Definitions for paradoxˈpær əˌdɒks

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word paradox

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

par•a•doxˈpær əˌdɒks(n.)

  1. a seemingly contradictory or absurd statement that expresses a possible truth.

  2. a self-contradictory and false proposition.

  3. a person, thing, or situation, exhibiting an apparently contradictory nature.

  4. an opinion or statement contrary to commonly accepted opinion.

Origin of paradox:

1530–40; < L paradoxum < Gk parádoxon, n. use of neut. of parádoxos unbelievable, lit., beyond belief. See para -1, orthodox

par`a•dox′i•cal•ness(n.)

par`a•dox`i•cal′i•ty(n.)

Princeton's WordNet

  1. paradox(noun)

    (logic) a statement that contradicts itself

    "`I always lie' is a paradox because if it is true it must be false"

Wiktionary

  1. paradox(Noun)

    A self-contradictory statement, which can only be true if it is false, and vice versa.

    "This sentence is false" is a paradox.

  2. paradox(Noun)

    A counterintuitive conclusion or outcome.

    It is an interesting paradox that drinking a lot of water can often make you feel thirsty.

  3. paradox(Noun)

    A claim that two apparently contradictory ideas are true.

    Not having a fashion is a fashion; that's a paradox.

  4. paradox(Noun)

    A person or thing having contradictory properties.

    He is a paradox; you would not expect him in that political party.

  5. paradox(Noun)

    An unanswerable question or difficult puzzle, particularly one which leads to a deeper truth.

  6. paradox(Noun)

    A statement which is difficult to believe, or which goes against general belief.

  7. paradox(Noun)

    The use of counterintuitive or contradictory statements (paradoxes) in speech or writing.

  8. paradox(Noun)

    A state in which one is logically compelled to contradict oneself.

  9. paradox(Noun)

    The practice of giving instructions that are opposed to the therapist's actual intent, with the intention that the client will disobey or be unable to obey.

  10. Origin: From paradoxe < paradoxum, from παράδοξος.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Paradox(noun)

    a tenet or proposition contrary to received opinion; an assertion or sentiment seemingly contradictory, or opposed to common sense; that which in appearance or terms is absurd, but yet may be true in fact

Freebase

  1. Paradox

    A paradox is an argument that produces an inconsistency, typically within logic or common sense. Most logical paradoxes are known to be invalid arguments but are still valuable in promoting critical thinking. However, some have revealed errors in definitions assumed to be rigorous, and have caused axioms of mathematics and logic to be re-examined. Still others, such as Curry's paradox, are not yet resolved. In common usage, the word "paradox" often refers to irony or contradiction. Examples outside logic include the Grandfather paradox from physics, and the Ship of Theseus from philosophy. Paradoxes can also take the form of images or other media. For example, M.C. Escher featured perspective-based paradoxes in many of his drawings.


Translations for paradox

Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary

paradox(noun)

a statement etc that seems to contradict itself but which is nevertheless true

If your birthday is on February 29 you could state the paradox that you are thirteen years old although you have only had three birthdays.

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