Definitions for nicknameˈnɪkˌneɪm

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word nickname

Princeton's WordNet

  1. nickname, moniker, cognomen, sobriquet, soubriquet, byname(noun)

    a familiar name for a person (often a shortened version of a person's given name)

    "Joe's mother would not use his nickname and always called him Joseph"; "Henry's nickname was Slim"

  2. nickname(verb)

    a descriptive name for a place or thing

    "the nickname for the U.S. Constitution is `Old Ironsides'"

  3. dub, nickname(verb)

    give a nickname to

GCIDE

  1. nickname(n.)

    A name given in affectionate familiarity, sportive familiarity, contempt, or derision; a familiar or an opprobrious appellation; as, Nicholas's nickname is Nick.

  2. Origin: [OE. ekename surname, hence, a nickname, an ekename being understood as a nekename, influenced also by E. nick, v. See Eke, and Name.]

Wiktionary

  1. nickname(Noun)

    A familiar, invented given name for a person or thing used instead of the actual name of the person or thing.

  2. nickname(Noun)

    A kind of byname that describes a person by a characteristic of that person.

  3. nickname(Verb)

    To give a nickname to (a person or thing).

  4. Origin: nekename, alteration (due to an incorrect division of the words an ekename as a nekename) of previous ekename, from eke + name. compare aukanafn.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Nickname(noun)

    a name given in contempt, derision, or sportive familiarity; a familiar or an opprobrious appellation

  2. Nickname(verb)

    to give a nickname to; to call by a nickname

  3. Origin: [OE. ekename surname, hence, a nickname, an ekename being understood as a nekename, influenced also by E. nick, v. See Eke, and Name.]

Freebase

  1. Nickname

    A nickname is "a usually familiar or humorous but sometimes pointed or cruel name given to a person or place, as a supposedly appropriate replacement for or addition to the proper name", or a name similar in origin and pronunciation from the original name. It can also be the familiar or truncated form of the proper name, which may sometimes be used simply for convenience. The term hypocoristic is used to refer to a nickname of affection between those in love or with a close emotional bond, compared with a term of endearment. The term diminutive name refers to nicknames that convey smallness, hence something regarded with affection or familiarity, or contempt. The distinction between the two is often blurred. It is a form of endearment and amusement. As a concept, it is distinct from both pseudonym and stage name, and also from a title, although there may be overlap in these concepts. A nickname is often considered desirable, symbolising a form of acceptance, but can sometimes be a form of ridicule.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Nickname

    nik′nām, n. a name given in contempt or sportive familiarity.—v.t. to give a nickname to. [M. E. neke-name, with intrusive initial n from eke-name, surname; from eke and name.]

Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms

  1. nickname

    A combination of two separate unclassified words that is assigned an unclassified meaning and is employed only for unclassified administrative, morale, or public information purposes.

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of nickname in Chaldean Numerology is: 8

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of nickname in Pythagorean Numerology is: 7

Sample Sentences & Example Usage

  1. Camp Gyno ':

    Camp Gyno ''s clearly got a nickname for life. It'll probably be the beginning of Camp Gyno ' college essay as well, camp Gyno ''s embraced it, but Camp Gyno ''s moved on.

  2. Bryan Wilson:

    So that's part of the reason I did the first one. I got ta do this, you know ? they kind of knew about the nickname' law hawk,' and they thought,' Yeah, we'll use that and make a ridiculous commercial.'.

  3. Judith Martin, (Miss Manners):

    What you have when everyone wears the same playclothes for all occasions, is addressad by nickname, expected to participate in Show And Tell, and bullied out of any desire form privacy, is not democracy; it is kindergarten.

  4. Jeb Bush:

    I got an email from brother George saying, 'Well done, Tortoise,' that's my new nickname because I told him I'm the tortoise in the race: slow, steady progress. Stay focused, stay steady, do the right thing each and every day.

  5. Jordan Spieth:

    It was either Colt Knost or Robert Garrigus ... I'm not sure who started with the nickname, but it's not nice what I say to them when they say it to me. I've been working on trying to keep it quiet. And this week isn't going to help.

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Translations for nickname

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