Definitions for pretextˈpri tɛkst

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word pretext

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

pre•textˈpri tɛkst(n.)

  1. something put forward to conceal a true purpose or object; ostensible reason; excuse.

  2. the misleading appearance or behavior assumed with this intention; subterfuge.

Origin of pretext:

1505–15; < L praetextum pretext, ornament, n. use of neut. ptp. of praetexere to edge with, place in front, pretend. See pre -, texture

Princeton's WordNet

  1. pretext, stalking-horse(noun)

    something serving to conceal plans; a fictitious reason that is concocted in order to conceal the real reason

  2. guise, pretense, pretence, pretext(noun)

    an artful or simulated semblance

    "under the guise of friendship he betrayed them"

Wiktionary

  1. pretext(Noun)

    A false, contrived or assumed purpose; a pretense.

    The reporter called the company on the pretext of trying to resolve a consumer complaint.

  2. pretext(Verb)

    To employ a pretext, which involves using a false or contrived purpose for soliciting the gain of something else.

    The spy obtained his phone records using possibly-illegal pretexting methods.

  3. Origin: From prétexte, from praetextum, neuter of praetextus, past participle of praetexere.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Pretext(noun)

    ostensible reason or motive assigned or assumed as a color or cover for the real reason or motive; pretense; disguise

Freebase

  1. Pretext

    A pretext is an excuse to do something or say something that is not accurate. Pretexts may be based on a half-truth or developed in the context of a misleading fabrication. Pretexts have been used to conceal the true purpose or rationale behind actions and words. In US law, a pretext usually describes false reasons that hide the true intentions or motivations for a legal action. If a party can establish a prima facie case for the proffered evidence, the opposing party must prove that the these reasons were "pretextual" or false. This can be accomplished by directly demonstrating that the motivations behind the presentation of evidence is false, or indirectly by evidence that the motivations are not "credible". In Griffith v. Schnitzer, an employment discrimination case, a jury award was reversed by a Court of Appeals because the evidence was not sufficient that the defendant's reasons were "pretextual". That is, the defendant's evidence was either undisputed, or the plaintiff's was "irrelevant subjective assessments and opinions". A "pretextual" arrest by law enforcement officers is one carried out for illegal purposes such as to conduct an unjustified search and seizure.


Translations for pretext

Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary

pretext(noun)

a reason given in order to hide the real reason; an excuse.

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"pretext." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2014. Web. 20 Apr. 2014. <http://www.definitions.net/definition/pretext>.

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