Definitions for osmosisɒzˈmoʊ sɪs, ɒs-

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word osmosis

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

os•mo•sisɒzˈmoʊ sɪs, ɒs-(n.)

  1. the tendency of a fluid, usu. water, to pass through a semipermeable membrane into a solution where the solvent concentration is higher, thus equalizing the concentrations of materials on either side of the membrane. the diffusion of fluids through membranes or porous partitions.

    Category: Biochemistry, Chemistry

  2. a subtle or gradual absorption:

    to learn by osmosis.

Origin of osmosis:

1865–70; Latinized form of now obs. osmose osmosis, extracted from endosmose endosmosis < F, =end-end - + Gk ōsm(ós) push, thrust + F -ose -osis

os•mot′i•cal•ly(adv.)

Princeton's WordNet

  1. osmosis(noun)

    (biology, chemistry) diffusion of molecules through a semipermeable membrane from a place of higher concentration to a place of lower concentration until the concentration on both sides is equal

Wiktionary

  1. osmosis(Noun)

    The net movement of solvent molecules from a region of high solvent potential to a region of lower solvent potential through a partially permeable membrane

  2. osmosis(Noun)

    Picking up knowledge accidentally, without actually seeking that particular knowledge.

    I was reading about chickens, and I guess I learned about hawks through osmosis.

Freebase

  1. Osmosis

    Osmosis is the spontaneous net movement of solvent molecules through a partially permeable membrane into a region of higher solute concentration, in the direction that tends to equalize the solute concentrations on the two sides. It may also be used to describe a physical process in which any solvent moves, without input of energy, across a semipermeable membrane separating two solutions of different concentrations. Although osmosis does not require input of energy, it does use kinetic energy and can be made to do work. The osmotic pressure is defined to be the pressure required to maintain an equilibrium, with no net movement of solvent. Osmotic pressure is a colligative property, meaning that the osmotic pressure depends on the molar concentration of the solute but not on its identity. Osmosis is essential in biological systems, as biological membranes are semipermeable. In general, these membranes are impermeable to large and polar molecules, such as ions, proteins, and polysaccharides, while being permeable to non-polar and/or hydrophobic molecules like lipids as well as to small molecules like oxygen, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, nitric oxide, etc. Permeability depends on solubility, charge, or chemistry, as well as solute size. Water molecules travel through the plasma membrane, tonoplast membrane or protoplast by diffusing across the phospholipid bilayer via aquaporins. Osmosis provides the primary means by which water is transported into and out of cells. The turgor pressure of a cell is largely maintained by osmosis, across the cell membrane, between the cell interior and its relatively hypotonic environment.

U.S. National Library of Medicine

  1. Osmosis

    Tendency of fluids (e.g., water) to move from the less concentrated to the more concentrated side of a semipermeable membrane.


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