Definitions for flamboyantflæmˈbɔɪ ənt

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word flamboyant

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

flam•boy•antflæmˈbɔɪ ənt(adj.)

  1. strikingly bold or brilliant; showy:

    flamboyant clothes.

  2. extravagantly dashing and colorful:

    flamboyant behavior.

  3. florid; ornate; elaborately styled.

  4. (often cap.) (in architecture) having the flamelike form of an ogee, as tracery. of or designating French Gothic architecture of the late 14th to mid-16th centuries, characterized by wavy, flamelike tracery and intricate detailing.

    Category: Architecture

Origin of flamboyant:

1825–35; < F, prp. of flamboyer to flame, flair

flam•boy′ant•ly(adv.)

Princeton's WordNet

  1. royal poinciana, flamboyant, flame tree, peacock flower, Delonix regia, Poinciana regia(adj)

    showy tropical tree or shrub native to Madagascar; widely planted in tropical regions for its immense racemes of scarlet and orange flowers; sometimes placed in genus Poinciana

  2. flamboyant, showy, splashy(adj)

    marked by ostentation but often tasteless

    "a cheap showy rhinestone bracelet"; "a splashy half-page ad"

  3. aureate, florid, flamboyant(adj)

    elaborately or excessively ornamented

    "flamboyant handwriting"; "the senator's florid speech"

Wiktionary

  1. flamboyant(Noun)

    A showy tropical tree, the royal poinciana (Delonix regia)

  2. flamboyant(Adjective)

    Showy, bold or audacious in behaviour, appearance, etc.

  3. flamboyant(Adjective)

    Referred to as the final stage of French Gothic architecture from the 14th to the 16th centuries.

  4. Origin: From flamboyant, participle of flamboyer, from flamboier, from flambe

Webster Dictionary

  1. Flamboyant(adj)

    characterized by waving or flamelike curves, as in the tracery of windows, etc.; -- said of the later (15th century) French Gothic style

Freebase

  1. Flamboyant

    Flamboyant is the name given to a florid style of late Gothic architecture in vogue in France from about 1350 until superseded by Renaissance architecture during the early 16th century, and mainly used in describing French buildings. The term is sometimes used of the early period of English Gothic architecture usually called the Decorated Style; the historian Edward Augustus Freeman proposed this in a work of 1851. A version of the style spread to Spain and Portugal during the 15th century. It evolved from the Rayonnant style and the English Decorated Style and was marked by even greater attention to decoration and the use of double curved tracery. The term was first used by Eustache-Hyacinthe Langlois, and like all the terms mentioned in this paragraph except "Sondergotik" describes the style of window tracery, which is much the easiest way of distinguishing within the overall Gothic period, but ignores other aspects of style. In England the later part of the period is known as Perpendicular architecture. In Germany Sondergotik is the more usual term. The name derives from the flame-like windings of its tracery and the dramatic lengthening of gables and the tops of arches. A key feature is the ogee arch, originating in Beverley Minster, England around 1320, which spread to York and Durham, although the form was never widely used in England, being superseded by the rise of the Perpendicular style around 1350. A possible point of connection between the early English work and the later development in France is the church at Chaumont. The Manueline in Portugal, and the Isabelline in Spain were even more extravagant continuations of the style in the late 15th and early 16th centuries.

The Nuttall Encyclopedia

  1. Flamboyant

    the name given, from the flame-like windings of its tracery, to a florid style of architecture in vogue in France during the 15th and 16th centuries.


Translations for flamboyant

Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary

flamboyant(adjective)

intended to attract notice

flamboyant clothes.

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