Definitions for flandersˈflæn dərz

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word flanders

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

Flan•dersˈflæn dərz(n.)

  1. a medieval country in W Europe, extending along the North Sea from the Strait of Dover to the Scheldt River: the corresponding modern regions include the provinces of East Flanders and West Flanders in W Belgium and the adjacent parts of N France and SW Netherlands.

    Category: Geography (places), Western History

Princeton's WordNet

  1. Flanders(noun)

    a medieval country in northern Europe that included regions now parts of northern France and Belgium and southwestern Netherlands

Wiktionary

  1. Flanders(ProperNoun)

    The Countship of Flanders, of varying extent.

  2. Flanders(ProperNoun)

    A subnational state in the north of federal Belgium, the institutional merger of a territorial region and the Dutch language 'community' which also has/shares some authority in the capital region Brussels.

  3. Flanders(ProperNoun)

    Two provinces in Belgian Flanders: (West-Flanders and East-Flanders).

  4. Flanders(ProperNoun)

    Short for French Flanders, a former province of the French kingdom on territory taken from the above countship, now constituting the French department Nord.

  5. Flanders(ProperNoun)

    The principal railway station in Lille, capital of the above.

  6. Origin: From Flandres, from Vlaanderen (pl.), from Vlander, from Old Frisian, from flaumdra ‘waterlogged land’, from ‘flowing, current (water)’ (compare Old High German weraltweraltfloum ‘transitoriness of life’, Old Norse flaumr ‘eddy’), from plow-m- ‘flow’ (compare Ancient Greek ‘dishwater, washing water’). More at flow. "Waterlogged" refers to the mudflats and salt marshes common to coastal Flanders.

Freebase

  1. Flanders

    Flanders today refers to the Dutch-speaking northern part of Belgium. It is one of the regions and communities of Belgium. Historically, the name referred to a region located in the north-western part of present-day Belgium and adjacent parts of France and the Netherlands. Both in the historical and the contemporary meaning, the demonym associated with Flanders is Fleming, while the corresponding adjective is Flemish. Brussels is the capital of Flanders, though not fully under its jurisdiction. Over the course of history, the geographical territory that was called "Flanders" has varied. From around 1000 AD, Flanders historically meant to English-speaking peoples the land situated along the North Sea from the Strait of Dover to the Scheldt estuary with ill-defined southern borders. It came to refer specifically to the County of Flanders, lasting from 862 to 1795, whose territory was situated in the northwestern part of what is now Belgium, with extensive portions in what is now northern France, and a small area that is now part of the Netherlands. Through marriage, the County of Flanders was joined with most of the rest of the Low Countries around 1400 AD, and it lost its independence. Most of the county's territory became part of an independent Belgium in 1830, and during the 19th and 20th centuries, it became increasingly commonplace to refer to the entire Dutch-speaking and northern part of Belgium as "Flanders", including the Belgian parts of the Duchy of Brabant and Limburg. In the late 20th century, Belgium became a federal state in which the Dutch-speaking part was given autonomy as the Flemish Community and the Flemish Region; these two entities were effectively merged, and Flanders now refers to the territory of the Flemish Community, which has partial jurisdiction over Brussels, its capital.

The Nuttall Encyclopedia

  1. Flanders

    the land of the Flemings, borders upon the North Sea, formerly extended from the Scheldt to the Somme, and included, besides the present Belgian provinces of East and West Flanders, part of Zealand, and also of Artois, in France; the ancient county dates from 862, in which year Charles the Bold of France, as suzerain, raised it to the status of a sovereign county, and bestowed it upon his son Baldwin I.; it has successively belonged to Spain and Austria, and in Louis XIV.'s reign a portion of it was ceded to France, now known as French Flanders, while Zealand passed into the hands of the Dutch; the remainder was in 1714 made the Austrian Netherlands, and in 1831 was incorporated with the new kingdom of Belgium (q. v.).

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"flanders." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2014. Web. 23 Oct. 2014. <http://www.definitions.net/definition/flanders>.

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