Definitions for shimmyˈʃɪm i

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word shimmy

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

shim•myˈʃɪm i(n.)(pl.)-mies

  1. (n.)an American ragtime dance marked by rapid shaking of the hips and shoulders.

    Category: Music and Dance

  2. excessive wobbling in the front wheels of a motor vehicle.

    Category: Automotive

  3. a chemise.

    Category: Clothing

  4. (v.i.)to dance the shimmy.

    Category: Music and Dance

  5. to shake, wobble, or vibrate.

Origin of shimmy:

1830–40; back formation and resp. of chemise

Princeton's WordNet

  1. shimmy(noun)

    an abnormal wobble in a motor vehicle (especially in the front wheels)

    "he could feel the shimmy in the steering wheel"

  2. chemise, shimmy, shift, slip, teddy(noun)

    a woman's sleeveless undergarment

  3. shimmy(verb)

    lively dancing (usually to ragtime music) with much shaking of the shoulders and hips

  4. shimmy, wobble(verb)

    tremble or shake

    "His voice wobbled with restrained emotion"

  5. shimmy(verb)

    dance a shimmy

Wiktionary

  1. shimmy(Noun)

    An abnormal vibration, especially in the wheels of a vehicle.

  2. shimmy(Noun)

    A dance that was popular in the 1920s.

  3. shimmy(Noun)

    A sleeveless chemise.

  4. shimmy(Verb)

    To climb something (e.g. a pole) gradually (e.g. using alternately one's arms then one's legs.)

  5. shimmy(Verb)

    To vibrate abnormally, as a broken wheel.

  6. shimmy(Verb)

    To shake the body as if dancing the shimmy.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Shimmy(noun)

    a chemise

Freebase

  1. Shimmy

    A shimmy is a dance move in which the body is held still, except for the shoulders, which are alternated back and forth. When the right shoulder goes back, the left one comes forward. It may help to hold the arms out slightly bent at the elbow, and when the shoulders are moved, keep the hands in the same position. In 1917, a dance-song titled "Shim-Me-Sha-Wabble" by Spencer Williams was published, as was "The Jazz Dance, which included the "Shimmy-She", among others. Flappers often performed the dance in the 1920s. The origin of the name is often attributed to Gilda Gray, a Polish emigrant to America. An anecdote says that when she was asked about her dancing style, she answered, in heavy accent, "I'm shaking my chemise". However, in an interview Gilda denied having said this, and earlier usages of the word are recorded. In the late 1910s others were also attributed as being the "inventor" of the shimmy, including Bee Palmer. Mae West, in her autobiography Goodness Had Nothing to Do with It, claimed to have retitled the "Shimmy-Shawobble" as the Shimmy herself, after seeing the moves in some black nightclubs. The move is also known under different names in various folk dances, in Gypsy dances. In Russian this move is called "Tsyganochka", or "gypsy girl", and is done by gypsy female dancers to produce a chime of costume decorations made of the sewn-on coins.

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