Definitions for lancashireˈlæŋ kəˌʃɪər, -ʃər

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word lancashire

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

Lan•ca•shireˈlæŋ kəˌʃɪər, -ʃər(n.)

  1. a county in NW England. 1,408,300; 1174 sq. mi. (3040 sq. km).

    Category: Geography (places)

    Ref: Also called Lancaster.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. Lancashire(noun)

    a historical area of northwestern England on the Irish Sea; noted for textiles

Wiktionary

  1. Lancashire(ProperNoun)

    A maritime county in the north-west of England bordered by the Irish Sea, Cumberland, Westmorland, Yorkshire and Cheshire.

Freebase

  1. Lancashire

    Lancashire is a non-metropolitan county of historic origin in the North West of England. It takes its name from the city of Lancaster, and is sometimes known as the County of Lancaster. Although Lancaster is still considered to be the county town, Lancashire County Council is based in Preston. Lancashire is sometimes referred to by the abbreviation Lancs, as originally used by the Royal Mail. The population of the ceremonial county is 1,449,300. People from the county are known as Lancastrians. The history of Lancashire is thought to have begun with its founding in the 12th century. In the Domesday Book, some of its lands had been treated as part of Yorkshire. The land that lay Inter Ripam et Mersam, "between the Ribble and Mersey", formed part of the returns for Cheshire. Once its initial boundaries were established, it bordered Cumberland, Westmorland, Yorkshire and Cheshire. Lancashire emerged during the Industrial Revolution as a major commercial and industrial region. The county encompassed several hundred mill towns and collieries. By the 1830s, approximately 85% of all cotton manufactured worldwide was processed in Lancashire. Preston, Accrington, Blackburn, Bolton, Rochdale, Oldham, Chorley, Darwen, Nelson, Colne, Burnley and Wigan were major cotton mill towns during this time. Blackpool was a major centre for tourism for the inhabitants of Lancashire's mill towns, particularly during wakes week.

The Nuttall Encyclopedia

  1. Lancashire

    English county stretching from the Cumberland Mountains in the N. to the Mersey in the S. along the shores of the Irish Sea; is the wealthiest and most populous county, and the indentations of the coast-line adapt it to be the chief outlet westward for English trade, more than a third of England's foreign commerce passing through its ports. The country is mostly low, with spurs of the Yorkshire hills; it is rich in minerals, chiefly coal and iron; its industrial enterprise is enormous; nearly half of the cotton manufacture of the world is carried on in its towns, besides woollen and silk manufacture, the making of engineer's tools, boots and shoes. The soil is a fertile loam, under corn and green crops and old pasture. Lancaster is the county town, but the largest towns are Liverpool, Manchester, Preston, and Blackburn. The northern portion, detached by Morecambe Bay, is known as Furness, belongs really to the Lake District, and has Barrow-in-Furness, with its large shipbuilding concerns, for its chief town. Lancashire has long been an influential political centre.

British National Corpus

  1. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'lancashire' in Written Corpus Frequency: #3059

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