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Cayo

Cayo is a Puerto Rican film released in 2005. It was directed by Vicente Juarbe and written by Ineabelle Sánchez and Pedro Muñiz. The film also stars Roselyn Sanchez.

— Freebase

Gwich'in

The Gwich’in, literally "one who dwells" or "resident of [a region]", are a First Nations of Canada and an Alaska Native Athabaskan people of the Athabaskan-speaking ethnolinguistic group who live in the northwestern part of North America, mostly above the Arctic Circle. The Gwichʼin were also known by the French name of Loucheux in historical documents, as well as the Tukudh, a term used by Anglican missionaries. Gwich’in often refer to themselves by the term Dinjii Zhuu instead of Gwich’in. Dinjii Zhuu literally translates as "Small People," but figuratively it refers to 'Indians', not just Gwich’in. The Gwich’in men are well known for their crafting of snowshoes, birchbark canoes, and the two-way sled. The women are renowned for their intricate and ornate beadwork. They also continue to make traditional caribou-skin clothing and porcupine sewing using porcupine quills, both of which are highly regarded among Gwich'in. Today the economy is mostly a mix of hunting, fishing, and seasonal wage-paying employment.

— Freebase

Jakaranda

Jakaranda was a pop group consisting of Kenny Wong, Allison DiNonno, and Jacqueline "Jackie" Siebert which performed from 1997 to 1998. The group was a part of Crave Records, a subsidiary of Sony Music Entertainment, which ceased operations in 1998. The group had moderate attention upon the release of the Disney remake The Parent Trap, where their single Never Let You Go was featured. A similar version of Never Let You Go was made by Dario G, an English dance music group in 1997 titled "Sunchyme." It reached No. 2 in the UK singles chart in 1997. The original theme for both these songs was taken from the 1985 song "Life in a Northern Town" by The Dream Academy. One album was produced before Crave was shut down and the group split thereafter.

— Freebase

Captain Morgan

Captain Morgan is a brand of rum produced by alcohol conglomerate Diageo. It is named after the 17th-century Welsh privateer of the Caribbean, Sir Henry Morgan who died on 26 August 1688. Since 2011, the label has used the slogan "To Life, Love and Loot."

— Freebase

Fraud Squad

A Fraud Squad is a police department which investigates fraud and other economic crimes. The largest Fraud Squad in the United Kingdom is run by the City of London Police who are responsible for policing London's and the UK's main financial hub. This department investigates what could be described as the "traditional" fraud offences, such as banking frauds; insurance frauds; investment frauds; insider dealing frauds; advance fee frauds and Internet frauds, amongst others. Each team is headed by a Detective Inspector who take it in turn on a weekly basis to act as the "Duty Squad" and they form the immediate response to any calls received concerning new fraud cases. The Fraud squad is a specialist area where officers are normally transferred from general detective duties with the Criminal Investigations Department. Some officers will nominated to work on specific cases for the Serious Fraud Office, they will also provide assistance and advice on policing matters to the SFO and Financial Services Authority. The City of London Police has recruited accountancy specialists directly into its Special Constabulary, and these officers primary duties are assisting in complex fraud investigations.

— Freebase

Financial crimes

Financial crimes are crimes against property, involving the unlawful conversion of the ownership of property to one's own personal use and benefit. Financial crimes may involve fraud; theft; scams or confidence tricks; tax evasion; bribery; embezzlement; identity theft; money laundering; and forgery and counterfeiting, including the production of Counterfeit money and consumer goods. Financial crimes may involve additional criminal acts, such as computer crime, elder abuse, burglary, armed robbery, and even violent crime such as robbery or murder. Financial crimes may be carried out by individuals, corporations, or by organized crime groups. Victims may include individuals, corporations, governments, and entire economies.

— Freebase

Maidens, Virginia

Maidens is a small unincorporated community in Goochland County, Virginia, United States. Sited on the north side of the James River, it is currently located on Maidens Rd. just south of the intersection of State Route 6.

— Freebase

Megacities

Megacities is a 1998 documentary film from Austria written and directed by Michael Glawogger.

— Freebase

Fire blight

Fire blight, also written fireblight, is a contagious disease affecting apples, pears, and some other members of the family Rosaceae. It is a serious concern to producers of apples and pears. Under optimal conditions, it can destroy an entire orchard in a single growing season. The causal pathogen is Erwinia amylovora, a Gram-negative bacterium in the family Enterobacteriaceae. Pears are the most susceptible, but apples, loquat, crabapples, quinces, hawthorn, cotoneaster, pyracantha, raspberry and some other rosaceous plants are also vulnerable. The disease is believed to be indigenous to North America, from where it spread to most of the rest of the world. Fire blight is not believed to be present in Australia though it might possibly exist there. It has been a major reason for a long-standing embargo on the importation of New Zealand apples to Australia . Japan was likewise believed to be without the disease, but it was discovered in pears grown in northern Japan. Japanese authorities are however still denying its existence and the Japanese scientist who discovered it is believed to have committed suicide after his name was leaked to affected farmers.

— Freebase

Best in Show

Best in Show is a 2000 American improvisational comedy film written and directed by Christopher Guest. The film follows five entrants in a prestigious dog show and focuses on the slightly surreal interactions among the various owners and handlers as they travel to the show and compete, and after the show. Much of the dialogue was improvised. Many of the actors were also involved in Guest's films including This Is Spinal Tap, Waiting for Guffman, A Mighty Wind, and For Your Consideration.

— Freebase

Late effect

In medicine, a late effect is a condition that appears after the acute phase of an earlier, causal condition has run its course. A late effect can be caused directly by the earlier condition, or indirectly by the treatment for the earlier condition. Some late effects can occur decades later. Historically, late effects have been very difficult to connect with their causes, but as survivorship and life span has increased and "follow up" has become standard practice, these connections are becoming established.

— Freebase

F-test

An F-test is any statistical test in which the test statistic has an F-distribution under the null hypothesis. It is most often used when comparing statistical models that have been fitted to a data set, in order to identify the model that best fits the population from which the data were sampled. Exact "F-tests" mainly arise when the models have been fitted to the data using least squares. The name was coined by George W. Snedecor, in honour of Sir Ronald A. Fisher. Fisher initially developed the statistic as the variance ratio in the 1920s.

— Freebase

Tree worship

Tree worship refers to the tendency of many societies throughout history to worship or otherwise mythologize trees. Trees have played an important role in many of the world's mythologies and religions, and have been given deep and sacred meanings throughout the ages. Human beings, observing the growth and death of trees, the elasticity of their branches, the sensitivity and the annual decay and revival of their foliage, see them as powerful symbols of growth, decay and resurrection. The most ancient cross-cultural symbolic representation of the universe's construction is the world tree. The image of the Tree of life is also a favourite in many mythologies. Various forms of trees of life also appear in folklore, culture and fiction, often relating to immortality or fertility. These often hold cultural and religious significance to the peoples for whom they appear. For them, it may also strongly be connected with the motif of the world tree. Other examples of trees featured in mythology are the Banyan and the Peepal trees in Hinduism, and the modern tradition of the Christmas Tree in Germanic mythology, the Tree of Knowledge of Judaism and Christianity, and the Bodhi tree in Buddhism. In folk religion and folklore, trees are often said to be the homes of tree spirits. Historical Druidism as well as Germanic paganism appear to have involved cultic practice in sacred groves, especially the oak. The term druid itself possibly derives from the Celtic word for oak.

— Freebase

Achronix Semiconductor

Achronix Semiconductor is a fabless semiconductor company based in San Jose, California with R&D in Bangalore, Karnataka. It designs high-speed asynchronous field-programmable gate arrays chips, manufactured at Intel Fabs since 2012. The series of 22 nm FPGAs is calles Speedster 22i and is manufactured using Tri-Gate process. Company was founded in 2004 by group from Cornell University: Dr. Rajit Manohar, Dr. Clinton Kelly IV, Dr. Virantha Ekanayake and John Lofton Holt. It was included in EE Times 60 Emerging Startups list in 2005. Prototypes of its FPGAs was made using 180 nm and 90 nm. Achronix has raised over $120 million in venture funding. According to interview in December 2012 with company chairman John Lofton Holt, Achronix may do IPO in 2014. Achronix was the first company allowed to use Intel's fabs and had began shipping of the product. There are 5 fabless companies announced at the middle of 2013 with agreements for chip manufacturing at Intel: Achronix, Tabula, Netronome, Microsemi and Altera. According to Kevin Morris, Achronix and Tabula may become #3 and #4 producers of high-end FPGA chips.

— Freebase

Shilo Inns

Shilo Inns is a mid-priced hotel chain operating 43 hotels predominantly on the west coast of the United States, with a large concentration of locations in the state of Oregon. It competes primarily with mid-range, family hotels such as Comfort Inn and Best Western, and today is one of the largest independently owned and operated Hotel companies in the Western United States. Hotels are frequently 2-3 stories and of a gray and blue color scheme, although there are exceptions. Most properties feature swimming pools, spas, and saunas and all now feature free high speed internet and are dog friendly. Selected properties offer room service and a continental breakfast. Some also include a full service Shilo Restaurant, and hotels in Beaverton, Klamath Falls, and Portland, Oregon feature cigar bars. In 2000 it was announced that the hotel chain would be partnering, at least at some locations, with Elmer's restaurants. Elmer's is a western US general dining restaurant, comparable to Denny's.

— Freebase

Lombardic language

Lombardic or Langobardic is the extinct language of the Lombards, the Germanic-speaking people who settled in Italy in the 6th century. The language was already rapidly declining by the 7th century as the invaders quickly adopted the Latin vernacular spoken by the local Roman population. Lombardic may have been in scattered use until as late as ca. AD 1000. A number of Italian place names and items of Italian vocabulary derive from Lombardic. Some linguists have argued that the modern Cimbrian and Mocheno dialects in Northeastern Italy, usually classified as Austro-Bavarian, are in fact surviving Lombard remnants. The language is preserved only fragmentarily, the main evidence being individual words used in Latin texts. For example, the Edict of Rothari of 643, the earliest Lombard legal code, is written in Latin, with only individual legal terms given in Lombardic. The many Lombard personal names preserved in Latin deeds from the Kingdom of the Lombards also provide evidence of the language. In the absence of Lombardic texts, it is not possible to draw any conclusions about the language's morphology and syntax. The genetic classification is necessarily based entirely on phonology. Since there is evidence that Lombardic participated in, and indeed shows some of the earliest evidence for, the High German consonant shift, it is classified as an Elbe Germanic or Upper German dialect. The Historia Langobardorum of Paulus Diaconus mentions a duke Zaban of 574, showing shifted to. The term stolesazo in the Edictum Rothari shows the same shift. Many names in the Lombard royal families show shifted consonants, particularly < in the following name components:

— Freebase

A Walk in the Park

"A Walk in the Park" is Namie Amuro's sixth solo single under the Avex Trax label. It was her first original single to be released after the massive success of her solo debut album, Sweet 19 Blues and was her fourth million selling single.

— Freebase


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