Definitions for sensationalismsɛnˈseɪ ʃə nlˌɪz əm

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word sensationalism

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

sen•sa•tion•al•ismsɛnˈseɪ ʃə nlˌɪz əm(n.)

  1. the use of sensational subject matter or style.

  2. the philosophic doctrine that the good is to be judged only by the gratification of the senses.

    Category: Philosphy

Origin of sensationalism:

1840–50

sen•sa`tion•al•is′tic(adj.)

Princeton's WordNet

  1. sensationalism(noun)

    subject matter that is calculated to excite and please vulgar tastes

  2. sensationalism, luridness(noun)

    the journalistic use of subject matter that appeals to vulgar tastes

    "the tabloids relied on sensationalism to maintain their circulation"

  3. sensualism, sensationalism(noun)

    (philosophy) the ethical doctrine that feeling is the only criterion for what is good

  4. empiricism, empiricist philosophy, sensationalism(noun)

    (philosophy) the doctrine that knowledge derives from experience

Wiktionary

  1. sensationalism(Noun)

    The use of sensational subject matter, style or methods, or the sensational subject matter itself; behavior, published materials, or broadcasts that are intentionally controversial, exaggerated, lurid, loud, or attention-grabbing. Especially applied to news media in a pejorative sense that they are reporting in a manner to gain audience or notoriety but at the expense of accuracy and professionalism.

  2. sensationalism(Noun)

    A theory of philosophy that all knowledge is ultimately derived from the senses.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Sensationalism(noun)

    the doctrine held by Condillac, and by some ascribed to Locke, that our ideas originate solely in sensation, and consist of sensations transformed; sensualism; -- opposed to intuitionalism, and rationalism

  2. Sensationalism(noun)

    the practice or methods of sensational writing or speaking; as, the sensationalism of a novel

Freebase

  1. Sensationalism

    Sensationalism is a type of editorial bias in mass media in which events and topics in news stories and pieces are over-hyped to increase viewership or readership numbers. Sensationalism may include reporting about generally insignificant matters and events that don't influence overall society and biased presentations of newsworthy topics in a sensationalist, trivial or tabloid manner. Some tactics include being deliberately obtuse, appealing to emotions, being controversial, intentionally omitting facts and information, being loud, self-centered and acting to obtain attention. Trivial information and events are sometimes misrepresented and exaggerated as important or significant, and often includes stories about the actions of individuals and small groups of people, the content of which is often insignificant and irrelevant relative to the macro-level day-to-day events that occur globally. Furthermore, the content and subject matter typically doesn't affect the lives of the masses and doesn't affect society, and instead is broadcast and printed to attract viewers and readers. Examples include press coverage about the Bill Clinton/Monica Lewinsky scandal, Casey Anthony Trial, Tonya Harding's role in the attack of Nancy Kerrigan, the Elian Gonzalez affair and the O.J. Simpson murder case.

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