Definitions for radicleˈræd ɪ kəl

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word radicle

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

rad•i•cleˈræd ɪ kəl(n.)

  1. Bot. an embryonic root.

    Category: Botany

  2. Anat. a small rootlike part or structure, as the beginning of a nerve or vein.

Origin of radicle:

1665–75; < L rādīcula small root =rādīc- (s. of rādīx) root1+-ula -ule

ra•dic•u•larrəˈdɪk yə lər(adj.)

Princeton's WordNet

  1. radicle(noun)

    (anatomy) a small structure resembling a rootlet (such as a fibril of a nerve)

Wiktionary

  1. radicle(Noun)

    The rudimentary shoot of a plant which supports the cotyledons in the seed, and from which the root is developed downward; the root of the embryo.

  2. radicle(Noun)

    A rootlet.

  3. Origin: From radicula.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Radicle(noun)

    the rudimentary stem of a plant which supports the cotyledons in the seed, and from which the root is developed downward; the stem of the embryo; the caulicle

  2. Radicle(noun)

    a rootlet; a radicel

Freebase

  1. Radicle

    In botany, the radicle is the first part of a seedling to emerge from the seed during the process of germination. The radicle is the embryonic root of the plant, and grows downward in the soil. Above the radicle is the embryonic stem or hypocotyl, supporting the cotyledon. It's the embryonic root inside the seed. It's the first thing to emerge out of a seed and down into the ground to allow the seed to suck up water and send out its leaves so that it can start photosynthesizing. The radicle emerges from a seed through the micropyle. Radicles in seedlings are classified into two main types. Those pointing away from the seed coat scar or hilum are classified as antitropous, and those pointing towards the hilum are syntropous. If the radicle begins to decay, the seedling undergoes preemergence damping-off. This disease appears on the radicle as darkened spots. Eventually, it causes death of the seedling. The plumule is the baby shoot. It grows after the radicle. In 1880 Charles Darwin published a book about plants he had studied, The Power of Movement in Plants, where he mentions the radicle.

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