Definitions for vulgateˈvʌl geɪt, -gɪt

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word vulgate

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

Vul•gateˈvʌl geɪt, -gɪt(n.)

  1. a Latin version of the Bible prepared chiefly by Saint Jerome at the end of the 4th century a .d . and used as an authorized version of the Roman Catholic Church.

    Category: Bible

  2. (l.c.) any commonly recognized text or version of a work.

  3. (adj.)of or pertaining to the Vulgate.

    Category: Bible

  4. (l.c.) commonly used or accepted; common.

Origin of Vulgate:

1605–15; < LL vulgāta (editiō) popular (edition); vulgāta, fem. ptp. of vulgāre to make common, publish, der. of vulgus the public

Princeton's WordNet

  1. Vulgate(noun)

    the Latin edition of the Bible translated from Hebrew and Greek mainly by St. Jerome at the end of the 4th century; as revised in 1592 it was adopted as the official text for the Roman Catholic Church

Wiktionary

  1. Vulgate(ProperNoun)

    the Latin translation of the Bible (from Hebrew and Greek) made by Saint Jerome

  2. vulgate(Noun)

    the vernacular language of a people

  3. Origin: From versio vulgata

Webster Dictionary

  1. Vulgate(adj)

    an ancient Latin version of the Scripture, and the only version which the Roman Church admits to be authentic; -- so called from its common use in the Latin Church

  2. Vulgate(adj)

    of or pertaining to the Vulgate, or the old Latin version of the Scriptures

Freebase

  1. Vulgate

    The Vulgate is a late 4th-century Latin translation of the Bible. It was largely the work of St. Jerome, who was commissioned by Pope Damasus I in 382 to make a revision of the Vetus Latina. Its widespread adoption eventually led to their eclipse. By the 13th century this revision had come to be called the versio vulgata, that is, the "commonly used translation". In the 16th century it became the definitive and officially promulgated Latin version of the Bible in the Roman Catholic Church.

The Nuttall Encyclopedia

  1. Vulgate

    a version of the Bible in Latin executed by St. Jerome (q. v.), and was in two centuries after its execution universally adopted in the Western Christian Church as authoritative for both faith and practice, and from the circumstance of its general reception it became known as the Vulgate (i. e. the commonly-accepted Bible of the Church), and it is the version accepted as authentic to-day by the Roman Catholic Church, under sanction of the Council of Trent. "With the publication of it," says Ruskin, "the great deed of fixing, in their ever since undisturbed harmony and majesty, the canon of Mosaic and Apostolic Scripture, was virtually accomplished, and the series of historic and didactic books which form our present Bible (including the Apocrypha) were established in and above the nascent thought of the noblest races of men living on the terrestrial globe, as a direct message to them from its Maker, containing whatever it was necessary for them to learn of His purposes towards them, and commanding, or advising, with divine authority and infallible wisdom, all that it was best for them to do and happiest to desire. Thus, partly as a scholar's exercise and partly as an old man's recreation, the severity of the Latin language was softened, like Venetian crystal, by the variable fire of Hebrew thought, and the 'Book of Books' took the abiding form of which all the future art of the Western nations was to be an hourly expanding interpretation."

Translation

Find a translation for the vulgate definition in other languages:

Select another language:

Discuss these vulgate definitions with the community:


Citation

Use the citation below to add this definition to your bibliography:

Style:MLAChicagoAPA

"vulgate." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2014. Web. 30 Oct. 2014. <http://www.definitions.net/definition/vulgate>.

Are we missing a good definition for vulgate?


The Web's Largest Resource for

Definitions & Translations


A Member Of The STANDS4 Network


Nearby & related entries:

Alternative searches for vulgate: