Definitions for occlusionəˈklu ʒən

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word occlusion

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

oc•clu•sionəˈklu ʒən(n.)

  1. the act of occluding or the state of being occluded.

  2. the fitting together of the teeth of the upper and lower jaws when the jaws are closed.

    Category: Dentistry

  3. Phonet. momentary complete closure at some area in the vocal tract.

    Category: Phonetics

  4. Category: Meteorology

    Ref: occluded front.

Origin of occlusion:

1635–45; < L occlūs(us) (ptp. of occlūdere

oc•clu′sive-sɪv(adj.)

Princeton's WordNet

  1. occlusion(noun)

    closure or blockage (as of a blood vessel)

  2. occluded front, occlusion(noun)

    (meteorology) a composite front when colder air surrounds a mass of warm air and forces it aloft

  3. occlusion(noun)

    (dentistry) the normal spatial relation of the teeth when the jaws are closed

  4. blockage, block, closure, occlusion, stop, stoppage(noun)

    an obstruction in a pipe or tube

    "we had to call a plumber to clear out the blockage in the drainpipe"

  5. blockage, closure, occlusion(noun)

    the act of blocking

Wiktionary

  1. occlusion(Noun)

    The process of occluding, or something that occludes.

  2. occlusion(Noun)

    Anything that obstructs or closes a vessel or canal.

  3. occlusion(Noun)

    The alignment of the teeth when upper and lower jaws are brought together.

  4. occlusion(Noun)

    An occluded front.

  5. occlusion(Noun)

    A closure within the vocal tract that produces an oral stop or nasal stop.

  6. occlusion(Noun)

    The absorption of a gas or liquid by a substance such as a metal.

  7. occlusion(Noun)

    The blocking of the view of part of an image by another.

Freebase

  1. Occlusion

    Occlusion, in a dental context, means simply the contact between teeth. More technically, it is the relationship between the maxillary and mandibular teeth when they approach each other, as occurs during chewing or at rest. Malocclusion is the misalignment of teeth and jaws, or more simply, a "bad bite". Malocclusion can cause a number of health and dental problems. Static occlusion refers to contact between teeth when the jaw is closed and stationary, while dynamic occlusion refers to occlusal contacts made when the jaw is moving. Dynamic occlusion is also termed as articulation. During chewing, there is no tooth contact between the teeth on the chewing side of the mouth. Centric occlusion is the occlusion of opposing teeth when the mandible is in centric relation. Centric occlusion is the first tooth contact and may or may not coincide with maximum intercuspation. It is also referred to as a person's habitual bite, bite of convenience, or intercuspation position. Centric relation, not to be confused with centric occlusion, is a relationship between the maxilla and mandible.

The Standard Electrical Dictionary

  1. Occlusion

    An absorption of gases by metals. Palladium will, if used as the hydrogen evolving electrode in decomposing water, absorb 980 times its volume of hydrogen, which is said to be occluded. The metal may also be heated in hydrogen and allowed to cool therein, when occlusion occurs. Platinum will occlude 4 times its volume of hydrogen; iron, 4.15 times its volume of carbon-monoxide; silver, 7 times its volume of oxygen. Metals with occluded gases may serve as elements in a galvanic couple. (See Gas Battery.) A metal expands in occluding a gas. In the storage battery it is believed that occlusion plays a part, hydrogen and oxygen being respectively absorbed by the two sets of plates, and acting as they do in Groves' gas battery.

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