Definitions for ulyssesyuˈlɪs iz; Brit. also ˈyu ləˌsiz

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word ulysses

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

U•lys•sesyuˈlɪs iz; Brit. also ˈyu ləˌsiz(n.)

  1. Category: Mythology

    Ref: Odysseus.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. Ulysses(noun)

    (Roman mythology) Roman spelling for Odysseus

Wiktionary

  1. Ulysses(ProperNoun)

    Latin name form of Odysseus

  2. Origin: From Ulysses, a frequent error for Ulixes, influenced by the Ancient Greek Ὀδυσσεύς.

Freebase

  1. Ulysses

    Ulysses is a novel by the Irish writer James Joyce. It was first serialised in parts in the American journal The Little Review from March 1918 to December 1920, and then published in its entirety by Sylvia Beach in February 1922, in Paris. Considered one of the most important works of Modernist literature, it has been called "a demonstration and summation of the entire movement". "Before Joyce, no writer of fiction had so foregrounded the process of thinking." Ulysses chronicles the passage of Leopold Bloom through Dublin during an ordinary day, 16 June 1904. Ulysses is the Latinised name of Odysseus, the hero of Homer's poem Odyssey, and the novel establishes a series of parallels between its characters and events and those of the poem. Ulysses is approximately 265,000 words in length, uses a lexicon of 30,030 words, and is divided into eighteen episodes. Since publication, the book has attracted controversy and scrutiny, ranging from early obscenity trials to protracted textual "Joyce Wars." Ulysses' stream-of-consciousness technique, careful structuring, and experimental prose—full of puns, parodies, and allusions, as well as its rich characterisations and broad humour, made the book a highly regarded novel in the Modernist pantheon. In 1998, the Modern Library ranked Ulysses first on its list of the 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century. Joyce fans worldwide now celebrate 16 June as Bloomsday.

The Nuttall Encyclopedia

  1. Ulysses

    chieftain of Ithaca, one of the Greek heroes in the Trojan War, in which he was with difficulty persuaded to join, but in which, however, he did good service both by his courage and his counsels; he is less famed for what he did before Troy than for what befell him in his ten years' wandering homeward after, as recorded by Homer in a separate poem called after him the "Odyssey" (q. v.), which relates his stay among the lotus-eaters (q. v.), his encounter with Polyphemus (q. v.), the enchantments of Circe (q. v.), the Sirens (q. v.), and Calypso (q. v.), and his shipwreck, &c. Tennyson represents him as impatient of the humdrum life of Ithaca on his return, and as longing to join his Trojan comrades in the Isles of the Blessed. See Penelope and Telemachus. Ulysses' Bow

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