Definitions for julian calendar

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Random House Webster's College Dictionary

Jul′ian cal′endar(n.)

  1. the calendar established by Julius Caesar in 46 b .c ., fixing the length of the year at 365 days and at 366 days every fourth year. There are 12 months of 30 or 31 days, except for February, which has 28 days with the exception of every fourth year, or leap year, when it has 29 days.

    Category: Horology

    Ref: Compare Gregorian calendar.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. Julian calendar, Old Style calendar(noun)

    the solar calendar introduced in Rome in 46 b.c. by Julius Caesar and slightly modified by Augustus, establishing the 12-month year of 365 days with each 4th year having 366 days and the months having 31 or 30 days except for February

Wiktionary

  1. Julian calendar(Noun)

    The calendar which was used in the western world before the present-day Gregorian calendar. The Julian calendar differed in having all multiple-of-4 years as leap years.

  2. Origin: Named after who introduced the calendar in 46 B.C.

Freebase

  1. Julian calendar

    The Julian calendar was a reform of the Roman calendar introduced by Julius Caesar in 46 BC. It took effect in 45 BC. It was the predominant calendar in most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was superseded by the Gregorian calendar. The Julian calendar has a regular year of 365 days divided into 12 months, as listed in Table of months. A leap day is added to February every four years. The Julian year is, therefore, on average 365.25 days long. It was intended to approximate the tropical year. Although Greek astronomers had known, at least since Hipparchus, that the tropical year was a few minutes shorter than 365.25 days, the calendar did not compensate for this difference. As a result, the calendar year gained about three days every four centuries compared to observed equinox times and the seasons. This discrepancy was corrected by the Gregorian reform of 1582. The Gregorian calendar has the same months and month lengths as the Julian calendar, but inserts leap days according to a different rule. Consequently, the Julian calendar is currently 13 days behind the Gregorian calendar; for instance, 1 January in the Julian calendar is 14 January in the Gregorian.

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