Definitions for macaroniˌmæk əˈroʊ ni

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word macaroni

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

mac•a•ro•niˌmæk əˈroʊ ni(n.)(pl.)-nis, -nies.

  1. small tubular pasta made of wheat flour.

    Category: Cooking

  2. an English dandy of the 18th century affecting Continental ways.

    Category: British

Origin of macaroni:

1590–1600; < dial. It maccaroni, pl. of maccarone

Princeton's WordNet

  1. macaroni(noun)

    a British dandy in the 18th century who affected Continental mannerisms

    "Yankee Doodle stuck a feather in his cap and called it macaroni"

  2. macaroni(noun)

    pasta in the form of slender tubes

Webster Dictionary

  1. Macaroni(noun)

    long slender tubes made of a paste chiefly of wheat flour, and used as an article of food; Italian or Genoese paste

  2. Macaroni(noun)

    a medley; something droll or extravagant

  3. Macaroni(noun)

    a sort of droll or fool

  4. Macaroni(noun)

    a finical person; a fop; -- applied especially to English fops of about 1775

  5. Macaroni(noun)

    the designation of a body of Maryland soldiers in the Revolutionary War, distinguished by a rich uniform

Freebase

  1. Macaroni

    Macaroni is a variety of dry pasta made with durum wheat. Elbow macaroni noodles normally do not contain eggs, and are normally cut in short, hollow shapes; however, the term refers not to the shape of the pasta, but to the kind of dough from which the noodle is made. Although home machines exist that can make macaroni shapes, macaroni is usually made commercially by large-scale extrusion. The curved shape is caused by the different speeds on either side of the pasta tube as it comes out of the machine. The name derives from Italian maccheroni, however Italians use maccheroni to refer to any form of pasta, whatever the shape, whether it is straight, tubular, two-inch or longer pasta. A different name, chifferi or lumaconi, refers to the elbow-shape pasta of this article. According to legend, macaroni was brought to Italy by Marco Polo, returning to Venice from China in 1292. This hypothesis has long been disproved, since it seems that macaroni was already used in Italy at least a century before, like pasta in general; Moroccan geographer Muhammad al-Idrisi, who lived in Sicily, documented macaroni in Sicily and in particular in Trabia. The academic consensus supports that the word is derived from the Greek μακαρία, a kind of barley broth which was served to commemorate the dead, which in turn comes from μάκαρες, "blessed dead", and that from μακάριος, collateral of μάκαρ, meaning "blessed, happy". The Italian linguist G. Alessio argues that the word can have two origins: the first from the Medieval Greek μακαρώνεια "dirge", which would be passed to mean "funeral meal" and then "food to serve" during this office, in which case the term would be composed of the double root of μακάριος "blessed" and αἰωνίος, "eternally", and the second from the Greek μακαρία "barley broth", which would have added the suffix -one.

The Nuttall Encyclopedia

  1. Macaroni

    a fine wheaten paste made into long thin tubes, and manufactured in Italy and the S. of France.


Translations for macaroni

Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary

macaroni(noun)

a form of pasta, pressed out to form tubes, and dried

The macaroni is over-cooked.

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