Definitions for monographˈmɒn əˌgræf, -ˌgrɑf

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word monograph

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

mon•o•graphˈmɒn əˌgræf, -ˌgrɑf(n.)

  1. a learned treatise on a particular subject.

  2. a written account of a single thing.

  3. (v.t.)to write a monograph about.

Origin of monograph:

1815–25

mon`o•graph′ic-ˈgræf ɪk(adj.)

Princeton's WordNet

  1. monograph(noun)

    a detailed and documented treatise on a particular subject

Wiktionary

  1. monograph(Noun)

    A scholarly book or a treatise on a single subject or a group of related subjects, usually written by one person.

    I had never given much thought to the role of darkness in ordinary human affairs until I read a monograph prepared by John Staudenmaier, a historian of technology and a Jesuit priest, for a recent conference at MIT. Cullen Murphy, "Hello Darkness", The Atlantic Monthly, March 1996, Volume 277, No. 3, pp. 22-24.

  2. monograph(Verb)

    To write a monograph on (a subject).

Webster Dictionary

  1. Monograph(noun)

    a written account or description of a single thing, or class of things; a special treatise on a particular subject of limited range

Freebase

  1. Monograph

    A monograph is a specialist work of writing on a single subject or an aspect of a subject, usually by a single author. The term 'monographia' is derived from Greek, meaning 'writing on a single subject'. Unlike a textbook, which surveys the state of knowledge in a field, the main purpose of a monograph is to present primary research and original scholarship. This research is presented at length, distinguishing a monograph from an article. For these reasons, publication of a monograph is commonly regarded as vital for career progression in many academic disciplines. Intended for other researchers and bought primarily by libraries, monographs are generally published as individual volumes in a short print run. Librarians consider a monograph to be a nonserial publication complete in one volume or a finite number of volumes. Thus it differs from a serial publication such as a magazine, journal, or newspaper. Book publishers use the term "artist monograph" to indicate books consisting of reproductions of works of art by a single artist, as opposed to surveys of art from multiple artists. Not to be confused with a monogram.

U.S. National Library of Medicine

  1. Monograph

    Work that is any publication that is not a serial or integrating resource. In cataloging usage, It is usually on a single subject or related subjects and is complete in itself, whether constructed of chapters, sections, or parts. While any article encountered in indexing journals can be, strictly speaking, a monograph, as a publication type, a monograph will refer to a cataloging item.

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