Definitions for juryˈdʒʊər i

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word jury

Princeton's WordNet

  1. jury(noun)

    a body of citizens sworn to give a true verdict according to the evidence presented in a court of law

  2. jury, panel(noun)

    a committee appointed to judge a competition

GCIDE

  1. Jury(n.)

    (Law) A body of people, selected according to law, impaneled and sworn to inquire into and try any matter of fact, and to render their true verdict according to the evidence legally adduced. In criminal trials the number of such persons is usually twelve, but in civil cases and in grand juries it may different. See Grand jury under Grand, and Inquest.

  2. Origin: [OF. jure an assize, fr. jurer to swear, L. jurare, jurari; akin to jus, juris, right, law. See Just,a., and cf. Jurat, Abjure.]

Wiktionary

  1. jury(Noun)

    A group of individuals chosen from the general population to hear and decide a case in a court of law.

  2. jury(Noun)

    A group of judges in a competition.

  3. jury(Verb)

    To judge by means of a jury

  4. Origin: From juree, from iurata, from iuro.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Jury(adj)

    for temporary use; -- applied to a temporary contrivance

  2. Jury(adj)

    a body of men, usually twelve, selected according to law, impaneled and sworn to inquire into and try any matter of fact, and to render their true verdict according to the evidence legally adduced. See Grand jury under Grand, and Inquest

  3. Jury(adj)

    a committee for determining relative merit or awarding prizes at an exhibition or competition; as, the art jury gave him the first prize

  4. Origin: [OF. jure an assize, fr. jurer to swear, L. jurare, jurari; akin to jus, juris, right, law. See Just,a., and cf. Jurat, Abjure.]

Freebase

  1. Jury

    A jury is a sworn body of people convened to render an impartial verdict officially submitted to them by a court, or to set a penalty or judgment. Modern juries tend to be found in courts to ascertain the guilt, or lack thereof, in a crime. In Anglophone jurisdictions, the verdict may be guilty, not guilty, or not proven. Juries are composed of jurors, who are by definition illiterates in the law and finders of fact, not professionals. The old institution of grand juries still exists in some places, particularly the United States, to investigate whether enough evidence of a crime exists to bring someone to trial. The jury arrangement has evolved out of the earliest juries, which were found in early medieval England. Members were supposed to inform themselves of crimes and then of the details of the crimes. Their function was therefore closer to that of a grand jury than that of a jury in a trial.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Jury

    jōō′ri, n. a body of not less than twelve men, selected and sworn, as prescribed by law, to declare the truth on evidence before them: a committee for deciding prizes at a public exhibition.—ns. Ju′ror, one who serves on a jury—also Ju′ryman; Ju′ry-box, the place in which the jury sit during a trial.—Jury of matrons, a jury of 'discreet' women impanelled to try a question of pregnancy, as where a widow alleges herself to be with child by her late husband, or a woman sentenced to death, to stay execution, pleads that she is with child. [Fr. juré, sworn—jurer—L. jurāre, to swear.]

The Nuttall Encyclopedia

  1. Jury

    a body of citizens set to try a question of fact, or to assess damages; in England and Ireland a jury numbers 12, and its verdict must be unanimous; in Scotland the verdict is by majority, and the jury numbers 12 in civil and 15 in criminal cases.

The Roycroft Dictionary

  1. jury

    1. The stupidity of one brain multiplied by twelve. 2. A collection of sedentary owls. 3. The humble apology of Civilization to Savagery. _E. g._, "Whatever exists may be touched, but a jury is an exception to this universal law--it must be reached."

The Foolish Dictionary, by Gideon Wurdz

  1. JURY

    Twelve men chosen to decide who has the better lawyer.

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'jury' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #4169

  2. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'jury' in Written Corpus Frequency: #3222

  3. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'jury' in Nouns Frequency: #1578

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of jury in Chaldean Numerology is: 1

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of jury in Pythagorean Numerology is: 2

Sample Sentences & Example Usage

  1. Alvin Gwynn:

    Those are the people in the jury box.

  2. Sharon Black:

    I think the jury's out on that right now.

  3. Law Professor Nancy Leong:

    That could make a difference in jury deliberations.

  4. Charles Barkley:

    The true story came out from the grand jury testimony.

  5. Jessica Wolfram:

    Just a waste of money, having the whole trial and jury.

Images & Illustrations of jury


Translations for jury

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