Definitions for resinˈrɛz ɪn

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word resin

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

res•inˈrɛz ɪn(n.)

  1. any of a class of nonvolatile, solid or semisolid organic substances, as copal or mastic, that consist of amorphous mixtures of carboxylic acids: used in medicine and in the making of varnishes and plastics.

    Category: Chemistry, Pharmacology

  2. a substance of this type obtained from certain pines; rosin.

    Category: Chemistry

  3. (v.t.)to treat or rub with resin.

    Category: Chemistry

Origin of resin:

1350–1400; ME < OF resine < L rēsīna, prob. < a non-IE language; cf. Gk rhētinē pine resin, from a related source

res′in•like`(adj.)

Princeton's WordNet

  1. resin, rosin(noun)

    any of a class of solid or semisolid viscous substances obtained either as exudations from certain plants or prepared by polymerization of simple molecules

Wiktionary

  1. resin(Noun)

    A viscous hydrocarbon secretion of many plants, particularly coniferous trees.

  2. resin(Noun)

    Any of various yellowish viscous liquids or soft solids of plant origin; used in lacquers, varnishes and many other applications; chemically they are mostly hydrocarbons, often polycyclic.

  3. resin(Noun)

    Any synthetic compound of similar properties.

  4. Origin: From résine, from resina

Webster Dictionary

  1. Resin(noun)

    any one of a class of yellowish brown solid inflammable substances, of vegetable origin, which are nonconductors of electricity, have a vitreous fracture, and are soluble in ether, alcohol, and essential oils, but not in water; specif., pine resin (see Rosin)

Freebase

  1. Resin

    Resin in the most specific use of the term is a hydrocarbon secretion of many plants, particularly coniferous trees. Resins are valued for their chemical properties and associated uses, such as the production of varnishes, adhesives and food glazing agents. They are also prized as an important source of raw materials for organic synthesis, and as constituents of incense and perfume. Plant resins have a very long history that was documented in ancient Greece by Theophrastus, in ancient Rome by Pliny the Elder, and especially in the resins known as frankincense and myrrh, prized in ancient Egypt. These were highly prized substances, and required as incense in some religious rites. Amber is a hard fossilized resin from ancient trees.

The Standard Electrical Dictionary

  1. Resin

    (a) The product obtained by non-destructive distillation of the juice of the pitch pine. It is the solid residue left after the turpentine has been evaporated or distilled. It is a mixture of abietic acid C44 H64 O5 and pinic acid C20 H30 O2. It is an insulator; its specific inductive capacity is 2.55. (Baltzmann.) Synonyms--Colophony--Rosin. (b) The name is also generally applied to similar substances obtained from the sap of other trees; thus shellac is a resin. The resins are a family of vegetable products; the solid portions of the sap of certain trees. Common resin, lac, dragons blood, are examples. They are all dielectrics and sources of resinous or negative electricity when rubbed with cotton, flannel, or silk. (See Electrostatic Series.)


Translations for resin

Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary

resin(noun)

a sticky substance produced by certain trees (eg firs, pines) and some other plants.

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