Definitions for waiverˈweɪ vər

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word waiver

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

waiv•erˈweɪ vər(n.)

  1. the intentional relinquishment of a right.

    Category: Law

  2. an express or written statement specifying this.

    Category: Law

Origin of waiver:

1620–30; < AF weyver, n. use of inf.: to waive ; see -er3

Princeton's WordNet

  1. release, waiver, discharge(noun)

    a formal written statement of relinquishment

Wiktionary

  1. waiver(Noun)

    The act of waiving, or not insisting on, some right, claim, or privilege.

  2. waiver(Noun)

    A legal document releasing some requirement, such as waiving a right (giving it up) or a waiver of liability (agreeing to hold someone blameless). Also used for such a form even before it is filled out and signed.

    I had to sign a waiver when I went skydiving, agreeing not to sue even if something went wrong.

  3. waiver(Noun)

    Something that releases a person from a requirement.

  4. waiver(Verb)

    See waive.

  5. Origin: weyver, from waiver

Webster Dictionary

  1. Waiver(noun)

    the act of waiving, or not insisting on, some right, claim, or privilege

Freebase

  1. Waiver

    A waiver is the voluntary relinquishment or surrender of some known right or privilege. Regulatory agencies or governments may issue waivers to exempt companies from certain regulations. For example, a United States law restricted the size of banks, but when banks exceeded these sizes, they obtained waivers. In another example, the United States federal government may issue waivers to individual states so that they may provide Medicare in different ways than the law typically requires. While a waiver is often in writing, sometimes a person's actions can act as a waiver. An example of a written waiver is a disclaimer, which becomes a waiver when accepted. When the right to hold a person liable through a lawsuit are waived, the waiver may be called an exculpatory clause, liability waiver, legal release, or hold harmless clause. In some cases, parties may sign a "non-waiver" contract which specifies that no rights are waived, particularly if a person's actions may suggest that rights are being waived. This is particularly common in insurance, as it is less detailed than a reservation of rights letter; the disadvantage is that it requires the signature of the insured. Sometimes the elements of "voluntary" and "known" are established by a legal fiction. In this case, one is presumed to know one's rights and that those rights are voluntarily relinquished if not asserted at the time.

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