Definitions for pragmatismˈpræg məˌtɪz əm

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word pragmatism

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

prag•ma•tismˈpræg məˌtɪz əm(n.)

  1. character or conduct that emphasizes practical results or concerns rather than theory or principle.

  2. a philosophical movement or system having various forms, but generally stressing practical consequences as constituting the essential criterion in determining meaning, truth, or value.

    Category: Philosphy

Origin of pragmatism:

1860–65

prag`ma•tis′tic(adj.)

Princeton's WordNet

  1. pragmatism(noun)

    (philosophy) the doctrine that practical consequences are the criteria of knowledge and meaning and value

  2. realism, pragmatism(noun)

    the attribute of accepting the facts of life and favoring practicality and literal truth

Wiktionary

  1. pragmatism(Noun)

    The pursuit of practicality over aesthetic qualities; a concentration on facts rather than emotions or ideals.

  2. pragmatism(Noun)

    The theory that political problems should be met with practical solutions rather than ideological ones.

  3. pragmatism(Noun)

    The idea that beliefs are identified with the actions of a believer, and the truth of beliefs with success of those actions in securing a believer's goals; the doctrine that ideas must be looked at in terms of their practical effects and consequences.

  4. Origin: From stem of πρᾶγμα + -ism.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Pragmatism(noun)

    the quality or state of being pragmatic; in literature, the pragmatic, or philosophical, method

Freebase

  1. Pragmatism

    Pragmatism is a philosophical tradition that began in the United States around 1870. Pragmatism is a rejection of the idea that the function of thought is to describe, represent, or mirror reality. Instead, pragmatists develop their philosophy around the idea that the function of thought is as a instrument or tool for prediction, action, and problem solving. Pragmatists contend that most philosophical topics--such as the nature of knowledge, language, concepts, meaning, belief, and science--are all best viewed in terms of their practical uses and successes rather than in terms of representative accuracy. A few of the various but interrelated positions often characteristic of philosophers working from a pragmatist approach include: ⁕Anti-representationalism; any view in philosophy of language that rejects analyzing the semantic meaning of propositions, mental states, and statements in terms of a correspondence or representational relationship and instead analyzes semantic meaning in terms of notions like dispositions to action, inferential relationships, and/or functional roles. Not to be confused with pragmatics, a sub-field of linguistics with no relation to philosophical pragmatism.

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