Definitions for joistdʒɔɪst

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word joist

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

joistdʒɔɪst(n.)

  1. one of a number of small parallel beams of timber, steel, or reinforced concrete that support a floor or ceiling.

    Category: Building Trades

Origin of joist:

1325–75; ME giste < OF, n. der. of gesir to lie 蠐 L jacēre

Princeton's WordNet

  1. joist(noun)

    beam used to support floors or roofs

Wiktionary

  1. joist(Noun)

    A piece of timber laid horizontally, or nearly so, to which the planks of the floor, or the laths or furring strips of a ceiling, are nailed. Called, according to its position or use, binding joist, bridging joist, ceiling joist, trimming joist, etc.

  2. joist(Verb)

    To fit or furnish with joists.

  3. Origin: giste, feminine of gist, the past participle of gesir.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Joist(noun)

    a piece of timber laid horizontally, or nearly so, to which the planks of the floor, or the laths or furring strips of a ceiling, are nailed; -- called, according to its position or use, binding joist, bridging joist, ceiling joist, trimming joist, etc. See Illust. of Double-framed floor, under Double, a

  2. Joist(verb)

    to fit or furnish with joists

Freebase

  1. Joist

    In architecture and engineering, a joist is one of the horizontal supporting members that run from wall to wall, wall to beam, or beam to beam to support a ceiling, roof, or floor. It may be made of oriented strand board, plywood, wood, steel, or concrete. Typically, a beam is bigger than a joist, which is often supported by beams and laid out in repetitive patterns. The wider the span between the supporting structures, the deeper the joist will need to be if it is not to deflect under load. Lateral support also increases its strength. There are approved formulas for calculating the depth required and reducing the depth as needed; however, a rule of thumb for calculating the depth of a wooden floor joist for a residential property is half the span in feet plus two inches; for example, the joist depth required for a 14‑foot span is 9 inches. Many steel joist manufacturers supply load tables in order to allow designers to select the proper joist sizes for their projects. Engineered wood products such as I-joists gain strength from the depth of the floor or the height of each joist, as well as the larger bottom and top chords, as compared to standard dimensional lumber joists. A common saying regarding structural design is that "deeper is cheaper", referring to the more cost-effective design of a given structure by using deeper but more expensive joists, because fewer joists needed and longer spans are achived, which more than makes up for the added cost of deeper joists.

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