Definitions for trepidationˌtrɛp ɪˈdeɪ ʃən

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word trepidation

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

trep•i•da•tionˌtrɛp ɪˈdeɪ ʃən(n.)

  1. tremulous fear, alarm, or agitation; perturbation.

  2. a trembling or quivering movement.

Origin of trepidation:

1595–1605; < L trepidātiō, der. of trepidā(re) to be apprehensive, panic

Princeton's WordNet

  1. trepidation(noun)

    a feeling of alarm or dread

Wiktionary

  1. trepidation(Noun)

    A fearful state; a state of hesitation or concern.

    I decided, with considerable trepidation, to let him drive my car without me.

  2. Origin: From trepidatio, from trepido

Webster Dictionary

  1. Trepidation(noun)

    an involuntary trembling, sometimes an effect of paralysis, but usually caused by terror or fear; quaking; quivering

  2. Trepidation(noun)

    hence, a state of terror or alarm; fear; confusion; fright; as, the men were in great trepidation

  3. Trepidation(noun)

    a libration of the starry sphere in the Ptolemaic system; a motion ascribed to the firmament, to account for certain small changes in the position of the ecliptic and of the stars

Freebase

  1. Trepidation

    According to a medieval theory of astronomy, trepidation is oscillation in the precession of the equinoxes. The theory was popular from the 9th to the 16th centuries. The origin of the theory of trepidation comes from the Small Commentary to the Handy Tables written by Theon of Alexandria in the 4th century CE. In precession, the equinoxes appear to move slowly through the ecliptic, completing a revolution in approximately 25,800 years. Theon states that certain ancient astrologers believed that the precession, rather than being a steady unending motion, instead reverses direction every 640 years. The equinoxes, in this theory, move through the ecliptic at the rate of 1 degree in 80 years over a span of 8 degrees, after which they suddenly reverse direction and travel back over the same 8 degrees. Theon describes but did not endorse this theory. A more sophisticated version of this theory was adopted in the 9th century to explain a variation which Islamic astronomers incorrectly believed was affecting the rate of precession. This version of trepidation is described in De motu octavae sphaerae, a Latin translation of a lost Arabic original. The book is attributed to the Arab astronomer by Thābit ibn Qurra, but the attribution has been contested in modern times. In this trepidation model, the oscillation is added to the equinoxes as they precess. The oscillation occurred over a period of 7000 years, added to the eighth sphere of the Ptolemaic system. "Thabit's" trepidation model was used in the Alfonsine Tables, which assigned a period of 49,000 years to precession. This version of trepidation dominated Latin astronomy in the later Middle Ages.

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