Definitions for talentˈtæl ənt

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word talent

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

tal•ent*ˈtæl ənt(n.)

  1. a special, often creative natural ability or aptitude:

    a talent for drawing.

  2. a person or persons with special ability, esp. in a particular field:

    the theater's major talents; the local talent.

  3. a power of mind or body considered as given to a person for use and improvement: so called from the parable in Matt. 25:14–30.

  4. any of various ancient units of weight, as a unit of the Middle East equal to 3000 shekels, or of Greece equal to 6000 drachmas.

    Category: Weights and Measures

  5. any of various ancient monetary units equal to the value of a talent weight of gold or silver.

    Category: Numismatics

  6. Obs. inclination or disposition.

* Syn: See ability.

Origin of talent:

bef. 900; ME, OE talente < L talenta, pl. of talentum < Gk tálanton balance, weight, monetary unit

tal′ent•ed(adj.)

Princeton's WordNet

  1. endowment, gift, talent, natural endowment(noun)

    natural abilities or qualities

  2. talent(noun)

    a person who possesses unusual innate ability in some field or activity

Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

  1. talent(noun)ˈtæl ənt

    a natural skill or ability

    his musical/artistic/athletic talents; She has a talent for making people feel welcome.

Wiktionary

  1. talent(Noun)

    A unit of weight and money used in ancient times in Greece, the Roman Empire, and the Middle East.

  2. talent(Noun)

    A desire or inclination for something.

  3. talent(Noun)

    After Matthew 25, above: A marked natural ability or skill.

    He has the talent of touching his nose with his tongue.

  4. talent(Noun)

    People of talent, viewed collectively; a talented person.

    The director searched their talent pool to fill the new opening.

  5. talent(Noun)

    The men or (especially) women of a place or area, judged by their attractiveness.

    Not much talent in this bar tonight u2013 let's hit the clubs.

  6. Origin: talente, from plural of talentum, from τάλαντον. Later senses reinforced by Old French talent.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Talent(verb)

    among the ancient Greeks, a weight and a denomination of money equal to 60 minae or 6,000 drachmae. The Attic talent, as a weight, was about 57 lbs. avoirdupois; as a denomination of silver money, its value was £243 15s. sterling, or about $1,180.

  2. Talent(verb)

    among the Hebrews, a weight and denomination of money. For silver it was equivalent to 3,000 shekels, and in weight was equal to about 93/ lbs. avoirdupois; as a denomination of silver, it has been variously estimated at from £340 to £396 sterling, or about $1,645 to $1,916. For gold it was equal to 10,000 gold shekels.

  3. Talent(verb)

    inclination; will; disposition; desire

  4. Talent(verb)

    intellectual ability, natural or acquired; mental endowment or capacity; skill in accomplishing; a special gift, particularly in business, art, or the like; faculty; a use of the word probably originating in the Scripture parable of the talents (Matt. xxv. 14-30)

Freebase

  1. Talent

    The talent was one of several ancient units of mass, as well as corresponding units of value equivalent to these masses of a precious metal. It was approximately the mass of water required to fill an amphora. A Greek, or Attic talent, was 26 kilograms, a Roman talent was 32.3 kilograms, an Egyptian talent was 27 kilograms, and a Babylonian talent was 30.3 kilograms. Ancient Israel, and other Levantine countries, adopted the Babylonian talent, but later revised the mass. The heavy common talent, used in New Testament times, was 58.9 kilograms. The talent of gold was known to Homer, who described how Achilles gave a half-talent of gold to Antilochus as a prize. An Attic talent of silver was the value of nine man-years of skilled work. During the Peloponnesian War, an Attic talent was the amount of silver that would pay a month's wages of a trireme crew of 200 men. Hellenistic mercenaries were commonly paid one drachma per day of military service. There were 6,000 drachmae in an Attic talent. The Babylonians, Sumerians, and Hebrews divided a talent into 60 mina, each of which was subdivided into 60 shekels. The Greek also used the ratio of 60 mina to one talent. A Greek mina was approximately 434 ± 3 grams. A Roman talent was 100 libra. A libra is exactly three quarters of a Greek mina, so a Roman talent is 1.25 Greek talents. An Egyptian talent was 80 libra.

The Nuttall Encyclopedia

  1. Talent

    a weight, coin, or sum of money among the ancients, of variable value among different nations and at different periods; the Attic weight being equal to about 57 lbs. troy, and the money to £243, 15s.; among the Romans the great talent was worth £99, and the little worth £75.

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'talent' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #4276

  2. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'talent' in Nouns Frequency: #1397


Translations for talent

Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary

talent(noun)

a special ability or cleverness; a skill

a talent for drawing.

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