Definitions for goadgoʊd

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word goad

Princeton's WordNet

  1. prod, goad(noun)

    a pointed instrument that is used to prod into a state of motion

  2. goad, goading, prod, prodding, urging, spur, spurring(verb)

    a verbalization that encourages you to attempt something

    "the ceaseless prodding got on his nerves"

  3. spur, goad(verb)

    give heart or courage to

  4. goad(verb)

    urge with or as if with a goad

  5. goad, prick(verb)

    stab or urge on as if with a pointed stick

  6. needle, goad(verb)

    goad or provoke,as by constant criticism

    "He needled her with his sarcastic remarks"

Wiktionary

  1. goad(Noun)

    A long, pointed stick used to prod animals.

  2. goad(Verb)

    To prod with a goad.

  3. goad(Verb)

    To encourage or stimulate.

  4. goad(Verb)

    To incite or provoke.

  5. Origin: gode, from gād 'spear', from gaidō (compare Old Norse gedda 'pike (fish)', Lombardic gaida 'spear'), from *ghai- (compare Irish gath 'spear', Sanskrit , हिनोति 'to urge on, throw', हेति 'missile, projectile').

Webster Dictionary

  1. Goad(verb)

    a pointed instrument used to urge on a beast; hence, any necessity that urges or stimulates

  2. Goad(verb)

    to prick; to drive with a goad; hence, to urge forward, or to rouse by anything pungent, severe, irritating, or inflaming; to stimulate

  3. Origin: [AS. gd; perh. akin to AS. gr a dart, and E. gore. See Gore, v. t.]

Freebase

  1. Goad

    The goad is a traditional farming implement, used to spur or guide lifestock, usually oxen, which are pulling a plough or a cart; used also to round up cattle. It is a type of a long stick with a pointed end, also known as the cattle prod. Though many people are unfamiliar with them today, goads have been common throughout the world. Goads in various guises are iconographic devices and may be seen in the 'elephant goad' or 'ankusha' in the hand of Ganesha, for example. The word is from Middle English gode, from Old English gād. According to the biblical passage Judges 3:31, Shamgar son of Anath killed six hundred Philistines with an oxgoad. Tischler and McHenry in discussing the biblical account of 'goad' hold: In the early days, before Israel had its own metal industries, farmers had to rely on the Philistines to sharpen their goads, as well as other metal tools, the plowshares and mattocks, forks, and axes. The image of prodding the reluctant or lazy creature made this a useful metaphor for sharp urging, such as the prick of conscience, the nagging of a mate, or the "words of the wise," which are "firmly embedded nails" in human minds.


Translations for goad

From our Multilingual Translation Dictionary

  • anstacheln, StachelstockGerman
  • aguijónSpanish
  • tutkainFinnish
  • למדהHebrew
  • ösztöke, ösztökélHungarian
  • stimulusLatin
  • whakaongaongaMāori
  • stimuleren, proveceren, aansporen, aanporren, aanmoedigen, aanzettenDutch
  • prowadzić, wodzić, podpuszczaćPolish
  • strămurare, îndemnaRomanian
  • подгонять, стрекало, подстрекать, поощрять, прутRussian
  • охрабрити, badalo, подстаћи, бадало, изазватиSerbo-Croatian
  • sporra, eggaSwedish

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