Definitions for montagemɒnˈtɑʒ; Fr. mɔ̃ˈtaʒ; -ˈtɑ ʒɪz; Fr. -ˈtaʒ; -tɑʒd; -ˈtɑ ʒɪŋ

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word montage

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

mon•tagemɒnˈtɑʒ; Fr. mɔ̃ˈtaʒ; -ˈtɑ ʒɪz; Fr. -ˈtaʒ; -tɑʒd; -ˈtɑ ʒɪŋ(n.; v.)(pl.)-tag•es; -taged; -tag•ing

  1. (n.)the combining of pictorial elements from different sources in a single composition.

    Category: Fine Arts

  2. Motion Pictures, Television. juxtaposition or partial superimposition of several shots to form a single image. a technique of film editing in which this is used to present an idea or set of interconnected ideas.

  3. any combination of disparate elements that forms or is felt to form a unified whole, single image, etc.

  4. (v.t.)to make or incorporate into a montage.

    Category: Common Vocabulary

Origin of montage:

1920–25; < F, =mont(er) to mount1+-age -age

Princeton's WordNet

  1. collage, montage(noun)

    a paste-up made by sticking together pieces of paper or photographs to form an artistic image

    "he used his computer to make a collage of pictures superimposed on a map"

Wiktionary

  1. montage(Noun)

    An art form consisting of putting together or assembling various smaller pictures to create a larger work.

  2. montage(Noun)

    An analogous literary, musical or other heterogenous artistic composite

  3. montage(Verb)

    To combine or depict into a montage

  4. Origin: From montage, from the verb monter

Freebase

  1. Montage

    Montage is a technique in film editing in which a series of short shots are edited into a sequence to condense space, time, and information. The term has been used in various contexts. It was introduced to cinema primarily by Eisenstein, and early Russian directors used it as a synonym for creative editing. In France the word "montage" simply denotes cutting. The term "montage sequence" has been used primarily by British and American studios, which refers to the common technique as outlined in this article. The montage sequence is usually used to suggest the passage of time, rather than to create symbolic meaning as it does in Soviet montage theory. From the 1930s to the 1950s, montage sequences often combined numerous short shots with special optical effects dance and music. They were usually assembled by someone other than the director or the editor of the movie.

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