldier on guard to observe the approach of danger: a watch-tower.—ns Sen′try-box, a box to shelter a sentry; Sen′try-go, any active military duty. [Prob. a corr. of sentinel—Low L. semitarius—L. semita, a path.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Show

Show

shō, v.t. to present to view: to enable to perceive or know: to inform: to teach: to guide: to prove: to explain: to bestow.—v.i. to appear, come into sight: to look:—pa.p. shōwn or shōwed.—n. act of showing: display: a sight or spectacle: parade: appearance: plausibility, pretence: a sign, indication.—ns. Show′-bill, a bill for showing or advertising the price, merits, &c. of goods; Show′-box, a showman's box out of which he takes his materials; Show′bread, among the Jews, the twelve loaves of bread shown or presented before Jehovah in the sanctuary; Show′-card, a placard with an announcement: a card of patterns; Show′-case, a case with glass sides in which articles are exhibited in a museum, &c.; Show′-end, that end of a piece of cloth which is on the outside of the roll for exhibition to customers; Show′er; Show′ing, appearance: a setting forth, representation; Show′man, one who exhibits shows; Show′-place, a place for exhibition: a gymnasium: (Shak.) a place where shows are exhibited; Show′-room, a room where a show is exhibited: a room in a warehouse, &c., where goods are displayed to the best advantage, a room in a commercial hotel where travellers' samples are exhibited.—Show a leg (vul.), to get out of bed; Show fight, to show a readiness to resist; Show forth, to give out, proclaim; Show off, to display ostentatiously; Show of hands, a raising of hands at a meeting to show approval of any proposal; Show one's hand (see Hand); Show one the door, to dismiss a person from one's house or presence; Show up, to expose to blame or ridicule. [A.S. scéawian; Dut. schouwen, Ger. schauen, to behold.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Tinder

Tinder

tin′dėr, n. anything used for kindling fire from a spark.—n. Tin′der-box, a box in which tinder is kept.—adjs. Tin′der-like (Shak.), inflammable as tinder; Tin′dery, irascible. [A.S. tynder; Ice. tundr, Ger. zunder. The root is found in A.S. tendan, Ger. zünden, to kindle.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Buchanan, George

Buchanan, George

a most distinguished scholar and humanist, born at Killearn, Stirlingshire; educated at St. Andrews and Paris; professor for three years in the College at St. Barbe; returned to Scotland, became tutor to James V.'s illegitimate sons; imprisoned by Cardinal Beaton for satires against the monks, escaped to France; driven from one place to another, imprisoned in a monastery in Portugal at the instance of the Inquisition, where he commenced his celebrated Latin version of the Psalms; came back to Scotland, was appointed in 1562 tutor to Queen Mary, in 1566 principal of St. Leonard's College, in St. Andrews, in 1567 moderator of the General Assembly in 1570 tutor to James VI., and had several offices of State conferred on him; wrote a "History of Scotland," and his book "De Jure Regni," against the tyranny of peoples by kings; died in Edinburgh without enough to bury him; was buried at the public expense in Greyfriars' churchyard; when dying, it is said he asked his housekeeper to examine his money-box and see if there was enough to bury him, and when he found there was not, he ordered her to distribute what there was among his poor neighbours and left it to the city to bury him or not as they saw good (1506-1582).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

holy penguin pee

holy penguin pee

[Linux] Notional substance said to be sprinkled by Linus onto other people's contributions. With this ritual, he blesses them, officially making them part of the kernel. First used in November 1998 just after Linus had handed the maintenance of the stable kernel over to Alan Cox.

— The New Hacker's Dictionary

camera

camera, photographic camera

equipment for taking photographs (usually consisting of a lightproof box with a lens at one end and light-sensitive film at the other)

— Princeton's WordNet

casket

casket, jewel casket

small and often ornate box for holding jewels or other valuables

— Princeton's WordNet

chest

chest

box with a lid; used for storage; usually large and sturdy

— Princeton's WordNet

emydidae

Emydidae, family Emydidae

box and water turtles

— Princeton's WordNet

family emydidae

Emydidae, family Emydidae

box and water turtles

— Princeton's WordNet

jewel casket

casket, jewel casket

small and often ornate box for holding jewels or other valuables

— Princeton's WordNet

photographic camera

camera, photographic camera

equipment for taking photographs (usually consisting of a lightproof box with a lens at one end and light-sensitive film at the other)

— Princeton's WordNet

play-box

playbox, play-box

a box for a child's toys and personal things (especially at a boarding school)

— Princeton's WordNet

playbox

playbox, play-box

a box for a child's toys and personal things (especially at a boarding school)

— Princeton's WordNet

tin

tin

a vessel (box, can, pan, etc.) made of tinplate and used mainly in baking

— Princeton's WordNet

Sans Souci

Sans Souci

"an elegant, commodious little 'country box,' one storey high, on a pleasant hill-top near Potsdam"; the retreat of Frederick the Great after his wars were over, and in part sketched by himself, and where he spent the last 40 years of his life, specially as years advanced; it is 20 m. from Berlin, and the name is Frederick's own invention.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

pees

pees

Something a chipmunk eats. Listed online in "what do chipmunk eat?" Dated 5/22/2016

— Editors Contribution

Axle guard

Axle guard

the part of the framing of a railway car or truck, by which an axle box is held laterally, and in which it may move vertically; -- also called a jaw in the United States, and a housing in England

— Webster Dictionary

Camel

Camel

a water-tight structure (as a large box or boxes) used to assist a vessel in passing over a shoal or bar or in navigating shallow water. By admitting water, the camel or camels may be sunk and attached beneath or at the sides of a vessel, and when the water is pumped out the vessel is lifted

— Webster Dictionary

Cist

Cist

a box or chest. Specifically: (a) A bronze receptacle, round or oval, frequently decorated with engravings on the sides and cover, and with feet, handles, etc., of decorative castings. (b) A cinerary urn. See Illustration in Appendix

— Webster Dictionary

Close-stool

Close-stool

a utensil to hold a chamber vessel, for the use of the sick and infirm. It is usually in the form of a box, with a seat and tight cover

— Webster Dictionary