Definitions for vitamin k

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word vitamin k

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

vitamin K 1(n.)

  1. a yellowish, oily, viscous liquid, C31H46O2, that occurs in leafy vegetables, rice, bran, and hog liver or is obtained esp. from alfalfa or putrefied sardine meat or synthesized and that promotes blood clotting by increasing the prothrombin content of the blood.

    Category: Biochemistry, Nutrition

    Ref: Also called phylloquinone, phytonadione.

Origin of vitamin K:

1930–35

vitamin K 2(n.)

  1. a light yellow, crystalline solid, C41H56O2, having properties similar to those of vitamin K1.

    Category: Biochemistry, Nutrition

Origin of vitamin K:

1935–40

vitamin K 3(n.)

  1. Category: Biochemistry, Nutrition

    Ref: menadione

Origin of vitamin K:

1955–60

Princeton's WordNet

  1. vitamin K, naphthoquinone, antihemorrhagic factor(noun)

    a fat-soluble vitamin that helps in the clotting of blood

Wiktionary

  1. vitamin K(Noun)

    Either of several related fat-soluble vitamins, found in leafy green vegetables, essential for blood clotting.

  2. vitamin K(Noun)

    The drug ketamine.

Freebase

  1. Vitamin K

    Vitamin K is a group of structurally similar, fat-soluble vitamins that the human body needs for posttranslational modification of certain proteins required for blood coagulation, and in metabolic pathways in bone and other tissue. They are 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone derivatives. This group of vitamins includes two natural vitamers: vitamin K1 and vitamin K2. Vitamin K1, also known as phylloquinone, phytomenadione, or phytonadione, is synthesized by plants, and is found in highest amounts in green leafy vegetables because it is directly involved in photosynthesis. It may be thought of as the "plant form" of vitamin K. It is active in animals and may perform the classic functions of vitamin K in animals, including its activity in the production of blood clotting proteins. Animals may also convert it to vitamin K2. Vitamin K2, the main storage form in animals, has several subtypes, which differ in isoprenoid chain length. These vitamin K2 homologs are called menaquinones, and are characterized by the number of isoprenoid residues in their side chains. Menaquinones are abbreviated MK-n, where M stands for menaquinone, the K stands for vitamin K, and the n represents the number of isoprenoid side chain residues. For example, menaquinone-4 has four isoprene residues in its side chain. Menaquinone-4 is the most common type of vitamin K2 in animal products since MK-4 is normally synthesized from vitamin K1 in certain animal tissues by replacement of the phytyl tail with an unsaturated geranylgeranyl tail containing four isoprene units, thus yielding menaquinone-4. This homolog of vitamin K2 may have enzyme functions that are distinct from those of vitamin K1.

U.S. National Library of Medicine

  1. Vitamin K

    A lipid cofactor that is required for normal blood clotting. Several forms of vitamin K have been identified: VITAMIN K 1 (phytomenadione) derived from plants, VITAMIN K 2 (menaquinone) from bacteria, and synthetic naphthoquinone provitamins, VITAMIN K 3 (menadione). Vitamin K 3 provitamins, after being alkylated in vivo, exhibit the antifibrinolytic activity of vitamin K. Green leafy vegetables, liver, cheese, butter, and egg yolk are good sources of vitamin K.

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