Definitions for madrigalˈmæd rɪ gəl

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word madrigal

Princeton's WordNet

  1. madrigal(verb)

    an unaccompanied partsong for 2 or 3 voices; follows a strict poetic form

  2. madrigal(verb)

    sing madrigals

    "The group was madrigaling beautifully"

Wiktionary

  1. madrigal(Noun)

    a song for a small number of unaccompanied voices; from 13th century Italy

  2. madrigal(Noun)

    a polyphonic song for about six voices, from 16th century Italy

  3. madrigal(Noun)

    a short poem, often pastoral, and suitable to be set to music

  4. Origin: From madrigale, from matricalis.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Madrigal(noun)

    a little amorous poem, sometimes called a pastoral poem, containing some tender and delicate, though simple, thought

  2. Madrigal(noun)

    an unaccompanied polyphonic song, in four, five, or more parts, set to secular words, but full of counterpoint and imitation, and adhering to the old church modes. Unlike the freer glee, it is best sung with several voices on a part. See Glee

  3. Origin: [It. madrigale, OIt. madriale, mandriale (cf. LL. matriale); of uncertain origin, possibly fr. It mandra flock, L. mandra stall, herd of cattle, Gr. ma`ndra fold, stable; hence, madrigal, originally, a pastoral song.]

Freebase

  1. Madrigal

    A madrigal is a secular vocal music composition, usually a partsong, of the Renaissance and early Baroque eras. Traditionally, polyphonic madrigals are unaccompanied; the number of voices varies from two to eight, and most frequently from three to six. It is quite distinct from the Italian Trecento madrigal of the late 13th and 14th centuries, with which it shares only the name. Madrigals originated in Italy during the 1520s. Unlike many strophic forms of the time, most madrigals were through-composed. In the madrigal, the composer attempted to express the emotion contained in each line, and sometimes individual words, of a celebrated poem. The madrigal originated in part from the frottola, in part from the resurgence in interest in vernacular Italian poetry, and also from the influence of the French chanson and polyphonic style of the motet as written by the Franco-Flemish composers who had naturalized in Italy during the period. A frottola generally would consist of music set to stanzas of text, while madrigals were through-composed. However, some of the same poems were used for both frottola and madrigals. The poetry of Petrarch in particular shows up in a wide variety of genres.

The Nuttall Encyclopedia

  1. Madrigal

    a short lyric containing some pleasant thought or sweet sentiment daintily expressed; applied also to vocal music of a similar character.


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