Definitions for pityˈpɪt i

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word pity

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

pit•y*ˈpɪt i(n.)(pl.)pit•ies

  1. (n.)sympathetic or kindly sorrow evoked by the suffering, distress, or misfortune of another, often leading one to give relief or aid or to show mercy.

  2. a cause or reason for pity, sorrow, or regret:

    What a pity you couldn't go!

  3. (v.t.)to feel pity or compassion for; be sorry for; commiserate with.

  4. (v.i.)to have compassion; feel pity.

Idioms for pity:

  1. have or take pity,to have compassion or show mercy.

    Category: Idiom

* Syn: See sympathy.

Origin of pity:

1175–1225; ME pite < OF pite, earlier pitet < L pietātem, acc. of pietāspiety

pit′y•ing•ly(adv.)

Princeton's WordNet

  1. commiseration, pity, ruth, pathos(noun)

    a feeling of sympathy and sorrow for the misfortunes of others

    "the blind are too often objects of pity"

  2. pity, shame(noun)

    an unfortunate development

    "it's a pity he couldn't do it"

  3. compassion, pity(verb)

    the humane quality of understanding the suffering of others and wanting to do something about it

  4. feel for, pity, compassionate, condole with, sympathize with(verb)

    share the suffering of

Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

  1. pity(noun)ˈpɪt i

    a feeling of great sympathy or sorrow toward sb because they are in a bad situation

    She felt pity for the people who had nothing left.

  2. pityˈpɪt i

    used to say that you feel sorry or disappointed

    It's a pity nobody called me.

  3. pityˈpɪt i

    to help sb you feel sorry for

    A passing driver took pity on us and drove us to town.

  4. pity(verb)ˈpɪt i

    to feel sorry or sympathy for

    I pity those people who had to wait all night.

Wiktionary

  1. pity(Noun)

    A feeling of sympathy at the misfortune or suffering of someone or something.

  2. pity(Noun)

    (countable but not used in the plural) Something regrettable.

  3. pity(Verb)

    To feel pity for (someone or something).

  4. pity(Interjection)

    Short form of what a pity.

  5. Origin: From pité, pittee etc., from pitet, pitié, from pietas.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Pity(noun)

    piety

  2. Pity(noun)

    a feeling for the sufferings or distresses of another or others; sympathy with the grief or misery of another; compassion; fellow-feeling; commiseration

  3. Pity(noun)

    a reason or cause of pity, grief, or regret; a thing to be regretted

  4. Pity(verb)

    to feel pity or compassion for; to have sympathy with; to compassionate; to commiserate; to have tender feelings toward (any one), awakened by a knowledge of suffering

  5. Pity(verb)

    to move to pity; -- used impersonally

  6. Pity(verb)

    to be compassionate; to show pity

Freebase

  1. Pity

    Pity means feeling for others, particularly feelings of sadness or sorrow, and is used in a comparable sense to the more modern words "sympathy" and "empathy". Through insincere usage, it can also have a more unsympathetic connotation of feelings of superiority or condescension. The word "pity" comes from the Latin word "Pietas". The word is often used in the translations from Ancient Greek into English of Aristotle's Poetics and Rhetoric. Aristotle argued that before a person can feel pity for another human, the person must first have experienced suffering of a similar type, and the person must also be somewhat distanced or removed from the sufferer. In Aristotle's Rhetoric he defines pity as follows: "Let pity, then, be a kind of pain in the case of an apparent destructive or painful harm of one not deserving to encounter it, which one might expect oneself, or one of one's own, to suffer, and this when it seems near". Aristotle also pointed out that "people pity their acquaintances, provided that they are not exceedingly close in kinship; for concerning these they are disposed as they are concerning themselves...For what is terrible is different from what is pitiable, and is expulsive of pity". Thus, from Aristotle's perspective, in order to feel pity, a person must believe that the person who is suffering does not deserve their fate. Developing a traditional Greek view in his work on poetry, Aristotle also defines tragedy as a kind of imitative poetry that provokes pity and fear.

The Foolish Dictionary, by Gideon Wurdz

  1. PITY

    An emotion awakened in a man's mind when he beholds the children of a woman who might have married him instead.

British National Corpus

  1. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'pity' in Written Corpus Frequency: #3493

  2. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'pity' in Nouns Frequency: #2045


Translations for pity

Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary

pity(noun)

a feeling of sorrow for the troubles and sufferings of others

He felt a great pity for her.

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