Definitions for inductanceɪnˈdʌk təns

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word inductance

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

in•duct•anceɪnˈdʌk təns(n.)

  1. the property of a circuit by which a change in current induces, by electromagnetic induction, an electromotive force.

    Category: Electricity and Magnetism

  2. Category: Electricity and Magnetism

    Ref: inductor (def. 1). 1

Origin of inductance:

1885–90

Princeton's WordNet

  1. induction, inductance(noun)

    an electrical phenomenon whereby an electromotive force (EMF) is generated in a closed circuit by a change in the flow of current

  2. inductor, inductance(noun)

    an electrical device (typically a conducting coil) that introduces inductance into a circuit

Wiktionary

  1. inductance(Noun)

    The property of an electric circuit by which a voltage is induced in it by a changing magnetic field.

  2. inductance(Noun)

    The quantity of the resulting electromagnetic flux divided by the current that produces it, measured in henries (SI symbol: H.)

Freebase

  1. Inductance

    In electromagnetism and electronics, inductance is the property of a conductor by which a change in current in the conductor "induces" a voltage in both the conductor itself and in any nearby conductors. This effect derives from two fundamental observations of physics: First, that a steady current creates a steady magnetic field and second, that a time-varying magnetic field induces a voltage in a nearby conductor. From Lenz's law, in an electric circuit, a changing electric current through a circuit that has inductance induces a proportional voltage which opposes the change in current. The varying field in this circuit may also induce an e.m.f. in a neighbouring circuit. The term 'inductance' was coined by Oliver Heaviside in February 1886. It is customary to use the symbol L for inductance, in honour of the physicist Heinrich Lenz. In the SI system the unit of inductance is the henry, named in honor of the scientist who discovered inductance, Joseph Henry. To add inductance to a circuit, electrical or electronic components called inductors are used, typically consisting of coils of wire to concentrate the magnetic field and so that the magnetic field is linked into the circuit more than once.

The Standard Electrical Dictionary

  1. Inductance

    The property of a circuit in virtue of which it exercises induction and develops lines of force. It is defined variously. As clear and satisfactory a definition as any is the following, due to Sumpner and Fleming: Inductance is the ratio between the total induction through a circuit to the current producing it. "Thus taking a simple helix of five turns carrying a current of two units, and assuming that 1,000 lines of force passed through the central turn, of which owing to leakage only 900 thread the next adjacent on each side, and again only 800 through the end turns, there would be 800 + 900 + 1000 + 900 + 800, or 4,400 linkages of lines with the wire, and this being with 2 units of current, there would be 2,200 linkages with unit current, and consequently the self-inductance of the helix would be 2,200 centimetres." (Kennelly.) Inductance, as regards its dimensions is usually reduced to a length, hence the last word of the preceding quotation. The practical unit of inductance is termed the henry, from Prof. Joseph Henry; the secohm, or the quad or quadrant. The latter alludes to the quadrant of the earth, the value in length of the unit in question. [Transcriber's note: (L (di/dt) = V). A current changing at the rate of one ampere per second through a one henry inductance produces one volt. A sinusoidal current produces a voltage 90 degrees ahead of the current, a cosine (the derivative of sine is cosine). One volt across one henry causes the current to increase at one ampere per second.]

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"inductance." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2014. Web. 25 Oct. 2014. <http://www.definitions.net/definition/inductance>.

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