Definitions for quicksandˈkwɪkˌsænd

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word quicksand

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

quick•sandˈkwɪkˌsænd(n.)

  1. a bed of soft or loose sand saturated with water and having considerable depth, yielding under weight and therefore tending to cause an object resting on its surface to sink.

    Category: Geology, Geography (terms)

Origin of quicksand:

1275–1325

quick′sand′y(adj.)

Princeton's WordNet

  1. quicksand(noun)

    a treacherous situation that tends to entrap and destroy

  2. quicksand(noun)

    a pit filled with loose wet sand into which objects are sucked down

Wiktionary

  1. quicksand(Noun)

    Wet sand that things readily sink in, often found near rivers or coasts

    My feet were firmly lodged in the quicksand, and the more I struggled the more I sank into it.

  2. quicksand(Noun)

    Anything that pulls one down or buries one metaphorically

    The quicksands of youth...

  3. Origin: From quyksande, from cwecesand, from kwikwaz + samdaz, equivalent to . Cognate with kwikzand, Quicksand, kwiksandur, kviksyndi. More at quick, sand.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Quicksand(noun)

    sand easily moved or readily yielding to pressure; especially, a deep mass of loose or moving sand mixed with water, sometimes found at the mouth of a river or along some coasts, and very dangerous, from the difficulty of extricating a person who begins sinking into it

Freebase

  1. Quicksand

    Quicksand is a colloid hydrogel consisting of fine granular material, clay, and water. Quicksand forms in saturated loose sand when the sand is suddenly agitated. When water in the sand cannot escape, it creates a liquefied soil that loses strength and cannot support weight. Quicksand can form in standing water or in upwards flowing water. In the case of upwards flowing water, seepage forces oppose the force of gravity and suspend the soil particles. The saturated sediment may appear quite solid until a sudden change in pressure or shock initiates liquefaction. This causes the sand to form a suspension and lose strength. The cushioning of water gives quicksand, and other liquefied sediments, a spongy, fluidlike texture. Objects in liquefied sand sink to the level at which the weight of the object is equal to the weight of the displaced soil/water mix and the submerged object floats due to its buoyancy. Liquefaction is a special case of quicksand. In this case, sudden earthquake forces immediately increases the pore pressure of shallow groundwater. The saturated liquefied soil loses strength, causing buildings or other objects on that surface to sink or fall over.

The Nuttall Encyclopedia

  1. Quicksand

    sandbank so saturated with water that it gives way under pressure; found near the mouths of rivers.

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