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Benjamin Bloom

Benjamin Samuel Bloom was an American educational psychologist who made contributions to the classification of educational objectives and to the theory of mastery-learning. He also directed a research team which conducted a major investigation into the development of exceptional talent whose results are relevant to the question of eminence, exceptional achievement, and greatness. In 1956, Bloom edited the first volume of Taxonomy of educational objectives: the classification of educational goals, which outlined a classification of learning objectives that has come to be known as Bloom's Taxonomy and remains a foundational and essential element within the educational community as evidenced in the 1981 survey Significant writings that have influenced the curriculum: 1906-1981, by H.G. Shane and the 1994 yearbook of the National Society for the Study of Education. Bloom's Two Sigma problem is also named after him.

— Freebase

Krazy

Krazy was a British comic published every Monday by IPC Magazines Ltd. It ran from 16 October 1976 to 15 April 1978, when it merged with stable-mate Whizzer and Chips. In 1977, one of the characters in the comic, Cheeky, proved popular enough to get his own comic, Cheeky, which was later merged into Whoopee!. The comic included a "disguise" back-cover, such as the cover of a diary or brochure, which allowed readers to hide the comic from parents or teachers.

— Freebase

Flandes

Flandes is a town and municipality in the Tolima department of Colombia. The population of the municipality was 22,064 as of the 1993 census.

— Freebase

Gross axle weight rating

The gross axle weight rating is the maximum distributed weight that may be supported by an axle of a road vehicle. Typically, GAWR is followed by either the letters FR or RR, which indicate front or rear axles respectively.

— Freebase

Dailly

Dailly is a village in South Ayrshire, Scotland. It is located on the Water of Girvan, 8 kilometres south of Maybole, and 5 kilometres east of Old Dailly. "New Dailly", as it was originally known, was laid out in the 1760s as a coal-mining village. In 1849 a fire broke out in Maxwell Colliery, one of the nearby mines, and continued to burn for 50 years.

— Freebase

Osez

Osez is born in Montevideo, he was a member of the rap group "Sens Unik". He performed live on many stages from Switzerland, New York to Paris, Montreal, Berlin, Barcelone and all over Europe. He started with the group in 1991 as dancer for the "6ème sens" tour then became a full-time MC. Sens Unik's third album, "Chromatic", went gold in both Switzerland and Sweden. Osez raps on the "Chromatic" and "El Sueno" tracks. The album spawned two hits and featured a number of other European hip hop artists including MC Solaar. Osez also appears on the track "Le vent tourne" from the gold album soundtrack of the movie La Haine from Mathieu Kassovitz. He left the band in 1996 for a solo career and appears as guest artist on the "Barbarian" track of the fourth Sens Unik album, "Tribulations", recorded in New York by Tim Latham. He has also been featured alongside MC Carlos on the track "Hijo de Latino", which celebrates his Latin heritage. Multicultural rappers such as Osez serve as an interesting contrast to the "Mundart" or "dialect" rap of more traditionally Swiss MCs.

— Freebase

Do Re Mi Fa So La Ti Do

Do Re Mi Fa So La Ti Do is a 2008 South Korean film based on the internet novel of the same title by Guiyeoni. Directed by Kang Geon-hyang and produced by New Crayon Entertainment. The film received 199,151 admissions nationwide.

— Freebase

Carrapateira, Paraíba

Carrapateira is a municipality in the state of Paraíba in the Northeast Region of Brazil.

— Freebase

Plymouth Company

The Plymouth Company was an English joint-stock company founded in 1606 by James I of England with the purpose of establishing settlements on the coast of North America. The merchants offered an economical agreement to the settlers, where the merchants agreed to finance their trip and in return the settlers would have to repay their trip, through the profits made, with interest. In 1620, after years of disuse, the company was revived and reorganized as the Plymouth Council for New England. The Plymouth Company had 40 patentees at that point, and established the Council for New England to oversee their efforts, but it stopped operating in 1624.

— Freebase

Cienega

A cienega or cienaga is a spring that is usually a wet, marshy area at the foot of a mountain, in a canyon, or on the edge of a grassland where groundwater bubbles to the surface. Often, a cienega does not drain into a stream, but evaporates, forming a small playa. The term cienega is used in English in the southwestern United States.

— Freebase

Safety data sheet

A safety data sheet, material safety data sheet, or product safety data sheet is an important component of product stewardship and occupational safety and health. It is intended to provide workers and emergency personnel with procedures for handling or working with that substance in a safe manner, and includes information such as physical data, toxicity, health effects, first aid, reactivity, storage, disposal, protective equipment, and spill-handling procedures. SDS formats can vary from source to source within a country depending on national requirements. SDSs are a widely used system for cataloging information on chemicals, chemical compounds, and chemical mixtures. SDS information may include instructions for the safe use and potential hazards associated with a particular material or product. These data sheets can be found anywhere where chemicals are being used. There is also a duty to properly label substances on the basis of physico-chemical, health and/or environmental risk. Labels can include hazard symbols such as the European Union standard black diagonal cross on an orange background, used to denote a harmful substance.

— Freebase

Caio, Carmarthenshire

Caio or Caeo is a village in the county of Carmarthenshire, south-west Wales, sited near to the Dolaucothi Gold Mines.

— Freebase

Bulbasaur

Bulbasaur, known as Fushigidane in Japan, is a Pokémon species in Nintendo and Game Freak's Pokémon franchise. Designed by Ken Sugimori, their name is a combination of the words "bulb" and "dinosaur." First appearing in Pokémon Red and Blue as a Starter Pokémon, they later appeared in subsequent sequels, spin-off games, related merchandise, and animated and printed adaptations of the franchise. Known as the Seed Pokémon, Bulbasaur can survive for days solely on sunlight. It is a central character in the anime, being one of Ash's main Pokémon for the first season, and a different one later being obtained by May. It is featured in various manga, and is owned by main protagonist Red in the Pokémon Adventures manga. Bulbasaur has been featured in myriad pieces of merchandise, including toys, key chains, and plush dolls.

— Freebase

Spent nuclear fuel

Spent nuclear fuel, occasionally called used nuclear fuel, is nuclear fuel that has been irradiated in a nuclear reactor. It is no longer useful in sustaining a nuclear reaction in an ordinary thermal reactor and depending on its point along the nuclear fuel cycle, it may have considerably different isotopic constituents.

— Freebase

Baracé

Baracé is a commune in the Maine-et-Loire department in western France.

— Freebase

Chiller Cabinet

The Chiller Cabinet is a radio show created by Ben Eshmade in 2002. The two hour show presents a range of "ambience, minimalism & movies on the radio" twice weekly. The show distinctively focuses on the above named areas of music and is blended continuously without voiceovers. Quickly after its first international broadcasts by Classic FM it attracted a cult following. It is now broadcasting on Chill, maintaining its original broadcast scheduling. The Chiller Cabinet released a compilation CD called Chiller Cabinet on 27 January 2004.

— Freebase

The Mirror

Mirror is a 1975 Russian art film directed by Andrei Tarkovsky. It is loosely autobiographical, unconventionally structured, and incorporates poems composed and read by the director's father, Arseny Tarkovsky. The film features Margarita Terekhova, Ignat Daniltsev, Alla Demidova, Anatoli Solonitsyn, Tarkovsky's wife Larisa Tarkovskaya and his mother Maria Vishnyakova, with a soundtrack by Eduard Artemyev. Mirror is known for its non-linear structure. It unfolds as an organic flow of memories recalled by a dying poet of key moments in his life both with respect to his immediate family as well as that of the Russian people as a whole during the tumultuous events of the twentieth century. In an effort to represent these themes visually, the film combines contemporary scenes with childhood memories, dreams, and newsreel footage; its cinematography slips, often unpredictably, between color, black-and-white, and sepia. The film's loose flow of visually oneiric images, combined with its rich - and often symbolic - imagery has been compared with the stream of consciousness technique in Modernist literature.

— Freebase

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